Autumn Semester 2020 takes place in a mixed form of online and classroom teaching.
Please read the published information on the individual courses carefully.

Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2016

Health Sciences and Technology Master Information
Major in Human Movement Science and Sport
Compulsory Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
376-0300-00LTranslational Science for Health and Medicine Restricted registration - show details O3 credits2GJ. Goldhahn, C. Wolfrum
AbstractTranslational science is a cross disciplinary scientific research that is motivated by the need for practical applications that help people. The course should help to clarify basics of translational science, illustrate successful applications and should enable students to integrate key features into their future projects.
ObjectiveAfter completing this course, students will be able to understand:
Principles of translational science (including project planning, ethics application, basics of resource management and interdisciplinary communication)
ContentWhat is translational science and what is it not?
How to identify need?
- Disease concepts and consequences for research
- Basics about incidence, prevalence etc., and orphan indications
How to choose the appropriate research type and methodology
- Ethical considerations including ethics application
- Pros and cons of different types of research
- Coordination of complex approaches incl. timing and resources
How to measure success?
- Outcome variables
- Improving the translational process
Challenges of communication?
How independent is translational science?
- Academic boundary conditions vs. industrial influences
Positive and negative examples will be illustrated by distinguished guest speakers.
Electives
Electives Courses I
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
376-0221-00LMethods and Concepts in Human Systems Neuroscience and Motor Control Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 18
W3 credits3PN. Wenderoth
AbstractThis course provides hands-on experience with measurement and analysis methods relevant for Humans Systems Neuroscience and Motor control (nerve/brain stimulation, EMG, EEG, psycho-physical paradigms etc). Students read scientific material, set up experiments, perform measurements in the lab, analyse data, apply statistics and write short reports or essays.
ObjectiveThis course will prepare students for experimental work as it is typically done during the master thesis. The goal is to gain hands-on experience with measurement and analysis methods relevant for Humans Systems Neuroscience and Motor control (ifor example peripheral nerve stimulation, electrical and magnetic brain stimulation, EMG, EEG, psycho-physical paradigms etc). Students will learn how to perform small scientific projects in this area. Students will work individually or in small groups and solve scientific problems which require them to perform measurements in human participants, extract relevant readouts from the data, apply appropriate statistics and interpret the results. They will also be required to write small essays and reports and they will get feedback on their writing throughout the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents are required to have successfully completed the course "Neural control of movement and motor learning" and to have basic knowledge of applied statistics. Self-study material about applied statistics will be available at the beginning of the course and statistical knowledge will be tested (central element) in the second course week. Passing this test is a requirement for continuing the course. Students will have to solve scientific problems, requiring them to independently study scientific material, apply statistics and report their results in the form of written reports and essays. Assessments will be made on the basis of the completed theoretical and practical work that will be performed either in small groups or individually.
376-0223-00LAdvanced Topics in Exercise Physiology Restricted registration - show details W3 credits2SC. Spengler, F. Gabe Beltrami, J. M. Kroepfl
AbstractIn this course, students read, present and discuss seminal publications in the area of exercise physiology. The focus lies on critical analysis of scientific content, conceptual as well as ethical aspects of publications. Students are trained in the most common scientific presentation techniques such as oral and poster presentations.
ObjectiveStudents gain further knowledge and a deeper understanding of concepts in exercise physiology. Emphasis is put on critical analysis and discussion of scientific publications as well as on improving scientific presentation skills.
LiteratureMaterial will be provided in moodle.
Prerequisites / NoticeSuccessful completion of the Exercise Physiology Course.
376-0225-00LPhysical Activities and HealthW3 credits2VE. de Bruin
AbstractThis course introduces/explores the complex relationship between physical activity, sedentary behavior and health. It will discuss the evolution of current physical activity recommendations. It will examine the current evidence base that has informed physical activity recommendations and that identified physical activity as a key modifiable lifestyle behavior contributing to disease and mortality.
ObjectiveOn completion of this course students will be able to demonstrate:
1. knowledge of and critical awareness of the role of physical activity and sedentary behavior in the maintenance of health and the aetiology, prevention and treatment of disease.
2. thorough knowledge and critical awareness of current recommendations for physical activity, and current prevalence and trends of physical activity and associated diseases
3. awareness of current national and international physical activity policies and how these impact on global challenges
ContentIntroduction to Physical Activity for Health, including sedentary behavior
Physical activity epidemiology; concepts principles and approaches
Physical activity and all cause morbidity and mortality
Physical activity and chronic disease; Coronary heart disease, diabetes, bone health, cancer and obesity
Physical activity and brain health
Physical activity and sedentary behavior recommendations
Population prevalence of physical activity and sedentary behavior
Physical activity policies
Physical activity assessment
LiteratureCore texts for this course are:
Hardman, A. and Stensel, D. Physical activity and health : the evidence explained. 2nd edition. (2009) UK, Routledge.

Bouchard, C., Blair, S. N., & Haskell, W. L. (Eds.). (2012). Physical activity and health. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.

Selective journal articles from relevant journals such as Journal of Physical Activity and Health and Journal of Aging and Physical Activity
Prerequisites / NoticeFrom the BSc-course the following book is recommended: 'Essentials of strength training and conditioning' T. Baechle, R. Earle (3rd Edition)
376-1651-00LClinical and Movement BiomechanicsW4 credits3GS.  Lorenzetti, R. List, N. Singh
AbstractMeasurement and modeling of the human movement during daily activities and in a clinical environment.
ObjectiveThe students are able to analyse the human movement from a technical point of view, to process the data and perform modeling with a focus towards clinical application.
ContentThis course includes study design, measurement techniques, clinical testing, accessing movement data and anysis as well as modeling with regards to human movement.
752-6101-00LDietary Etiologies of Chronic DiseaseW3 credits2VM. B. Zimmermann
AbstractTo have the student gain understanding of the links between the diet and the etiology and progression of chronic diseases, including diabetes, gastrointestinal diseases, kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, arthritis and food allergies.
ObjectiveTo examine and understand the protective effect of foods and food ingredients in the maintenance of health and the prevention of chronic disease, as well as the progression of complications of the chronic diseases.
ContentThe course evaluates food and food ingredients in relation to primary and secondary prevention of chronic diseases including diabetes, gastrointestinal diseases, kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, arthritis and food allergies.
Lecture notesThere is no script. Powerpoint presentations will be made available on-line to students.
LiteratureTo be provided by the individual lecturers, at their discretion.
Prerequisites / NoticeNo compulsory prerequisites, but prior completion of Human Nutrition I + II (Humanernährung I+II) is strongly advised.
Elective Courses II
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0104-00LUncertainty Quantification for Engineering & Life Sciences Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
Number of participants limited to 60.
W4 credits3GP. Koumoutsakos
AbstractQuantification of uncertainties in computational models pertaining to applications in engineering and life sciences. Exploitation of massively available data to develop computational models with quantifiable predictive capabilities. Applications of Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation to problems in mechanics, control, systems and cell biology.
ObjectiveThe course will teach fundamental concept of Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation (UQ+P) for computational models of systems in Engineering and Life Sciences. Emphasis will be placed on practical and computational aspects of UQ+P including the implementation of relevant algorithms in multicore architectures.
ContentTopics that will be covered include: Uncertainty quantification under
parametric and non-parametric modelling uncertainty, Bayesian inference with model class assessment, Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation, prior and posterior reliability analysis.
Lecture notesThe class will be largely based on the book: Data Analysis: A Bayesian Tutorial by Devinderjit Sivia as well as on class notes and related literature that will be distributed in class.
Literature1. Data Analysis: A Bayesian Tutorial by Devinderjit Sivia
2. Probability Theory: The Logic of Science by E. T. Jaynes
3. Class Notes
Prerequisites / NoticeFundamentals of Probability, Fundamentals of Computational Modeling
227-0385-10LBiomedical ImagingW6 credits5GS. Kozerke, K. P. Prüssmann, M. Rudin
AbstractIntroduction and analysis of medical imaging technology including X-ray procedures, computed tomography, nuclear imaging techniques using single photon and positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound imaging techniques.
ObjectiveTo understand the physical and technical principles underlying X-ray imaging, computed tomography, single photon and positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound and Doppler imaging techniques. The mathematical framework is developed to describe image encoding/decoding, point-spread function/modular transfer function, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast behavior for each of the methods. Matlab exercises are used to implement and study basic concepts.
Content- X-ray imaging
- Computed tomography
- Single photon emission tomography
- Positron emission tomography
- Magnetic resonance imaging
- Ultrasound/Doppler imaging
Lecture notesLecture notes and handouts
LiteratureWebb A, Smith N.B. Introduction to Medical Imaging: Physics, Engineering and Clinical Applications; Cambridge University Press 2011
Prerequisites / NoticeAnalysis, Linear Algebra, Physics, Basics of Signal Theory, Basic skills in Matlab programming
227-0386-00LBiomedical Engineering Information W4 credits3GJ. Vörös, S. J. Ferguson, S. Kozerke, U. Moser, M. Rudin, M. P. Wolf, M. Zenobi-Wong
AbstractIntroduction into selected topics of biomedical engineering as well as their relationship with physics and physiology. The focus is on learning the concepts that govern common medical instruments and the most important organs from an engineering point of view. In addition, the most recent achievements and trends of the field of biomedical engineering are also outlined.
ObjectiveIntroduction into selected topics of biomedical engineering as well as their relationship with physics and physiology. The course provides an overview of the various topics of the different tracks of the biomedical engineering master course and helps orienting the students in selecting their specialized classes and project locations.
ContentIntroduction into neuro- and electrophysiology. Functional analysis of peripheral nerves, muscles, sensory organs and the central nervous system. Electrograms, evoked potentials. Audiometry, optometry. Functional electrostimulation: Cardiac pacemakers. Function of the heart and the circulatory system, transport and exchange of substances in the human body, pharmacokinetics. Endoscopy, medical television technology. Lithotripsy. Electrical Safety. Orthopaedic biomechanics. Lung function. Bioinformatics and Bioelectronics. Biomaterials. Biosensors. Microcirculation.Metabolism.
Practical and theoretical exercises in small groups in the laboratory.
Lecture notesIntroduction to Biomedical Engineering
by Enderle, Banchard, and Bronzino

AND

https://www1.ethz.ch/lbb/Education/BME
227-0447-00LImage Analysis and Computer Vision Information W6 credits3V + 1UL. Van Gool, O. Göksel, E. Konukoglu
AbstractLight and perception. Digital image formation. Image enhancement and feature extraction. Unitary transformations. Color and texture. Image segmentation and deformable shape matching. Motion extraction and tracking. 3D data extraction. Invariant features. Specific object recognition and object class recognition.
ObjectiveOverview of the most important concepts of image formation, perception and analysis, and Computer Vision. Gaining own experience through practical computer and programming exercises.
ContentThe first part of the course starts off from an overview of existing and emerging applications that need computer vision. It shows that the realm of image processing is no longer restricted to the factory floor, but is entering several fields of our daily life. First it is investigated how the parameters of the electromagnetic waves are related to our perception. Also the interaction of light with matter is considered. The most important hardware components of technical vision systems, such as cameras, optical devices and illumination sources are discussed. The course then turns to the steps that are necessary to arrive at the discrete images that serve as input to algorithms. The next part describes necessary preprocessing steps of image analysis, that enhance image quality and/or detect specific features. Linear and non-linear filters are introduced for that purpose. The course will continue by analyzing procedures allowing to extract additional types of basic information from multiple images, with motion and depth as two important examples. The estimation of image velocities (optical flow) will get due attention and methods for object tracking will be presented. Several techniques are discussed to extract three-dimensional information about objects and scenes. Finally, approaches for the recognition of specific objects as well as object classes will be discussed and analyzed.
Lecture notesCourse material Script, computer demonstrations, exercises and problem solutions
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
Basic concepts of mathematical analysis and linear algebra. The computer exercises are based on Linux and C.
The course language is English.
327-2125-00LMicroscopy Training SEM I - Introduction to SEM Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 6.
The participants will be chosen based on a short motivation letter. Please send this letter to S. Rodighiero (main lecturer) as soon as possible.
W1 credit3PS. Rodighiero, A. G. Bittermann, K. Kunze, J. Reuteler
AbstractThe introductory course on Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) emphasizes hands-on learning. Using 2 SEM instruments, students have the opportunity to study their own samples, or standard test samples, as well as solving exercises provided by ScopeM scientists.
Objective- Set-up, align and operate a SEM successfully and safely.
- Accomplish imaging tasks successfully and optimize microscope performances.
- Master the operation of a low-vacuum and field-emission SEM and EDX instrument.
- Perform sample preparation with corresponding techniques and equipment for imaging and analysis
- Acquire techniques in obtaining secondary electron and backscatter electron micrographs
- Perform EDX qualitative and semi-quantitative analysis
ContentDuring the course, students learn through lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on sessions how to setup and operate SEM instruments, including low-vacuum and low-voltage applications.
This course gives basic skills for students new to SEM. At the end of the course, students with no prior experience are able to align a SEM, to obtain secondary electron (SE) and backscatter electron (BSE) micrographs and to perform energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) qualitative and semi-quantitative analysis. The procedures to better utilize SEM to solve practical problems and to optimize SEM analysis for a wide range of materials will be emphasized.

- Discussion of students' sample/interest
- Introduction and discussion on Electron Microscopy and instrumentation
- Lectures on electron sources, electron lenses and probe formation
- Lectures on beam/specimen interaction, image formation, image contrast and imaging modes.
- Lectures on sample preparation techniques for EM
- Brief description and demonstration of the SEM microscope
- Practice on beam/specimen interaction, image formation, image contrast (and image processing)
- Student participation on sample preparation techniques
- Scanning Electron Microscopy lab exercises: setup and operate the instrument under various imaging modalities
- Lecture and demonstrations on X-ray micro-analysis (theory and detection), qualitative and semi-quantitative EDX and point analysis, linescans and spectral mapping
- Practice on real-world samples and report results
Literature- Detailed course manual
- Williams, Carter: Transmission Electron Microscopy, Plenum Press, 1996
- Hawkes, Valdre: Biophysical Electron Microscopy, Academic Press, 1990
- Egerton: Physical Principles of Electron Microscopy: an introduction to TEM, SEM and AEM, Springer Verlag, 2007
Prerequisites / NoticeNo mandatory prerequisites. Please consider the prior attendance to EM Basic lectures (551- 1618-00V; 227-0390-00L; 327-0703-00L) as suggested prerequisite.
327-2126-00LMicroscopy Training TEM I - Introduction to TEM Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
Number of participants limited to 6.

The participants will be chosen based on a short motivation letter. Please send this letter to S. Rodighiero (main lecturer).
W1 credit3P
AbstractThe introductory course on Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) provides theoretical and hands-on learning for new operators, utilizing lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on sessions.
Objective- Overview of TEM theory, instrumentation, operation and applications.
- Alignment and operation of a TEM, as well as acquisition and interpretation of images, diffraction patterns, accomplishing basic tasks successfully.
- Knowledge of electron imaging modes (including Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy), magnification calibration, and image acquisition using CCD cameras.
- To set up the TEM to acquire diffraction patterns, perform camera length calibration, as well as measure and interpret diffraction patterns.
- Overview of techniques for specimen preparation.
ContentUsing two Transmission Electron Microscopes the students learn how to align a TEM, select parameters for acquisition of images in bright field (BF) and dark field (DF), perform scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging, phase contrast imaging, and acquire electron diffraction patterns. The participants will also learn basic and advanced use of digital cameras and digital imaging methods.

- Introduction and discussion on Electron Microscopy and instrumentation.
- Lectures on electron sources, electron lenses and probe formation.
- Lectures on beam/specimen interaction, image formation, image contrast and imaging modes.
- Lectures on sample preparation techniques for EM.
- Brief description and demonstration of the TEM microscope.
- Practice on beam/specimen interaction, image formation, Image contrast (and image processing).
- Demonstration of Transmission Electron Microscopes and imaging modes (Phase contrast, BF, DF, STEM).
- Student participation on sample preparation techniques.
- Transmission Electron Microscopy lab exercises: setup and operate the instrument under various imaging modalities.
- TEM alignment, calibration, correction to improve image contrast and quality.
- Electron diffraction.
- Practice on real-world samples and report results.
Literature- Detailed course manual
- Williams, Carter: Transmission Electron Microscopy, Plenum Press, 1996
- Hawkes, Valdre: Biophysical Electron Microscopy, Academic Press, 1990
- Egerton: Physical Principles of Electron Microscopy: an introduction to TEM, SEM and AEM, Springer Verlag, 2007
Prerequisites / NoticeNo mandatory prerequisites. Please consider the prior attendance to EM Basic lectures (551- 1618-00V; 227-0390-00L; 327-0703-00L) as suggested prerequisite.
363-0301-00LWork Design and Organizational Change Information W3 credits2GG. Grote
AbstractGood work design is crucial for individual and company effectiveness and a core element to be considered in organizational change. Meaning of work, organization-technology interaction, and uncertainty management are discussed with respect to work design and sustainable organizational change. As course project, students learn and apply a method for analyzing and designing work in business settings.
Objective- Know effects of work design on competence, motivation, and well-being
- Understand links between design of individual jobs and work processes
- Know basic processes involved in systematic organizational change
- Understand the interaction between organization and technology and its impact on organizational change
- Understand relevance of work design for company performance and strategy
- Know and apply methods for analyzing and designing work
Content- Work design: From Adam Smith to job crafting
- Effects of work design on performance and well-being
- Approaches to analyzing and designing work
- Modes of organizational change and change methods
- Balancing stability and flexibility in organizations as design criterium
- The organization-technology interaction and its impact on work design and organizational change
- Example Flexible working arrangements
- Strategic choices for work design
LiteratureA list of required readings will be provided at the beginning of the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course includes the completion of a course project to be conducted in groups of four students. The project entails applying a particular method for analyzing and designing work processes and is carried out by means of interviews and observations in companies chosen by the students.
363-0790-00LTechnology Entrepreneurship Information W2 credits2VU. Claesson, B. Clarysse
AbstractTechnology ventures are significantly changing the global economic picture. Technological skills increasingly need to be complemented by entrepreneurial understanding.
This course offers the fundamentals in theory and practice of entrepreneurship in new technology ventures. Main topics covered are success factors in the creation of new firms, including founding, financing and growing a venture.
ObjectiveThis course provides theory-grounded knowledge and practice-driven skills for founding, financing, and growing new technology ventures. A critical understanding of dos and don'ts is provided through highlighting and discussing real life examples and cases.
ContentSee course website: Link
Lecture notesLecture slides and case material
376-0130-00LLaboratory Course in Exercise Physiology Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 48.

BWS: Amandatory for "Exercise physiology".
HST: Possible from the 5th semester on,
W3 credits4PC. Spengler
AbstractConduct physical performance tests and measurements that are typically used to assess performance of athletes and/or patients and that deepen the understanding of physiological processes in response to physical exertion.
ObjectiveGain hands-on experience in exercise physiology and consolidate knowledge on physiological adaptations to different types and degrees of physical activity and climatic influences. Learn fundamental assessment techniques of the muscular system, the cardio-respiratory system and of whole-body performance, learn scientifically correct data analysis and interpretation of results. Insight into today's Sports Medicine.
ContentLaboratory course:
Various exercise tests assessing human performance and assessments of physiological responses to activity (examples are VO2max-test, Conconi-Tests, Determination of anaerobic threshold, Cooper-Test, 1-repetition maximum test, lactate minimum test), dynamometry, mechanography, body composition etc.). Insight into measurements in Sports Medicine.
Lecture notesTutorial on Laboratory Experiments in Exercise Physiology
(Editor: Exercise Physiology Lab)
LiteratureSchmidt/Lang/Heckmann: Physiologie des Menschen, Springer-Verlag, Heidelberg

Kenney/Wilmore/Costill: Physiology of Sport and Exercise, Human Kinetics
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite:
Anatomy and physiology classes and lab course in physiology successfully completed (BWS students please contact C. M. Spengler)

Desirable:
Exercise Physiology Lecture (concomitantly or passed; is selection criterion in case of more applications than lab spaces)
376-0203-00LMovement and Sport Biomechanics Information W4 credits3GB. Taylor, R. List, S.  Lorenzetti
AbstractLearning to view the human body as a (bio-) mechanical system. Making the connections between everyday movements and sports activity with injury, discomfort, prevention and rehabilitation.
ObjectiveStudents are able to describe the human body as a mechanical system.
They analyse and describe human movement according to the laws of mechanics.
ContentMovement- and sports biomechanics deals with the attributes of the human body and their link to mechanics. The course includes topics such as functional anatomy, biomechanics of daily activities (gait, running, etc.) and looks at movement in sport from a mechanical point of view. Furthermore, simple reflections on the loading analysis of joints in various situations are discussed. Additionally, questions covering the statics and dynamics of rigid bodies, and inverse dynamics, relevant to biomechanics are investigated.
376-0207-00LExercise PhysiologyW4 credits3GC. Spengler
AbstractThis course provides an overview over molecular and systemic aspects of neuromuscular, cardiovascular and respiratory adaptations to acute and chronic exercise as well as the interactions of the different systems influencing factors, e.g. genetics, gender, age, altitude/depth, heat/cold, with respect to performance and health.
ObjectiveThe aim of this course is to understand molecular and systemic aspects of neuromuscular, cardiovascular and respiratory adaptations to acute and chronic exercise as well as the interaction of the different systems regarding health-relevant aspects and performance in healthy people and persons with selected diseases. Furthermore, students will understand the influence of genetics, gender, age, altitude/depth, heat and cold on the named factors.
ContentHistory of Exercise Physiology, research methods, fibertype heterogeneity and its functional significance, neural control of muscle force, molecular nad cellular mechanisms of muscle adaptation to resistance, endurance and stretching exercise, interindividual variability in the response to training, cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses to acute and chronic exercise, sexi differences relevant to exercise performance, exercise in hot and cold environment, children and adolescents in sport and exercise, exercise at altitude and depth, aging and exercise performance, exercise for health, exercise in the context of disease.
Lecture notesOnline material is provided during the course.
LiteratureRecommended textbooks:

William D. McArdle, Frank I. Katch, Victor L. Katch
Exercise Physiology: Nutrition, Energy, and Human Performance, Eighth Edition, 2014
ISBN/ISSN: 9781451191554

W.L. Kenney, J.H. Wilmore, D.L. Costill
Physiology of Sport and Exercise
5th Edition, 2012
ISBN-13: 978-0-7360-9409-2 / ISBN-10: 0-7360-9409-1
Prerequisites / NoticeAnatomy and Physiology I + II
376-0815-00LWriting your Master's Thesis: Natural Sciences and Engineering C1-C2 Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
Your course regristration is only valid with a simultaneous online registration at the language center (www.sprachenzentrum.uzh.ch).

Number of participants limited to 15 (3 courses are available).

Attention: Registration is only possible from 12.9. (from 11.30h) - 15.9.2016
W2 credits2VS. Milligan
AbstractWe'll prepare you to produce your MSc thesis. You'll learn how to structure your thesis, write scientific English, and manage your writing efficiently. You'll receive detailed feedback on work in progress.
ObjectiveBy the end of the course students are able to plan, draft, and edit academic English papers and theses; structure and write clear texts in a style which is acceptable to their academic discourse community; manage the writing process efficiently; select formal vocabulary and use it in a generally accurate and correct manner; choose and use generally suitable grammatical structures, punctuation, and orthographic conventions, assess their own effectiveness as writers of academic English, and identify areas in which further development is needed.
ContentThe course covers the writing context; the writing process; structuring sentences, paragraphs, longer sections (such as introduction, methods, results, and discussion), and whole texts; presenting and integrating non-textual elements such as graphs and tables; and editing and correcting drafts and proofs. Each lesson comprises a mixture of elements, including specialist input, individual tasks, pairwork, and groupwork. Active participation is expected.
376-1033-00LHistory of SportsW2 credits2VM. Gisler
AbstractComprehension for development and changes of sports from the ancient world to the presence. Description of sports in services of national idea, from education and health promotion from the middle of the 18th century till this day.
ObjectiveUnderstanding for the development and adaptation of sports from the ancient world to present times.
ContentKurzüberblick über Antike bis frühe Neuzeit. Darstellung des Sports im Dienst nationaler Ideen, von Bildung und Erziehung, der Gesundheitsförderung von der Mitte des 18. Jahrhunderts bis heute.Überblick über die Geschichte der Olympischen Spiele in der Antike und Gegenwart.
Lecture notesEin Skript für die aktuelle Veranstaltung wird abgegeben.
LiteratureLiteraturangaben für eine Vertiefung der Inhalte werden im Skript gemacht. Die Anschaffung von Spezialliteratur ist allerdings nicht notwendig.
376-1107-00LSport PedagogyW2 credits2VD. Seiler Hubler
AbstractCentral aspects of Sport related pedagogy will be handled in these lectures. These aspects cover, amongst others, the subject and tasks of Sport related pedagogy. Furthermore, the general and sports relevant foundations of Sport related pedagogy will be covered.
ObjectiveTo gain basic knowledge of sports pedagogy and to recognize starting points for applied sports pedagogical intervention in schools.
ContentInhaltliche Schwerpunkte der Vorlesung sind:
- Einführung in die Sportpädagogik und die pädagogische Psychologie des Sportunterrichts
- Bedeutung des Sports im Jugendalter
- Zeitgemässer Sportunterricht
- Sport und Leistung
- Heterogenität im Sportunterricht
- Sport und Gesundheit
- Geschlechterfragen im Sport
- Soziale und moralische Entwicklung im Sportunterricht
Lecture notesUnterrichtsmaterialien zu den einzelnen Veranstaltungen werden den Studierenden zur Verfügung gestellt.
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