Autumn Semester 2020 takes place in a mixed form of online and classroom teaching.
Please read the published information on the individual courses carefully.

Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2018

Computational Science and Engineering Master Information
Electives
In the ‘electives’ subcategory, at least two course units must be successfully completed.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0113-00LApplied Fluid DynamicsW4 credits2V + 1UJ.‑P. Kunsch
AbstractApplied Fluid Dynamics
The methods of fluid dynamics play an important role in the description of a chain of events, involving the release, spreading and dilution of dangerous fluids in the environment.
Tunnel ventilation systems and strategies are studied, which must meet severe requirements during normal operation and in emergency situations (tunnel fires etc.).
ObjectiveGenerally applicable methods in fluid dynamics and gas dynamics are illustrated and practiced using selected current examples.
ContentOften experts fall back on the methodology of fluid dynamics when involved in the construction of environmentally friendly processing and incineration facilities, as well as when choosing safe transport and storage options for dangerous materials. As a result of accidents, but also in normal operations, dangerous gases and liquids may escape and be transported further by wind or flowing water.
There are many possible forms that the resulting damage may take, including fire and explosion when flammable substances are mixed. The topics covered include: Emissions of liquids and gases from containers and pipelines, evaporation from pools and vaporization of gases kept under pressure, the spread and dilution of waste gas plumes in the wind, deflagration and detonation of inflammable gases, fireballs in gases held under pressure, pollution and exhaust gases in tunnels (tunnel fires etc.)
Lecture notesnot available
Prerequisites / NoticeRequirements: successful attendance at lectures "Fluiddynamik I und II", "Thermodynamik I und II"
151-0709-00LStochastic Methods for Engineers and Natural Scientists Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 45.
W4 credits3GD. W. Meyer-Massetti
AbstractThe course provides an introduction into stochastic methods that are applicable for example for the description and modeling of turbulent and subsurface flows. Moreover, mathematical techniques are presented that are used to quantify uncertainty in various engineering applications.
ObjectiveBy the end of the course you should be able to mathematically describe random quantities and their effect on physical systems. Moreover, you should be able to develop basic stochastic models of such systems.
Content- Probability theory, single and multiple random variables, mappings of random variables
- Estimation of statistical moments and probability densities based on data
- Stochastic differential equations, Ito calculus, PDF evolution equations
- Polynomial chaos and other expansion methods
All topics are illustrated with engineering applications.
Lecture notesDetailed lecture notes will be provided.
LiteratureSome textbooks related to the material covered in the course:
Stochastic Methods: A Handbook for the Natural and Social Sciences, Crispin Gardiner, Springer, 2010
The Fokker-Planck Equation: Methods of Solutions and Applications, Hannes Risken, Springer, 1996
Turbulent Flows, S.B. Pope, Cambridge University Press, 2000
Spectral Methods for Uncertainty Quantification, O.P. Le Maitre and O.M. Knio, Springer, 2010
151-0532-00LNonlinear Dynamics and Chaos I Information W4 credits2V + 2UF. Kogelbauer
AbstractBasic facts about nonlinear systems; stability and near-equilibrium dynamics; bifurcations; dynamical systems on the plane; non-autonomous dynamical systems; chaotic dynamics.
ObjectiveThis course is intended for Masters and Ph.D. students in engineering sciences, physics and applied mathematics who are interested in the behavior of nonlinear dynamical systems. It offers an introduction to the qualitative study of nonlinear physical phenomena modeled by differential equations or discrete maps. We discuss applications in classical mechanics, electrical engineering, fluid mechanics, and biology. A more advanced Part II of this class is offered every other year.
Content(1) Basic facts about nonlinear systems: Existence, uniqueness, and dependence on initial data.

(2) Near equilibrium dynamics: Linear and Lyapunov stability

(3) Bifurcations of equilibria: Center manifolds, normal forms, and elementary bifurcations

(4) Nonlinear dynamical systems on the plane: Phase plane techniques, limit sets, and limit cycles.

(5) Time-dependent dynamical systems: Floquet theory, Poincare maps, averaging methods, resonance
Lecture notesThe class lecture notes will be posted electronically after each lecture. Students should not rely on these but prepare their own notes during the lecture.
Prerequisites / Notice- Prerequisites: Analysis, linear algebra and a basic course in differential equations.

- Exam: two-hour written exam in English.

- Homework: A homework assignment will be due roughly every other week. Hints to solutions will be posted after the homework due dates.
151-0317-00LVisualization, Simulation and Interaction - Virtual Reality IIW4 credits3GA. Kunz
AbstractThis lecture provides deeper knowledge on the possible applications of virtual reality, its basic technolgy, and future research fields. The goal is to provide a strong knowledge on Virtual Reality for a possible future use in business processes.
ObjectiveVirtual Reality can not only be used for the visualization of 3D objects, but also offers a wide application field for small and medium enterprises (SME). This could be for instance an enabling technolgy for net-based collaboration, the transmission of images and other data, the interaction of the human user with the digital environment, or the use of augmented reality systems.
The goal of the lecture is to provide a deeper knowledge of today's VR environments that are used in business processes. The technical background, the algorithms, and the applied methods are explained more in detail. Finally, future tasks of VR will be discussed and an outlook on ongoing international research is given.
ContentIntroduction into Virtual Reality; basisc of augmented reality; interaction with digital data, tangible user interfaces (TUI); basics of simulation; compression procedures of image-, audio-, and video signals; new materials for force feedback devices; intorduction into data security; cryptography; definition of free-form surfaces; digital factory; new research fields of virtual reality
Lecture notesThe handout is available in German and English.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
"Visualization, Simulation and Interaction - Virtual Reality I" is recommended.

Didactical concept:
The course consists of lectures and exercises.
151-0833-00LPrinciples of Nonlinear Finite-Element-MethodsW5 credits2V + 2UN. Manopulo, B. Berisha
AbstractMost problems in engineering are of nonlinear nature. The nonlinearities are caused basically due to the nonlinear material behavior, contact conditions and instability of structures. The principles of the nonlinear Finite-Element-Method (FEM) will be introduced in the scope of this lecture for treating such problems.
ObjectiveThe goal of the lecture is to provide the students with the fundamentals of the non linear Finite Element Method (FEM). The lecture focuses on the principles of the nonlinear Finite-Element-Method based on explicit and implicit formulations. Typical applications of the nonlinear Finite-Element-Methods are simulations of:

- Crash
- Collapse of structures
- Materials in Biomechanics (soft materials)
- General forming processes

Special attention will be paid to the modeling of the nonlinear material behavior, thermo-mechanical processes and processes with large plastic deformations. The ability to independently create a virtual model which describes the complex non linear systems will be acquired through accompanying exercises. These will include the Matlab programming of important model components such as constitutive equations
Content- Fundamentals of continuum mechanics to characterize large plastic deformations
- Elasto-plastic material models
- Updated-Lagrange (UL), Euler and combined Euler-Lagrange (ALE) approaches
- FEM implementation of constitutive equations
- Element formulations
- Implicit and explicit FEM methods
- FEM formulations of coupled thermo-mechanical problems
- Modeling of tool contact and the influence of friction
- Solvers and convergence
- Modeling of crack propagation
- Introduction of advanced FE-Methods
Lecture notesyes
LiteratureBathe, K. J., Finite-Element-Procedures, Prentice-Hall, 1996
Prerequisites / NoticeIf we will have a large number of students, two dates for the exercises will be offered.
263-2800-00LDesign of Parallel and High-Performance Computing Information W7 credits3V + 2U + 1AT. Hoefler, M. Püschel
AbstractAdvanced topics in parallel / concurrent programming.
ObjectiveUnderstand concurrency paradigms and models from a higher perspective and acquire skills for designing, structuring and developing possibly large concurrent software systems. Become able to distinguish parallelism in problem space and in machine space. Become familiar with important technical concepts and with concurrency folklore.
227-0102-00LDiscrete Event Systems Information W6 credits4GL. Thiele, L. Vanbever, R. Wattenhofer
AbstractIntroduction to discrete event systems. We start out by studying popular models of discrete event systems. In the second part of the course we analyze discrete event systems from an average-case and from a worst-case perspective. Topics include: Automata and Languages, Specification Models, Stochastic Discrete Event Systems, Worst-Case Event Systems, Verification, Network Calculus.
ObjectiveOver the past few decades the rapid evolution of computing, communication, and information technologies has brought about the proliferation of new dynamic systems. A significant part of activity in these systems is governed by operational rules designed by humans. The dynamics of these systems are characterized by asynchronous occurrences of discrete events, some controlled (e.g. hitting a keyboard key, sending a message), some not (e.g. spontaneous failure, packet loss).

The mathematical arsenal centered around differential equations that has been employed in systems engineering to model and study processes governed by the laws of nature is often inadequate or inappropriate for discrete event systems. The challenge is to develop new modeling frameworks, analysis techniques, design tools, testing methods, and optimization processes for this new generation of systems.

In this lecture we give an introduction to discrete event systems. We start out the course by studying popular models of discrete event systems, such as automata and Petri nets. In the second part of the course we analyze discrete event systems. We first examine discrete event systems from an average-case perspective: we model discrete events as stochastic processes, and then apply Markov chains and queuing theory for an understanding of the typical behavior of a system. In the last part of the course we analyze discrete event systems from a worst-case perspective using the theory of online algorithms and adversarial queuing.
Content1. Introduction
2. Automata and Languages
3. Smarter Automata
4. Specification Models
5. Stochastic Discrete Event Systems
6. Worst-Case Event Systems
7. Network Calculus
Lecture notesAvailable
Literature[bertsekas] Data Networks
Dimitri Bersekas, Robert Gallager
Prentice Hall, 1991, ISBN: 0132009161

[borodin] Online Computation and Competitive Analysis
Allan Borodin, Ran El-Yaniv.
Cambridge University Press, 1998

[boudec] Network Calculus
J.-Y. Le Boudec, P. Thiran
Springer, 2001

[cassandras] Introduction to Discrete Event Systems
Christos Cassandras, Stéphane Lafortune.
Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1999, ISBN 0-7923-8609-4

[fiat] Online Algorithms: The State of the Art
A. Fiat and G. Woeginger

[hochbaum] Approximation Algorithms for NP-hard Problems (Chapter 13 by S. Irani, A. Karlin)
D. Hochbaum

[schickinger] Diskrete Strukturen (Band 2: Wahrscheinlichkeitstheorie und Statistik)
T. Schickinger, A. Steger
Springer, Berlin, 2001

[sipser] Introduction to the Theory of Computation
Michael Sipser.
PWS Publishing Company, 1996, ISBN 053494728X
227-0116-00LVLSI I: From Architectures to VLSI Circuits and FPGAs Information W6 credits5GF. K. Gürkaynak, L. Benini
AbstractThis first course in a series that extends over three consecutive terms is concerned with tailoring algorithms and with devising high performance hardware architectures for their implementation as ASIC or with FPGAs. The focus is on front end design using HDLs and automatic synthesis for producing industrial-quality circuits.
ObjectiveUnderstand Very-Large-Scale Integrated Circuits (VLSI chips), Application-Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC), and Field-Programmable Gate-Arrays (FPGA). Know their organization and be able to identify suitable application areas. Become fluent in front-end design from architectural conception to gate-level netlists. How to model digital circuits with VHDL or SystemVerilog. How to ensure they behave as expected with the aid of simulation, testbenches, and assertions. How to take advantage of automatic synthesis tools to produce industrial-quality VLSI and FPGA circuits. Gain practical experience with the hardware description language VHDL and with industrial Electronic Design Automation (EDA) tools.
ContentThis course is concerned with system-level issues of VLSI design and FPGA implementations. Topics include:
- Overview on design methodologies and fabrication depths.
- Levels of abstraction for circuit modeling.
- Organization and configuration of commercial field-programmable components.
- VLSI and FPGA design flows.
- Dedicated and general purpose architectures compared.
- How to obtain an architecture for a given processing algorithm.
- Meeting throughput, area, and power goals by way of architectural transformations.
- Hardware Description Languages (HDL) and the underlying concepts.
- VHDL and SystemVerilog compared.
- VHDL (IEEE standard 1076) for simulation and synthesis.
- A suitable nine-valued logic system (IEEE standard 1164).
- Register Transfer Level (RTL) synthesis and its limitations.
- Building blocks of digital VLSI circuits.
- Functional verification techniques and their limitations.
- Modular and largely reusable testbenches.
- Assertion-based verification.
- Synchronous versus asynchronous circuits.
- The case for synchronous circuits.
- Periodic events and the Anceau diagram.
- Case studies, ASICs compared to microprocessors, DSPs, and FPGAs.

During the exercises, students learn how to model digital ICs with VHDL. They write testbenches for simulation purposes and synthesize gate-level netlists for VLSI chips and FPGAs. Commercial EDA software by leading vendors is being used throughout.
Lecture notesTextbook and all further documents in English.
LiteratureH. Kaeslin: "Top-Down Digital VLSI Design, from Architectures to Gate-Level Circuits and FPGAs", Elsevier, 2014, ISBN 9780128007303.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
Basics of digital circuits.

Examination:
In written form following the course semester (spring term). Problems are given in English, answers will be accepted in either English oder German.

Further details:
https://iis-students.ee.ethz.ch/lectures/vlsi-i/
227-0148-00LVLSI III: Test and Fabrication of VLSI Circuits Information W6 credits4GF. K. Gürkaynak, L. Benini
AbstractIn this course, we will cover how modern microchips are fabricated, and we will focus on methods and tools to uncover fabrication defects, if any, in these microchips. As part of the exercises, students will get to work on an industrial 1 million dollar automated test equipment.
ObjectiveLearn about modern IC manufacturing methodologies, understand the problem of IC testing. Cover the basic methods, algorithms and techniques to test circuits in an efficient way. Learn about practical aspects of IC testing and apply what you learn in class using a state-of-the art tester.
ContentIn this course we will deal with modern integrated circuit (IC) manufacturing technology and cover topics such as:
- Today's nanometer CMOS fabrication processes (HKMG).
- Optical and post optical Photolithography.
- Potential alternatives to CMOS technology and MOSFET devices.
- Evolution paths for design methodology.
- Industrial roadmaps for the future evolution of semiconductor technology (ITRS).

If you want to earn money by selling ICs, you will have to deliver a product that will function properly with a very large probability. The main emphasis of the lecture will be discussing how this can be achieved. We will discuss fault models and practical techniques to improve testability of VLSI circuits. At the IIS we have a state-of-the-art automated test equipment (Advantest SoC V93000) that we will make available for in class exercises and projects. At the end of the lecture you will be able to design state-of-the art digital integrated circuits such as to make them testable and to use automatic test equipment (ATE) to carry out the actual testing.

During the first weeks of the course there will be weekly practical exercises where you will work in groups of two. For the last 5 weeks of the class students will be able to choose a class project that can be:
- The test of their own chip developed during a previous semester thesis
- Developing new setups and measurement methods in C++ on the tester
- Helping to debug problems encountered in previous microchips by IIS.

Half of the oral exam will consist of a short presentation on this class project.
Lecture notesMain course book: "Essentials of Electronic Testing for Digital, Memory and Mixed-Signal VLSI Circuits" by Michael L. Bushnell and Vishwani D. Agrawal, Springer, 2004. This book is available online within ETH through
http://link.springer.com/book/10.1007%2Fb117406
Prerequisites / NoticeAlthough this is the third part in a series of lectures on VLSI design, you can follow this course even if you have not visited VLSI I and VLSI II lectures. An interest in integrated circuit design, and basic digital circuit knowledge is required though.

Course website:
https://iis-students.ee.ethz.ch/lectures/vlsi-iii/
227-0447-00LImage Analysis and Computer Vision Information W6 credits3V + 1UL. Van Gool, O. Göksel, E. Konukoglu
AbstractLight and perception. Digital image formation. Image enhancement and feature extraction. Unitary transformations. Color and texture. Image segmentation. Motion extraction and tracking. 3D data extraction. Invariant features. Specific object recognition and object class recognition. Deep learning and Convolutional Neural Networks.
ObjectiveOverview of the most important concepts of image formation, perception and analysis, and Computer Vision. Gaining own experience through practical computer and programming exercises.
ContentThis course aims at offering a self-contained account of computer vision and its underlying concepts, including the recent use of deep learning.
The first part starts with an overview of existing and emerging applications that need computer vision. It shows that the realm of image processing is no longer restricted to the factory floor, but is entering several fields of our daily life. First the interaction of light with matter is considered. The most important hardware components such as cameras and illumination sources are also discussed. The course then turns to image discretization, necessary to process images by computer.
The next part describes necessary pre-processing steps, that enhance image quality and/or detect specific features. Linear and non-linear filters are introduced for that purpose. The course will continue by analyzing procedures allowing to extract additional types of basic information from multiple images, with motion and 3D shape as two important examples. Finally, approaches for the recognition of specific objects as well as object classes will be discussed and analyzed. A major part at the end is devoted to deep learning and AI-based approaches to image analysis. Its main focus is on object recognition, but also other examples of image processing using deep neural nets are given.
Lecture notesCourse material Script, computer demonstrations, exercises and problem solutions
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
Basic concepts of mathematical analysis and linear algebra. The computer exercises are based on Python and Linux.
The course language is English.
227-0417-00LInformation Theory IW6 credits4GA. Lapidoth
AbstractThis course covers the basic concepts of information theory and of communication theory. Topics covered include the entropy rate of a source, mutual information, typical sequences, the asymptotic equi-partition property, Huffman coding, channel capacity, the channel coding theorem, the source-channel separation theorem, and feedback capacity.
ObjectiveThe fundamentals of Information Theory including Shannon's source coding and channel coding theorems
ContentThe entropy rate of a source, Typical sequences, the asymptotic equi-partition property, the source coding theorem, Huffman coding, Arithmetic coding, channel capacity, the channel coding theorem, the source-channel separation theorem, feedback capacity
LiteratureT.M. Cover and J. Thomas, Elements of Information Theory (second edition)
227-0427-00LSignal Analysis, Models, and Machine LearningW6 credits4GH.‑A. Loeliger
AbstractMathematical methods in signal processing and machine learning.
I. Linear signal representation and approximation: Hilbert spaces, LMMSE estimation, regularization and sparsity.
II. Learning linear and nonlinear functions and filters: neural networks, kernel methods.
III. Structured statistical models: hidden Markov models, factor graphs, Kalman filter, Gaussian models with sparse events.
ObjectiveThe course is an introduction to some basic topics in signal processing and machine learning.
ContentPart I - Linear Signal Representation and Approximation: Hilbert spaces, least squares and LMMSE estimation, projection and estimation by linear filtering, learning linear functions and filters, L2 regularization, L1 regularization and sparsity, singular-value decomposition and pseudo-inverse, principal-components analysis.
Part II - Learning Nonlinear Functions: fundamentals of learning, neural networks, kernel methods.
Part III - Structured Statistical Models and Message Passing Algorithms: hidden Markov models, factor graphs, Gaussian message passing, Kalman filter and recursive least squares, Monte Carlo methods, parameter estimation, expectation maximization, linear Gaussian models with sparse events.
Lecture notesLecture notes.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
- local bachelors: course "Discrete-Time and Statistical Signal Processing" (5. Sem.)
- others: solid basics in linear algebra and probability theory
227-0627-00LApplied Computer ArchitectureW6 credits4GA. Gunzinger
AbstractThis lecture gives an overview of the requirements and the architecture of parallel computer systems, performance, reliability and costs.
ObjectiveUnderstand the function, the design and the performance modeling of parallel computer systems.
ContentThe lecture "Applied Computer Architecture" gives technical and corporate insights in the innovative Computer Systems/Architectures (CPU, GPU, FPGA, special processors) and their real implementations and applications. Often the designs have to deal with technical limits.
Which computer architecture allows the control of the over 1000 magnets at the Swiss Light Source (SLS)?
Which architecture is behind the alarm center of the Swiss Railway (SBB)?
Which computer architectures are applied for driver assistance systems?
Which computer architecture is hidden behind a professional digital audio mixing desk?
How can data streams of about 30 TB/s, produced by a protone accelerator, be processed in real time?
Can the weather forecast also be processed with GPUs?
How can a good computer architecture be found?
Which are the driving factors in succesful computer architecture design?
Lecture notesScript and exercices sheets.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
Basics of computer architecture.
252-0237-00LConcepts of Object-Oriented Programming Information W6 credits3V + 2UP. Müller
AbstractCourse that focuses on an in-depth understanding of object-oriented programming and compares designs of object-oriented programming languages. Topics include different flavors of type systems, inheritance models, encapsulation in the presence of aliasing, object and class initialization, program correctness, reflection
ObjectiveAfter this course, students will:
Have a deep understanding of advanced concepts of object-oriented programming and their support through various language features. Be able to understand language concepts on a semantic level and be able to compare and evaluate language designs.
Be able to learn new languages more rapidly.
Be aware of many subtle problems of object-oriented programming and know how to avoid them.
ContentThe main goal of this course is to convey a deep understanding of the key concepts of sequential object-oriented programming and their support in different programming languages. This is achieved by studying how important challenges are addressed through language features and programming idioms. In particular, the course discusses alternative language designs by contrasting solutions in languages such as C++, C#, Eiffel, Java, Python, and Scala. The course also introduces novel ideas from research languages that may influence the design of future mainstream languages.

The topics discussed in the course include among others:
The pros and cons of different flavors of type systems (for instance, static vs. dynamic typing, nominal vs. structural, syntactic vs. behavioral typing)
The key problems of single and multiple inheritance and how different languages address them
Generic type systems, in particular, Java generics, C# generics, and C++ templates
The situations in which object-oriented programming does not provide encapsulation, and how to avoid them
The pitfalls of object initialization, exemplified by a research type system that prevents null pointer dereferencing
How to maintain the consistency of data structures
LiteratureWill be announced in the lecture.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
Mastering at least one object-oriented programming language (this course will NOT provide an introduction to object-oriented programming); programming experience
252-0417-00LRandomized Algorithms and Probabilistic MethodsW8 credits3V + 2U + 2AA. Steger
AbstractLas Vegas & Monte Carlo algorithms; inequalities of Markov, Chebyshev, Chernoff; negative correlation; Markov chains: convergence, rapidly mixing; generating functions; Examples include: min cut, median, balls and bins, routing in hypercubes, 3SAT, card shuffling, random walks
ObjectiveAfter this course students will know fundamental techniques from probabilistic combinatorics for designing randomized algorithms and will be able to apply them to solve typical problems in these areas.
ContentRandomized Algorithms are algorithms that "flip coins" to take certain decisions. This concept extends the classical model of deterministic algorithms and has become very popular and useful within the last twenty years. In many cases, randomized algorithms are faster, simpler or just more elegant than deterministic ones. In the course, we will discuss basic principles and techniques and derive from them a number of randomized methods for problems in different areas.
Lecture notesYes.
Literature- Randomized Algorithms, Rajeev Motwani and Prabhakar Raghavan, Cambridge University Press (1995)
- Probability and Computing, Michael Mitzenmacher and Eli Upfal, Cambridge University Press (2005)
252-0546-00LPhysically-Based Simulation in Computer Graphics Information W4 credits2V + 1UM. Bächer, V. da Costa de Azevedo, B. Solenthaler
AbstractThis lecture provides an introduction to physically-based animation in computer graphics and gives an overview of fundamental methods and algorithms. The practical exercises include three assignments which are to be solved in small groups. In an addtional course project, topics from the lecture will be implemented into a 3D game or a comparable application.
ObjectiveThis lecture provides an introduction to physically-based animation in computer graphics and gives an overview of fundamental methods and algorithms. The practical exercises include three assignments which are to be solved in small groups. In an addtional course project, topics from the lecture will be implemented into a 3D game or a comparable application.
ContentThe lecture covers topics in physically-based modeling,
such as particle systems, mass-spring models, finite difference and finite element methods. These approaches are used to represent and simulate deformable objects or fluids with applications in animated movies, 3D games and medical systems. Furthermore, the lecture covers topics such as rigid body dynamics, collision detection, and character animation.
Prerequisites / NoticeFundamentals of calculus and physics, basic concepts of algorithms and data structures, basic programming skills in C++. Knowledge on numerical mathematics as well as ordinary and partial differential equations is an asset, but not required.
261-5100-00LComputational Biomedicine Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 60.
W4 credits2V + 1UG. Rätsch
AbstractThe course critically reviews central problems in Biomedicine and discusses the technical foundations and solutions for these problems.
ObjectiveOver the past years, rapid technological advancements have transformed classical disciplines such as biology and medicine into fields of apllied data science. While the sheer amount of the collected data often makes computational approaches inevitable for analysis, it is the domain specific structure and close relation to research and clinic, that call for accurate, robust and efficient algorithms. In this course we will critically review central problems in Biomedicine and will discuss the technical foundations and solutions for these problems.
ContentThe course will consist of three topic clusters that will cover different aspects of data science problems in Biomedicine:
1) String algorithms for the efficient representation, search, comparison, composition and compression of large sets of strings, mostly originating from DNA or RNA Sequencing. This includes genome assembly, efficient index data structures for strings and graphs, alignment techniques as well as quantitative approaches.
2) Statistical models and algorithms for the assessment and functional analysis of individual genomic variations. this includes the identification of variants, prediction of functional effects, imputation and integration problems as well as the association with clinical phenotypes.
3) Models for organization and representation of large scale biomedical data. This includes ontolgy concepts, biomedical databases, sequence annotation and data compression.
Prerequisites / NoticeData Structures & Algorithms, Introduction to Machine Learning, Statistics/Probability, Programming in Python, Unix Command Line
401-4503-68LReading Course: Reduced Basis MethodsW4 credits2GR. Hiptmair
AbstractReduced Basis Methods (RBM) allow the efficient repeated numerical soluton of parameter depedent differential equations, which arise, e.g., in PDE-constrained optimization, optimal control, inverse problems, and uncertainty quantification. This course introduces the mathematical foundations of RBM and discusses algorithmic and implementation aspects.
Objective* Knowledge about the main principles underlying RBMs
* Familiarity with algorithms for the construction of reduced bases
* Knowledge about the role of and techniques for a posteriori error estimation.
* Familiarity with some applications of RBMs.
LiteratureMain reference:
Hesthaven, Jan S.; Rozza, Gianluigi; Stamm, Benjamin, Certified reduced basis methods for parametrized partial differential equations. SpringerBriefs in Mathematics, 2016

Supplementary reference:
Quarteroni, Alfio; Manzoni, Andrea; Negri, Federico, Reduced basis methods for partial differential equations. An introduction. Unitext 92, Springer, Cham, 2016.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis is a reading course, which will closely follow the book by J. Hesthaven, G. Rozza and B. Stamm. Participants are expected to study particular sections of the book every week, which will then be discussed during the course sessions.
401-4619-67LAdvanced Topics in Computational Statistics
Does not take place this semester.
W4 credits2VN. Meinshausen
AbstractThis lecture covers selected advanced topics in computational statistics. This year the focus will be on graphical modelling.
ObjectiveStudents learn the theoretical foundations of the selected methods, as well as practical skills to apply these methods and to interpret their outcomes.
ContentThe main focus will be on graphical models in various forms:
Markov properties of undirected graphs; Belief propagation; Hidden Markov Models; Structure estimation and parameter estimation; inference for high-dimensional data; causal graphical models
Prerequisites / NoticeWe assume a solid background in mathematics, an introductory lecture in probability and statistics, and at least one more advanced course in statistics.
401-3627-00LHigh-Dimensional Statistics
Does not take place this semester.
W4 credits2VP. L. Bühlmann
Abstract"High-Dimensional Statistics" deals with modern methods and theory for statistical inference when the number of unknown parameters is of much larger order than sample size. Statistical estimation and algorithms for complex models and aspects of multiple testing will be discussed.
ObjectiveKnowledge of methods and basic theory for high-dimensional statistical inference
ContentLasso and Group Lasso for high-dimensional linear and generalized linear models; Additive models and many smooth univariate functions; Non-convex loss functions and l1-regularization; Stability selection, multiple testing and construction of p-values; Undirected graphical modeling
LiteraturePeter Bühlmann and Sara van de Geer (2011). Statistics for High-Dimensional Data: Methods, Theory and Applications. Springer Verlag.
ISBN 978-3-642-20191-2.
Prerequisites / NoticeKnowledge of basic concepts in probability theory, and intermediate knowledge of statistics (e.g. a course in linear models or computational statistics).
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