Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2021

Doctoral Department of Humanities, Social and Political Sciences Information
Doctoral and Post-Doctoral Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
» Course Catalogue of ETH Zurich
851-0624-00LETH4D PhD Seminar: Research for Development Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
Number of participants limited to 15.
W1 credit1KI. Günther
AbstractDoctoral candidates from all ETH departments, whose research is related to development issues, and conducting research in low or middle-income countries are invited to give a presentation about their on-going work and discuss their doctoral project with a diverse group of researchers.
ObjectiveDoctoral students are able to present their doctoral project to an interdisciplinary audience and to respond to questions within a wider development context.
853-0726-00LHistory II: Global (Anti-Imperialism and Decolonisation, 1919-1975)W3 credits2VB. Schär
AbstractThe lecture will give an insight into the formation of anticolonial nationalist movements in Asia and Africa from the beginning of the 20th century onwards and discuss the various dimensions of dismantling of colonial empires.
ObjectiveThe lecture will give students an insight into the history of the non-European world, looking specifically into the political, economic, social and cultural transformation on the backgrounds of colonial penetration strategies and the resistance of anti-colonial movements. The aim is to show that societies in Asia and Africa are not just the product of colonial penetration or anti-colonial resistance, but that both aspects influenced the present political, economic, social and cultural perception of these parts of the world to a considerable extent. A nuanced knowledge of the long and arduous process of decolonisation is hence important to understand today's geopolitical constellation, still characterised by the struggle for a just post-imperial world order.
LiteratureJansen, J.C. und Osterhammel, J., Dekolonisation: Das Ende der Imperien, München 2013.
Prerequisites / NoticeA detailed syllabus will be available in due course at http://www.gmw.ethz.ch/en/teaching/lehrveranstaltungen.html
851-0732-03LIntellectual Property: An Introduction Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 150

Particularly suitable for students of D-ARCH, D-BIOL, D-CHAB, D-INFK, D-ITET, D-MAVT, D- MATL, D-MTEC.
W2 credits2VS. Bechtold, R. Zingg
AbstractThe course introduces students to the basics of the intellectual property system and of innovation policy. Areas covered include patent, copyright, trademark, design, know-how protection, open source, and technology transfer. The course looks at Swiss, European, U.S. and international law and uses examples from a broad range of technologies. Insights can be used in academia, industry or start-ups.
ObjectiveIntellectual property issues become more and more important in our society. In order to prepare students for their future challenges in research, industry or start-ups, this course introduces them to the foundations of the intellectual property system. The course covers patent, copyright, trademark, design, know-how protection, open source, and technology transfer law. It explains links to contract, antitrust, Internet, privacy and communications law where appropriate. While the introduction to these areas of the law is designed at a general level, examples and case studies come from various jurisdictions, including Switzerland, the European Union, the United States, and international law.

In addition, the course introduces students to the fundamentals of innovation policy. After exposing students to the economics of intellectual property protection, the course asks questions such as: Why do states grant property rights in inventions? Has the protection of intellectual property gone too far? How do advances in biotechnology and the Internet affect the intellectual property system? What is the relationship between open source, open access and intellectual property? What alternatives to intellectual property protection exist?

Knowing how the intellectual property system works and what kind of protection is available is useful for all students who are interested in working in academia, industry or in starting their own company. Exposing students to the advantages and disadvantages of the intellectual property system enables them to participate in the current policy discussions on intellectual property, innovation and technology law. The course will include practical examples and case studies as well as guest speakers from industry and private practice.
851-0587-01LCIS PhD Colloquium
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at UZH.
UZH Module Code: 615G930a

Mind the enrolment deadlines at UZH:
https://www.uzh.ch/cmsssl/en/studies/application/deadlines.html
W2 credits1KUniversity lecturers
AbstractIn this internal colloquium doctoral students present their work after about 12 months of research.
ObjectiveThe aim of this colloquium is that the presenters receive feedback on their research at an important stage (a stage at which significant changes of direction, methodology, etc, may still be undertaken) in the PhD process.
ContentPresentation of doctoral research.
Lecture notesDistributed electronically.
LiteratureDistributed electronically.
851-0252-04LBehavioral Studies Colloquium Information Z0 credits2KD. Helbing, U. Brandes, C. Hölscher, M. Kapur, C. Stadtfeld, E. Stern
AbstractThis colloquium offers an opportunity for students to discuss their ongoing research and scientific ideas in the behavioral sciences, both at the micro- and macro-levels of cognitive, behavioral and social science. It also offers an opportunity for students from other disciplines to discuss their research ideas in relation to behavioral science. The colloquium also features invited research talks.
ObjectiveStudents know and can apply autonomously up-to-date investigation methods and techniques in the behavioral sciences. They achieve the ability to develop their own ideas in the field and to communicate their ideas in oral presentations and in written papers. The credits will be obtained by a written report of approximately 10 pages.
ContentThis colloquium offers an opportunity for students to discuss their ongoing research and scientific ideas in the behavioral sciences, both at the micro- and macro-levels of cognitive, behavioral and social science. It also offers an opportunity for students from other disciplines to discuss their ideas in so far as they have some relation to behavioral science. The possible research areas are wide and may include theoretical as well as empirical approaches in Social Psychology and Research on Higher Education, Sociology, Modeling and Simulation in Sociology, Decision Theory and Behavioral Game Theory, Economics, Research on Learning and Instruction, Cognitive Psychology and Cognitive Science. Ideally the students (from Bachelor, Master, Ph.D. and Post-Doc programs) have started to start work on their thesis or on any other term paper.
Course credit can be obtained either based on a talk in the colloquium plus a written essay, or by writing an essay about a topic related to one of the other talks in the course. Students interested in giving a talk should contact the course organizers (Ziegler, Kapur) before the first session of the semester. Priority will be given to advanced / doctoral students for oral presentations. The course credits will be obtained by a written report of approximately 10 pages. The colloquium also serves as a venue for invited talks by researchers from other universities and institutions related to behavioral and social sciences.
LiteratureWill be provided on request.
Prerequisites / NoticeDoctoral students in D-GESS can obtain 2 credit points for presenting their dissertation research plan.
851-0252-01LHuman-Computer Interaction: Cognition and Usability Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 40.

Particularly suitable for students of D-ITET
W3 credits2SC. Hölscher, S. Credé, H. Zhao
AbstractThis seminar introduces theory and methods in human-computer interaction and usability. Cognitive Science provides a theoretical framework for designing user interfaces as well as a range of methods for assessing usability (user testing, cognitive walkthrough, GOMS). The seminar will provide an opportunity to experience some of the methods in applied group projects.
ObjectiveThis seminar will introduce key topics, theories and methodology in human-computer interaction (HCI) and usability. Presentations will cover the basics of human-computer interaction and selected topics like mobile interaction, adaptive systems, human error and attention. A focus of the seminar will be on getting to know evaluation techniques in HCI. Students will work in groups and will first familiarize themselves with a select usability evaluation method (e.g. user testing, GOMS, task analysis, heuristic evaluation, questionnaires or Cognitive Walkthrough). They will then apply the methods to a human-computer interaction setting (e.g. an existing software or hardware interface) and present the method as well as their procedure and results to the plenary. Active participation is vital for the success of the seminar, and students are expected to contribute to presentations of foundational themes, methods and results of their chosen group project. In order to obtain course credit a written essay / report will be required (details to be specified in the introductory session of the course).
851-0252-05LResearch Seminar Cognitive Science Restricted registration - show details
Prerequisite: Participants should be involved in research in the cognitive science group.
W2 credits2SC. Hölscher, S. Andraszewicz
AbstractThe colloquium provides a forum for researchers and graduate students in cognitive science to present/discuss their ongoing projects as well as jointly discuss current publications in cognitive science and related fields. A subset of the sessions will include invited external visitors presenting their research. Participants of this colloquium are expected to be involved in active research group.
ObjectiveGraduate student train and improve their presentation skills based on their own project ideas, all participants stay informed on current trends in the field and have the opportunity for networking with invited scholars.
851-0252-06LIntroduction to Social Networks: Theory, Methods and Applications
This course is intended for students interested in data analysis and with basic knowledge of inferential statistics.
W3 credits2GC. Stadtfeld, U. Brandes
AbstractHumans are connected by various social relations. When aggregated, we speak of social networks. This course discusses how social networks are structured, how they change over time and how they affect the individuals that they connect. It integrates social theory with practical knowledge of cutting-edge statistical methods and applications from a number of scientific disciplines.
ObjectiveThe aim is to enable students to contribute to social networks research and to be discriminating consumers of modern literature on social networks. Students will acquire a thorough understanding of social networks theory (1), practical skills in cutting-edge statistical methods (2) and their applications in a number of scientific fields (3).
In particular, at the end of the course students will
- Know the fundamental theories in social networks research (1)
- Understand core concepts of social networks and their relevance in different contexts (1, 3)
- Be able to describe and visualize networks data in the R environment (2)
- Understand differences regarding analysis and collection of network data and other type of survey data (2)
- Know state-of-the-art inferential statistical methods and how they are used in R (2)
- Be familiar with the core empirical studies in social networks research (2, 3)
- Know how network methods can be employed in a variety of scientific disciplines (3)
860-0017-00LScience Communication Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 15.

Priority for Science, Technology, and Policy MSc.
W3 credits3GM. Dunn Cavelty, S. Rodriguez Martinez
AbstractSuccessful dissemination of scientific results to policy-makers and the wider public is an essential skill at the intersection of science, technology and policy making. This course looks at the expectations and needs of different target groups and teaches “best practices” for different modes of communication via a variety of exercises.
ObjectiveThe aim of this course is to learn about science communication in theory and learn how to apply this knowledge in practice through different formats and media, aimed at different audiences.
ContentSuccessful dissemination of scientific results to policy-makers and the wider public is an essential skill at the intersection of science, technology and policy making. This course looks at the expectations and needs of different target groups and teaches “best practices” for different modes of communication via a variety of exercises.
Lecture notesReading material is made available through Moodle.
LiteratureReading material is made available through Moodle.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe total number of students is 15. MSc students, PhD students and postdocs with a science and technology background have priority; weekly meetings of minimum 2, maximum 3 hours during FS (Spring Semester); grading based on the exercises and final products on a 1-6 point scale
151-0906-00LFrontiers in Energy Research Information
This course is only for doctoral students.
W2 credits2SC. Schaffner
AbstractDoctoral students at ETH Zurich working in the broad area of energy present their research to their colleagues, their advisors and the scientific community. Each week a different student gives a 50-60 min presentation of their research (a full introduction, background & findings) followed by discussion with the audience.
ObjectiveThe key objectives of the course are:
(1) participants will gain knowledge of advanced research in the area of energy;
(2) participants will actively participate in discussion after each presentation;
(3) participants gain experience of different presentation styles;
(4) to create a network amongst the energy research doctoral student community.
ContentDoctoral students at ETH Zurich working in the broad area of energy present their research to their colleagues, to their advisors and to the scientific community. There will be one presentation a week during the semester, each structured as follows: 20 min introduction to the research topic, 30 min presentation of the results, 30 min discussion with the audience.
Lecture notesSlides will be available on the Energy Science Center pages(www.esc.ethz.ch/events/frontiers-in-energy-research.html).
851-0735-16LStart Ups and Taxes Restricted registration - show details W2 credits2SP. Pamini
AbstractETH students learn the relevancy of the tax law framework in the context of company start-ups. Based on theory and case studies, the participants discuss which regulatory options the legislator has, how it can promote innovative start-ups and where the typical pitfalls are. The consequences of direct and indirect taxes are debated both at the company and the entrepreneur level.
ObjectiveMost of the time, scientific knowledge and the resulting technical innovations spread outside of the academic world over the activities of business ventures, specifically by developing new products and processes or by improving existing ones. As an ETH graduate who would like to practically implement her theoretical knowledge, you know the advantages and disadvantages of the manifold legal system set by the legislator, both from a private and from a tax law perspective.

Start-ups differ substantially from normal kinds of enterprises. For instance, ownership can be concentrated in few hands and change over time, being opened to venture investors (e.g. in connection with private equity funds). The corporate governance can be particularly complex (e.g. including dual-class shares or an asymmetry between the degree of financial participation and the share of voting rights). The industry wherein the start-up is doing business can also be typically very volatile, preventing to find sensible comparables to value the start-up; reliable business plans are often missing.

On the one hand, in this seminar you learn the regulatory options that are available to the legislator to promote innovative start-ups. In this context, you are also introduced into financial markets theory, economic policy making, innovation promotion and business strategy. On the other hand, you learn the technical knowledge in Swiss tax law that you need in case of a possible future business venture. You will be also stimulated in approaching complex problems outside of your area of specialisation thinking in a connected way. Pre-knowledge in law or in business administration is useful, but does not represent any necessary condition to participate.

In the first sessions, the lecturer introduces you into the theoretical fundamentals as well as into the Swiss tax system, covering both direct taxes (such as the individual income and wealth taxes and the corporate income and capital taxes) and indirect taxes (such as VAT - value added tax, WHT - withholding tax, and stamp duties). Focusing on the field of start-ups, the discussions will deal both with individuals and corporations. The second part of the seminar will consist of the active discussion, primarily done by the seminar participants themselves, of some hypothetical business cases where the typical tax issues in connection with start-ups can be analysed more specifically.
851-0252-10LProject in Behavioural Finance Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
Number of participants limited to 40

Particularly suitable for students of D-MTEC
W3 credits2SC. Hölscher
AbstractThis interactive practical course provides and overview of the key topics in behavioral finance. Along studying information about investor's behavior, decision-making, cognitive, biological and personality markers of risk taking and measuring risk appetite, students train critical thinking, argumentation and presentation. The learning process is based on interactive discussions and presentations.
ObjectiveThis course provides an overview of the key topics in behavioural finance and gives the opportunity for a first hands-on experience in designing, analysing and presenting a behavioural study. In the first half of the semester, students present papers from different topics within behavioural finance, including Judgment and Decision Making, psychometrics and individual differences, and risk perception and eliciting people’s propensity to take risk, biological markers of risk taking and investment behavior and trading games. The paper presentations are informal, require no power-point presentations and are followed by a discussion with the rest of the students in the class. The goal of these presentations is three-fold: in an interactive and engaging way, to provide an overview of the topics contained in the area of behavioural finance, to teach students to extract the most relevant information from scientific papers and be able to communicate them to their peers and to enhance critical thinking during the discussion.
In the middle of the semester, the students pick a topic in which they want to conduct a small study. Some topics will be offered by the lecturers, but students are free to choose a topic of their own.
This is followed by fine-tuning their research questions given found literature, data collection and analysis. At the end of the semester students receive feedback and advice on the data analysis and present the results in a formal presentation with slides. The final assignment is a written report from their study. Active participation in the meetings is mandatory to pass the course. This course does not involve learning by heart.

Key skills after the course completion:
- Overview of topics in behavioural finance
- Communication of research output in an a formal and informal way, in an oral and written form
- Critical thinking
- Argumentation and study design
Content- Giving presentations
- How to quickly "read" a paper
- Judgment and Decision Making, Heuristics and Biases
- Biology on the trading floor
- Psychometrics and individual differences
- Eliciting people's propensity to take risks
- Experimental design in behavioural studies
- Experimental Asset Markets
Lecture notesAll learning materials will be available to students over eDoz platform.
LiteratureTversky, A., & Kahneman, D. (1992). Advance in prospect theory: Cumulative representation of uncertainty. Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, 5(4), 297-323

Rieskamp, J. (2008). The probabilistic nature of preferential choice. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, memory and Cognition, 34(6), 1446-1465

Hertwig, R., & Herzog, S. (2009). Fast and frugal heuristics: Tools of social rationality. Social Cognition, 27(5), 661-698

Coates, J.M., Gurnell, M., & Sarnyai, Z. (2010). From molecule to market: steroid hormones and financial risk taking. Philosophical Transacations of the Royal Society B, 365, 331-343

Cueva, C., Roberts, R.E., Spencer, T., Rani, N., Tempest, M., Tobler, P.N., Herbert, J., & Rustichini (2015). Cortisol and testosterone increase financial risk taking and may destabilize markets. Nature, 5(11206), 1-16

Conlin, A., Kyröläinen, P., Kaakinen, M., Järvelin, M-R., Perttunen, J., & Svento, R. (2015). Personality traits and stock market participation. Journal of Empirical Finance, 33, 34-50

Kosinski, M., Stillwell, D., & Graepel, T. (2013). Private traits and attributes are predictable from digital records of human behavior. Proceedings in National Academy of Sciences, 110, 5802-5805

Oehler, A., Wedlich, F., Wendt, S., & Horn, M. (July 9, 2016). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2807401

Fenton-O'Creevy, M., Nicholson, N., Soane, E., & Willman, P. (2003). Trading on illusions: Unrealistic perceptions of control and trading performance. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, 76, 53-68

Frey, R., Pedroni, A., Mata, R., Rieskamp, J., & Hertwig, R. (2017). Risk preference shares the psychometric structure of major psychological traits. Science Advances, 3, 1-13

Schürmann, O., Andraszewicz, S., & Rieskamp, J. (2017). The importance of losses when eliciting risk preferences. Under review

Andraszewicz, S., Kaszas, D., Zeisberger, S., Murphy, R.O., & Hölscher, C. (2017). Simulating historical market crashes in the laboratory. Manuscript in preparation.

Allenbach, M., Kaszas, D., Andraszewicz, S., & Hölscher, C. (2017). Skin conductance response as marker or risk undertaken by investors. Manuscript in preparation.

Simic, M., Kaszas, D., Andraszewicz, S., & Hölscher, C. (2017). Incentive structure compatibility in a principal agent problem. Manuscript in preparation.

Sornette, D., Andraszewicz, S., Wu, K., Murphy, R.O., Rindlerm P., & Sanadgol, D. (2017). Overpricing persistance in experimental asset markets with intrinsic uncertainty. Under review.

Andraszewicz, S., Wu, K., & Sornette, D. (2017). Behavioural effects and market dynamics in field and laboratory experimental asset markets. Under review.
Prerequisites / NoticeGrading is based the active participation in the class and the final project. There is no exam.
851-0105-01LCross-Cultural Competences Arab World Information
Does not take place this semester.
W3 credits2V
AbstractThis lecture will discuss important topics of the Arab culture involving different value systems, world-views, and paradigms pointing to possible areas of misunderstandings and conflict in an inter-cultural setting as well as approaches to deal with these issues.
ObjectiveThis lectures gives an insight into different areas of the Arab culture such as gender roles, significance of family and marriage, concepts of honor and hierarchy, the role of religion in everyday life, being guest or host, obligations in family and society, and others. The aim is to identify different value systems, world-views and paradigms that may cause problems in an cross-cultural setting as well as possible approaches to deal with these issues. Even though most of the topics concern the Arab region as whole, the lecture will focus on the Arab East (not the Maghreb), especially Egypt, the Levant and the Gulf countries.
860-0022-00LComplexity and Global Systems Science Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 50.

Prerequisites: solid mathematical skills.

Particularly suitable for students of D-ITET, D-MAVT and ISTP
W3 credits2SD. Helbing, S. Mahajan
AbstractThis course discusses complex techno-socio-economic systems, their counter-intuitive behaviors, and how their theoretical understanding empowers us to solve some long-standing problems that are currently bothering the world.
ObjectiveParticipants should learn to get an overview of the state of the art in the field, to present it in a well understandable way to an interdisciplinary scientific audience, to develop models for open problems, to analyze them, and to defend their results in response to critical questions. In essence, participants should improve their scientific skills and learn to think scientifically about complex dynamical systems.
ContentThis course starts with a discussion of the typical and often counter-intuitive features of complex dynamical systems such as self-organization, emergence, (sudden) phase transitions at "tipping points", multi-stability, systemic instability, deterministic chaos, and turbulence. It then discusses phenomena in networked systems such as feedback, side and cascading effects, and the problem of radical uncertainty. The course progresses by demonstrating the relevance of these properties for understanding societal and, at times, global-scale problems such as traffic jams, crowd disasters, breakdowns of cooperation, crime, conflict, social unrests, political revolutions, bubbles and crashes in financial markets, epidemic spreading, and/or "tragedies of the commons" such as environmental exploitation, overfishing, or climate change. Based on this understanding, the course points to possible ways of mitigating techno-socio-economic-environmental problems, and what data science may contribute to their solution.
Lecture notes"Social Self-Organization
Agent-Based Simulations and Experiments to Study Emergent Social Behavior"
Helbing, Dirk
ISBN 978-3-642-24004-1
LiteraturePhilip Ball
Why Society Is A Complex Matter
https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783642289996

Globally networked risks and how to respond
Nature: https://www.nature.com/articles/nature12047

Global Systems Science and Policy
Link

Managing Complexity: Insights, Concepts, Applications
https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783540752608

Further links:

http://global-systems-science.org

Link

Link

https://ec.europa.eu/digital-single-market/en/global-systems-science

Further literature will be recommended in the lectures.
Prerequisites / NoticeMathematical skills can be helpful
851-0586-03LApplied Network Science: Sports Networks Restricted registration - show details
Number of participant limited to 20
W3 credits2SU. Brandes
AbstractWe study applications of network science methods, this time in the domain of sports.
Topics are selected for diversity in research questions and techniques
with applications such as passing networks, team rankings, and career trajectories.
Student teams present results from the recent literature, possibly with replication, in a mini-conference shortly before the start of EURO 2020 [sic].
ObjectiveNetwork science as a paradigm is entering domains from engineering to the humantities but application is tricky.
By examples from recent research on sports, sports administration, and the sociology of sports, students learn to appreciate that, and how, context matters.
They will be able to assess the appropriateness of approaches
for substantive research problems, and especially when and why quantitative approaches are or are not suitable.
LiteratureOriginal research articles will be introduced in the first session. General introduction:

Wäsche, Dickson, Woll & Brandes (2017). Social Network Analysis in Sport Research: An Emerging Paradigm. European Journal for Sport and Society 14(2):138-165. DOI: 10.1080/16138171.2017.1318198
851-0739-01LSequencing Legal DNA: NLP for Law and Political Economy
Particularly suitable for students of D-INFK, D-ITET, D-MTEC
W3 credits2VE. Ash
AbstractThis course explores the application of natural language processing techniques to texts in law, politics, and the news media.
ObjectiveStudents will be introduced to a broad array of tools in natural language processing (NLP). They will learn to evaluate and apply NLP tools to a variety of problems. The applications will focus on social-science contexts, including law, politics, and the news media. Topics include text classification, topic modeling, transformers, model explanation, and bias in language.
ContentNLP technologies have the potential to assist judges and other decision-makers by making tasks more efficient and consistent. On the other hand, language choices could be biased toward some groups, and automated systems could entrench those biases.

We will explore the use of NLP for social science research, not just in the law but also in politics, the economy, and culture. We will explore, critique, and integrate the emerging set of tools for debiasing language models and think carefully about how notions of fairness should be applied in this domain.
Prerequisites / NoticeSome programming experience in Python is required, and some experience with NLP is highly recommended.
851-0158-13LEcology and Environmentalism Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 40

Particularly suitable for students of D-ERDW, D-HEST, D-USYS, D-BIOL
W3 credits2SN. Guettler
AbstractThe notion of „ecology“ refers to both, scientific research on environments as well as their protection. But how have academic ecology and the environmental movements intersected throughout history?
ObjectiveIn the seminar, students will read and discuss key sources as well as secondary literature on the knowledge transfers between scientific ecology and the environmental movements of the 19th and 20th century. Topics range from 19th-century homeland movement and the rise of ecological awareness in colonial settings, to the rise of an environmental awareness during the Cold War, with a special focus on „green“ politics in Europe. Apart from scientists and „counter-scientists“ the seminar focuses on concepts and ideas that circulated between academic ecology and different nature movements.
The participants learn to engage historically with original texts as well as to handle independently the extensive historical literature on the history of environmentalism. At the same time, they develop a critical understanding of different political agendas that have shaped academic and popular ecology until the present day. Students also learn to communicate their findings by writing short (and fictive) blog posts on different aspects of this history.
851-0739-02LSequencing Legal DNA: NLP for Law and Political Economy (Course Project)
This is the optional course project for "Building a Robot Judge: Data Science for the Law."

Please register only if attending the lecture course or with consent of the instructor.

Some programming experience in Python is required, and some experience with text mining is highly recommended.
W2 credits2VE. Ash
AbstractThis is the companion course for extra credit for a course project, for the course "Sequencing Legal DNA: NLP for Law and Political Economy".
ObjectiveStudents will be introduced to a broad array of tools in natural language processing (NLP). They will learn to evaluate and apply NLP tools to a variety of problems. The applications will focus on social-science contexts, including law, politics, and the news media. Topics include text classification, topic modeling, transformers, model explanation, and bias in language.
851-0586-02LThe Spectacles of MeasurementW3 credits2VU. Brandes
AbstractIf you can't measure it, you can't manage it. Explorations into mathematical foundations and societal implications of measuring humans, processes, and things in an increasingly datafied world.
ObjectiveStudents have a basic understanding of what makes a property quantifiable. They know the difference between operational and representational measurement, and the consequences this has for both, the collection of data and its use in decision making and control. With a critical attitude toward datafication, contextual differences are appreciated across domains such as science and engineering, business and entertainment, health and sports, governance and policy making.
ContentMeasurement Theory
- representations
- scales and meaningfulness
- direct vs. indirect
- conjoint measurement

Measurement Practice
- units and standards
- sensors and instruments
- items and questionnaires
- indices and datafication

Measurement Politics
- administration and coordination
- discrimination and behavior
- smart living
Lecture notesSlides made available in a course moodle.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents pair up in teams to write an essay on a measurement problem they care about (such as one pertinent to their discipline or research). The essay is pitched to the others in the course during a poster session at the end of the semester (may have to be replaced with an online session in FS21).
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