Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2020

Computer Science Master Information
Focus Courses
Focus Courses General Studies
Elective Focus Courses General Studies
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
272-0302-00LApproximation and Online Algorithms Information W5 credits2V + 1U + 1AH.‑J. Böckenhauer, D. Komm
AbstractThis lecture deals with approximative algorithms for hard optimization problems and algorithmic approaches for solving online problems as well as the limits of these approaches.
ObjectiveGet a systematic overview of different methods for designing approximative algorithms for hard optimization problems and online problems. Get to know methods for showing the limitations of these approaches.
ContentApproximation algorithms are one of the most succesful techniques to attack hard optimization problems. Here, we study the so-called approximation ratio, i.e., the ratio of the cost of the computed approximating solution and an optimal one (which is not computable efficiently).
For an online problem, the whole instance is not known in advance, but it arrives pieceweise and for every such piece a corresponding part of the definite output must be given. The quality of an algorithm for such an online problem is measured by the competitive ratio, i.e., the ratio of the cost of the computed solution and the cost of an optimal solution that could be given if the whole input was known in advance.

The contents of this lecture are
- the classification of optimization problems by the reachable approximation ratio,
- systematic methods to design approximation algorithms (e.g., greedy strategies, dynamic programming, linear programming relaxation),
- methods to show non-approximability,
- classic online problem like paging or scheduling problems and corresponding algorithms,
- randomized online algorithms,
- the design and analysis principles for online algorithms, and
- limits of the competitive ratio and the advice complexity as a way to do a deeper analysis of the complexity of online problems.
LiteratureThe lecture is based on the following books:

J. Hromkovic: Algorithmics for Hard Problems, Springer, 2004

D. Komm: An Introduction to Online Computation: Determinism, Randomization, Advice, Springer, 2016

Additional literature:

A. Borodin, R. El-Yaniv: Online Computation and Competitive Analysis, Cambridge University Press, 1998
401-3052-05LGraph Theory Information W5 credits2V + 1UB. Sudakov
AbstractBasic notions, trees, spanning trees, Caley's formula, vertex and edge connectivity, 2-connectivity, Mader's theorem, Menger's theorem, Eulerian graphs, Hamilton cycles, Dirac's theorem, matchings, theorems of Hall, König and Tutte, planar graphs, Euler's formula, basic non-planar graphs, graph colorings, greedy colorings, Brooks' theorem, 5-colorings of planar graphs
ObjectiveThe students will get an overview over the most fundamental questions concerning graph theory. We expect them to understand the proof techniques and to use them autonomously on related problems.
Lecture notesLecture will be only at the blackboard.
LiteratureWest, D.: "Introduction to Graph Theory"
Diestel, R.: "Graph Theory"

Further literature links will be provided in the lecture.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents are expected to have a mathematical background and should be able to write rigorous proofs.


NOTICE: This course unit was previously offered as 252-1408-00L Graphs and Algorithms.
401-3903-11LGeometric Integer ProgrammingW6 credits2V + 1UJ. Paat
AbstractInteger programming is the task of minimizing a linear function over all the integer points in a polyhedron. This lecture introduces the key concepts of an algorithmic theory for solving such problems.
ObjectiveThe purpose of the lecture is to provide a geometric treatment of the theory of integer optimization.
ContentKey topics are:

- Lattice theory and the polynomial time solvability of integer optimization problems in fixed dimension.

- Structural properties of integer sets that reveal other parameters affecting the complexity of integer problems

- Duality theory for integer optimization problems from the vantage point of lattice free sets.
Lecture notesnot available, blackboard presentation
LiteratureLecture notes will be provided.

Other helpful materials include

Bertsimas, Weismantel: Optimization over Integers, 2005

and

Schrijver: Theory of linear and integer programming, 1986.
Prerequisites / Notice"Mathematical Optimization" (401-3901-00L)
227-0560-00LDeep Learning for Autonomous Driving Information Restricted registration - show details
Registration in this class requires the permission of the instructors. Class size will be limited to 80 students.
Preference is given to EEIT, INF and RSC students.
W6 credits3V + 2PD. Dai, A. Liniger
AbstractAutonomous driving has moved from the realm of science fiction to a very real possibility during the past twenty years, largely due to rapid developments of deep learning approaches, automotive sensors, and microprocessor capacity. This course covers the core techniques required for building a self-driving car, especially the practical use of deep learning through this theme.
ObjectiveStudents will learn about the fundamental aspects of a self-driving car. They will also learn to use modern automotive sensors and HD navigational maps, and to implement, train and debug their own deep neural networks in order to gain a deep understanding of cutting-edge research in autonomous driving tasks, including perception, localization and control.

After attending this course, students will:
1) understand the core technologies of building a self-driving car;
2) have a good overview over the current state of the art in self-driving cars;
3) be able to critically analyze and evaluate current research in this area;
4) be able to implement basic systems for multiple autonomous driving tasks.
ContentWe will focus on teaching the following topics centered on autonomous driving: deep learning, automotive sensors, multimodal driving datasets, road scene perception, ego-vehicle localization, path planning, and control.

The course covers the following main areas:

I) Foundation
a) Fundamentals of a self-driving car
b) Fundamentals of deep-learning


II) Perception
a) Semantic segmentation and lane detection
b) Depth estimation with images and sparse LiDAR data
c) 3D object detection with images and LiDAR data
d) Object tracking and motion prediction

III) Localization
a) GPS-based and Vision-based Localization
b) Visual Odometry and Lidar Odometry

IV) Path Planning and Control
a) Path planning for autonomous driving
b) Motion planning and vehicle control
c) Imitation learning and reinforcement learning for self driving cars

The exercise projects will involve training complex neural networks and applying them on real-world, multimodal driving datasets. In particular, students should be able to develop systems that deal with the following problems:
- Sensor calibration and synchronization to obtain multimodal driving data;
- Semantic segmentation and depth estimation with deep neural networks ;
- Learning to drive with images and map data directly (a.k.a. end-to-end driving)
Lecture notesThe lecture slides will be provided as a PDF.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis is an advanced grad-level course. Students must have taken courses on machine learning and computer vision or have acquired equivalent knowledge. Students are expected to have a solid mathematical foundation, in particular in linear algebra, multivariate calculus, and probability. All practical exercises will require basic knowledge of Python and will use libraries such as PyTorch, scikit-learn and scikit-image.
227-1034-00LComputational Vision (University of Zurich)
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at UZH.
UZH Module Code: INI402

Mind the enrolment deadlines at UZH:
https://www.uzh.ch/cmsssl/en/studies/application/mobilitaet.html
W6 credits2V + 1UD. Kiper
AbstractThis course focuses on neural computations that underlie visual perception. We study how visual signals are processed in the retina, LGN and visual cortex. We study the morpholgy and functional architecture of cortical circuits responsible for pattern, motion, color, and three-dimensional vision.
ObjectiveThis course considers the operation of circuits in the process of neural computations. The evolution of neural systems will be considered to demonstrate how neural structures and mechanisms are optimised for energy capture, transduction, transmission and representation of information. Canonical brain circuits will be described as models for the analysis of sensory information. The concept of receptive fields will be introduced and their role in coding spatial and temporal information will be considered. The constraints of the bandwidth of neural channels and the mechanisms of normalization by neural circuits will be discussed.
The visual system will form the basis of case studies in the computation of form, depth, and motion. The role of multiple channels and collective computations for object recognition will
be considered. Coordinate transformations of space and time by cortical and subcortical mechanisms will be analysed. The means by which sensory and motor systems are integrated to allow for adaptive behaviour will be considered.
ContentThis course considers the operation of circuits in the process of neural computations. The evolution of neural systems will be considered to demonstrate how neural structures and mechanisms are optimised for energy capture, transduction, transmission and representation of information. Canonical brain circuits will be described as models for the analysis of sensory information. The concept of receptive fields will be introduced and their role in coding spatial and temporal information will be considered. The constraints of the bandwidth of neural channels and the mechanisms of normalization by neural circuits will be discussed.
The visual system will form the basis of case studies in the computation of form, depth, and motion. The role of multiple channels and collective computations for object recognition will
be considered. Coordinate transformations of space and time by cortical and subcortical mechanisms will be analysed. The means by which sensory and motor systems are integrated to allow for adaptive behaviour will be considered.
LiteratureBooks: (recommended references, not required)
1. An Introduction to Natural Computation, D. Ballard (Bradford Books, MIT Press) 1997.
2. The Handbook of Brain Theorie and Neural Networks, M. Arbib (editor), (MIT Press) 1995.
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