Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2015

Electrical Engineering and Information Technology Master Information
Major Courses
A total of 42 CP must be achieved form courses during the Master Program. The individual study plan is subject to the tutor's approval.
Communication
Core Subjects
These core subjects are particularly recommended for the field of "Communications".
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0111-00LCommunication Electronics Information W6 credits2V + 2UQ. Huang
AbstractElectronics for communications systems, with emphasis on realization. Low noise amplifiers, modulators and demodulators, transmit amplifiers and oscillators are discussed in the context of wireless communications. Wireless receiver, transmitter and frequency synthesizer will be described. Importance of and trade offs among sensitivity, linearity and selectivity are discussed extensively.
ObjectiveFoundation course for understanding modern electronic circuits for communication applications. We learn how theoretical communications principles are reduced to practice using transistors, switches, inductors, capacitors and resistors. The harsh environment such communication electronics will be exposed to and the resulting requirements on the sensitivity, linearity and selectivity help explain the design trade offs encountered in every circuit block found in a modern transceiver.
ContentAccounting for more than two trillion dollars per year, communications is one of the most important drivers for advanced economies of our time. Wired networks have been a key enabler to the internet age and the proliferation of search engines, social networks and electronic commerce, whereas wireless communications, cellular networks in particular, have liberated people and increased productivity in developed and developing nations alike. Integrated circuits that make such communications devices light weight and affordable have played a key role in the proliferation of communications.
This course introduces our students to the key components that realize the tangible products in electronic form. We begin with an introduction to wireless communications, and describe the harsh environment in which a transceiver has to work reliably. In this context we highlight the importance of sensitivity or low noise, linearity, selectivity, power consumption and cost, that are all vital to a competitive device in such applications.
We shall review bipolar and MOS devices from a designer's prospectives, before discussing basic amplifier structures - common emitter/source, common base/gate configurations, their noise performance and linearity, impedance matching, and many other things one needs to know about a low noise amplifier.
We will discuss modulation, and the mixer that enables its implementation. Noise and linearity form an inseparable part of the discussion of its design, but we also introduce the concept of quadrature demodulator, image rejection, and the effects of mismatch on performance.
When mixers are used as a modulator the signals they receive are usually large and the natural linearity of transistors becomes insufficient. The concept of feedback will be introduced and its function as an improver of linearity studied in detail.
Amplifiers in the transmit path are necessary to boost the power level before the signal leaves an integrated circuit to drive an even more powerful amplifier (PA) off chip. Linearized pre-amplifiers will be studied as part of the transmitter.
A crucial part of a mobile transceiver terminal is the generation of local oscillator signals at the desired frequencies that are required for modulation and demodulation. Oscillators will be studied, starting from stability criteria of an electronic system, then leading to criteria for controlled instability or oscillation. Oscillator design will be discussed in detail, including that of crystal controlled oscillators which provide accurate time base.
An introduction to phase-locked loops will be made, illustrating how it links a variable frequency oscillator to a very stable fixed frequency crystal oscillator, and how phase detector, charge pump and programmable dividers all serve to realize an agile frequency synthesizer that is very stable in each frequency synthesized.
Lecture notesScript with slides and notes is available.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course Analog Integrated Circuits is recommended as preparation for this course.
227-0418-00LAlgebra and Error Correcting Codes Information W6 credits4GH.‑A. Loeliger
AbstractThe course is an introduction to error correcting codes covering both classical algebraic codes and modern iterative decoding. The course is also an introduction to "abstract" algebra and some of its applications in coding and signal processing.
ObjectiveThe course is an introduction to error correcting codes covering both classical algebraic codes and modern iterative decoding. The course is also an introduction to "abstract" algebra and some of its applications in coding and signal processing.
ContentCoding: coding and modulation, linear codes, Hamming space codes, Euclidean space codes, trellises and Viterbi decoding, convolutional codes, factor graphs and message passing algorithms, low-density parity check codes, turbo codes, polar codes, Reed-Solomon codes.
Algebra: groups, rings, homomorphisms, ideals, fields, finite fields, vector spaces, polynomials, Chinese Remainder Theorem.
Lecture notesLecture Notes (english)
227-0420-00LInformation Theory II Information W6 credits2V + 2US. M. Moser
AbstractThis course builds on Information Theory I. It introduces additional topics in single-user communication, connections between Information Theory and Statistics, and Network Information Theory.
ObjectiveThe course has two objectives: to introduce the students to the key information theoretic results that underlay the design of communication systems and to equip the students with the tools that are needed to conduct research in Information Theory.
ContentDifferential entropy, maximum entropy, the Gaussian channel and water filling, the entropy-power inequality, Sanov's Theorem, Fisher information, the broadcast channel, the multiple-access channel, Slepian-Wolf coding, and the Gelfand-Pinsker problem.
Lecture notesn/a
LiteratureT.M. Cover and J.A. Thomas, Elements of Information Theory, second edition, Wiley 2006
227-0436-00LDigital Communication and Signal Processing Information W6 credits2V + 2UA. Wittneben
AbstractA comprehensive presentation of modern digital modulation, detection and synchronization schemes and relevant aspects of signal processing enables the student to analyze, simulate, implement and research the physical layer of advanced digital communication schemes. The course both covers the underlying theory and provides problem solving and hands-on experience.
ObjectiveDigital communication systems are characterized by ever increasing requirements on data rate, spectral efficiency and reliability. Due to the huge advances in very large scale integration (VLSI) we are now able to implement extremely complex digital signal processing algorithms to meet these challenges. As a result the physical layer (PHY) of digital communication systems has become the dominant function in most state-of-the-art system designs. In this course we discuss the major elements of PHY implementations in a rigorous theoretical fashion and present important practical examples to illustrate the application of the theory. In Part I we treat discrete time linear adaptive filters, which are a core component to handle multiuser and intersymbol interference in time-variant channels. Part II is a seminar block, in which the students develop their analytical and experimental (simulation) problem solving skills. After a review of major aspects of wireless communication we discuss, simulate and present the performance of novel cooperative and adaptive multiuser wireless communication systems. As part of this seminar each students has to give a 15 minute presentation and actively attends the presentations of the classmates. In Part III we cover parameter estimation and synchronization. Based on the classical discrete detection and estimation theory we develop maximum likelihood inspired digital algorithms for symbol timing and frequency synchronization.
ContentPart I: Linear adaptive filters for digital communication
• Finite impulse response (FIR) filter for temporal and spectral shaping
• Wiener filters
• Method of steepest descent
• Least mean square adaptive filters

Part II: Seminar block on cooperative wireless communication
• review of the basic concepts of wireless communication
• multiuser amplify&forward relaying
• performance evaluation of adaptive A&F relaying schemes and student presentations

Part III: Parameter estimation and synchronization
• Discrete detection theory
• Discrete estimation theory
• Synthesis of synchronization algorithms
• Frequency estimation
• Timing adjustment by interpolation
Lecture notesLecture notes.
Literature[1] Oppenheim, A. V., Schafer, R. W., "Discrete-time signal processing", Prentice-Hall, ISBN 0-13-754920-2.
[2] Haykin, S., "Adaptive filter theory", Prentice-Hall, ISBN 0-13-090126-1.
[3] Van Trees, H. L., "Detection , estimation and modulation theory", John Wiley&Sons, ISBN 0-471-09517-6.
[4] Meyr, H., Moeneclaey, M., Fechtel, S. A., "Digital communication receivers: synchronization, channel estimation and signal processing", John Wiley&Sons, ISBN 0-471-50275-8.
Prerequisites / NoticeFormal prerequisites: none
Recommended: Communication Systems or equivalent
227-0438-00LFundamentals of Wireless Communication Information
Does not take place this semester.
W6 credits2V + 2UH. Bölcskei
AbstractThe class focuses on fundamental communication-theoretic aspects of modern wireless communication systems. The main topics covered are the system-theoretic characterization of wireless channels, the principle of diversity, information theoretic aspects of communication over fading channels, and the basics of multi-user communication theory and cellular systems.
ObjectiveAfter attending this lecture, participating in the discussion sessions, and working on the homework problem sets, students should be able to
- understand the nature of the fading mobile radio channel and its implications for the design of communication systems
- analyze existing communication systems
- apply the fundamental principles to new wireless communication systems, especially in the design of diversity techniques and coding schemes
ContentThe goal of this course is to study the fundamental principles of wireless communication, enabling students to analyze and design current and future wireless systems. The outline of the course is as follows:

Wireless Channels
What differentiates wireless communication from wired communication is the nature of the communication channel. Motion of the transmitter and the receiver, the environment, multipath propagation, and interference render the channel model more complex. This part of the course deals with modeling issues, i.e., the process of finding an accurate and mathematically tractable formulation of real-world wireless channels. The model will turn out to be that of a randomly time-varying linear system. The statistical characterization of such systems is given by the scattering function of the channel, which in turn leads us to the definition of key propagation parameters such as delay spread and coherence time.

Diversity
In a wireless channel, the time varying destructive and constructive addition of multipath components leads to signal fading. The result is a significant performance degradation if the same signaling and coding schemes as for the (static) additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channel are used. This problem can be mitigated by diversity techniques. If several independently faded copies of the transmitted signal can be combined at the receiver, the probability of all copies being lost--because the channel is bad--decreases. Hence, the performance of the system will be improved. We will look at different means to achieve diversity, namely through time, frequency, and space. Code design for fading channels differs fundamentally from the AWGN case. We develop criteria for designing codes tailored to wireless channels. Finally, we ask the question of how much diversity can be obtained by any means over a given wireless channel.

Information Theory of Wireless Channels
Limited spectral resources make it necessary to utilize the available bandwidth to its maximum extent. Information theory answers the fundamental question about the maximum rate that can reliably be transmitted over a wireless channel. We introduce the basic information theoretic concepts needed to analyze and compare different systems. No prior experience with information theory is necessary.

Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) Wireless Systems
The major challenges in future wireless communication system design are increased spectral efficiency and improved link reliability. In recent years the use of spatial (or antenna) diversity has become very popular, which is mostly due to the fact that it can be provided without loss in spectral efficiency. Receive diversity, that is, the use of multiple antennas on the receive side of a wireless link, is a well-studied subject. Driven by mobile wireless applications, where it is difficult to deploy multiple antennas in the handset, the use of multiple antennas on the transmit side combined with signal processing and coding has become known under the name of space-time coding. The use of multiple antennas at both ends of a wireless link (MIMO technology) has been demonstrated to have the potential of achieving extraordinary data rates. This chapter is devoted to the basics of MIMO wireless systems.

Cellular Systems: Multiple Access and Interference Management
This chapter deals with the basics of multi-user communication. We start by exploring the basic principles of cellular systems and then take a look at the fundamentals of multi-user channels. We compare code-division multiple-access (CDMA) and frequency-division multiple access (FDMA) schemes from an information-theoretic point of view. In the course of this comparison an important new concept, namely that of multiuser diversity, will emerge. We conclude with a discussion of the idea of opportunistic communication and by assessing this concept from an information-theoretic point of view.
Lecture notesLecture notes will be handed out during the lectures.
LiteratureA set of handouts covering digital communication basics and mathematical preliminaries is available on the website. For further reading, we recommend
- J. M. Wozencraft and I. M. Jacobs, "Principles of Communication Engineering," Wiley, 1965
- A. Papoulis and S. U. Pillai, "Probability, Random Variables, and Stochastic Processes," McGraw Hill, 4th edition, 2002
- G. Strang, "Linear Algebra and its Applications," Harcourt, 3rd edition, 1988
- T.M. Cover and J. A. Thomas, "Elements of Information Theory," Wiley, 1991
Prerequisites / NoticeThis class will be taught in English. The oral exam will be in German (unless you wish to take it in English, of course).

A prerequisite for this course is a working knowledge in digital communications, random processes, and detection theory.
227-0558-00LPrinciples of Distributed Computing Information W6 credits2V + 2U + 1AR. Wattenhofer
AbstractWe study the fundamental issues underlying the design of distributed systems: communication, coordination, fault-tolerance, locality, parallelism, self-organization, symmetry breaking, synchronization, uncertainty. We explore essential algorithmic ideas and lower bound techniques.
ObjectiveDistributed computing is essential in modern computing and communications systems. Examples are on the one hand large-scale networks such as the Internet, and on the other hand multiprocessors such as your new multi-core laptop. This course introduces the principles of distributed computing, emphasizing the fundamental issues underlying the design of distributed systems and networks: communication, coordination, fault-tolerance, locality, parallelism, self-organization, symmetry breaking, synchronization, uncertainty. We explore essential algorithmic ideas and lower bound techniques, basically the "pearls" of distributed computing. We will cover a fresh topic every week.
ContentDistributed computing models and paradigms, e.g. message passing, shared memory, synchronous vs. asynchronous systems, time and message complexity, peer-to-peer systems, small-world networks, social networks, sorting networks, wireless communication, and self-organizing systems.

Distributed algorithms, e.g. leader election, coloring, covering, packing, decomposition, spanning trees, mutual exclusion, store and collect, arrow, ivy, synchronizers, diameter, all-pairs-shortest-path, wake-up, and lower bounds
Lecture notesAvailable. Our course script is used at dozens of other universities around the world.
LiteratureLecture Notes By Roger Wattenhofer. These lecture notes are taught at about a dozen different universities through the world.

Distributed Computing: Fundamentals, Simulations and Advanced Topics
Hagit Attiya, Jennifer Welch.
McGraw-Hill Publishing, 1998, ISBN 0-07-709352 6

Introduction to Algorithms
Thomas Cormen, Charles Leiserson, Ronald Rivest.
The MIT Press, 1998, ISBN 0-262-53091-0 oder 0-262-03141-8

Disseminatin of Information in Communication Networks
Juraj Hromkovic, Ralf Klasing, Andrzej Pelc, Peter Ruzicka, Walter Unger.
Springer-Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg, 2005, ISBN 3-540-00846-2

Introduction to Parallel Algorithms and Architectures: Arrays, Trees, Hypercubes
Frank Thomson Leighton.
Morgan Kaufmann Publishers Inc., San Francisco, CA, 1991, ISBN 1-55860-117-1

Distributed Computing: A Locality-Sensitive Approach
David Peleg.
Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM), 2000, ISBN 0-89871-464-8
Prerequisites / NoticeCourse pre-requisites: Interest in algorithmic problems. (No particular course needed.)
252-0407-00LCryptography Information W7 credits3V + 2U + 1AU. Maurer
AbstractFundamentals and applications of cryptography. Cryptography as a mathematical discipline: reductions, constructive cryptography paradigm, security proofs. The discussed primitives include cryptographic functions, pseudo-randomness, symmetric encryption and authentication, public-key encryption, key agreement, and digital signature schemes. Selected cryptanalytic techniques.
ObjectiveThe goals are:
(1) understand the basic theoretical concepts and scientific thinking in cryptography;
(2) understand and apply some core cryptographic techniques and security proof methods;
(3) be prepared and motivated to access the scientific literature and attend specialized courses in cryptography.
ContentSee course description.
Lecture notesyes.
Prerequisites / NoticeFamiliarity with the basic cryptographic concepts as treated for
example in the course "Information Security" is required but can
in principle also be acquired in parallel to attending the course.
Recommended Subjects
These courses are recommended, but you are free to choose courses from any other special field. Please consult your tutor.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0116-00LVLSI I: From Architectures to VLSI Circuits and FPGAs Information W7 credits5GH. Kaeslin, N. Felber
AbstractThis first course in a series that extends over three consecutive terms is concerned with tailoring algorithms and with devising high performance hardware architectures for their implementation as ASIC or with FPGAs. The focus is on front end design using HDLs and automatic synthesis for producing industrial-quality circuits.
ObjectiveUnderstand Very-Large-Scale Integrated Circuits (VLSI chips), Application-Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC), and Field-Programmable Gate-Arrays (FPGA). Know their organization and be able to identify suitable application areas. Become fluent in front-end design from architectural conception to gate-level netlists. How to model digital circuits with VHDL or SystemVerilog. How to ensure they behave as expected with the aid of simulation, testbenches, and assertions. How to take advantage of automatic synthesis tools to produce industrial-quality VLSI and FPGA circuits. Gain practical experience with the hardware description language VHDL and with industrial Electronic Design Automation (EDA) tools.
ContentThis course is concerned with system-level issues of VLSI design and FPGA implementations. Topics include:
- Overview on design methodologies and fabrication depths.
- Levels of abstraction for circuit modeling.
- Organization and configuration of commercial field-programmable components.
- VLSI and FPGA design flows.
- Dedicated and general purpose architectures compared.
- How to obtain an architecture for a given processing algorithm.
- Meeting throughput, area, and power goals by way of architectural transformations.
- Hardware Description Languages (HDL) and the underlying concepts.
- VHDL and SystemVerilog compared.
- VHDL (IEEE standard 1076) for simulation and synthesis.
- A suitable nine-valued logic system (IEEE standard 1164).
- Register Transfer Level (RTL) synthesis and its limitations.
- Building blocks of digital VLSI circuits.
- Functional verification techniques and their limitations.
- Modular and largely reusable testbenches.
- Assertion-based verification.
- Synchronous versus asynchronous circuits.
- The case for synchronous circuits.
- Periodic events and the Anceau diagram.
- Case studies, ASICs compared to microprocessors, DSPs, and FPGAs.

During the exercises, students learn how to model digital ICs with VHDL. They write testbenches for simulation purposes and synthesize gate-level netlists for VLSI chips and FPGAs. Only commercial EDA software by leading vendors is being used.
Lecture notesTextbook and all further documents in English.
LiteratureH. Kaeslin: "Top-Down Digital VLSI Design, from Architectures to Gate-Level Circuits and FPGAs", Elsevier, 2014, ISBN 9780128007303.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
Basics of digital circuits.

Examination:
In written form following the course semester (spring term). Problems are given in English, answers will be accepted in either English oder German.

Further details:
http://www.iis.ee.ethz.ch/stud_area/vorlesungen/vlsi1.en.html
227-0148-00LVLSI III: Test and Fabrication of VLSI Circuits Information W6 credits4GN. Felber, H. Kaeslin
AbstractThis last course in our VLSI series is concerned with the manufacturing of integrated circuits (IC) in CMOS technology, with defects that may occur during the process, and ---above all--- with the methods and tools for detecting design flaws and fabrication defects.
ObjectiveKnow how to apply methods, software tools and equipment for designing testable VLSI circuits, for testing fabricated ICs, and for physical analysis in the occurrence of defective parts. A basic understanding of modern semiconductor technologies.
ContentThis final course in a series of three focusses on manufacturing, testing, physical analysis, and packaging of VLSI circuits. Future prospects of micro- and nanoelectronics are also being discussed. Topics include:
- Effects of fabrication defects.
- Abstraction from physical to transistor- and gate-level fault models.
- Fault grading in the occurrence of large ASICs.
- Generation of efficient test vector sets.
- Enhancement of testability with built-in self test.
- Organisation and application of automated test equipment.
- Physical analysis of devices.
- Packaging problems and solutions.
- Today's nanometer CMOS fabrication processes (HKMG).
- Optical and post optical Photolithography.
- Potential alternatives to CMOS technology and MOSFET devices.
- Evolution paths for design methodology.
- Industrial roadmaps for the future evolution of semiconductor technology (ITRS).

Exercises teach students how to use CAE/CAD software and automated equipment for testing ASICs after fabrication. Students that have submitted a design for manufacturing at the end of the 7th term do so on their own circuits. Physical analysis methods with professional equipment (AFM, DLTS) complement this training.
Lecture notesEnglish lecture notes.

All written documents in English.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
Basics of digital design.

Further details:
http://www.iis.ee.ethz.ch/stud_area/vorlesungen/vlsi3.en.html
227-0216-00LControl Systems II Information W6 credits4GR. Smith
AbstractIntroduction to basic and advanced concepts of modern feedback control.
ObjectiveIntroduction to basic and advanced concepts of modern feedback control.
ContentThis course is designed as a direct continuation of the course "Regelsysteme" (Control Systems). The primary goal is to further familiarize students with various dynamic phenomena and their implications for the analysis and design of feedback controllers. Simplifying assumptions on the underlying plant that were made in the course "Regelsysteme" are relaxed, and advanced concepts and techniques that allow the treatment of typical industrial control problems are presented. Topics include control of systems with multiple inputs and outputs, control of uncertain systems (robustness issues), limits of achievable performance, and controller implementation issues.
Lecture notesThe slides of the lecture are available to download
LiteratureSkogestad, Postlethwaite: Multivariable Feedback Control - Analysis and Design. Second Edition. John Wiley, 2005.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
Control Systems or equivalent
227-0366-00LIntroduction to Computational Electromagnetics Information W6 credits4GC. Hafner, J. Leuthold, J. Smajic
AbstractAn overview over the most prominent methods for the simulation of electromagnetic fields is given This includes domain methods such as finite differences and finite elements, method of moments, and boundary methods. Both time domain and frequency domain techniques are considered.
ObjectiveOverview of numerical methods for the simulation of electromagnetic fields and hands-on experiments with selected methods.
ContentOverview of concepts of the main numerical methods for the simulation of electromagnetic fields: Finite Difference Method, Finite Element Method, Transmission Line Matrix Method, Matrix Methods, Multipole Methods, Image Methods, Method of Moments, Integral Equation Methods, Beam Propagation Method, Mode Matching Technique, Spectral Domain Analysis, Method of Lines. Applications: Problems in electrostatic and magnetostatic, guided waves and free-space propagation problems, antennas, resonators, inhomogeneous transmissionlLines, nanotechnic, optics etc.
Lecture notesDownload from: http://alphard.ethz.ch/hafner/Vorles/lect.htm
Prerequisites / NoticeFirst half of the semester: lectures; second half of the semester: exercises in form of small projects
227-0434-00LHarmonic Analysis: Theory and Applications in Advanced Signal Processing Information W6 credits2V + 2UH. Bölcskei
AbstractThis course is an introduction to the field of applied harmonic analysis with emphasis on applications in signal processing such as transform coding, inverse problems, imaging, signal recovery, and inpainting. We will consider theoretical, applied, and algorithmic aspects.
ObjectiveThis course is an introduction to the field of applied harmonic analysis with emphasis on applications in signal processing such as transform coding, inverse problems, imaging, signal recovery, and inpainting. We will consider theoretical, applied, and algorithmic aspects.
ContentFrame theory: Frames in finite-dimensional spaces, frames for Hilbert spaces, sampling theorems as frame expansions

Spectrum-blind sampling: Sampling of multi-band signals with known support set, density results by Beurling and Landau, unknown support sets, multi-coset sampling, the modulated wideband converter, reconstruction algorithms

Sparse signals and compressed sensing: Uncertainty principles, recovery of sparse signals with unknown support set, recovery of sparsely corrupted signals, orthogonal matching pursuit, basis pursuit, the multiple measurement vector problem

High-dimensional data and dimension reduction: Random projections, the Johnson-Lindenstrauss Lemma, the Restricted Isometry Property, concentration inequalities, covering numbers, Kashin widths
Lecture notesLecture notes, problem sets with documented solutions.
LiteratureS. Mallat, ''A wavelet tour of signal processing: The sparse way'', 3rd ed., Elsevier, 2009

I. Daubechies, ''Ten lectures on wavelets'', SIAM, 1992

O. Christensen, ''An introduction to frames and Riesz bases'', Birkhäuser, 2003

K. Gröchenig, ''Foundations of time-frequency analysis'', Springer, 2001

M. Elad, ''Sparse and redundant representations -- From theory to applications in signal and image processing'', Springer, 2010
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course is heavy on linear algebra, operator theory, and functional analysis. A solid background in these areas is beneficial. We will, however, try to bring everybody on the same page in terms of the mathematical background required, mostly through reviews of the mathematical basics in the discussion sessions. Moreover, the lecture notes contain detailed material on the advanced mathematical concepts used in the course. If you are unsure about the prerequisites, please contact C. Aubel or H. Bölcskei.
227-0441-00LMobile Communications: Technology and Quality of Service Information W6 credits4GM. Kuhn
AbstractBased on an introduction to wireless communications, the lecture course covers: WLAN and cellular networks, PHY technologies, MAC schemes, mechanisms supporting QoS in wireless networks, QoS measurements and evaluation, benchmarking.
ObjectiveIntroduction to mobile wireless communications, including characteristics of the wireless channel, PHY layer technologies (for example MIMO, OFDM etc.) and MAC layer schemes; comparison of different cellular standards; definition of QoS and support of QoS in wireless networks; understanding QoS measurements, their evaluation and benchmarking in cellular networks.
Content- Introduction
- Wireless channel, propagation of electromagnetic waves, antenna structures
- Mobile communication, modulation techniques, OFDM, MIMO
- Wireless networks (cellular networks, access networks)
- Wireless standards (e.g. UMTS, LTE, IEEE 802.11)
- Services in wireless networks
- Quality of service (QoS) in wireless networks (definitions, Key Performance Indicators, mechanisms used to support QoS)
- QoS measurements (e.g. voice quality, coverage, delay) and their statistical evaluation
- Benchmarking (methodology, statistical methods and models)


Weekly exercises included in the lecture
Lecture notesLecture slides are available.
LiteratureWill be announced in the lecture.
Prerequisites / NoticeEnglish
227-0456-00LHigh Frequency and Microwave Electronics I Information
Does not take place this semester.
W6 credits4GC. Bolognesi
AbstractUnderstanding of basic building blocks of microwave electronics technology, with a focus on active semiconductor devices.
ObjectiveUnderstanding the fundamentals of microwave electronics technology, with emphasis on active components.
ContentIntroduction, microstrip transmission lines, matching, semiconductors, pn-junction, noise, PIN-diode and applications, Schottky diodes and detectors, bipolar transistors and heterojunction bipolar transistors, MESFET physics and properties, high-electron mobility transistors, microwave amplifiers.
Lecture notesScript: Mikrowellentechnik and Mikrowellenelektronik, by Werner Bächtold
(In German).
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lectures will be held in English.
227-0468-00LAnalog Signal Processing and Filtering Information
Suitable for Master Students as well as Doctoral Students.

This course will be offered in Autumn Semester from HS 2015 on.
It won't be offered in Spring 2016 anymore.
W6 credits2V + 2UH. Schmid
AbstractThis lecture provides a wide overview over analogue (mostly integrated) filters (continuous-time and discrete-time), amplifiers, and sigma-delta converters, and gives examples with sensor interfaces and class-D audio drivers. All circuits are treated using a signal-flow view. The lecture is suitable for both analog and digital designers.
ObjectiveThis lecture provides a wide overview over analogue (mostly integrated) filters (continuous-time and discrete-time), amplifiers, and sigma-delta converters, and gives examples with sensor interfaces and class-D audio drivers. All these circuits are treated using a signal-flow view. The lecture is suitable for both analog and digital designers. The way the exam is done allows for the different interests of the two groups.

The learning goal is that the students can apply signal-flow graphs and can understand the signal flow in such circuits and systems (including non-ideal effects) well enough to enable them to gain an understanding of further circuits and systems by themselves.
ContentAt the beginning, signal-flow graphs in general and driving-point signal-flow graphs in particular are introduced. We will use them during the whole term to analyze circuits and understand how signals propagate through them. The theory and CMOS implementation of active Filters is then discussed in detail using the example of Gm-C filters. Theory and implementation of opamps, current conveyors, and inductor simulators follow. The link to the practical design of circuits and systems is done with an overview over different quality measures and figures of merit used in scientific literature and datasheets. Finally, an introduction to switched-capacitor filters and circuits is given, including sensor read-out amplifiers, correlated double sampling, and chopping. These topics form the basis for the longest part of the lecture: the discussion of sigma-delta A/D and D/A converters, which are portrayed as mixed analog-digital (MAD) filters in this lecture.
Lecture notesThe base for these lectures are lecture notes and two or three published scientific papers. From these papers we will together develop the technical content.

Details: http://people.ee.ethz.ch/~hps/asfwiki/

Some material is protected by password; students from ETHZ who are interested can write to haschmid@ethz.ch to ask for the password even if they do not attend the lecture.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Recommended (but not required): Stochastic models and signal processing, Communication Electronics, Analog Integrated Circuits, Transmission Lines and Filters.

Knowledge of the Laplace Transform (transfer functions, poles and zeros, bode diagrams, stability criteria ...) and of the main properties of linear systems is necessary.
227-0478-00LAcoustics II Information W6 credits4GK. Heutschi
AbstractAdvanced knowledge of the functioning and application of electro-acoustic transducers.
ObjectiveAdvanced knowledge of the functioning and application of electro-acoustic transducers.
ContentElectrical, mechanical and acoustical analogies. Transducers, microphones and loudspeakers, acoustics of musical instruments, sound recording, sound reproduction, digital audio.
Lecture notesavailable
227-0678-00LSpeech Processing II Information
"Speech Processing II" takes place for the last time in spring 2015.
W6 credits2V + 2UB. Pfister
AbstractInterdisciplinary approaches to text-to-speech synthesis and speech recognition (continuation of course speech processing I).
ObjectiveIn this course selected concepts and interdisciplinary approaches to text-to-speech synthesis and speech recognition are presented.
ContentFundamentals of representation and application of linguistic knowledge: Introduction of the theory of formal languages, the Chomsky hierarchy, word analysis, finite state machines, parsing.
Speech synthesis: Natural language analysis (for words and sentences), lexicon, grammar for natural language; generation of the abstract representation of pronunciation (phone sequence, accents, phrases). Additionally, the ETH text-to-speech system SVOX is discussed.
Speech recognition: The statistical approach to speech recognition with hidden Markov models is detailed: Basic algorithms (forward, Viterbi and Baum-Welch algorithm), problems of implementation, HMM training, whole vs. subword modeling, isolated word recognition, continuous speech recognition, statistical and rule-based language models.
Lecture notesThe following textbook will be used: "Sprachverarbeitung - Grundlagen und Methoden der Sprachsynthese und Spracherkennung", B. Pfister und T. Kaufmann, Springer Verlag, ISBN: 978-3-540-75909-6
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
Speech Processing I.
227-1032-00LNeuromorphic Engineering II Information W6 credits5GT. Delbrück, G. Indiveri, S.‑C. Liu
AbstractThis course teaches the basics of analog chip design and layout with an emphasis on neuromorphic circuits, which are introduced in the fall semester course "Neuromorphic Engineering I".
ObjectiveDesign of a neuromorphic circuit for implementation with CMOS technology.
ContentThis course teaches the basics of analog chip design and layout with an emphasis on neuromorphic circuits, which are introduced in the autumn semester course "Neuromorphic Engineering I".

The principles of CMOS processing technology are presented. Using a set of inexpensive software tools for simulation, layout and verification, suitable for neuromorphic circuits, participants learn to simulate circuits on the transistor level and to make their layouts on the mask level. Important issues in the layout of neuromorphic circuits will be explained and illustrated with examples. In the latter part of the semester students simulate and layout a neuromorphic chip. Schematics of basic building blocks will be provided. The layout will then be fabricated and will be tested by students during the following fall semester.
LiteratureS.-C. Liu et al.: Analog VLSI Circuits and Principles; software documentation.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Neuromorphic Engineering I strongly recommended
252-0526-00LStatistical Learning Theory Information W4 credits2V + 1UJ. M. Buhmann
AbstractThe course covers advanced methods of statistical learning :
PAC learning and statistical learning theory;variational methods and optimization, e.g., maximum entropy techniques, information bottleneck, deterministic and simulated annealing; clustering for vectorial, histogram and relational data; model selection; graphical models.
ObjectiveThe course surveys recent methods of statistical learning. The fundamentals of machine learning as presented in the course "Introduction to Machine Learning" are expanded and in particular, the theory of statistical learning is discussed.
Content# Boosting: A state-of-the-art classification approach that is sometimes used as an alternative to SVMs in non-linear classification.
# Theory of estimators: How can we measure the quality of a statistical estimator? We already discussed bias and variance of estimators very briefly, but the interesting part is yet to come.
# Statistical learning theory: How can we measure the quality of a classifier? Can we give any guarantees for the prediction error?
# Variational methods and optimization: We consider optimization approaches for problems where the optimizer is a probability distribution. Concepts we will discuss in this context include:

* Maximum Entropy
* Information Bottleneck
* Deterministic Annealing

# Clustering: The problem of sorting data into groups without using training samples. This requires a definition of ``similarity'' between data points and adequate optimization procedures.
# Model selection: We have already discussed how to fit a model to a data set in ML I, which usually involved adjusting model parameters for a given type of model. Model selection refers to the question of how complex the chosen model should be. As we already know, simple and complex models both have advantages and drawbacks alike.
# Reinforcement learning: The problem of learning through interaction with an environment which changes. To achieve optimal behavior, we have to base decisions not only on the current state of the environment, but also on how we expect it to develop in the future.
Lecture notesno script; transparencies of the lectures will be made available.
LiteratureDuda, Hart, Stork: Pattern Classification, Wiley Interscience, 2000.

Hastie, Tibshirani, Friedman: The Elements of Statistical Learning, Springer, 2001.

L. Devroye, L. Gyorfi, and G. Lugosi: A probabilistic theory of pattern recognition. Springer, New York, 1996
Prerequisites / NoticeRequirements:

basic knowledge of statistics, interest in statistical methods.

It is recommended that Introduction to Machine Learning (ML I) is taken first; but with a little extra effort Statistical Learning Theory can be followed without the introductory course.
227-0120-00LCommunication Networks Information W6 credits4GB. Plattner, B. L. H. Ager, P. Georgopoulos, K. A. Hummel, L. Vanbever
AbstractThe students will understand the fundamental concepts of communication networks, with a focus on computer networking. They will learn to identify relevant mechanisms that are used in networks, and will see a reasonable set of examples implementing such mechanisms, both as seen from an abstract perspective and with hands-on, practical experience.
ObjectiveThe students will understand the fundamental concepts of communication networks, with a focus on computer networking. They will learn to identify relevant mechanisms that are used to networks work, and will see a reasonable set of examples implementing such mechanisms, both as seen from an abstract perspective and with hands-on, practical experience.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: A layered model of communication systems (represented by the OSI Reference Model) has previously been introduced.
252-0286-00LSystem Construction Information
Does not take place this semester.
The course will be offered again in the autumn semester 2015.
W4 credits2V + 1Unot available
AbstractMain goal is teaching knowledge and skills needed for building custom operating systems and runtime environments. Relevant topics are studied at the example of sufficiently simple systems that have been built at our Institute in the past, ranging from purpose-oriented single processor real-time systems up to generic system kernels on multi-core hardware.
ObjectiveThe lecture's main goal is teaching of knowledge and skills needed for building custom operating systems and runtime environments.

The lecture intends to supplement more abstract views of software construction, and to contribute to a better understanding of "how it really works" behind the scenes.
ContentCase Study 1: Embedded System
- Safety-critical and fault-tolerant monitoring system
- Based on an auto-pilot system for helicopters

Case Study 2: Multi-Processor Operating System
- Universal operating system for symmetric multiprocessors
- Shared memory approach
- Based on Language-/System Codesign (Active Oberon / A2)

Case Study 3: Custom designed Single-Processor System
- RISC Single-processor system designed from scratch
- Hardware on FPGA
- Graphical workstation OS and compiler (Project Oberon)

Case Study 4: Custom-designed Multi-Processor System
- Special purpose heterogeneous system on a chip
- Masssively parallel hard- and software architecture based on message passing
- Focus: dataflow based applications
Lecture notesPrinted lecture notes will be delivered during the lecture. Slides will also be available from the lecture homepage.
Computers and Networks
Core Subjects
These core subjects are particularly recommended for the field of "Computers and Networks".
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0558-00LPrinciples of Distributed Computing Information W6 credits2V + 2U + 1AR. Wattenhofer
AbstractWe study the fundamental issues underlying the design of distributed systems: communication, coordination, fault-tolerance, locality, parallelism, self-organization, symmetry breaking, synchronization, uncertainty. We explore essential algorithmic ideas and lower bound techniques.
ObjectiveDistributed computing is essential in modern computing and communications systems. Examples are on the one hand large-scale networks such as the Internet, and on the other hand multiprocessors such as your new multi-core laptop. This course introduces the principles of distributed computing, emphasizing the fundamental issues underlying the design of distributed systems and networks: communication, coordination, fault-tolerance, locality, parallelism, self-organization, symmetry breaking, synchronization, uncertainty. We explore essential algorithmic ideas and lower bound techniques, basically the "pearls" of distributed computing. We will cover a fresh topic every week.
ContentDistributed computing models and paradigms, e.g. message passing, shared memory, synchronous vs. asynchronous systems, time and message complexity, peer-to-peer systems, small-world networks, social networks, sorting networks, wireless communication, and self-organizing systems.

Distributed algorithms, e.g. leader election, coloring, covering, packing, decomposition, spanning trees, mutual exclusion, store and collect, arrow, ivy, synchronizers, diameter, all-pairs-shortest-path, wake-up, and lower bounds
Lecture notesAvailable. Our course script is used at dozens of other universities around the world.
LiteratureLecture Notes By Roger Wattenhofer. These lecture notes are taught at about a dozen different universities through the world.

Distributed Computing: Fundamentals, Simulations and Advanced Topics
Hagit Attiya, Jennifer Welch.
McGraw-Hill Publishing, 1998, ISBN 0-07-709352 6

Introduction to Algorithms
Thomas Cormen, Charles Leiserson, Ronald Rivest.
The MIT Press, 1998, ISBN 0-262-53091-0 oder 0-262-03141-8

Disseminatin of Information in Communication Networks
Juraj Hromkovic, Ralf Klasing, Andrzej Pelc, Peter Ruzicka, Walter Unger.
Springer-Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg, 2005, ISBN 3-540-00846-2

Introduction to Parallel Algorithms and Architectures: Arrays, Trees, Hypercubes
Frank Thomson Leighton.
Morgan Kaufmann Publishers Inc., San Francisco, CA, 1991, ISBN 1-55860-117-1

Distributed Computing: A Locality-Sensitive Approach
David Peleg.
Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM), 2000, ISBN 0-89871-464-8
Prerequisites / NoticeCourse pre-requisites: Interest in algorithmic problems. (No particular course needed.)
227-0678-00LSpeech Processing II Information
"Speech Processing II" takes place for the last time in spring 2015.
W6 credits2V + 2UB. Pfister
AbstractInterdisciplinary approaches to text-to-speech synthesis and speech recognition (continuation of course speech processing I).
ObjectiveIn this course selected concepts and interdisciplinary approaches to text-to-speech synthesis and speech recognition are presented.
ContentFundamentals of representation and application of linguistic knowledge: Introduction of the theory of formal languages, the Chomsky hierarchy, word analysis, finite state machines, parsing.
Speech synthesis: Natural language analysis (for words and sentences), lexicon, grammar for natural language; generation of the abstract representation of pronunciation (phone sequence, accents, phrases). Additionally, the ETH text-to-speech system SVOX is discussed.
Speech recognition: The statistical approach to speech recognition with hidden Markov models is detailed: Basic algorithms (forward, Viterbi and Baum-Welch algorithm), problems of implementation, HMM training, whole vs. subword modeling, isolated word recognition, continuous speech recognition, statistical and rule-based language models.
Lecture notesThe following textbook will be used: "Sprachverarbeitung - Grundlagen und Methoden der Sprachsynthese und Spracherkennung", B. Pfister und T. Kaufmann, Springer Verlag, ISBN: 978-3-540-75909-6
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
Speech Processing I.
Recommended Subjects
These courses are recommended, but you are free to choose courses from any other special field. Please consult your tutor.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0116-00LVLSI I: From Architectures to VLSI Circuits and FPGAs Information W7 credits5GH. Kaeslin, N. Felber
AbstractThis first course in a series that extends over three consecutive terms is concerned with tailoring algorithms and with devising high performance hardware architectures for their implementation as ASIC or with FPGAs. The focus is on front end design using HDLs and automatic synthesis for producing industrial-quality circuits.
ObjectiveUnderstand Very-Large-Scale Integrated Circuits (VLSI chips), Application-Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC), and Field-Programmable Gate-Arrays (FPGA). Know their organization and be able to identify suitable application areas. Become fluent in front-end design from architectural conception to gate-level netlists. How to model digital circuits with VHDL or SystemVerilog. How to ensure they behave as expected with the aid of simulation, testbenches, and assertions. How to take advantage of automatic synthesis tools to produce industrial-quality VLSI and FPGA circuits. Gain practical experience with the hardware description language VHDL and with industrial Electronic Design Automation (EDA) tools.
ContentThis course is concerned with system-level issues of VLSI design and FPGA implementations. Topics include:
- Overview on design methodologies and fabrication depths.
- Levels of abstraction for circuit modeling.
- Organization and configuration of commercial field-programmable components.
- VLSI and FPGA design flows.
- Dedicated and general purpose architectures compared.
- How to obtain an architecture for a given processing algorithm.
- Meeting throughput, area, and power goals by way of architectural transformations.
- Hardware Description Languages (HDL) and the underlying concepts.
- VHDL and SystemVerilog compared.
- VHDL (IEEE standard 1076) for simulation and synthesis.
- A suitable nine-valued logic system (IEEE standard 1164).
- Register Transfer Level (RTL) synthesis and its limitations.
- Building blocks of digital VLSI circuits.
- Functional verification techniques and their limitations.
- Modular and largely reusable testbenches.
- Assertion-based verification.
- Synchronous versus asynchronous circuits.
- The case for synchronous circuits.
- Periodic events and the Anceau diagram.
- Case studies, ASICs compared to microprocessors, DSPs, and FPGAs.

During the exercises, students learn how to model digital ICs with VHDL. They write testbenches for simulation purposes and synthesize gate-level netlists for VLSI chips and FPGAs. Only commercial EDA software by leading vendors is being used.
Lecture notesTextbook and all further documents in English.
LiteratureH. Kaeslin: "Top-Down Digital VLSI Design, from Architectures to Gate-Level Circuits and FPGAs", Elsevier, 2014, ISBN 9780128007303.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
Basics of digital circuits.

Examination:
In written form following the course semester (spring term). Problems are given in English, answers will be accepted in either English oder German.

Further details:
http://www.iis.ee.ethz.ch/stud_area/vorlesungen/vlsi1.en.html
227-0126-00LAdvanced Topics in Networked Embedded Systems Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 12.
W2 credits1SO. Saukh, J. Beutel, L. Thiele
AbstractThe seminar will cover advanced topics in networked embedded systems. A particular focus are cyber-physical systems and sensor networks in various application domains.
ObjectiveThe goal is to get a deeper understanding on leading edge technologies in the discipline, on classes of applications, and on current as well as future research directions.
ContentThe seminar enables Master students, PhDs and Postdocs to learn about latest breakthroughs in wireless sensor networks, networked embedded systems and devices, and energy-harvesting in several application domains, including environmental monitoring, tracking, smart buildings and control. Participants are requested to actively participate in the organization and preparation of the seminar.
227-0198-00LWearable Systems II: Design and Implementation Information W6 credits4GG. Tröster
AbstractConcepts and methods to integrate mobile computers into clothes.
Textile sensors: strain, pressure, temperature, ECG, EMG,..
New substrates (eTextile, Smart Textile), organic material (foils)
Power and Energy in Wearable Systems
Economical conditions
Evaluation of research institutions, projects and proposals.
ObjectiveTo integrate wearable computers also commercially successful in our daily outfit, innovative sensing and communication technologies as well as economical and ethical aspects have to be considered.

The course deals with
> Textile Sensors: strain, pressure, temperature, ECK, EMG, ...
> Packaging: new substrates (eTextiles), organic material (foils)
> Power and energy in mobile systems.
> Privacy and Ethics

Using a business plan we will practice the commercialisation of our 'Wearable Computers'.

Supported by a wiki-tool the course is organized as a seminar, in which the addressed topics are jointly discussed considering the aspect 'Concept of a research proposal'. According to the ETH 'critical thinking initiative' we will analyse and reflect implementation concepts incorporating the social and scientific context. Presentations alternate with workshops and discussions. Instead of an oral examination a thesis in a form of a project proposal can be submitted.

The audience determines the used language (German or English)
ContentTo integrate wearable computers also commercially successful in our daily outfit, innovative sensing and communication technologies as well as economical and ethical aspects have to be considered.

The course deals with
> Textile Sensors: strain, pressure, temperature, ECK, EMG, ...
> Packaging: new substrates (eTextiles), organic material (foils)
> Power and energy in mobile systems.
> Privacy and Ethics

Using a business plan we will practice the commercialisation of our 'Wearable Computers'.

Supported by a wiki-tool the course is organized as a seminar, in which the addressed topics are jointly discussed considering the aspect 'Concept of a research proposal'. According to the ETH 'critical thinking initiative' we will analyse and reflect implementation concepts incorporating the social and scientific context. Presentations alternate with workshops and discussions. Instead of an oral examination a thesis in a form of a project proposal can be submitted.

The audience determines the used language (German or English)
Lecture notesA wiki-tool will be available for the internal communication; that includes lecture notes for all lessons, assignments and solutions.
http://www.ife.ee.ethz.ch/education/wearable_systems_2/
LiteratureWill be provided in the course material
Prerequisites / NoticeSupported by a wiki-tool the course is organized as a seminar, in which the addressed topics are jointly discussed considering the aspect 'Concept of a research proposal'. According to the ETH 'critical thinking initiative' we will analyse and reflect implementation concepts incorporating the social and scientific context. Presentations alternate with workshops and discussions. Instead of an oral examination a thesis in a form of a project proposal can be submitted.

The audience determines the date and the used language (German or English)

No special prerequisites, also not the participation of 'Wearable Systems 1'
227-0420-00LInformation Theory II Information W6 credits2V + 2US. M. Moser
AbstractThis course builds on Information Theory I. It introduces additional topics in single-user communication, connections between Information Theory and Statistics, and Network Information Theory.
ObjectiveThe course has two objectives: to introduce the students to the key information theoretic results that underlay the design of communication systems and to equip the students with the tools that are needed to conduct research in Information Theory.
ContentDifferential entropy, maximum entropy, the Gaussian channel and water filling, the entropy-power inequality, Sanov's Theorem, Fisher information, the broadcast channel, the multiple-access channel, Slepian-Wolf coding, and the Gelfand-Pinsker problem.
Lecture notesn/a
LiteratureT.M. Cover and J.A. Thomas, Elements of Information Theory, second edition, Wiley 2006
227-0436-00LDigital Communication and Signal Processing Information W6 credits2V + 2UA. Wittneben
AbstractA comprehensive presentation of modern digital modulation, detection and synchronization schemes and relevant aspects of signal processing enables the student to analyze, simulate, implement and research the physical layer of advanced digital communication schemes. The course both covers the underlying theory and provides problem solving and hands-on experience.
ObjectiveDigital communication systems are characterized by ever increasing requirements on data rate, spectral efficiency and reliability. Due to the huge advances in very large scale integration (VLSI) we are now able to implement extremely complex digital signal processing algorithms to meet these challenges. As a result the physical layer (PHY) of digital communication systems has become the dominant function in most state-of-the-art system designs. In this course we discuss the major elements of PHY implementations in a rigorous theoretical fashion and present important practical examples to illustrate the application of the theory. In Part I we treat discrete time linear adaptive filters, which are a core component to handle multiuser and intersymbol interference in time-variant channels. Part II is a seminar block, in which the students develop their analytical and experimental (simulation) problem solving skills. After a review of major aspects of wireless communication we discuss, simulate and present the performance of novel cooperative and adaptive multiuser wireless communication systems. As part of this seminar each students has to give a 15 minute presentation and actively attends the presentations of the classmates. In Part III we cover parameter estimation and synchronization. Based on the classical discrete detection and estimation theory we develop maximum likelihood inspired digital algorithms for symbol timing and frequency synchronization.
ContentPart I: Linear adaptive filters for digital communication
• Finite impulse response (FIR) filter for temporal and spectral shaping
• Wiener filters
• Method of steepest descent
• Least mean square adaptive filters

Part II: Seminar block on cooperative wireless communication
• review of the basic concepts of wireless communication
• multiuser amplify&forward relaying
• performance evaluation of adaptive A&F relaying schemes and student presentations

Part III: Parameter estimation and synchronization
• Discrete detection theory
• Discrete estimation theory
• Synthesis of synchronization algorithms
• Frequency estimation
• Timing adjustment by interpolation
Lecture notesLecture notes.
Literature[1] Oppenheim, A. V., Schafer, R. W., "Discrete-time signal processing", Prentice-Hall, ISBN 0-13-754920-2.
[2] Haykin, S., "Adaptive filter theory", Prentice-Hall, ISBN 0-13-090126-1.
[3] Van Trees, H. L., "Detection , estimation and modulation theory", John Wiley&Sons, ISBN 0-471-09517-6.
[4] Meyr, H., Moeneclaey, M., Fechtel, S. A., "Digital communication receivers: synchronization, channel estimation and signal processing", John Wiley&Sons, ISBN 0-471-50275-8.
Prerequisites / NoticeFormal prerequisites: none
Recommended: Communication Systems or equivalent
227-0559-00LSeminar in Distributed Computing Information W2 credits2SR. Wattenhofer
AbstractIn this seminar participating students present and discuss recent research papers in the area of distributed computing. The seminar consists of algorithmic as well as systems papers in distributed computing theory, peer-to-peer computing, ad hoc and sensor networking, or multi-core computing.
ObjectiveIn the last two decades, we have experienced an unprecedented growth in the area of distributed systems and networks; distributed computing now encompasses many of the activities occurring in today's computer and communications world. This course introduces the basics of distributed computing, highlighting common themes and techniques. We study the fundamental issues underlying the design of distributed systems: communication, coordination, synchronization, uncertainty. We explore essential algorithmic ideas and lower bound techniques.

In this seminar, students present the latest work in this domain.

Seminar language: English
ContentDifferent each year. For details see: www.disco.ethz.ch/courses.html
Lecture notesSlides of presentations will be made available.
LiteraturePapers.
The actual paper selection can be found on www.disco.ethz.ch/courses.html.
252-0407-00LCryptography Information W7 credits3V + 2U + 1AU. Maurer
AbstractFundamentals and applications of cryptography. Cryptography as a mathematical discipline: reductions, constructive cryptography paradigm, security proofs. The discussed primitives include cryptographic functions, pseudo-randomness, symmetric encryption and authentication, public-key encryption, key agreement, and digital signature schemes. Selected cryptanalytic techniques.
ObjectiveThe goals are:
(1) understand the basic theoretical concepts and scientific thinking in cryptography;
(2) understand and apply some core cryptographic techniques and security proof methods;
(3) be prepared and motivated to access the scientific literature and attend specialized courses in cryptography.
ContentSee course description.
Lecture notesyes.
Prerequisites / NoticeFamiliarity with the basic cryptographic concepts as treated for
example in the course "Information Security" is required but can
in principle also be acquired in parallel to attending the course.
252-0408-00LCryptographic Protocols Information W5 credits2V + 2UU. Maurer, M. Hirt
AbstractThe course presents a selection of hot research topics in cryptography. The choice of topics varies and may include provable security, interactive proofs, zero-knowledge protocols, secret sharing, secure multi-party computation, e-voting, etc.
ObjectiveIndroduction to a very active research area with many gems and paradoxical
results. Spark interest in fundamental problems.
ContentThe course presents a selection of hot research topics in cryptography. The choice of topics varies and may include provable security, interactive proofs, zero-knowledge protocols, secret sharing, secure multi-party computation, e-voting, etc.
Lecture notesthe lecture notes are in German, but they are not required as the entire
course material is documented also in other course material (in english).
Prerequisites / NoticeA basic understanding of fundamental cryptographic concepts
(as taught for example in the course Information Security or
in the course Cryptography) is useful, but not required.
851-0734-00LInformation Security LawW2 credits2VU. Widmer
AbstractIntroduction to Information Security Law for non-legal students respectively prospective decision-makers in companies and public authorities who will have to deal with information security issues (CIOs, COOs, CEOs). The lectures will focus on the legal aspects of the security of ICT infrastructures, including networks (Internet), and of the transported and processed information.
ObjectiveThe objective is to understand the meaning and aims of information security and the legal framework, to become acquainted with legal instruments available to provide effective protection for infrastructures and sensitive legal assets and to present an analysis of possible legal loopholes and potential measures. No prior legal knowledge is required for those wishing to attend these lectures.
ContentThe lectures will deal with industry-specific as well as cross-sector specific themes involving both technology and law from the areas of data protection law, computer crimes, statutory duties of confidentiality, telecommunication surveillance (Internet), electronic signatures, liability etc.
Lecture notesThe lectures will be accompanied by powerpoint slide presentations, downloadable before the lectures begin, or available as hard copy at the lectures themselves.
LiteratureReferences to further literature sources will be given in the lectures.
Electronics and Photonics
Core Subjects
These core subjects are particularly recommended for the field of "Electronics and Photonics".
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0111-00LCommunication Electronics Information W6 credits2V + 2UQ. Huang
AbstractElectronics for communications systems, with emphasis on realization. Low noise amplifiers, modulators and demodulators, transmit amplifiers and oscillators are discussed in the context of wireless communications. Wireless receiver, transmitter and frequency synthesizer will be described. Importance of and trade offs among sensitivity, linearity and selectivity are discussed extensively.
ObjectiveFoundation course for understanding modern electronic circuits for communication applications. We learn how theoretical communications principles are reduced to practice using transistors, switches, inductors, capacitors and resistors. The harsh environment such communication electronics will be exposed to and the resulting requirements on the sensitivity, linearity and selectivity help explain the design trade offs encountered in every circuit block found in a modern transceiver.
ContentAccounting for more than two trillion dollars per year, communications is one of the most important drivers for advanced economies of our time. Wired networks have been a key enabler to the internet age and the proliferation of search engines, social networks and electronic commerce, whereas wireless communications, cellular networks in particular, have liberated people and increased productivity in developed and developing nations alike. Integrated circuits that make such communications devices light weight and affordable have played a key role in the proliferation of communications.
This course introduces our students to the key components that realize the tangible products in electronic form. We begin with an introduction to wireless communications, and describe the harsh environment in which a transceiver has to work reliably. In this context we highlight the importance of sensitivity or low noise, linearity, selectivity, power consumption and cost, that are all vital to a competitive device in such applications.
We shall review bipolar and MOS devices from a designer's prospectives, before discussing basic amplifier structures - common emitter/source, common base/gate configurations, their noise performance and linearity, impedance matching, and many other things one needs to know about a low noise amplifier.
We will discuss modulation, and the mixer that enables its implementation. Noise and linearity form an inseparable part of the discussion of its design, but we also introduce the concept of quadrature demodulator, image rejection, and the effects of mismatch on performance.
When mixers are used as a modulator the signals they receive are usually large and the natural linearity of transistors becomes insufficient. The concept of feedback will be introduced and its function as an improver of linearity studied in detail.
Amplifiers in the transmit path are necessary to boost the power level before the signal leaves an integrated circuit to drive an even more powerful amplifier (PA) off chip. Linearized pre-amplifiers will be studied as part of the transmitter.
A crucial part of a mobile transceiver terminal is the generation of local oscillator signals at the desired frequencies that are required for modulation and demodulation. Oscillators will be studied, starting from stability criteria of an electronic system, then leading to criteria for controlled instability or oscillation. Oscillator design will be discussed in detail, including that of crystal controlled oscillators which provide accurate time base.
An introduction to phase-locked loops will be made, illustrating how it links a variable frequency oscillator to a very stable fixed frequency crystal oscillator, and how phase detector, charge pump and programmable dividers all serve to realize an agile frequency synthesizer that is very stable in each frequency synthesized.
Lecture notesScript with slides and notes is available.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course Analog Integrated Circuits is recommended as preparation for this course.
227-0146-00LAnalog-to-Digital Converters Information W6 credits2V + 2UQ. Huang, T. Burger
AbstractThis course provides a thorough treatment of integrated data conversion systems from system level specifications and trade-offs, over architecture choice down to circuit implementation.
ObjectiveData conversion systems are substantial sub-parts of many electronic systems, e.g. the audio conversion system of a home-cinema systems or the base-band front-end of a wireless modem. Data conversion systems usually determine the performance of the overall system in terms of dynamic range and linearity. The student will learn to understand the basic principles behind data conversion and be introduced to the different methods and circuit architectures to implement such a conversion. The conversion methods such as successive approximation or algorithmic conversion are explained with their principle of operation accompanied with the appropriate mathematical calculations, including the effects of non-idealties in some cases. After successful completion of the course the student should understand the concept of an ideal ADC, know all major converter architectures, their principle of operation and what governs their performance.
Content- Introduction: information representation and communication; abstraction, categorization and symbolic representation; basic conversion algorithms; data converter application; tradeoffs among key parameters; ADC taxonomy.
- Dual-slope & successive approximation register (SAR) converters: dual slope principle & converter; SAR ADC operating principle; SAR implementation with a capacitive array; range extension with segmented array.
- Algorithmic & pipelined A/D converters: algorithmic conversion principle; sample & hold stage; pipe-lined converter; multiplying DAC; flash sub-ADC and n-bit MDAC; redundancy for correction of non-idealties, error correction.
- Performance metrics and non-linearity: ideal ADC; offset, gain error, differential and integral non-linearities; capacitor mismatch; impact of capacitor mismatch on SAR ADC's performance.
- Flash, folding an interpolating analog-to-digital converters: flash ADC principle, thermometer to binary coding, sparkle correction; limitations of flash converters; the folding principle, residue extraction; folding amplifiers; cascaded folding; interpolation for folding converters; cascaded folding and interpolation.
- Noise in analog-to-digital converters: types of noise; noise calculation in electronic circuit, kT/C-noise, sampled noise; noise analysis in switched-capacitor circuits; aperture time uncertainty and sampling jitter.
- Delta-sigma A/D-converters: linearity and resolution; from delta-modulation to delta-sigma modulation; first-oder delta-sigma modulation, circuit level implementation; clock-jitter & SNR in delta-sigma modulators; second-order delta-sigma modulation, higher-order modulation, design procedure for a single-loop modulator.
- Digital-to-analog converters: introduction; current scaling D/A converter, current steering DAC, calibration for improved performance.
Lecture notesHandouts of the slides will be distributed.
Literature- B. Razavi, Principles of Data Conversion System Design, IEEE Press, 1994
- M. Gustavsson et. al., CMOS Data Converters for Communications, Springer, 2010
- R.J. van de Plassche, CMOS Integrated Analog-to-Digital and Digital-to-Analog Converters, Springer, 2010
Prerequisites / NoticeIt is highly recommended to attend the course "Analog Integrated Circuits" of Prof. Huang as a preparation for this course.
227-0148-00LVLSI III: Test and Fabrication of VLSI Circuits Information W6 credits4GN. Felber, H. Kaeslin
AbstractThis last course in our VLSI series is concerned with the manufacturing of integrated circuits (IC) in CMOS technology, with defects that may occur during the process, and ---above all--- with the methods and tools for detecting design flaws and fabrication defects.
ObjectiveKnow how to apply methods, software tools and equipment for designing testable VLSI circuits, for testing fabricated ICs, and for physical analysis in the occurrence of defective parts. A basic understanding of modern semiconductor technologies.
ContentThis final course in a series of three focusses on manufacturing, testing, physical analysis, and packaging of VLSI circuits. Future prospects of micro- and nanoelectronics are also being discussed. Topics include:
- Effects of fabrication defects.
- Abstraction from physical to transistor- and gate-level fault models.
- Fault grading in the occurrence of large ASICs.
- Generation of efficient test vector sets.
- Enhancement of testability with built-in self test.
- Organisation and application of automated test equipment.
- Physical analysis of devices.
- Packaging problems and solutions.
- Today's nanometer CMOS fabrication processes (HKMG).
- Optical and post optical Photolithography.
- Potential alternatives to CMOS technology and MOSFET devices.
- Evolution paths for design methodology.
- Industrial roadmaps for the future evolution of semiconductor technology (ITRS).

Exercises teach students how to use CAE/CAD software and automated equipment for testing ASICs after fabrication. Students that have submitted a design for manufacturing at the end of the 7th term do so on their own circuits. Physical analysis methods with professional equipment (AFM, DLTS) complement this training.
Lecture notesEnglish lecture notes.

All written documents in English.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
Basics of digital design.

Further details:
http://www.iis.ee.ethz.ch/stud_area/vorlesungen/vlsi3.en.html
227-0159-00LQuantum Transport in Nanoscale Devices Information W6 credits2V + 2UM. Luisier
AbstractThis class offers an introduction into quantum transport theory, a rigorous approach to electron transport at the nanoscale. It covers different topics such as bandstructure, Wave Function and Non-equilibrium Green's Function formalisms, and electron interactions with their environment. Matlab exercises accompany the lectures where students learn how to develop their own transport simulator.
ObjectiveThe continuous scaling of electronic devices has given rise to structures whose dimensions do not exceed a few atomic layers. At this size, electrons do not behave as particle any more, but as propagating waves and the classical representation of electron transport as the sum of drift-diffusion processes fails. The purpose of this class is to explore and understand the displacement of electrons through nanoscale device structures based on state-of-the-art quantum transport methods and to get familiar with the underlying equations by developing his own nanoelectronic device simulator.
ContentThe following topics will be addressed:
- Introduction to quantum transport modeling
- Bandstructure representation and effective mass approximation
- Open vs closed boundary conditions to the Schrödinger equation
- Comparison of the Wave Function and Non-equilibrium Green's Function formalisms as solution to the Schrödinger equation
- Self-consistent Schödinger-Poisson simulations
- Quantum transport simulations of resonant tunneling diodes and quantum well nano-transistors
- Top-of-the-barrier simulation approach to nano-transistor
- Electron interactions with their environment (phonon, roughness, impurity,...)
- Multi-band transport models
Lecture notesLecture slides are distributed every week and can be found at
http://www.iis.ee.ethz.ch/stud_area/vorlesungen/electransport.en.html
LiteratureRecommended textbook: "Electronic Transport in Mesoscopic Systems", Supriyo Datta, Cambridge Studies in Semiconductor Physics and Microelectronic Engineering, 1997
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowledge of semiconductor device physics and quantum mechanics
227-0456-00LHigh Frequency and Microwave Electronics I Information
Does not take place this semester.
W6 credits4GC. Bolognesi
AbstractUnderstanding of basic building blocks of microwave electronics technology, with a focus on active semiconductor devices.
ObjectiveUnderstanding the fundamentals of microwave electronics technology, with emphasis on active components.
ContentIntroduction, microstrip transmission lines, matching, semiconductors, pn-junction, noise, PIN-diode and applications, Schottky diodes and detectors, bipolar transistors and heterojunction bipolar transistors, MESFET physics and properties, high-electron mobility transistors, microwave amplifiers.
Lecture notesScript: Mikrowellentechnik and Mikrowellenelektronik, by Werner Bächtold
(In German).
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lectures will be held in English.
227-0198-00LWearable Systems II: Design and Implementation Information W6 credits4GG. Tröster
AbstractConcepts and methods to integrate mobile computers into clothes.
Textile sensors: strain, pressure, temperature, ECG, EMG,..
New substrates (eTextile, Smart Textile), organic material (foils)
Power and Energy in Wearable Systems
Economical conditions
Evaluation of research institutions, projects and proposals.
ObjectiveTo integrate wearable computers also commercially successful in our daily outfit, innovative sensing and communication technologies as well as economical and ethical aspects have to be considered.

The course deals with
> Textile Sensors: strain, pressure, temperature, ECK, EMG, ...
> Packaging: new substrates (eTextiles), organic material (foils)
> Power and energy in mobile systems.
> Privacy and Ethics

Using a business plan we will practice the commercialisation of our 'Wearable Computers'.

Supported by a wiki-tool the course is organized as a seminar, in which the addressed topics are jointly discussed considering the aspect 'Concept of a research proposal'. According to the ETH 'critical thinking initiative' we will analyse and reflect implementation concepts incorporating the social and scientific context. Presentations alternate with workshops and discussions. Instead of an oral examination a thesis in a form of a project proposal can be submitted.

The audience determines the used language (German or English)
ContentTo integrate wearable computers also commercially successful in our daily outfit, innovative sensing and communication technologies as well as economical and ethical aspects have to be considered.

The course deals with
> Textile Sensors: strain, pressure, temperature, ECK, EMG, ...
> Packaging: new substrates (eTextiles), organic material (foils)
> Power and energy in mobile systems.
> Privacy and Ethics

Using a business plan we will practice the commercialisation of our 'Wearable Computers'.

Supported by a wiki-tool the course is organized as a seminar, in which the addressed topics are jointly discussed considering the aspect 'Concept of a research proposal'. According to the ETH 'critical thinking initiative' we will analyse and reflect implementation concepts incorporating the social and scientific context. Presentations alternate with workshops and discussions. Instead of an oral examination a thesis in a form of a project proposal can be submitted.

The audience determines the used language (German or English)
Lecture notesA wiki-tool will be available for the internal communication; that includes lecture notes for all lessons, assignments and solutions.
http://www.ife.ee.ethz.ch/education/wearable_systems_2/
LiteratureWill be provided in the course material
Prerequisites / NoticeSupported by a wiki-tool the course is organized as a seminar, in which the addressed topics are jointly discussed considering the aspect 'Concept of a research proposal'. According to the ETH 'critical thinking initiative' we will analyse and reflect implementation concepts incorporating the social and scientific context. Presentations alternate with workshops and discussions. Instead of an oral examination a thesis in a form of a project proposal can be submitted.

The audience determines the date and the used language (German or English)

No special prerequisites, also not the participation of 'Wearable Systems 1'
151-0172-00LDevices and Systems Information W5 credits4GC. I. Roman, A. Hierlemann
AbstractThe students are introduced to the fundamentals and physics of microelectronic devices as well as to microsystems in general (MEMS). They will be able to apply this knowledge for system research and development and to assess and apply principles, concepts and methods from a broad range of technical and scientific disciplines for innovative products.
ObjectiveThe students are introduced to the fundamentals and physics of microelectronic devices as well as to microsystems in general (MEMS), basic electronic circuits for sensors, RF-MEMS, chemical microsystems, BioMEMS and microfluidics, magnetic sensors and optical devices, and in particular to the concepts of Nanosystems (focus on carbon nanotubes), based on the respective state-of-research in the field. They will be able to apply this knowledge for system research and development and to assess and apply principles, concepts and methods from a broad range of technical and scientific disciplines for innovative products.
ContentIntroduction to semiconductors, MOSFET transistors
Basic electronic circuits for sensors and microsystems
Transducer Fundamentals
Chemical sensors and biosensors, microfluidics and bioMEMS
RF MEMS
Magnetic Sensors, optical Devices
Nanosystem concepts
Lecture noteshandouts
227-0150-00LAdvanced System-on-chip Design: Integrated Parallel Computing Architectures Information W6 credits4GL. Benini
AbstractThe course will cover Digital System-on-Chip architectures: multi-cores, many-cores, GP-GPUs and heterogeneous platforms, with an in-depth view on design tools and methods targeting advanced nanometer-scale technology and system integration options.
ObjectiveTo provide an in-depth understanding of the links and dependencies between architectures and their silicon implementation and to get an
exposure to state-of-the-art methodologies for designing complex integrated systems using advanced technologies. Practical experience will also be gained through projects assigned on specific topics.
ContentThe course will cover Digital System-on-Chip architectures, design tools and methods, with an in-depth view on design challenges related to advanced silicon technology and state-of-the-art system integration options (novel storage options, three-dimensional integration, advanced system packaging). The emphasis will be on programmable parallel architectures, namely, multi and many- cores, GPUs, vector accelerators, heterogeneous platforms, and the complex design choices required to achieve scalability and energy proportionality. The course will cover not only circuit, logic and microarchitecture design, but it will also delve into system design, touching on hardware-software tradeoffs and full-system analysis and optimization taking into account non-functional constraints and quality metrics, such as power consumption, thermal dissipation, reliability and variability.
Lecture notesSlides will be provided to accompany lectures
LiteratureD. Patterson, J. Hennessy, Computer Architecture, Fifth Edition: A Quantitative Approach (The Morgan Kaufmann Series in Computer Architecture and Design), 2011.

D. Patterson, J. Hennessy, Computer Organization and Design, Fifth Edition: The Hardware/Software Interface (The Morgan Kaufmann Series in Computer Architecture and Design), 2013.
Prerequisites / NoticeKnowledge of digital design at the level of "Design of Digital Circuits SS12" is required.

Knowledge of basic VLSI design at the level of "VLSI I: Architectures of VLSI Circuits" is required
Recommended Subjects
These courses are recommended, but you are free to choose courses from any other special field. Please consult your tutor.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0620-00LEmbedded MEMS Lab Information
Number of participants limited to 15.
W5 credits3PK. Chikkadi, S. Blunier
AbstractPractical course: Students are introduced to the process steps required for the fabrication of MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical System) and carry out the fabrication and testing steps in the clean rooms themselves. Additionally, they learn the requirements for working in clean rooms. Processing and characterization will be documented and analyzed in a final report.
ObjectiveStudents learn the individual process steps that are required to make a MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical System). Students carry out the process steps themselves in laboratories and clean rooms. Furthermore, participants become familiar with the special requirements (cleanliness, safety, operation of equipment and handling hazardous chemicals) of working in the clean rooms and laboratories. The entire production, processing, and characterization of the MEMS is documented and evaluated in a final report.
ContentWith guidance from a tutor, the individual silicon microsystem process steps that are required for the fabrication of an accelerometer are carried out:
- Photolithography, dry etching, wet etching, sacrificial layer etching, critical point drying, various cleaning procedures
- Packaging and electrical connection of a MEMS device
- Testing and characterization of the MEMS device
- Written documentation and evaluation of the entire production, processing and characterization
Lecture notesA document containing theory, background and practical course content is distributed in the informational meeting.
LiteratureThe document provides sufficient information for the participants to successfully participate in the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeParticipating students are required to attend all scheduled lectures and meetings of the course.

Participating students are required to provide proof that they have personal accident insurance prior to the start of the laboratory portion of the course.

This master's level course is limited to 15 students per semester for safety and efficiency reasons.
If there are more than 15 students registered, we regret to restrict access to this course by the following rules:

Priority 1: master students of the master's program in "Micro and Nanosystems"

Priority 2: master students of the master's program in "Mechanical Engineering" with a specialization in Microsystems and Nanoscale Engineering (MAVT-tutors Profs Daraio, Dual, Hierold, Koumoutsakos, Nelson, Norris, Park, Poulikakos, Pratsinis, Stemmer), who attended the bachelor course "151-0621-00L Microsystems Technology" successfully.

Priority 3: master students, who attended the bachelor course "151-0621-00L Microsystems Technology" successfully.

Priority 4: all other students (PhD, bachelor, master) with a background in silicon or microsystems process technology.

If there are more students in one of these priority groups than places available, we will decide by drawing lots.
Students will be notified at the first lecture of the course (introductory lecture) as to whether they are able to participate.

The course is offered in autumn and spring semester.
227-0158-00LSemiconductor Transport Theory and Monte Carlo Device Simulation Information W4 credits2V + 1UF. Bufler, A. Schenk
AbstractThe first part deals with semiconductor transport theory including the necessary quantum mechanics.
In the second part, the Boltzmann equation is solved with the stochastic methods of Monte Carlo simulation.
The exercises address also TCAD simulations of MOSFETs. Thus the topics include theoretical physics,
numerics and practical applications.
ObjectiveOn the one hand, the link between microscopic physics and its concrete application in device simulation is established; on the other hand, emphasis is also laid on the presentation of the numerical techniques involved.
ContentQuantum theoretical foundations I (state vectors, Schroedinger and Heisenberg picture). Band structure (Bloch theorem, one dimensional periodic potential, density of states). Pseudopotential theory (crystal symmetries, reciprocal lattice, Brillouin zone).
Semiclassical transport theory (Boltzmann transport equation (BTE), scattering processes, linear transport).<br>
Monte Carlo method (Monte Carlo simulation as solution method of the BTE, algorithm, expectation values).<br>
Implementational aspects of the Monte Carlo algorithm (discretization of the Brillouin zone, self-scattering according to Rees, acceptance- rejection method etc.). Bulk Monte Carlo simulation (velocity-field characteristics, particle generation, energy distributions, transport parameters). Monte Carlo device simulation (ohmic boundary conditions, MOSFET simulation).
Quantum theoretical foundations II (limits of semiclassical transport theory, quantum mechanical derivation of the BTE, Markov-Limes).
Lecture notesLecture notes (in German)
227-0366-00LIntroduction to Computational Electromagnetics Information W6 credits4GC. Hafner, J. Leuthold, J. Smajic
AbstractAn overview over the most prominent methods for the simulation of electromagnetic fields is given This includes domain methods such as finite differences and finite elements, method of moments, and boundary methods. Both time domain and frequency domain techniques are considered.
ObjectiveOverview of numerical methods for the simulation of electromagnetic fields and hands-on experiments with selected methods.
ContentOverview of concepts of the main numerical methods for the simulation of electromagnetic fields: Finite Difference Method, Finite Element Method, Transmission Line Matrix Method, Matrix Methods, Multipole Methods, Image Methods, Method of Moments, Integral Equation Methods, Beam Propagation Method, Mode Matching Technique, Spectral Domain Analysis, Method of Lines. Applications: Problems in electrostatic and magnetostatic, guided waves and free-space propagation problems, antennas, resonators, inhomogeneous transmissionlLines, nanotechnic, optics etc.
Lecture notesDownload from: http://alphard.ethz.ch/hafner/Vorles/lect.htm
Prerequisites / NoticeFirst half of the semester: lectures; second half of the semester: exercises in form of small projects
227-0376-00LReliability of Electronic Equipment and SystemsW4 credits2V + 1UU. Sennhauser, M. Held
AbstractReliability and availability are basic properties for safe and sustainable products in communications, energy and medical technology, air and space applications, and electronics. They are described as stochastic and physical processes and have to be optimized with functionality, environmental impact and life cycle costs in development phase already. The required basics will be taught.
ObjectiveIntroduction to the concepts and methods of systems engineering for the design and production of reliable devices, equipment, and systems.
ContentQuality assurance of technical systems (introduction); introduction to stochastic processes; reliability analysis; design and investigation of fault-tolerant structures; component selection and qualification; maintainability analysis (introduction); software quality; design rules for reliability, maintainability, and software quality; availability analysis (introduction); reliability tests (introduction).
Lecture notesCopies of relevant transparencies and additional tables
LiteratureReliability Engineering, Springer 2004, ISBN 3-540-40287-X
227-0468-00LAnalog Signal Processing and Filtering Information
Suitable for Master Students as well as Doctoral Students.

This course will be offered in Autumn Semester from HS 2015 on.
It won't be offered in Spring 2016 anymore.
W6 credits2V + 2UH. Schmid
AbstractThis lecture provides a wide overview over analogue (mostly integrated) filters (continuous-time and discrete-time), amplifiers, and sigma-delta converters, and gives examples with sensor interfaces and class-D audio drivers. All circuits are treated using a signal-flow view. The lecture is suitable for both analog and digital designers.
ObjectiveThis lecture provides a wide overview over analogue (mostly integrated) filters (continuous-time and discrete-time), amplifiers, and sigma-delta converters, and gives examples with sensor interfaces and class-D audio drivers. All these circuits are treated using a signal-flow view. The lecture is suitable for both analog and digital designers. The way the exam is done allows for the different interests of the two groups.

The learning goal is that the students can apply signal-flow graphs and can understand the signal flow in such circuits and systems (including non-ideal effects) well enough to enable them to gain an understanding of further circuits and systems by themselves.
ContentAt the beginning, signal-flow graphs in general and driving-point signal-flow graphs in particular are introduced. We will use them during the whole term to analyze circuits and understand how signals propagate through them. The theory and CMOS implementation of active Filters is then discussed in detail using the example of Gm-C filters. Theory and implementation of opamps, current conveyors, and inductor simulators follow. The link to the practical design of circuits and systems is done with an overview over different quality measures and figures of merit used in scientific literature and datasheets. Finally, an introduction to switched-capacitor filters and circuits is given, including sensor read-out amplifiers, correlated double sampling, and chopping. These topics form the basis for the longest part of the lecture: the discussion of sigma-delta A/D and D/A converters, which are portrayed as mixed analog-digital (MAD) filters in this lecture.
Lecture notesThe base for these lectures are lecture notes and two or three published scientific papers. From these papers we will together develop the technical content.

Details: http://people.ee.ethz.ch/~hps/asfwiki/

Some material is protected by password; students from ETHZ who are interested can write to haschmid@ethz.ch to ask for the password even if they do not attend the lecture.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Recommended (but not required): Stochastic models and signal processing, Communication Electronics, Analog Integrated Circuits, Transmission Lines and Filters.

Knowledge of the Laplace Transform (transfer functions, poles and zeros, bode diagrams, stability criteria ...) and of the main properties of linear systems is necessary.
227-0659-00LIntegrated Systems Seminar Information W1 credit1SA. Schenk
AbstractIn the "Fachseminar IIS" the students learn to communicate topics, ideas or problems of scientific research by listening to more experienced authors and by presenting scientific work in a conference-like situation for a specific audience.
ObjectiveThe seminar aims at instructing graduate and PhD students in the basics of presentation techniques, i.e. "how to give a professional talk". Attendees have the possibility to become acquainted with a current topic by a literature study, and to present the results thereof in a 20 minutes talk in English. The participation at the seminar gives also an overview on current problems in modern nanoelectronics and bio-electromagnetics.
ContentThe seminar topics' are design of digital integrated circuits, physical characterization in nanoelectronics and bio-electromagnetics Simulation.

The studens learn how to find the right literature for a certain topic quickly, as well as how to prepare a talk for a scientific conference, i.e. presentation techniques.
Lecture notesPresentation material
Literatureto be discussed with the advisor
227-0662-00LOrganic and Nanostructured Optics and Electronics Information W6 credits4GV. Wood
AbstractThis course examines the optical and electronic properties of excitonic materials that can be leveraged to create thin-film light emitting devices and solar cells. Laboratory sessions provide students with experience in synthesis and optical characterization of nanomaterials as well as fabrication and characterization of thin film devices.
ObjectiveGain the knowledge and practical experience to begin research with organic or nanostructured materials and understand the key challenges in this rapidly emerging field.
Content0-Dimensional Excitonic Materials (organic molecules and colloidal quantum dots)

Energy Levels and Excited States (singlet and triplet states, optical absorption and luminescence).

Excitonic and Polaronic Processes (charge transport, Dexter and Förster energy transfer, and exciton diffusion).

Devices (photodetectors, solar cells, and light emitting devices).
LiteratureLecture notes and reading assignments from current literature to be posted on website.
Prerequisites / NoticeCourse grade will be based on a final project.
227-0664-00LTechnology and Policy of Electrical Energy StorageW4 credits2GV. Wood, T. Schmidt
Abstract
ObjectiveThe students will learn of the complexity involved in battery research, design, production, as well as in investment, economics and policy making around batteries. Students from technical disciplines will gain insights into policy, while students from social science backgrounds will gain insights into technology.
ContentWith the global emphasis on decreasing CO2 emissions, achieving fossil fuel independence, and integrating renewables on the electric grid, developing and implementing energy storage solutions for electric mobility and grid stabilization represent a key technology and policy challenge. The class will focus on lithium ion batteries since they are poised to enter a variety of markets where policy decisions will affect their production, adoption, and usage scenarios. The course considers the interplay between technology, economics, and policy.
Lecture notesMaterials will be made available on the website.
LiteratureMaterials will be made available on the website.
Prerequisites / NoticeStrong interest in energy and technology policy.
Energy and Power Electronics
Core Subjects
These core subjects are particularly recommended for the field of "Energy and Power Electronics".
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0528-00LPower System Dynamics and Control Information W6 credits4GG. Andersson, M. Zima
AbstractDynamic processes in power systems, load-frequency control, voltage control, stability, line protection.
ObjectiveDynamic processes in power systems, load-frequency control, voltage control, stability, line protection.
ContentDynamical properties of electric machines, networks, loads and integrated systems. Models of power plants, turbines, turbine control, load-frequency control, tie-line control. Models of synchronous machines. Equal area criterion. Small signal stability. Voltage control and static stability. Properties of protection systems: dependability, reliability, selectivity, back-up functions, economy. Line protections: Influence of fault impedance, grounding, time setting. Differential protections. Digital protections. Intelligent protections.
Lecture notesLecture notes. WWW pages.
227-0248-00LPower Electronic Systems II Information W6 credits4GJ. W. Kolar
AbstractThis course details structures, operating ranges, and control concepts of modern power electronic systems to provide a deeper understanding of power electronic circuits and power components. Most recent concepts of high switching frequency AC/DC converters and AC/AC matrix inverters are presented. Simulation exercises, implemented in GeckoCIRCUITS, are used to consolidate the concepts discussed.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to convey knowledge of structures, operating ranges, and control concepts of modern power electronic systems. Further objectives are: to know most recent concepts and operation modes of high switching frequency AC/DC converters and AC/AC matrix inverters; to develop a deeper understanding of multi-pulse power converter circuits, transformers, and electromechanical energy converters; and to understand in-depth details of power electronic systems. Simulation exercises, implemented in the electric circuit simulator GeckoCIRCUITS, are used to consolidate the presented theoretical concepts.
ContentConverter dynamics and control: State Space Averaging, transfer functions, controller design, impact of the input filter on the converter transfer functions.
Performance data of single-phase and three-phase systems: effect of different loss components on the efficiency characteristics, linear and non-linear single phase loads, power flow of general three-phase systems, space vector calculus.
Modeling and control of three-phase PWM rectifiers: system characterization using rotating coordinates, control structure, transfer functions, operation with symmetrical and unsymmetrical mains voltages.
Scaling laws of transformers and electromechanical actuators.
Drives with permanent magnet synchronous machines: basic function, modeling, field-oriented control.
Unidirectional AC/DC converters and AC/AC converters: voltage and current DC link converters, indirect and direct matrix converters.
Lecture notesLecture notes and associated exercises including correct answers, simulation program for interactive self-learning including visualization/animation features.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Introductory course on power electronics.
227-0529-00LSmartGrids: System Optimization of Smart and Liberalized Electric Power Systems Information W6 credits4GR. Bacher
AbstractModel based optimization of SmartGrids systems considering Physics, Economics and Legislation; Optimality conditions and solutions; Lagrange-Multipliers and market prices; Price incentives in case of restrictions and grid constraints; Transmission grid congestions and implicit auctions; Security of supply with high variability + market requirements; Electricity market and SmartGrids system models.
Objective- Understanding the legal, physical and market based framework for Smart Grid based electric power systems.
- Understanding the theory of mathematical optimization models and algorithms for a secure and market based operation of Smart Power Systems.
- Gaining experience with the formulation, implementation and computation of constrained optimization problems for Smart Grid and market based electricity systems.
Content- Legal conditions for the regulation and operation of electric power systems (CH, EU).
- Physical laws and constraints in electric power systems.
- Special characteristics of the good "electricity".
- Optimization as mathematical tool for analyzing network based electric power systems.
- Types of optimization problems, optimality conditions and optimization methods.
- Various electricity market models, their advantages and disadvantages.
- SmartGrids: The new energy system and compatibility issues with traditional market models.
Lecture notesText book is continuously updated and distributed to students.
LiteratureClass text book contains active hyperlinks related to back ground material.
Prerequisites / NoticeMotivation, Active participation (discussions). Numerical analysis, power system basics and modeling, optimization basics
227-0207-00LNonlinear Systems and Control Information
Prerequisite: Control Systems (227-0103-00L)
W6 credits4GE. Gallestey Alvarez, P. F. Al Hokayem
AbstractTo introduce students to the area of nonlinear systems and control, to familiarize them with tools for modelling and analysing nonlinear systems and to provide an overview of the various nonlinear controller design methods.
ObjectiveOn completion of the course, students understand the difference between linear and nonlinear systems, know the the mathematical techniques for modeling and analysing these systems, and have learnt various methods for designing controllers for these systems.
Course puts the student in the position to deploy nonlinear control techniques in real applications. Theory and exercises are combined for better understanding of virtues and drawbacks in the different methods.
ContentVirtually all practical control problems are of nonlinear nature. In some
cases the application of linear control methods will lead to satisfying controller performance. In many other cases only application of nonlinear analysis and synthesis methods will guarantee achievement of the desired objectives. During the past decades a number of practically applicable and mature nonlinear controller design methods have been developed and have proven themselves in applications. After an introduction of the basic methods for modelling and analysing nonlinear systems, these methods will be introduced together with a critical discussion of their pros and cons, and the students will be familiarized with the basic concepts of nonlinear control theory.

This course is designed as an introduction to the nonlinear control field and thus no prior knowledge of this area is required. The course builds, however, on a good knowledge of the basic concepts of linear control.
Lecture notesAn english manuscript will be made available on the course homepage during the course.
LiteratureH.K. Khalil: Nonlinear Systems, Prentice Hall, 2001.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Linear Control Systems, or equivalent.
227-0518-00LEnergy Conversion in Mechatronics Information W6 credits4GU. Bikle, A. Colotti, L. Küng
AbstractKnowledge of the relevant target parameters with the Design process of electrical machines. Understanding and use of methods, which are used during the Design optimization.
ObjectiveKnowledge of the relevant target parameters with the Design process of electrical machines. Understanding and use of methods, which are used during the Design optimization.
ContentThe field of application of the electrical machines reaches from the clock drive over engines for electric power tools, industrial drives and vehicles up to the generators for the energy production. Starting with the general bases of the machine Design target parameters for two selected types of electrical machines are deduced and optimization tasks are treated. Computer-aided methods are applied like: Finite elements or simulations. Further practice-relevant models are presented from higher electrical engineering, as well as from the directly involved fields of activity such as mechanics, fluid dynamics/cooling, insulation technology. The lecture material is deepened by exercises on the basis of practical examples. Integrated constituent of the lecture is a industrial visit for illustrating the practice.
Lecture notesManuscript for lecture, worksheets and exercise, optimization software.
LiteratureFor references see manuscriptum
227-0536-00LMultiphysics Simulations for Power Systems Information W3 credits2V + 1UJ. Smajic
AbstractThe goals of this course are a) understanding the fundamentals of the electromagnetic, thermal, mechanical, and coupled field simulations and b) performing effective simulations of primary equipment of electric power systems. The course is understood complementary to 227-0537-00L "Technology of Electric Power System Components", but can also be taken separately.
ObjectiveThe student should learn the fundamentals of the electromagnetic, thermal, mechanical, and coupled fields simulations necessary for modern product development and research based on virtual prototyping. She / he should also learn the theoretical background of the finite element method (FEM) and its application to low- and high-frequency electromagnetic field simulation problems. The practical exercises of the course should be done by using one of the commercially available field simulation software (Infolytica, ANSYS, and / or COMSOL). After completing the course the student should be able to properly and efficiently use the software to simulate practical design problems and to understand and interpret the obtained results.
Content1. Elektromagnetic Fields and Waves: Simulation Aspects (1 lecture, 2 hours)
a. Short review of the governing equations
b. Boundary conditions
c. Initial conditions
d. Linear and nonlinear material properties
e. Coupled fields (electro-mechanical and electro-thermal coupling)

2. Finite Element Method for elektromagnetic simulations (5 lectures and 3 exercises, 16 hours)
a. Scalar-FEM in 2-D (electrostatic, magnetostatic, eddy-currents, etc.)
b. Vector-FEM in 3-D (3-D eddy-currents, wave propagation, etc.)
c. Numerical aspects of the analysis (convergence, linear solvers, preconditioning, mesh quality, etc.)
d. Matlab code for 2-D FEM for learning and experimenting

3. Practical applications (5 lectures and 5 exercises, 20 hours)
a. Dielectric analysis of high-voltage equipment
b. Nonlinear quasi-electrostatic analysis of surge arresters
c. Eddy-currents analysis of power transformers
d. Electromagnetic analysis of electric machines
e. Very fast transients in gas insulated switchgears (GIS)
f. Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC)
227-0537-00LTechnology of Electric Power System Components Information W6 credits4GC. Franck
AbstractBasics of the technology of important components in electric power transmission and distribution systems (primary technology).
ObjectiveAt the end of this course, the students can name the primary components of electric power systems and explain where and why they are used. For the most important components, the students can explain the working principle in detail and calculate and derive key parameters.
ContentBasic physical and engineering aspects for transmission and distribution of electric power. Limiting boundary conditions are not only electrical parameters, but also mechanical, thermal, chemical, environmental and economical aspects.
The lecture covers the most important traditional components, but also new trends and the dimensioning of components with computer simulations.
Parts of the lecture will be held by external experts in the field and there will be two excursions, one to a utility and one to an industrial company.

The course "Multiphysics Simulations for Power Systems 227-0536-00L" is aligned with the present course and considered complementary.
Lecture notesyes
Literatureadditional literature will be available online via the teaching document repository.
Prerequisites / NoticeContent of lecture "Electric Power Systems" must be known. Lecture "High voltage technology" is recommended.
Recommended Subjects
These courses are recommended, but you are free to choose courses from any other special field. Please consult your tutor.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0376-00LReliability of Electronic Equipment and SystemsW4 credits2V + 1UU. Sennhauser, M. Held
AbstractReliability and availability are basic properties for safe and sustainable products in communications, energy and medical technology, air and space applications, and electronics. They are described as stochastic and physical processes and have to be optimized with functionality, environmental impact and life cycle costs in development phase already. The required basics will be taught.
ObjectiveIntroduction to the concepts and methods of systems engineering for the design and production of reliable devices, equipment, and systems.
ContentQuality assurance of technical systems (introduction); introduction to stochastic processes; reliability analysis; design and investigation of fault-tolerant structures; component selection and qualification; maintainability analysis (introduction); software quality; design rules for reliability, maintainability, and software quality; availability analysis (introduction); reliability tests (introduction).
Lecture notesCopies of relevant transparencies and additional tables
LiteratureReliability Engineering, Springer 2004, ISBN 3-540-40287-X
227-0730-00LPower Market II - Modeling and Strategic Positioning Information W6 credits4GD. Reichelt, G. A. Koeppel
AbstractModel to price options, analysis of sensitivities, delta and gamma neutral hedging of a portfolio, financial modelling of physical assets, evaluation of power plants using discounted cash flows or real options, management of a portfolio.
ObjectiveModel to price options, analysis of sensitivities, delta and gamma neutral hedging of a portfolio, financial modelling of physical assets, evaluation of power plants using discounted cash flows or real options, management of a portfolio.
Content5. Options and derivatives

6. Hedging strategies
6.1 Delta and gamma-neutral hedging
6.2 Replicating portfolio
6.3 Option strategies

7. Finance and valuation
7.1 Valuation of assets, power stations and grids
7.2 Real options

8. Commodities
8.1 Commodity trading
8.2 Emission trading
8.3 Guarantees of orignation system

9. Marketing & Sales
9.1 Structured products
9.2 Marketing
Lecture notesHandouts - all material in English
Prerequisites / Notice2 day excursion, presentations of invited speakers from the industry
227-0221-00LModel Predictive Control Information Restricted registration - show details
Enrolling necessary (see "Notice").
W6 credits4GM. Morari
AbstractSystem complexity and demanding performance render traditional control inadequate. Applications from the process industry to the communications sector increasingly use MPC. The last years saw tremendous progress in this interdisciplinary area. The course first gives an overview of basic concepts and then uses them to derive MPC algorithms. There are exercises and invited speakers from industry.
ObjectiveIncreased system complexity and more demanding performance requirements have rendered traditional control laws inadequate regardless if simple PID loops are considered or robust feedback controllers designed according to some H2/infinity criterion. Applications ranging from the process industries to the automotive and the communications sector are making increased use of Model Predictive Control (MPC), where a fixed control law is replaced by on-line optimization performed over a receding horizon. The advantage is that MPC can deal with almost any time-varying process and specifications, limited only by the availability of real-time computer power.
In the last few years we have seen tremendous progress in this interdisciplinary area where fundamentals of systems theory, computation and optimization interact. For example, methods have emerged to handle hybrid systems, i.e. systems comprising both continuous and discrete components. Also, it is now possible to perform most of the computations off-line thus reducing the control law to a simple look-up table.
The first part of the course is an overview of basic concepts of system theory and optimization, including hybrid systems and multi-parametric programming. In the second part we show how these concepts are utilized to derive MPC algorithms and to establish their properties. On the last day, speakers from various industries talk about a wide range of applications where MPC was used with great benefit.
There will be exercise sessions throughout the course where the students can test their understanding of the material. We will make use of the MPC Toolbox for Matlab that is distributed by MathWorks.
ContentTentative Program

Day 1: Linear Systems I
Fundamentals of linear system theory – Review (system representations, poles, zeros, stability, controllability & observability, stochastic system descriptions, modeling of noise).

Day 2: Linear Systems II
Optimal control and filtering for linear systems (linear quadratic regulator, linear observer, Kalman Filter, separation principle, Riccati Difference Equation).

Days 3 and 4: Basics on Optimization
Fundamentals of optimization (linear programming, quadratic programming, mixed integer linear/quadratic programming, duality theory, KKT conditions, constrained optimization solvers).
Exercises.

Day 5: Introduction to MPC
MPC – concept and formulation, finite horizon optimal control, receding horizon control, stability and feasibility, computation.
Exercises.

Day 6: Numerical methods for MPC
Unconstrained Optimization, Constrained Optimization, Software applications

Day 7: Practical Aspects, Explicit & Hybrid MPC
- Reference tracking and soft constraints
- Explicit solution to MPC for linear constrained systems. Motivation. Introduction to (multi)-parametric programming through a simple example. Multi-parametric linear and quadratic programming: geometric algorithm. Formulation of MPC for linear constrained systems as a multi-parametric linear/quadratic program. A brief introduction to Multi-parametric Toolbox.
- MPC for discrete-time hybrid systems. Introduction to hybrid systems. Models of hybrid systems (MLD, DHA, PWA, etc.). Equivalence between different models. Modelling using HYSDEL. MLD systems. MPC based on MILP/MIQP. Explicit solution: mpMILP. Short introduction into dynamic programming (DP). Computation of the explicit MPC for PWA systems based on DP. Exercises.

Day 8: Applications
Invited speakers from industry and academia, different case studies

Day 9
Design exercise
Lecture notesScript / lecture notes will be provided.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
One semester course on automatic control, Matlab, linear algebra.

ETH students:
As participation is limited, a reservation (e-mail: bolleal@control.ee.ethz.ch) is required. Please give information on your "Studienrichtung", semester, institute, etc.
After your reservation has been confirmed, please register online at www.mystudies.ethz.ch.

Interested persons from outside ETH:
It is not possible/needed to enrol as external auditor for this course. Please contact Alain Bolle to register for the course (bolleal@control.ee.ethz.ch).

We have only a limited number of places in the course, it is "first come, first served"!
227-0708-00LDiagnostics, Measurement and Testing Technology in High Voltage Technology Information E-0 credits2SH.‑J. Weber
AbstractDiscussion of various diagnostic methods to evaluate the electrical insulation of the components and subsystems of high-voltage networks. Independent performance of experiments in the laboratory using high and low voltages. Acquaintance with the most important testing methods and international standards. Calibration methods and maintenance of high-voltage measuring devices.
Objectivesee above
Lecture notesHandouts
Literature- M. Beyer, W. Boeck, K. Möller, W. Zaengl: Hochspannungstechnik, Springer-Verlag, 1986
- A. Küchler: Hochspannungstechnik, Springer, Berlin, 3. Auflage, 2009
227-0516-01LElectrical Drive Systems I Information W6 credits4GP. Steimer, A. Omlin, C. A. Stulz
AbstractIn the course "Antriebssysteme I", a complete electrical drive including its main components is investigated. This includes mainly electrical machines, power seminconductors, power electronics converters and control algorithms for the complete drive system. Regarding the machines, the main focus is on the asynchronous machine, but also other concepts are covered.
ObjectiveThe students understand a complete electrical drive system including its main components like electrical machines, converters and controls.
ContentFundamentals in mechanics and magnetic circuits; Induction machine and synchronous machine; DC machine; Power semiconductors; Converter topologies; Controls (i.e. field oriented control); Traction application; Implementation of the control on a microcontroller.
Lecture notesLecture notes will be distributed (hardcopy und elektronisch)
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Power Electronics (fall) or equivalent.

Visit of ABB Power Electronics and Medium Voltage Drives
151-0160-00LNuclear Energy SystemsW4 credits2V + 1US. Hirschberg, H.‑M. Prasser, I. Günther-Leopold, W. Hummel, T. Williams, P. K. Zuidema
AbstractNuclear energy and sustainability, Nuclear fuel production, energy and materials balance of Nuclear Power Plants, Fuel and spent fuel handling, Fuel reprocessing, Radioactive waste disposal, Environmental impact of radiation releases.
ObjectiveStudents get an overview on the physical fundamentals, the technological processes and the environmental impact of the full energy conversion chain of nuclear power generation. The are enabled to assess to potentials and risks arising from embedding nuclear power in a complex energy system.
ContentMethods to measure the sustainability of energy systems will be presented, nuclear energy is analysed concerning its sustainability and compared to other energy sources. The environmental impact of the nuclear energy system as a whole is discussed, including the question of CO2 emissions, CO2 reduction costs, radioactive releases from the power plant, the fuel chain and the final disposal. The material balance of different fuel cycles with thermal and fast reactors is examined. A survey on the geological origin of nuclear fuel, uranium mining, refinement, enrichment and fuel rod fabrication processes is given. Methods of fuel reprocessing including modern developments of deep partitioning as well as methods to treat and minimize the amount and radiotoxicity of nuclear waste are described. The project of final disposals for radioactive waste in Switzerland is presented.
Lecture notesThe script will be handed out
376-1217-00LRehabilitation Engineering I: Motor Functions Information W3 credits2V + 1UR. Riener
AbstractRehabilitation engineering” is the application of science and technology to ameliorate the handicaps of individuals with disabilities in order to reintegrate them into society. The goal of this lecture is to present classical and new rehabilitation engineering principles and examples applied to compensate or enhance especially motor deficits.
ObjectiveProvide theoretical and practical knowledge of principles and applications used to rehabilitate individuals with motor disabilities.
Content“Rehabilitation” is the (re)integration of an individual with a disability into society. Rehabilitation engineering is “the application of science and technology to ameliorate the handicaps of individuals with disability”. Such handicaps can be classified into motor, sensor, and cognitive (also communicational) disabilities. In general, one can distinguish orthotic and prosthetic methods to overcome these disabilities. Orthoses support existing but affected body functions (e.g., glasses, crutches), while prostheses compensate for lost body functions (e.g., cochlea implant, artificial limbs). In case of sensory disorders, the lost function can also be substituted by other modalities (e.g. tactile Braille display for vision impaired persons).

The goal of this lecture is to present classical and new technical principles as well as specific examples applied to compensate or enhance mainly motor deficits. Modern methods rely more and more on the application of multi-modal and interactive techniques. Multi-modal means that visual, acoustical, tactile, and kinaesthetic sensor channels are exploited by displaying the patient with a maximum amount of information in order to compensate his/her impairment. Interaction means that the exchange of information and energy occurs bi-directionally between the rehabilitation device and the human being. Thus, the device cooperates with the patient rather than imposing an inflexible strategy (e.g., movement) upon the patient. Multi-modality and interactivity have the potential to increase the therapeutical outcome compared to classical rehabilitation strategies.
In the 1 h exercise the students will learn how to solve representative problems with computational methods applied to exoprosthetics, wheelchair dynamics, rehabilitation robotics and neuroprosthetics.
Lecture notesLecture notes will be distributed at the beginning of the lecture (1st session)
LiteratureIntroductory Books

Neural prostheses - replacing motor function after desease or disability. Eds.: R. Stein, H. Peckham, D. Popovic. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Advances in Rehabilitation Robotics – Human-Friendly Technologies on Movement Assistance and Restoration for People with Disabilities. Eds: Z.Z. Bien, D. Stefanov (Lecture Notes in Control and Information Science, No. 306). Springer Verlag Berlin 2004.

Intelligent Systems and Technologies in Rehabilitation Engineering. Eds: H.N.L. Teodorescu, L.C. Jain (International Series on Computational Intelligence). CRC Press Boca Raton, 2001.

Control of Movement for the Physically Disabled. Eds.: D. Popovic, T. Sinkjaer. Springer Verlag London, 2000.

Interaktive und autonome Systeme der Medizintechnik - Funktionswiederherstellung und Organersatz. Herausgeber: J. Werner, Oldenbourg Wissenschaftsverlag 2005.

Biomechanics and Neural Control of Posture and Movement. Eds.: J.M. Winters, P.E. Crago. Springer New York, 2000.

Selected Journal Articles

Abbas, J., Riener, R. (2001) Using mathematical models and advanced control systems techniques to enhance neuroprosthesis function. Neuromodulation 4, pp. 187-195.

Burdea, G., Popescu, V., Hentz, V., and Colbert, K. (2000): Virtual reality-based orthopedic telerehabilitation, IEEE Trans. Rehab. Eng., 8, pp. 430-432

Colombo, G., Jörg, M., Schreier, R., Dietz, V. (2000) Treadmill training of paraplegic patients using a robotic orthosis. Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development, vol. 37, pp. 693-700.

Colombo, G., Jörg, M., Jezernik, S. (2002) Automatisiertes Lokomotionstraining auf dem Laufband. Automatisierungstechnik at, vol. 50, pp. 287-295.

Cooper, R. (1993) Stability of a wheelchair controlled by a human. IEEE Transactions on Rehabilitation Engineering 1, pp. 193-206.

Krebs, H.I., Hogan, N., Aisen, M.L., Volpe, B.T. (1998): Robot-aided neurorehabilitation, IEEE Trans. Rehab. Eng., 6, pp. 75-87

Leifer, L. (1981): Rehabilitive robotics, Robot Age, pp. 4-11

Platz, T. (2003): Evidenzbasierte Armrehabilitation: Eine systematische Literaturübersicht, Nervenarzt, 74, pp. 841-849

Quintern, J. (1998) Application of functional electrical stimulation in paraplegic patients. NeuroRehabilitation 10, pp. 205-250.

Riener, R., Nef, T., Colombo, G. (2005) Robot-aided neurorehabilitation for the upper extremities. Medical & Biological Engineering & Computing 43(1), pp. 2-10.

Riener, R., Fuhr, T., Schneider, J. (2002) On the complexity of biomechanical models used for neuroprosthesis development. International Journal of Mechanics in Medicine and Biology 2, pp. 389-404.

Riener, R. (1999) Model-based development of neuroprostheses for paraplegic patients. Royal Philosophical Transactions: Biological Sciences 354, pp. 877-894.
Prerequisites / NoticeTarget Group:
Students of higher semesters and PhD students of
- D-MAVT, D-ITET, D-INFK
- Biomedical Engineering
- Medical Faculty, University of Zurich
Students of other departments, faculties, courses are also welcome
227-0117-00LHigh Voltage Technology Information W6 credits4GC. Franck, U. Straumann
AbstractUnderstanding of the fundamental phenomena and principles connected with the occurrence of extensive electric field strengths. This knowledge is applied to the dimensioning of equipment of electric power systems. Methods of computer-modeling in use today are presented and applied within the framework of the exercises.
ObjectiveThe students know the fundamental phenomena and principles connected with the occurrence of extensive electric field strengths. They comprehend the different mechanisms leading to the failure of insulation systems and are able to apply failure criteria on the dimensioning of high voltage components. They have the ability to identify of weak spots in insulation systems and to name possibilities for improvement. Further they know the different insulation systems and their dimensioning in practice.
Content- discussion of the field equations relevant for high voltage engineering.
- analytical and numerical solutions/solving of this equations, as well as the derivation of the important equivalent circuits for the description of the fields and losses in insulations
- introduction to kinetic theory of gases
- mechanisms of the breakdown in gaseous, liquid and solid insulations, as well as insulation systems
- methods for the mathematical determination of the electric withstand of gaseous, liquid and solid insulations
- application of the expertise on high voltage components
- excursions to manufacturers of high voltage components
- workshop to learn on computer-modeling in high voltage engineering
Lecture notesHandouts
LiteratureA. Küchler, Hochspannungstechnik, Springer Berlin, 3. Auflage, 2009 (ISBN: 978-3540784128)
227-0524-00LRailway Systems II Information W6 credits4GM. Meyer
AbstractConcepts, characteristics and interaction of the railway subsystems with a focus on the integration of vehicles, and infrastructure:
- traction chain and auxiliary supply
- railway power supply
- signaling systems
- communication and train control systems
- electrical system compatibility
Objectiverefer to the german version
ContentET II (Frühjahrsemester) - Traktion, Bahnstrom, Signalisierung und Zugsicherung, Elektrische Systemkompatibilität

Traktionsausrüstung
1.1 Systemkonzepte, Topologien, Auswahlkriterien
1.2 Traktionsstromrichter, Steuerung, Regelung und Schutz
1.3 Fahrmotor, Getriebe
1.4 Hochspannungsausrüstung, inkl. Störstromfilter und Haupttransformator, Erdkonzepte
1.5 Hilfsbetriebe, Kühlung,
1.6 Energieverbrauch

Kommunikations- und Zugsicherungssysteme
2.1 Zugbeeinflussung
2.2 European Train Control System (ETCS)
2.3 Automatisierung

Systemintegration
3.1 Bahnstromversorgung: Konzepte, Merkmale, Ausführungsbeispiele
3.2 Störstrom, Stabilität, Elektrische Systemkompatibilität


Exkursionen
Bombardier Transportation, Zürich
Grosse Bahnexkursion (2 Tage), u.a.:
- Energieversorgung
- Unterhalt
- Führerstandsfahrten
Prerequisites / NoticeGrosse Exkursion zu Herstellern und Betreibern

Referenten:
Dr. Christian Gerster, Bombardier Transportation (Switzerland) AG
Dr. Rolf Gutzwiller, EduRail GmbH
Dr. Markus Meyer, Emkamatik GmbH

Voraussetzungen (empfohlen):
- Eisenbahn-Systemtechnik I
- Grundlagen Elektrotechnik
- Grundlagen Leistungselektronik
- Grundlagen Elektrische Maschinen
Systems and Control
Core Subjects
These core subjects are particularly recommended for the field of "Systems and Control".
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0566-00LRecursive Estimation Information W4 credits2V + 1UR. D'Andrea
AbstractEstimation of the state of a dynamic system based on a model and observations in a computationally efficient way.
ObjectiveLearn the basic recursive estimation methods and their underlying principles.
ContentIntroduction to state estimation; probability review; Bayes' theorem; Bayesian tracking; extracting estimates from probability distributions; Kalman filter; extended Kalman filter; particle filter; observer-based control and the separation principle.
Lecture notesLecture notes available on course website: http://www.idsc.ethz.ch/education/lectures/recursive-estimation.html
Prerequisites / NoticeRequirements: Introductory probability theory and matrix-vector algebra.
227-0207-00LNonlinear Systems and Control Information
Prerequisite: Control Systems (227-0103-00L)
W6 credits4GE. Gallestey Alvarez, P. F. Al Hokayem
AbstractTo introduce students to the area of nonlinear systems and control, to familiarize them with tools for modelling and analysing nonlinear systems and to provide an overview of the various nonlinear controller design methods.
ObjectiveOn completion of the course, students understand the difference between linear and nonlinear systems, know the the mathematical techniques for modeling and analysing these systems, and have learnt various methods for designing controllers for these systems.
Course puts the student in the position to deploy nonlinear control techniques in real applications. Theory and exercises are combined for better understanding of virtues and drawbacks in the different methods.
ContentVirtually all practical control problems are of nonlinear nature. In some
cases the application of linear control methods will lead to satisfying controller performance. In many other cases only application of nonlinear analysis and synthesis methods will guarantee achievement of the desired objectives. During the past decades a number of practically applicable and mature nonlinear controller design methods have been developed and have proven themselves in applications. After an introduction of the basic methods for modelling and analysing nonlinear systems, these methods will be introduced together with a critical discussion of their pros and cons, and the students will be familiarized with the basic concepts of nonlinear control theory.

This course is designed as an introduction to the nonlinear control field and thus no prior knowledge of this area is required. The course builds, however, on a good knowledge of the basic concepts of linear control.
Lecture notesAn english manuscript will be made available on the course homepage during the course.
LiteratureH.K. Khalil: Nonlinear Systems, Prentice Hall, 2001.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Linear Control Systems, or equivalent.
227-0216-00LControl Systems II Information W6 credits4GR. Smith
AbstractIntroduction to basic and advanced concepts of modern feedback control.
ObjectiveIntroduction to basic and advanced concepts of modern feedback control.
ContentThis course is designed as a direct continuation of the course "Regelsysteme" (Control Systems). The primary goal is to further familiarize students with various dynamic phenomena and their implications for the analysis and design of feedback controllers. Simplifying assumptions on the underlying plant that were made in the course "Regelsysteme" are relaxed, and advanced concepts and techniques that allow the treatment of typical industrial control problems are presented. Topics include control of systems with multiple inputs and outputs, control of uncertain systems (robustness issues), limits of achievable performance, and controller implementation issues.
Lecture notesThe slides of the lecture are available to download
LiteratureSkogestad, Postlethwaite: Multivariable Feedback Control - Analysis and Design. Second Edition. John Wiley, 2005.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
Control Systems or equivalent
227-0221-00LModel Predictive Control Information Restricted registration - show details
Enrolling necessary (see "Notice").
W6 credits4GM. Morari
AbstractSystem complexity and demanding performance render traditional control inadequate. Applications from the process industry to the communications sector increasingly use MPC. The last years saw tremendous progress in this interdisciplinary area. The course first gives an overview of basic concepts and then uses them to derive MPC algorithms. There are exercises and invited speakers from industry.
ObjectiveIncreased system complexity and more demanding performance requirements have rendered traditional control laws inadequate regardless if simple PID loops are considered or robust feedback controllers designed according to some H2/infinity criterion. Applications ranging from the process industries to the automotive and the communications sector are making increased use of Model Predictive Control (MPC), where a fixed control law is replaced by on-line optimization performed over a receding horizon. The advantage is that MPC can deal with almost any time-varying process and specifications, limited only by the availability of real-time computer power.
In the last few years we have seen tremendous progress in this interdisciplinary area where fundamentals of systems theory, computation and optimization interact. For example, methods have emerged to handle hybrid systems, i.e. systems comprising both continuous and discrete components. Also, it is now possible to perform most of the computations off-line thus reducing the control law to a simple look-up table.
The first part of the course is an overview of basic concepts of system theory and optimization, including hybrid systems and multi-parametric programming. In the second part we show how these concepts are utilized to derive MPC algorithms and to establish their properties. On the last day, speakers from various industries talk about a wide range of applications where MPC was used with great benefit.
There will be exercise sessions throughout the course where the students can test their understanding of the material. We will make use of the MPC Toolbox for Matlab that is distributed by MathWorks.
ContentTentative Program

Day 1: Linear Systems I
Fundamentals of linear system theory – Review (system representations, poles, zeros, stability, controllability & observability, stochastic system descriptions, modeling of noise).

Day 2: Linear Systems II
Optimal control and filtering for linear systems (linear quadratic regulator, linear observer, Kalman Filter, separation principle, Riccati Difference Equation).

Days 3 and 4: Basics on Optimization
Fundamentals of optimization (linear programming, quadratic programming, mixed integer linear/quadratic programming, duality theory, KKT conditions, constrained optimization solvers).
Exercises.

Day 5: Introduction to MPC
MPC – concept and formulation, finite horizon optimal control, receding horizon control, stability and feasibility, computation.
Exercises.

Day 6: Numerical methods for MPC
Unconstrained Optimization, Constrained Optimization, Software applications

Day 7: Practical Aspects, Explicit & Hybrid MPC
- Reference tracking and soft constraints
- Explicit solution to MPC for linear constrained systems. Motivation. Introduction to (multi)-parametric programming through a simple example. Multi-parametric linear and quadratic programming: geometric algorithm. Formulation of MPC for linear constrained systems as a multi-parametric linear/quadratic program. A brief introduction to Multi-parametric Toolbox.
- MPC for discrete-time hybrid systems. Introduction to hybrid systems. Models of hybrid systems (MLD, DHA, PWA, etc.). Equivalence between different models. Modelling using HYSDEL. MLD systems. MPC based on MILP/MIQP. Explicit solution: mpMILP. Short introduction into dynamic programming (DP). Computation of the explicit MPC for PWA systems based on DP. Exercises.

Day 8: Applications
Invited speakers from industry and academia, different case studies

Day 9
Design exercise
Lecture notesScript / lecture notes will be provided.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
One semester course on automatic control, Matlab, linear algebra.

ETH students:
As participation is limited, a reservation (e-mail: bolleal@control.ee.ethz.ch) is required. Please give information on your "Studienrichtung", semester, institute, etc.
After your reservation has been confirmed, please register online at www.mystudies.ethz.ch.

Interested persons from outside ETH:
It is not possible/needed to enrol as external auditor for this course. Please contact Alain Bolle to register for the course (bolleal@control.ee.ethz.ch).

We have only a limited number of places in the course, it is "first come, first served"!
227-0224-00LStochastic Systems Information W4 credits2V + 1UF. Herzog
AbstractProbability. Stochastic processes. Stochastic differential equations. Ito. Kalman filters. St Stochastic optimal control. Applications in financial engineering.
ObjectiveStochastic dynamic systems. Optimal control and filtering of stochastic systems. Examples in technology and finance.
Content- Stochastic processes
- Stochastic calculus (Ito)
- Stochastic differential equations
- Discrete time stochastic difference equations
- Stochastic processes AR, MA, ARMA, ARMAX, GARCH
- Kalman filter
- Stochastic optimal control
- Applications in finance and engineering
Lecture notesH. P. Geering et al., Stochastic Systems, Measurement and Control Laboratory, 2007 and handouts
227-0690-06LAdvanced Topics in Control (Spring 2015) Information
New topics are introduced every year.
W4 credits2V + 2UF. Dörfler
AbstractThis class will introduce students to advanced, research level topics in the area of automatic control. Coverage varies from semester to semester, repetition for credit is possible, upon consent of the instructor. During the Spring Semester 2015 the class will concentrate on distributed systems and control.
ObjectiveThe intent is to introduce students to advanced research level topics in the area of automatic control. The course is jointly organized by Prof. R. D'Andrea, L. Guzzella, J. Lygeros, M. Morari, R. Smith, and F. Dörfler. Coverage and instructor varies from semester to semester. Repetition for credit is possible, upon consent of the instructor. During the Spring Semester 2015 the class will be taught by F. Dörfler and will focus on distributed systems and control.
ContentDistributed control systems include large-scale physical systems, engineered multi-agent systems, as well as their interconnection in cyber-physical systems. Representative examples are the electric power grid, camera networks, and robotic sensor networks. The challenges associated with these systems arise due to their coupled, distributed, and large-scale nature, and due to limited sensing, communication, and control capabilities. This course covers modeling, analysis, and design of distributed control systems.

Topics covered in the course include:
- the theory of graphs (with an emphasis on algebraic and spectral graph theory);
- basic models of multi-agent and interconnected dynamical systems;
- continuous-time and discrete-time distributed averaging algorithms (consensus);
- coordination algorithms for rendezvous, formation, flocking, and deployment;
- applications in robotic coordination, coupled oscillators, social networks, sensor networks, electric power grids, epidemics, and positive systems.
Lecture notesA set of self-contained set of lecture nodes will be made available on the course website.
LiteratureRelevant papers and books will be made available through the course website.
Prerequisites / NoticeControl systems (227-0216-00L), Linear system theory (227-0225-00L), or equivalents, as well as sufficient mathematical maturity.
Recommended Subjects
These courses are recommended, but you are free to choose courses from any other special field. Please consult your tutor.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
376-1217-00LRehabilitation Engineering I: Motor Functions Information W3 credits2V + 1UR. Riener
AbstractRehabilitation engineering” is the application of science and technology to ameliorate the handicaps of individuals with disabilities in order to reintegrate them into society. The goal of this lecture is to present classical and new rehabilitation engineering principles and examples applied to compensate or enhance especially motor deficits.
ObjectiveProvide theoretical and practical knowledge of principles and applications used to rehabilitate individuals with motor disabilities.
Content“Rehabilitation” is the (re)integration of an individual with a disability into society. Rehabilitation engineering is “the application of science and technology to ameliorate the handicaps of individuals with disability”. Such handicaps can be classified into motor, sensor, and cognitive (also communicational) disabilities. In general, one can distinguish orthotic and prosthetic methods to overcome these disabilities. Orthoses support existing but affected body functions (e.g., glasses, crutches), while prostheses compensate for lost body functions (e.g., cochlea implant, artificial limbs). In case of sensory disorders, the lost function can also be substituted by other modalities (e.g. tactile Braille display for vision impaired persons).

The goal of this lecture is to present classical and new technical principles as well as specific examples applied to compensate or enhance mainly motor deficits. Modern methods rely more and more on the application of multi-modal and interactive techniques. Multi-modal means that visual, acoustical, tactile, and kinaesthetic sensor channels are exploited by displaying the patient with a maximum amount of information in order to compensate his/her impairment. Interaction means that the exchange of information and energy occurs bi-directionally between the rehabilitation device and the human being. Thus, the device cooperates with the patient rather than imposing an inflexible strategy (e.g., movement) upon the patient. Multi-modality and interactivity have the potential to increase the therapeutical outcome compared to classical rehabilitation strategies.
In the 1 h exercise the students will learn how to solve representative problems with computational methods applied to exoprosthetics, wheelchair dynamics, rehabilitation robotics and neuroprosthetics.
Lecture notesLecture notes will be distributed at the beginning of the lecture (1st session)
LiteratureIntroductory Books

Neural prostheses - replacing motor function after desease or disability. Eds.: R. Stein, H. Peckham, D. Popovic. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Advances in Rehabilitation Robotics – Human-Friendly Technologies on Movement Assistance and Restoration for People with Disabilities. Eds: Z.Z. Bien, D. Stefanov (Lecture Notes in Control and Information Science, No. 306). Springer Verlag Berlin 2004.

Intelligent Systems and Technologies in Rehabilitation Engineering. Eds: H.N.L. Teodorescu, L.C. Jain (International Series on Computational Intelligence). CRC Press Boca Raton, 2001.

Control of Movement for the Physically Disabled. Eds.: D. Popovic, T. Sinkjaer. Springer Verlag London, 2000.

Interaktive und autonome Systeme der Medizintechnik - Funktionswiederherstellung und Organersatz. Herausgeber: J. Werner, Oldenbourg Wissenschaftsverlag 2005.

Biomechanics and Neural Control of Posture and Movement. Eds.: J.M. Winters, P.E. Crago. Springer New York, 2000.

Selected Journal Articles

Abbas, J., Riener, R. (2001) Using mathematical models and advanced control systems techniques to enhance neuroprosthesis function. Neuromodulation 4, pp. 187-195.

Burdea, G., Popescu, V., Hentz, V., and Colbert, K. (2000): Virtual reality-based orthopedic telerehabilitation, IEEE Trans. Rehab. Eng., 8, pp. 430-432

Colombo, G., Jörg, M., Schreier, R., Dietz, V. (2000) Treadmill training of paraplegic patients using a robotic orthosis. Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development, vol. 37, pp. 693-700.

Colombo, G., Jörg, M., Jezernik, S. (2002) Automatisiertes Lokomotionstraining auf dem Laufband. Automatisierungstechnik at, vol. 50, pp. 287-295.

Cooper, R. (1993) Stability of a wheelchair controlled by a human. IEEE Transactions on Rehabilitation Engineering 1, pp. 193-206.

Krebs, H.I., Hogan, N., Aisen, M.L., Volpe, B.T. (1998): Robot-aided neurorehabilitation, IEEE Trans. Rehab. Eng., 6, pp. 75-87

Leifer, L. (1981): Rehabilitive robotics, Robot Age, pp. 4-11

Platz, T. (2003): Evidenzbasierte Armrehabilitation: Eine systematische Literaturübersicht, Nervenarzt, 74, pp. 841-849

Quintern, J. (1998) Application of functional electrical stimulation in paraplegic patients. NeuroRehabilitation 10, pp. 205-250.

Riener, R., Nef, T., Colombo, G. (2005) Robot-aided neurorehabilitation for the upper extremities. Medical & Biological Engineering & Computing 43(1), pp. 2-10.

Riener, R., Fuhr, T., Schneider, J. (2002) On the complexity of biomechanical models used for neuroprosthesis development. International Journal of Mechanics in Medicine and Biology 2, pp. 389-404.

Riener, R. (1999) Model-based development of neuroprostheses for paraplegic patients. Royal Philosophical Transactions: Biological Sciences 354, pp. 877-894.
Prerequisites / NoticeTarget Group:
Students of higher semesters and PhD students of
- D-MAVT, D-ITET, D-INFK
- Biomedical Engineering
- Medical Faculty, University of Zurich
Students of other departments, faculties, courses are also welcome
151-0104-00LUncertainty Quantification for Engineering & Life Sciences Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
Number of participants limited to 40.
W4 credits3GP. Koumoutsakos
AbstractQuantification of uncertainties in computational models pertaining to applications in engineering and life sciences. Exploitation of massively available data to develop computational models with quantifiable predictive capabilities. Applications of Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation to problems in mechanics, control, systems and cell biology.
ObjectiveThe course will teach fundamental concept of Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation (UQ+P) for computational models of systems in Engineering and Life Sciences. Emphasis will be placed on practical and computational aspects of UQ+P including the implementation of relevant algorithms in multicore architectures.
ContentTopics that will be covered include: Uncertainty quantification under
parametric and non-parametric modelling uncertainty, Bayesian inference with model class assessment, Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation, prior and posterior reliability analysis.
Lecture notesThe class will be largely based on the book: Data Analysis: A Bayesian Tutorial by Devinderjit Sivia as well as on class notes and related literature that will be distributed in class.
Literature1. Data Analysis: A Bayesian Tutorial by Devinderjit Sivia
2. Probability Theory: The Logic of Science by E. T. Jaynes
3. Class Notes
Prerequisites / NoticeFundamentals of Probability, Fundamentals of Computational Modeling
151-0532-00LNonlinear Dynamics and Chaos I Information W4 credits2V + 1UD. Karrasch, G. Haller
AbstractBasic facts about nonlinear systems; stability and near-equilibrium dynamics; bifurcations; dynamical systems on the plane; non-autonomous dynamical systems; chaotic dynamics.
ObjectiveThis course is intended for Masters and Ph.D. students in engineering sciences, physics and applied mathematics who are interested in the behavior of nonlinear dynamical systems. It offers an introduction to the qualitative study of nonlinear physical phenomena modeled by differential equations or discrete maps. We discuss applications in classical mechanics, electrical engineering, fluid mechanics, and biology. A more advanced Part II of this class is offered every other year.
Content(1) Basic facts about nonlinear systems: Existence, uniqueness, and dependence on initial data.

(2) Near equilibrium dynamics: Linear and Lyapunov stability

(3) Bifurcations of equilibria: Center manifolds, normal forms, and elementary bifurcations

(4) Nonlinear dynamical systems on the plane: Phase plane techniques, limit sets, and limit cycles.

(5) Time-dependent dynamical systems: Floquet theory, Poincare maps, averaging methods, resonance
Lecture notesThe class lecture notes will be posted electronically after each lecture. Students should not rely on these but prepare their own notes during the lecture.
Prerequisites / Notice- Prerequisites: Analysis, linear algebra and a basic course in differential equations.

- Exam: two-hour written exam in English.

- Homework: A homework assignment will be due roughly every other week. Hints to solutions will be posted after the homework due dates.
151-0641-00LIntroduction to Robotics and Mechatronics Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 60. COURSE IS FULLY BOOKED!

The enrollment is only valid if an e-mail is sent to fullrich@ethz.ch with "IRM participation" in the subject. Enrollment is valid starting from September 2014. The order of enrollment will be considered according to the time your e-mail is sent.
W4 credits2V + 2UB. Nelson
AbstractThe aim of this lecture is to expose students to the fundamentals of these systems. Over the course of these lectures, topics will include how to interface a computer with the real world, different types of sensors and their use, different types of actuators and their use.
ObjectiveThe aim of this lecture is to expose students to the fundamentals of these systems. Over the course of these lectures, topics will include how to interface a computer with the real world, different types of sensors and their use, different types of actuators and their use, and forward and inverse kinematics. Throughout the course students will periodically attend laboratory sessions and implement lessons learned during lectures on real mechatronic systems.
ContentAn ever increasing number of mechatronic systems are finding their way into our daily lives. Mechatronic systems synergistically combine computer science, electrical engineering, and mechanical engineering. Robotics systems can be viewed as a subset of mechatronics that focuses on sophisticated control of moving devices. The aim of this lecture is to expose students to the fundamentals of these systems. Over the course of these lectures, topics will include how to interface a computer with the real world, different types of sensors and their use, different types of actuators and their use, and forward and inverse kinematics. Throughout the course students will periodically attend laboratory sessions and implement lessons learned during lectures on real mechatronic systems.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe registration is limited to 60 students.
There are 4 credit points for this lecture.
The lecture will be held in English.
The students are expected to be familiar with C programming.
151-0854-00LAutonomous Mobile Robots Information W5 credits4GP. Furgale, M. Hutter, M. Rufli, D. Scaramuzza, R. Siegwart
AbstractThe objective of this course is to provide the basics required to develop autonomous mobile robots and systems. Main emphasis is put on mobile robot locomotion and kinematics, envionmen perception, and probabilistic environment modeling, localizatoin, mapping and navigation. Theory will be deepened by exercises with small mobile robots and discussed accross application examples.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to provide the basics required to develop autonomous mobile robots and systems. Main emphasis is put on mobile robot locomotion and kinematics, envionmen perception, and probabilistic environment modeling, localizatoin, mapping and navigation.
Lecture notesThis lecture is enhanced by around 30 small videos introducing the core topics, and multiple-choice questions for continuous self-evaluation. It is developed along the TORQUE (Tiny, Open-with-Restrictions courses focused on QUality and Effectiveness) concept, which is ETH's response to the popular MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) concept.
LiteratureThis lecture is based on the Textbook:
Introduction to Autonomous Mobile Robots
Roland Siegwart, Illah Nourbakhsh, Davide Scaramuzza, The MIT Press, Second Edition 2011, ISBN: 978-0262015356
227-0529-00LSmartGrids: System Optimization of Smart and Liberalized Electric Power Systems Information W6 credits4GR. Bacher
AbstractModel based optimization of SmartGrids systems considering Physics, Economics and Legislation; Optimality conditions and solutions; Lagrange-Multipliers and market prices; Price incentives in case of restrictions and grid constraints; Transmission grid congestions and implicit auctions; Security of supply with high variability + market requirements; Electricity market and SmartGrids system models.
Objective- Understanding the legal, physical and market based framework for Smart Grid based electric power systems.
- Understanding the theory of mathematical optimization models and algorithms for a secure and market based operation of Smart Power Systems.
- Gaining experience with the formulation, implementation and computation of constrained optimization problems for Smart Grid and market based electricity systems.
Content- Legal conditions for the regulation and operation of electric power systems (CH, EU).
- Physical laws and constraints in electric power systems.
- Special characteristics of the good "electricity".
- Optimization as mathematical tool for analyzing network based electric power systems.
- Types of optimization problems, optimality conditions and optimization methods.
- Various electricity market models, their advantages and disadvantages.
- SmartGrids: The new energy system and compatibility issues with traditional market models.
Lecture notesText book is continuously updated and distributed to students.
LiteratureClass text book contains active hyperlinks related to back ground material.
Prerequisites / NoticeMotivation, Active participation (discussions). Numerical analysis, power system basics and modeling, optimization basics
252-0526-00LStatistical Learning Theory Information W4 credits2V + 1UJ. M. Buhmann
AbstractThe course covers advanced methods of statistical learning :
PAC learning and statistical learning theory;variational methods and optimization, e.g., maximum entropy techniques, information bottleneck, deterministic and simulated annealing; clustering for vectorial, histogram and relational data; model selection; graphical models.
ObjectiveThe course surveys recent methods of statistical learning. The fundamentals of machine learning as presented in the course "Introduction to Machine Learning" are expanded and in particular, the theory of statistical learning is discussed.
Content# Boosting: A state-of-the-art classification approach that is sometimes used as an alternative to SVMs in non-linear classification.
# Theory of estimators: How can we measure the quality of a statistical estimator? We already discussed bias and variance of estimators very briefly, but the interesting part is yet to come.
# Statistical learning theory: How can we measure the quality of a classifier? Can we give any guarantees for the prediction error?
# Variational methods and optimization: We consider optimization approaches for problems where the optimizer is a probability distribution. Concepts we will discuss in this context include:

* Maximum Entropy
* Information Bottleneck
* Deterministic Annealing

# Clustering: The problem of sorting data into groups without using training samples. This requires a definition of ``similarity'' between data points and adequate optimization procedures.
# Model selection: We have already discussed how to fit a model to a data set in ML I, which usually involved adjusting model parameters for a given type of model. Model selection refers to the question of how complex the chosen model should be. As we already know, simple and complex models both have advantages and drawbacks alike.
# Reinforcement learning: The problem of learning through interaction with an environment which changes. To achieve optimal behavior, we have to base decisions not only on the current state of the environment, but also on how we expect it to develop in the future.
Lecture notesno script; transparencies of the lectures will be made available.
LiteratureDuda, Hart, Stork: Pattern Classification, Wiley Interscience, 2000.

Hastie, Tibshirani, Friedman: The Elements of Statistical Learning, Springer, 2001.

L. Devroye, L. Gyorfi, and G. Lugosi: A probabilistic theory of pattern recognition. Springer, New York, 1996
Prerequisites / NoticeRequirements:

basic knowledge of statistics, interest in statistical methods.

It is recommended that Introduction to Machine Learning (ML I) is taken first; but with a little extra effort Statistical Learning Theory can be followed without the introductory course.
Subjects of General Interest
These courses are suitable for several special fields. Please consult your tutor.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0708-00LDiagnostics, Measurement and Testing Technology in High Voltage Technology Information Z0 credits2SH.‑J. Weber
AbstractDiscussion of various diagnostic methods to evaluate the electrical insulation of the components and subsystems of high-voltage networks. Independent performance of experiments in the laboratory using high and low voltages. Acquaintance with the most important testing methods and international standards. Calibration methods and maintenance of high-voltage measuring devices.
Objectivesee above
Lecture notesHandouts
Literature- M. Beyer, W. Boeck, K. Möller, W. Zaengl: Hochspannungstechnik, Springer-Verlag, 1986
- A. Küchler: Hochspannungstechnik, Springer, Berlin, 3. Auflage, 2009
151-0306-00LVisualization, Simulation and Interaction - Virtual Reality I Information W4 credits4GA. Kunz
AbstractTechnology of Virtual Reality. Human factors, Creation of virtual worlds, Lighting models, Display- and acoustic- systems, Tracking, Haptic/tactile interaction, Motion platforms, Virtual prototypes, Data exchange, VR Complete systems, Augmented reality, Collaboration systems; VR and Design; Implementation of the VR in the industry; Human Computer Interfaces (HCI).
ObjectiveThe product development process in the future will be characterized by the Digital Product which is the center point for concurrent engineering with teams spreas worldwide. Visualization and simulation of complex products including their physical behaviour at an early stage of development will be relevant in future. The lecture will give an overview to techniques for virtual reality, to their ability to visualize and to simulate objects. It will be shown how virtual reality is already used in the product development process.
ContentIntroduction to the world of virtual reality; development of new VR-techniques; introduction to 3D-computergraphics; modelling; physical based simulation; human factors; human interaction; equipment for virtual reality; display technologies; tracking systems; data gloves; interaction in virtual environment; navigation; collision detection; haptic and tactile interaction; rendering; VR-systems; VR-applications in industry, virtual mockup; data exchange, augmented reality.
Lecture notesA complete version of the handout is also available in English.
Prerequisites / NoticeVoraussetzungen:
keine
Vorlesung geeignet für D-MAVT, D-ITET, D-MTEC und D-INF

Testat/ Kredit-Bedingungen/ Prüfung:
– Teilnahme an Vorlesung und Kolloquien
– Erfolgreiche Durchführung von Übungen in Teams
– Mündliche Einzelprüfung 30 Minuten
Semester Projects
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-1572-01LSemester Project (Nr 1) Restricted registration - show details
Please fill in the following form before registering: http://www.ee.ethz.ch/project_registration_form.
W8 credits20AProfessors
AbstractSemester projects are designed to train the students for independent scientific work. A project uses the student's technical and social skills acquired during the master's program. The semester project comprises 280 hours of work and is supervised by a professor.
Objectivesee above
227-1572-02LSemester Project (Nr 2) Restricted registration - show details
Please fill in the following form before registering: http://www.ee.ethz.ch/project_registration_form.
W8 credits20AProfessors
AbstractSemester projects are designed to train the students for independent scientific work. A project uses the student's technical and social skills acquired during the master's program. The semester project comprises 280 hours of work and is supervised by a professor.
Objectivesee above
Compulsory Electives in Humanities, Social and Political Sciences
» see GESS Compulsory Electives
Industrial Internship
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-1550-00LInternship in Industry Restricted registration - show details
Only for Electrical Engineering and Information Technology MSc
Z0 creditsexternal organisers
AbstractThe main objective of the 12-week internship is to expose master's students to the industrial work environment. During this period, students have the opportunity to be involved in on-going projects at the host institution.
Objectivesee above
Master Thesis
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-1501-00LMaster's Thesis Information Restricted registration - show details
Admission only if A L L of the following apply:
a) bachelor program successfully completed;
b) acquired (if applicable) all credits from additional requirements for admission to master program;
c) successfully completed both semester projects.

Note: the conditions above are not applicable to incoming exchange students.

All students, please fill in the following form before registering: http://www.ee.ethz.ch/project_registration_form.
O30 credits68DProfessors
AbstractThe Master Program finishes with a 6-months Master Thesis which is directed by a Professor of the Department or a Professor of another Department who is associated with the D-ITET. Students gain the ability to conduct independent scientific research on a specific research problem.
Objectivesee above
Generally Accessible Seminars and Colloquia
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0919-00LKnowledge-Based Image Interpretation Information Z0 credits2SG. Székely, L. Van Gool
AbstractWith the lecture series on special topics of Knowledge based image interpretation we sporadically offer special talks.
ObjectivePresentation and discussion of internal and external original research results on the area of image analysis, computer vision, virtual and augmented reality and physically based simulation. Following recent work in the literature.
ContentPresentation and discussion of internal and external original research results on the area of image analysis, computer vision, virtual and augmented reality and physically based simulation. Following recent work in the literature.
227-0920-00LSeminar in Systems and Control Information Z0 credits1SM. Morari, R. D'Andrea, J. Lygeros, R. Smith
AbstractCurrent topics in Systems and Control presented mostly by external speakers from academia and industry.
Objectivesee above
227-0950-00LAcoustics Information Z0 credits0.5KK. Heutschi
AbstractCurrent topics in Acoustics presented mostly by external speakers from academia and industry.
Objectivesee above
227-0980-00LSeminar on Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Information Z0 credits2KK. P. Prüssmann, S. Kozerke, M. Rudin
AbstractActuel developments and problems of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)
ObjectiveGetting insight to advanced topics in Magnetic Resonance Imaging
227-0970-00LResearch Topics in Biomedical Engineering Information Z1 credit2KK. P. Prüssmann, M. Rudin, M. Stampanoni, K. Stephan, J. Vörös
AbstractCurrent topics in Biomedical Engineering presented mostly by external speakers from academia and industry.
Objectivesee above
227-0955-00LSeminar in Electromagnetics Information Z3 credits2KJ. Leuthold
AbstractSelected topics of the current research activities of the IFH and closely related institutions are discussed.
ObjectiveHave an overview on the research activities of the IFH.
227-0708-00LDiagnostics, Measurement and Testing Technology in High Voltage Technology Information Z0 credits2SH.‑J. Weber
AbstractDiscussion of various diagnostic methods to evaluate the electrical insulation of the components and subsystems of high-voltage networks. Independent performance of experiments in the laboratory using high and low voltages. Acquaintance with the most important testing methods and international standards. Calibration methods and maintenance of high-voltage measuring devices.
Objectivesee above
Lecture notesHandouts
Literature- M. Beyer, W. Boeck, K. Möller, W. Zaengl: Hochspannungstechnik, Springer-Verlag, 1986
- A. Küchler: Hochspannungstechnik, Springer, Berlin, 3. Auflage, 2009
252-4810-00LZISC Information Security Colloquium Information
Does not take place this semester.
Z0 credits2KS. Capkun, D. Basin, U. Maurer, A. Perrig, B. Plattner
AbstractSeries of invited lectures about current topics in information security. Schedule according to announcement on the lecture web page.
Objectivesee above
Course Units for Additional Admission Requirements
The courses below are only available for MSc students with additional admission requirements.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0101-AALDiscrete-Time and Statistical Signal Processing Information
Enrolment only for MSc students who need this course as additional requirement.
E-6 credits8RH.‑A. Loeliger
AbstractFundamental topics of digital signal processing with a bias towards applications in communications: discrete-time linear filters, equalization, DFT, discrete-time stochastic processes, elements of detection theory and estimation theory, LMMSE estimation and LMMSE filtering, LMS algorithm, Viterbi algorithm.
ObjectiveThrough self study the participant is introduced to some fundamental topics of digital signal processing with a bias towards applications in communications. The two main themes are "linearity" and "probability". In the first part of the course, we deepen our understanding of discrete-time linear filters. In the second part of the course, we review the basics of probability theory and discrete-time stochastic processes. We then discuss some basic concepts of detection theory and estimation theory, as well as some practical methods including LMMSE estimation
and LMMSE filtering, the LMS algorithm, and the Viterbi algorithm.
ContentDiscrete-time linear systems and the z-transform.
Discrete time and continuous time: forth and back.
Digital filters.
DFT.
Elements of probability theory.
Discrete-time stochastic processes.
Elements of detection theory and estimation theory.
Linear estimation and filtering.
Wiener filter.
LMS algorithm.
Viterbi algorithm.
Lecture notesLecture Notes.
227-0103-AALControl Systems Information
Enrolment only for MSc students who need this course as additional requirement.
E-6 credits8RM. Morari
AbstractStudy of concepts and methods for the mathematical description and analysis of dynamical systems. The concept of feedback. Design of control systems for single input - single output and multivariable systems.
ObjectiveStudy of concepts and methods for the mathematical description and analysis of dynamical systems. The concept of feedback. Design of control systems for single input - single output and multivariable systems.
ContentProcess automation, concept of control. Modelling of dynamical systems - examples, state space description, linearisation, analytical/numerical solution. Laplace transform, system response for first and second order systems - effect of additional poles and zeros. Closed-loop control - idea of feedback. PID control, Ziegler - Nichols tuning. Stability, Routh-Hurwitz criterion, root locus, frequency response, Bode diagram, Bode gain/phase relationship, controller design via "loop shaping", Nyquist criterion. Feedforward compensation, cascade control. Multivariable systems (transfer matrix, state space representation), multi-loop control, problem of coupling, Relative Gain Array, decoupling, sensitivity to model uncertainty. State space representation (modal description, controllability, control canonical form, observer canonical form), state feedback, pole placement - choice of poles. Observer, observability, duality, separation principle. LQ Regulator, optimal state estimation.
Lecture notesA copy of the lecture slides can be obtained from Student Print on Demand (SPOD) for CHF 11. www.spod.ethz.ch

Exercise material is available for download at the Control Systems webpage www.control.ee.ethz.ch/~rs or in the exercise sessions.
LiteratureG.F. Franklin, J.D. Powell, A. Emami-Naeini. Feedback Control of Dynamic Systems. 6th edition, Prentice Hall, Version 2009, Reading, ISBN 978-0-1350-150-9.Softcover student's edition ca. CHF 150.-. (Spring 2010)
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
Signal and Systems Theory / MATLAB skills
227-0166-AALAnalog Integrated Circuits Information
Enrolment only for MSc students who need this course as additional requirement.
ATTENTION: Starting in the fall semester 2015, this course will be offered only in the fall with an examination only in winter.
E-6 credits8RQ. Huang
AbstractThis course provides a foundation in analog integrated circuit design based on bipolar and CMOS technologies.
ObjectiveIntegrated circuits are responsible for much of the progress in electronics in the last 50 years, particularly the revolutions in the Information and Communications Technologies we witnessed in recent years. Analog integrated circuits play a crucial part in the highly integrated systems that power the popular electronic devices we use daily. Understanding their design is beneficial to both future designers and users of such systems.
The basic elements, design issues and techniques for analog integrated circuits will be taught in this course.
ContentReview of bipolar and MOS devices and their small-signal equivalent circuit models; Building blocks in analog circuits such as current sources, active load, current mirrors, supply independent biasing etc; Amplifiers: differential amplifiers, cascode amplifier, high gain structures, output stages, gain bandwidth product of op-amps; Stability; Comparators; Second-order effects in analog circuits such as mismatch, noise and offset; A/D and D/A converters; Introduction to switched capacitor circuits.
Lecture notesHandouts of slides. No script but an accompanying textbook is recommended.
LiteratureGray, Hurst, Lewis, Meyer, "Analysis and Design of Analog Integrated Circuits", 5th Ed. Wiley, 2010.
227-0117-AALHigh Voltage Technology Information
Enrolment only for MSc students who need this course as additional requirement.
E-6 credits8RC. Franck
AbstractUnderstanding of the fundamental phenomena and principles connected with the occurrence of extensive electric field strengths. This knowledge is applied to the dimensioning of equipment of electric power systems. Methods of computer-modeling in use today are presented and applied within the framework of the exercises.
ObjectiveThe students know the fundamental phenomena and principles connected with the occurrence of extensive electric field strengths. They comprehend the different mechanisms leading to the failure of insulation systems and are able to apply failure criteria on the dimensioning of high voltage components. They have the ability to identify of weak spots in insulation systems and to name possibilities for improvement. Further they know the different insulation systems and their dimensioning in practice.
Content- discussion of the field equations relevant for high voltage engineering.
- analytical and numerical solutions/solving of this equations, as well as the derivation of the important equivalent circuits for the description of the fields and losses in insulations
- introduction to kinetic theory of gases
- mechanisms of the breakdown in gaseous, liquid and solid insulations, as well as insulation systems
- methods for the mathematical determination of the electric withstand of gaseous, liquid and solid insulations
- application of the expertise on high voltage components
- excursions to manufacturers of high voltage components
- workshop to learn on computer-modeling in high voltage engineering
Lecture notesHandouts
LiteratureA. Küchler, Hochspannungstechnik, Springer Berlin, 3. Auflage, 2009 (ISBN: 978-3540784128)