The spring semester 2021 will take place online until further notice. Exceptions: Courses that can only be carried out with on-site presence. Please note the information provided by the lecturers.

Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2016

Civil Engineering Master Information
1. Semester
Seminar Work
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0007-00LConceptual Design Restricted registration - show details O4 credits3ST. Vogel, H. Figi, H. Schnetzer
AbstractProcurement of consistent procedures to solve typical problems of civil engineering. Consolidation of the knowledge of the bachelor courses; integration of bachelors of other universities.
Practice of the holistic approach of conceptual design, parallel and iterative operations on varying levels of detailing. Integration of different fields of knowledge and experiences.
ObjectiveProcurement of consistent procedures to solve typical problems of civil engineering. Consolidation of the knowledge of the bachelor courses; integration of bachelors of other universities.
Practice of the holistic approach of conceptual design, parallel and iterative operations on varying levels of detailing. Integration of different fields of knowledge and experiences.
ContentBasic tools:
Literature research, quotations
Technical report and presentations
Basics of graphical representation

Elements of the design process:
Service criteria and respective agreement
Design requirements and design boundary conditions
Design alternatives
Preliminary dimensioning
Cost effectiveness
Optimization
Detailing

Exemplary consolidations:
Geotechnical basics of retaining walls
Conceptual design and shaping of retaining walls
Drainage of structures
Case study conceptual bridge design

Implementation with a planning tutorial:
Presentation of the objects
Survey and inventory
Design options
Intermediate review
Final presentation
Lecture notesLecture notes, partially as download
http://www.vogel.ibk.ethz.ch/studium/downloads.html
LiteratureNormen
Norm SIA 260 (2013): Grundlagen der Projektierung von Tragwerken, Schweiz. Ingenieur- und Architektenverein, Zürich, 44 pp.
Norm SIA 261 (2014): Einwirkungen auf Tragwerke, Schweiz. Ingenieur- und Architektenverein, Zürich, 132 pp.
Norm SIA 400 (2000): Planbearbeitung im Hochbau, Schweiz. Ingenieur- und Architektenverein, Zürich, 92 pp.

Weiterführende Literatur
Marti, P.(2003): Tragwerksentwurf, Dokumentation SIA D 0181, Schweiz. Ingenieur- und Architektenverein, Zürich, pp. 11-23.
Lüchinger, P.(2003): Tragwerksanalyse und Bemessung, Dokumentation SIA D 0181, Schweiz. Ingenieur- und Architektenverein, Zürich, pp. 25-34.
Vogel, T. (2003): Beispiel, Projektierung eines Widerlagers, Dokumentation SIA D 0181, Schweiz. Ingenieur- und Architektenverein, Zürich, pp. 67-87.
Bögle, A. (2002): Zum Bewertungsprozess im Ingenieurwesen, Beton- und Stahlbetonbau 97 Heft 11, pp. 601-614.
Tiefbauamt Graubünden (2006): Inhalt einer Nutzungsvereinbarung, Abteilung Kunstbauten, Anhang zu den Weisungen von 15.06.2006, pp. 2
Major Courses
Major in Construction and Maintenance Management
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0579-00LInfrastructure Maintenance Processes
Does not take place this semester.
101-0579-00L "Infrastructure Maintenance Processes" will be offered from FS17 on with new title 101-0579-00L "Infrastructure Management 2: Evaluation Tools".
O3 credits2GB. T. Adey
AbstractThis course provides an introduction to the tools that can be used to evaluate infrastructure. In particular tools:
- to measure the level of service being obtained from infrastructure,
- to predict slow changes in infrastructure over time, and
- to predict fast changes in infrastructure over time,fits of monitoring.
Objectiveto equip students with tools to be used to evaluate infrastructure and the level of service being provided from infrastructure
ContentIntroduction
Levels of service
Reliability of infrastructure
Availability and maintainability of infrastructure
Mechanistic-empirical models
Regression analysis
Event trees
Fault trees
Markov chains
Neural networks
Bayesian networks
Conclusion
Lecture notesAll necessary materials (e.g. transparencies and hand-outs) will be distributed before class.
LiteratureAppropriate reading material will be assigned when necessary.
066-0415-00LBuilding Physics: Theory and Applications Information Restricted registration - show details W4 credits3V + 1UJ. Carmeliet, J. Allegrini, D. Derome
AbstractPrinciples of heat and mass transport, hygro-thermal performance, durability of the building envelope and interaction with indoor and outdoor climates, applications.
ObjectiveThe students will acquire in the following fields:
- Principles of heat and mass transport and its mathematical description.
- Indoor and outdoor climate and driving forces.
- Hygrothermal properties of building materials.
- Building envelope solutions and their construction.
- Hygrothermal performance and durability.
ContentPrinciples of heat and mass transport, hygro-thermal performance, durability of the building envelope and interaction with indoor and outdoor climates, applications.
529-0193-00LRenewable Energy Technologies I
The lectures Renewable Energy Technologies I (529-0193-00L) and Renewable Energy Technologies II (529-0191-01L) can be taken independently from one another.
W4 credits3GA. Wokaun, A. Steinfeld
AbstractScenarios for world energy demand and CO2 emissions, implications for climate. Methods for the assessment of energy chains. Potential and technology of renewable energies: Biomass (heat, electricity, biofuels), solar energy (low temp. heat, solar thermal and photovoltaic electricity, solar chemistry). Wind and ocean energy, heat pumps, geothermal energy, energy from waste. CO2 sequestration.
ObjectiveScenarios for the development of world primary energy consumption are introduced. Students know the potential and limitations of renewable energies for reducing CO2 emissions, and their contribution towards a future sustainable energy system that respects climate protection goals.
ContentScenarios for the development of world energy consumption, energy intensity and economic development. Energy conversion chains, primary energy sources and availability of raw materials. Methods for the assessment of energy systems, ecological balances and life cycle analysis of complete energy chains. Biomass: carbon reservoirs and the carbon cycle, energetic utilisation of biomass, agricultural production of energy carriers, biofuels. Solar energy: solar collectors, solar-thermal power stations, solar chemistry, photovoltaics, photochemistry. Wind energy, wind power stations. Ocean energy (tides, waves). Geothermal energy: heat pumps, hot steam and hot water resources, hot dry rock (HDR) technique. Energy recovery from waste. Greenhouse gas mitigation, CO2 sequestration, chemical bonding of CO2. Consequences of human energy use for ecological systems, atmosphere and climate.
Lecture notesLecture notes will be distributed electronically during the course.
Literature- Kaltschmitt, M., Wiese, A., Streicher, W.: Erneuerbare Energien (Springer, 2003)

- Tester, J.W., Drake, E.M., Golay, M.W., Driscoll, M.J., Peters, W.A.: Sustainable Energy - Choosing Among Options (MIT Press, 2005)

- G. Boyle, Renewable Energy: Power for a sustainable futureOxford University Press, 3rd ed., 2012, ISBN: 978-0-19-954533-9

-V. Quaschning, Renewable Energy and Climate ChangeWiley- IEEE, 2010, ISBN: 978-0-470-74707-0, 9781119994381 (online)
Prerequisites / NoticeFundamentals of chemistry, physics and thermodynamics are a prerequisite for this course.

Topics are available to carry out a Project Work (Semesterarbeit) on the contents of this course.
066-0427-00LDesign and Building Process MBS Information W2 credits2VA. Paulus
Abstract"Design and Building Process MBS" is a brief manual for prospective architects and engineers covering the competencies and the responsibilities of all involved parties through the design and building process. Lectures on twelve compact aspects gaining importance in a increasingly specialised, complex and international surrounding.
ObjectiveParticipants will come to understand how they can best navigate the design and building process, especially in relation to understanding their profession, gaining a thorough knowledge of rules and regulations, as well as understanding how involved parties' minds work. They will also have the opportunity to investigate ways in which they can relate to, understand, and best respond to their clients' wants and needs. Finally, course participants will come to appreciate the various tools and instruments, which are available to them when implementing their projects. The course will guide the participants, bringing the individual pieces of knowledge into a superordinate relationship.
Content"Design and Building Process MBS" is a brief manual for prospective architects and engineers covering the competencies and the responsibilities of involved parties through the design and building process. Twelve compact aspects regarding the establishe building culture are gaining importance in an increasingly specialised, complex and international surrounding. Lectures on the topics of profession, service model, organisation, project, design quality, coordination, costing, tendering and construction management, contracts and agreements, life cycle, real estate market, and getting started will guide the participants, bringing the individual pieces of knowledge into a superordinate relationship. The course introduces the key figures, depicts the criteria of the project and highlights the proveded services of the consultants. In addition to discussing the basics, the terminologies and the tendencies, the lecture units will refer to the studios as well as the prctice: Teaching-based case studies will compliment and deepen the understanding of the twelve selected aspects. The course is presented as a moderated seminar to allow students the opportunity for invididual input: active cololaboration between the students and their tutor therefore required.
101-0427-01LSystem and Network PlanningW6 credits4GU. A. Weidmann
AbstractPublic transports in the context of the transport systems; customer needs in the transport market; service planning processes for regular public transport services; long distance, regional and urban public transport service strategies; access to public transport and the last mile
ObjectiveStudents will develop a basic knowledge of all stages of the public transport planning process from market demand to service planning; they will understand the most relevant planning methods and will be able to use them
Content(1) Fundamentals of system and network planning: Mobility and transport systems; public transport systems; customer needs versus supply characteristics of regular services. (2) System and network planning in public passenger services: Goals of the system and network planning; generic planning process; demarcation, analysis of the situation, setting of targets; design of public transport services; evaluation and optimization; system planning. (3) Public transport services: long distance service offers; suburban and urban service offers; regional and local service offers; access to public transport and the last mile.
Lecture notesA script in German will be provided for the course. The slides are made available.
LiteratureReferences to technical literature will be included in the course script. An additional list of literature will be given during the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeNo remarks.
101-0520-00LProject Management: Project Execution to CloseoutW+3 credits2GJ. J. Hoffman
AbstractThe course will give Engineering students a comprehensive overview and enduring understanding of the techniques, processes, tool and terminology to manage the Project Triangle (time, cost Quality) and to organize,analyze,control and report a complex project from start of Project Execution to Project Completion. Responsibilities will be detailed in each phase of the execution.
ObjectiveA student after completing the course will have the understanding of the Project Management duties, responsibilities, actions and decisions to be done during the Execution phase of a complex project.
ContentExecution Phase of the Project
Engineering Management - Scope, EV Measurement, Reporting and Organization
Procurement and Transportation - Scope, EV Measurement, Reporting and Organization
Civil Construction and Erection - Scope, EV Measurement, Reporting and Organization
Financial Reporting and forecasting
Risk & Opportunity Identification Assessment and Quantification during Execution
Team Organization and Leadership
Risk and opportunity identification and quantification
Contract Claims and Delays
Execution Quality
Environmental Health and safety during execution
LiteratureRequired and suggested reading will be uploaded on weakly basis.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite for this course is course Project Management: Pre-Tender to Contract Execution number 101-0517-01 G, unless otherwise approved by the lecturer.
101-0521-00LProject Management for Construction ProjectsW+3 credits2SB. García de Soto Lastra
AbstractThis course is designed to lay down the foundation of the different concepts, techniques, and tools for successful project management of construction projects.
ObjectiveThe goal is that at the end of this course students should have a good understanding of the different project management knowledge areas, the phases required for successful project management, and the role of a project manager. To demonstrate this, students will work in groups in different case studies to apply the concepts, tools and techniques presented in the class.
ContentThe main content of the course is summarized in the following topics:
- Project and organization structures
- Project scheduling
- Resource management
- Project estimating
- Project financing
- Risk management
- Interpersonal skills
Lecture notesThe slides for the class will be available for download from Moodle at least one day before each class. Copies of all necessary documents will be distributed at appropriate times.
LiteratureRelevant readings will be recommended throughout the course (and made available to the students via Moodle).
Prerequisites / NoticeThere are no pre-requisites to enroll in this course.
101-0522-00LIntroduction to Construction Information Management & ModellingW+3 credits2GB. García de Soto Lastra
AbstractThis course will provide both a theoretical background and a pragmatic project work (case studies) on current trends and developments of information modeling and management in the construction industry around the world and in Switzerland. The course will include external lecturers from engineering and construction companies in Switzerland.
ObjectiveStudents enrolled in this course are expected to become familiar with current information modeling and management technologies and their applications to the construction industry, and to get a good understanding of new project delivery systems and technologies for integrated practice.
ContentThe content of the course is summarized in the following topics:
- Introduction to information modeling and management technologies
- Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) (vs. traditional delivery methods)
- Information model execution plan
- Information modeling tools and parametric modeling
- Interoperability
- Standards and foundations
- Implications for engineers and the construction industry
- Implications for owners and facility managers
- Information Modeling and Prefabrication
- Construction Analysis and Planning (4D modeling)
- Quantity Takeoff and Cost Estimating (5D modeling)
Lecture notesThe slides for the class will be available for download from Moodle at least one day before each class. Copies of all necessary documents will be distributed at appropriate times.
LiteratureRelevant readings will be recommended throughout the course and made available to the students via Moodle.
Prerequisites / NoticeThere are no pre-requisites to enroll in this course.

Note: the use of special software (e.g. Revit, ArchiCAD) or simulation software (e.g., Bentley ConstrucSim, Navisworks, Solibri Model Checker, etc.) is beyond the scope of this course.
101-0509-00LInfrastructure Management 1: ProcessW+3 credits2GB. T. Adey
AbstractThe course provides an introduction to the steps included in the infrastructure management process. The lectures are given by a mixture of external people in German and internal people in English.
ObjectiveUpon completion of the course, students will
- understand the steps required to manage infrastructure effectively,
- understand the complexity of these steps, and
- have an overview of the tools that they can use in each of the steps.
Content- The infrastructure management process and guidelines
- Knowing the infrastructure - Dealing with data
- Establishing goals and constraints
- Establishing organization structure and processes
- Making predictions
- Selecting strategies
- Developing programs
- Planning interventions
- Conducting impact analysis
- Reviewing the process
Lecture notesAppropriate reading / and study material will be handed out during the course.
Transparencies will be handed out at the beginning of each class.
LiteratureAppropriate literature will be handed out when required.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe courses will be given half in English and half in German. Students should have a minimum of level B2 in both to register for the course.
Major in Geotechnical Engineering
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0317-00LTunnelling IW+3 credits2GG. Anagnostou, E. Pimentel
AbstractBasic aspects of design and analysis of underground structures. Conventional tunnel construction methods. Auxiliary measures (ground improvement and drainage, forepoling, face reinforcement). Numerical analysis methods.
ObjectiveBasic aspects of design and analysis of underground structures. Conventional tunnel construction methods. Auxiliary measures (ground improvement and drainage, forepoling, face reinforcement). Numerical analysis methods.
ContentNumerical analysis methods in tunnelling.
Conventional excavation methods (full face, top heading and bench, side drift method, ...)
Auxiliary measures:
- Injections
- Jet grouting
- Ground freezing
- Drainage
- Forepoling
- Face reinforcement
Lecture notesAutographieblätter
LiteratureEmpfehlungen
101-0357-00LTheoretical and Experimental Soil Mechanics Restricted registration - show details
Prerequisites: Mechanics I, II and III.

The number of participants is limited to 60 due to the existing laboratory equipment! Students with major in Geotechnical Engineering have priority. Registrations will be accepted in the order they are received.
W+6 credits4GI. Anastasopoulos, R. Herzog
AbstractOverview of soil behaviour
Explanation of typical applications: reality, modelling, laboratory tests with transfer of results to the practical examples
Consolidation theory and typical applications in practice
Triaxial & direct shear tests: consolidation & shear, drained & undrained response
Plasticity theory & Critical State Soil Mechanics, Cam Clay
Application of plasticity theory
ObjectiveExtend knowledge of theoretical approaches that can be used to describe soil behaviour to enable students to carry out more advanced geotechnical design and to plan the appropriate laboratory tests to obtain relevant parameters for coupled plasticity models of soil behaviour.
A further goal is to give students the wherewithal to be able to select an appropriate constitutive model and set up insitu stress conditions in preparation for subsequent numerical modelling (e.g. with finite elements).
ContentOverview of soil behaviour
Discussion of general gaps between basic theory and soil response
Stress paths in practice & in laboratory tests
Explanation of typical applications: reality, modelling, laboratory tests with transfer of results to the practical examples
Consolidation theory for incremental and continuous loading oedometer tests and typical applications in practice
Triaxial & direct shear tests: consolidation & shear, drained & undrained response
Plasticity theory & Critical State Soil Mechanics, Cam Clay
Application of plasticity theory
Lecture notesPrinted script with web support
Exercises
Literaturehttp://geotip.igt.ethz.ch/
Prerequisites / NoticeLectures will be conducted as Problem Based Learning within the framework of a case history
Virtual laboratory in support of 'hands-on' experience of selected laboratory tests

Pre-requirements: Basic knowledge in soil mechanics as well as knowledge of advanced mechanics
Laboratory equipment will be available for 60 students. First priority goes to those registered for the geotechnics specialty in the Masters, 2nd year students then first year students, doctoral students qualifying officially for their PhD status and then 'first come, first served'.
101-0307-00LDesign and Construction in Geotechnical Engineering Restricted registration - show details W4 credits3GI. Anastasopoulos, A. Marin, A. Zafeirakos
AbstractThis lecture deals with the practical application of the knowledge gained in the fundamental lectures from the Bachelor degree.
The basics of planing and design of geotechnical structures will be taught for the main topics geotechical engineers are faced to in practice.
ObjectiveTransfer of the fundamental knowledge taught in the Bachelor degree to practical application.
Ability to plan and design geotechnical structures based on the state of the art.
ContentIntroduction to Swisscode SIA
Foundations and settlements
Pile foundations
Excavations
Slopes
Soil nailing
Reinforced geosystems
Ground improvement
River levees
Lecture notesScript in the form of chapters and powerpoint overheads with web support (http://geotip.igt.ethz.ch)
Exercises
Literaturerelevant literature will be stated during the lectures
Prerequisites / NoticePre-condition: Successful examinations (pass) in the geotechnical studies (soil mechanics and ground engineering, each 5 credits) in the Bachelor degree of Civil Engineering (ETH), or equivalent for new students.

The lecture contains at least one presentation from practice
101-0369-00LForensic Geotechnical Engineering Information Restricted registration - show details
Prerequisites: successful participation in "Geotechnical Engineering" (101-0315-00L) or an equivalent course.
W3 credits2GA. Puzrin
AbstractIn this course selected famous geotechnical failures are investigated with the following purpose: (a) to deepen understanding of the geotechnical risks and possible solutions; (b) to practice design and analysis methods; (c) to learn the techniques for investigation of failures; (d) to learn the techniques for mitigation of the failure damage.
ObjectiveIn this course selected famous geotechnical failures are investigated with the following purpose: (a) to deepen understanding of the geotechnical risks and possible solutions; (b) to practice design and analysis methods; (c) to learn the techniques for investigation of failures; (d) to learn the techniques for mitigation of the failure damage.
ContentFailure due to the loading history
Failure due to the creeping landslides
Failure due to excessive settlements
Failure due to the leaning instability
Failure due to tunnelling
Bearing capacity failure
Excavation failure
Lecture notesLecture notes
Exercises
LiteraturePuzrin, A.M.; Alonso, E.E.; Pinyol, N.M.: Geomechanics of failures. Springer, 2010.

Lang, H.J; Huder, J; Amann, P.; Puzrin, A.M.: Bodenmechanik und Grundbau, Springer-Lehrbuch, 9. Auflage, 2010.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course is given in the first MSc semester.
Prerequisite: Basic knowledge in Geotechnical Engineering (Course content of "Grundbau" or similar lecture).
Major in Structural Engineering
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0117-00LStructural Analysis IIIO3 credits2GD. Heinzmann, S. Zweidler
AbstractEnhanced understanding of the load-deformation response of beam and frame structures. Systematic treatment of elementary and combined load carrying mechanisms of elastic beams, cables, arches and rings.
ObjectiveEnhanced understanding of the load-deformation response of beam and frame structures. Systematic treatment of elementary and combined load carrying mechanisms of elastic beams, cables, arches and rings.
ContentAxially loaded members, shear deformation of girders, torsion, beams, cables, arches and rings, shear walls and frames, combined cable and flexural action.
Lecture notesLecture notes
101-0127-00LStructural Concrete III Information O3 credits2GW. Kaufmann
AbstractThis course supplements the courses Structural Concrete I and II regarding the analysis and dimensioning of reinforced and prestressed concrete structures. It focuses on lower bound and upper bound limit analysis methods for girders, discs and shells, particularly regarding their applicability to the safety assessment of existing structures.
ObjectiveEnhancement of the understanding of the load-deformation reponse of reinforced and prestressed concrete; refined knowledge of models and ability to apply them to general problems, particularly regarding the structural safety assessment of existing structures; awareness of the limits of applicability of limit analysis methods and ability to check their applicability.
ContentFundamentals (structural analysis, theorems of limit analysis, applicability of limit analysis methods); shear walls and girders (stress fields and truss models, failure mechanisms, deformation capacity, membrane elements with yield conditions and load-deformation behaviour); slabs (equilibrium solutions, yield conditions, failure mechanisms, shear in slabs); prestressed concrete for plate and shell structures; long term effects; complements (fire, watertight concrete structures).
Lecture notesLecture notes see http://www.kaufmann.ibk.ethz.ch/en/education/master/structural-concrete-iii.html
LiteratureMarti, P., Alvarez, M., Kaufmann, W. und Sigrist, V., "Tragverhalten von Stahlbeton", IBK Publikation SP-008, Sept. 1999, 301 pp.
Muttoni, A., Schwartz, J. und Thürlimann, B.,: "Bemessung von Betontragwerken mit Spannungsfeldern", Birkhäuser Verlag, Basel, 1997, 145 pp.
101-0137-00LSteel Structures IIIO3 credits2GM. Fontana
AbstractEnhance theoretical considerations and detailing of structural steel design including aspects of economy and erection. E.g. Cranes, composite construction (compression and bending, continuous girders, partial connection, serviceability), fire design, stability of frames and buckling of plates with stiffeners, cold rolled sections, corrosion protection, price calculation and quality control
ObjectiveEnhance theoretical considerations und detailing of structural steel design including aspects of economy and erection.
ContentConstructive design of cranes, composite construction (compression and bending, continuous girders, partial connection, serviceability), fire design, stability of frames and buckling of plates with stiffeners, cold rolled sections, corrosion protection, price calculation and quality control
Lecture notesAutography
Copies of presentations
Literature- Stahlbauhandbuch 1 und 2, Stahlbau-Verlags-GmbH, Köln
- Stahlbaukalender 2000, Ernst + Sohn, Berlin, 1999
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Steel Structures I and II
101-0187-00LStructural Reliability and Risk Analysis Information W3 credits2GB. Sudret
AbstractStructural reliability aims at quantifying the probability of failure of systems due to uncertainties in their design, manufacturing and environmental conditions. Risk analysis combines this information with the consequences of failure in view of optimal decision making. The course presents the underlying probabilistic modelling and computational methods for reliability and risk assessment.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is to provide the students with a thorough understanding of the key concepts behind structural reliability and risk analysis. After this course the students will have refreshed their knowledge of probability theory and statistics to model uncertainties in view of engineering applications. They will be able to analyze the reliability of a structure and to use risk assessment methods for decision making under uncertain conditions. They will be aware of the state-of-the-art computational methods and software in this field.
ContentEngineers are confronted every day to decision making under limited amount of information and uncertain conditions. When designing new structures and systems, the design codes such as SIA or Euro- codes usually provide a framework that guarantees safety and reliability. However the level of safety is not quantified explicitly, which does not allow the analyst to properly choose between design variants and evaluate a total cost in case of failure. In contrast, the framework of risk analysis allows one to incorporate the uncertainty in decision making.

The first part of the course is a reminder on probability theory that is used as a main tool for reliability and risk analysis. Classical concepts such as random variables and vectors, dependence and correlation are recalled. Basic statistical inference methods used for building a probabilistic model from the available data, e.g. the maximum likelihood method, are presented.

The second part is related to structural reliability analysis, i.e. methods that allow one to compute probabilities of failure of a given system with respect to prescribed criteria. The framework of reliability analysis is first set up. Reliability indices are introduced together with the first order-second moment method (FOSM) and the first order reliability method (FORM). Methods based on Monte Carlo simulation are then reviewed and illustrated through various examples. By-products of reliability analysis such as sensitivity measures and partial safety coefficients are derived and their links to structural design codes is shown. The reliability of structural systems is also introduced as well as the methods used to reassess existing structures based on new information.

The third part of the course addresses risk assessment methods. Techniques for the identification of hazard scenarios and their representation by fault trees and event trees are described. Risk is defined with respect to the concept of expected utility in the framework of decision making. Elements of Bayesian decision making, i.e. pre-, post and pre-post risk assessment methods are presented.

The course also includes a tutorial using the UQLab software dedicated to real world structural reliability analysis.
Lecture notesSlides of the lectures are available online every week. A printed version of the full set of slides is proposed to the students at the beginning of the semester.
LiteratureAng, A. and Tang, W.H, Probability Concepts in Engineering - Emphasis on Applications to Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2nd Edition, John Wiley & Sons, 2007.

S. Marelli, R. Schöbi, B. Sudret, UQLab user manual - Structural reliability (rare events estimation), Report UQLab-V0.92-107.
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic course on probability theory and statistics
101-0157-01LStructural Dynamics and Vibration ProblemsW3 credits2GB. Stojadinovic
AbstractFundamentals of structural dynamics are presented. Computing the response of elastic and inelastic single-DOF, continuous-mass and multiple-DOF structural systems subjected to harmonic, periodic, pulse, impulse, and random excitation is discussed. Practical solutions to vibration problems in flexible structures excited by humans, machinery, wind and explosions are developed.
ObjectiveAfter successful completion of this course the students will be able to:
1. Explain the dynamic equilibrium of structures under dynamic loading.
2. Use second-order differential equations to theoretically and numerically model the dynamic equilibrium of structural systems.
3. Model structural systems using single-degree-of-freedom, continuous-mass and multiple-degree-of-freedom models.
4. Compute the dynamic response of structural system to harmonic, periodic, pulse, impulse and random excitation using time-history and response-spectrum methods.
5. Apply structural dynamics principles to solve vibration problems in flexible structures excited by humans, machines, wind or explosions.
6. Use dynamics of structures to identify the basis for structural design code provisions related to dynamic loading.
ContentThis is a course on structural dynamics, an extension of structural analysis for loads that induce significant inertial forces and vibratory response of structures. Dynamic responses of elastic and inelastic single-degree-of-freedom, continuous-mass and multiple-degree-of-freedom structural systems subjected to harmonic, periodic, pulse, impulse, and random excitation are discussed. Theoretical background and engineering guidelines for practical solutions to vibration problems in flexible structures caused by humans, machinery, wind or explosions are presented. Laboratory demonstrations of single- and multi-degree-of-freedom system dynamic response and use of viscous and tuned-mass dampers are conducted.
Lecture notesThe electronic copies of the learning material will be uploaded to ILIAS and available through myStudies. The learning material includes: the lecture presentations, additional reading material, and exercise problems and solutions.
LiteratureDynamics of Structures: Theory and Applications to Earthquake Engineering, 4th edition, Anil Chopra, Prentice Hall, 2014

Vibration Problems in Structures: Practical Guidelines, Hugo Bachmann et al., Birkhäuser, Basel, 1995

Weber B., Tragwerksdynamik. http://e-collection.ethbib.ethz.ch/cgi-bin/show.pl?type=lehr&nr=76 .ETH Zürich, 2002.
Prerequisites / NoticeKnowledge of the fundamentals in structural analysis, and in structural design of reinforced concrete, steel and/or wood structures is mandatory. Working knowledge of matrix algebra and ordinary differential equations is required. Familiarity with Matlab and with structural analysis computer software is desirable.
051-0551-00LEnergy- and Climate Systems I Information W2 credits2GA. Schlüter
AbstractThe lecture contains concepts, physics and components of building technologies for the efficient and sustainable energy supply and climatisation of buildings and their interaction with architecture and urban design. Using calculations, students learn to aquire relevant numbers and assess the performance of solutions.
ObjectiveThe lecture series focuses on the physical principles and technical components of relevant systems for an efficient and sustainable climatisation and energy supply of buildings. A special focus is on the interrelation of supply systems and architectural design and construction. Learning and practicing methods of quantifying demand and supply allows identifying parameters relevant for design.
Content1. Introduction
2. Heating and cooling
3. Active and passive ventilation
4. Electricity in buildings
Lecture notesThe Slides from the lecture serve as lecture notes and are available as download.
LiteratureA list of relevant literature is available at the chair.
101-0177-00LBuilding Physics: Moisture and Durability Information W3 credits2GJ. Carmeliet, T. Defraeye
AbstractMoisture transport and related degradation processes in building and civil engineering materials and structures; concepts of poromechanics and multiscale analysis; analysis of damage cases.
Objective- Basic knowledge of moisture transport and related degradation processes in building and civil engineering materials and structures
- Introduction to concepts of poromechanics and multiscale analysis
- Application of knowledge by the analysis of damage cases
Content1. Introduction
Moisture damage: problem statement
Durability

2. Moisture Transport
Description of moisture transport
Determination of moisture transport properties
Hysteresis
Transport in cracked materials
Damage and moisture transport in cracked media

3. Poromechanics
Moisture and mechanics: poro-elasticity
Poro-elasticity and salt crystallisation
Poro-elasticity and damage
Case studies

4. Multiscale analysis
Problem statement
Multiscale transport model
Multiscale coupled transport - damage model
101-0167-01LFibre Composite Materials in Structural EngineeringW3 credits2GM. Motavalli
Abstract1) Lamina and Laminate Theory
2) FRP Manufacturing and Testing Methods
3) Design and Application of Externally Bonded Reinforcement to Concrete, Timber, Masonry, and metallic Structures
4) FRP Reinforced Concrete, All FRP Structures
5) Measurement Techniques and Structural Health Monitoring
ObjectiveAt the end of the course, you shall be able to

1) Design advanced FRP composites for your structures,

2) To consult owners and clients with necessray testing and SHM techniques for FRP structures,

3) Continue your education as a phd student in this field.
ContentFibre Reinforced Polymer (FRP) composites are increasingly being used in civil infrastructure applications, such as reinforcing rods, tendons and FRP profiles as well as wraps for seismic upgrading of columns and repair of deteriorated structures. The objective of this course is on one hand to provide new generation of engineering students with an overall awareness of the application and design of FRP reinforcing materials for internal and external strengthening (repair) of reinforced concrete structures. The FRP strengthening of other structures such as metallic, timber and masonry will also be shortly discussed. On the other hand the course will provide guidance to students seeking additional information on the topic. Many practical cases will be presented analysed and discussed. An ongoing structural health monitoring of these new materials is necessary to ensure that the structures are performing as planned, and that the safety and integrity of structures is not compromised. The course outlines some of the primary considerations to keep in mind when designing and utilizing structural health monitoring technologies. During the course, students will have the opportunity to design FRP strengthened concrete beams, apply the FRP by themselves, and finally test their samples up to failure.
Lecture notes1) Power Point Printouts
2) Handouts
Literature1) Lawrence C. Bank, Composites for Construction: Structural Design with FRP Materials, John Wiley & Sons, ISBN-13: 978-0471-68126-7

2) fib bulletin 14, Externally Bonded FRP Reinforcement for RC Structures, 2001

3) Eckold G., Design and Manufacture of Composite Structures, ISBN 1 85573 051 0, Woodhead Publishing Limited, Cambridge, England, 1994
Prerequisites / Notice1) Laboratory Tours and Demonstrations: Empa Structural Engineering Laboratory including Smart Composites, Shape Memory Alloys, Large Scale Testing of Structural Components
2) Working with Composite Materials in the Laboratory (application, testing, etc)
101-0190-06LTopics on Signal Processing and IdentificationW2 credits2VS. Pakzad
AbstractIn this course some fundamental topics on digital signal processing will be reviewed. This includes an introduction to digital signals In time, frequency and z-domain, as well as sampling theory and digital filter design. We will then discuss the state space model of dynamic systems and introduce methods of identification of such systems, with an emphasis on using data from mobile sensors.
ObjectiveThe students will be able to analyse digital signals and systems in time-, z-, and frequency domains, and create, implement, and identify digital systems. The examples and sample data are measured from civil structures.
101-0637-01LWood and Wood Composites
Remark: Until HS15 in major materials and mechanics.
W3 credits2GA. Frangi, I. Burgert, G. Fink, M. Fontana, R. Steiger
AbstractKnowledge of characteristic properties of wood as a anisotropic and porous material and their consideration in structural timber design. History, ecology, structure of timber, drying, material properties, influence of moisture and creep. Durability and grading.
Solid timber, glued laminated timber and wood composites.
Fire behaviour and fire design.
ObjectiveKnowledge of characteristic properties of wood as a anisotropic and porous material and their consideration in structural timber design. Knowledge about history, ecology, structure of timber, drying, material properties, influence of moisture and creep, durability and grading.
Knowledge about material properties and field of applications of solid timber, glued laminated timber and wood composites.
Design of timber in fire.
ContentCharacteristic properties of wood as a anisotropic and porous material and their consideration in structural timber design. History, ecology, structure of timber, drying, material properties, influence of moisture and creep, grading. Durability.
Material properties and field of applications of solid timber, glued laminated timber and wood composites.
Fire safety and fire design.
Case studies.
Lecture notesPower Point slides. Further literature.
Literature- U. Lohmann: Holzhandbuch, 2. Aufl., DRW-Verlag Stuttgart, 1982
- R. von Halasz, C. Scheer (Hrsg.): Holzbau-Taschenbuch, Band 1: Grundlagen, Entwurf und Konstruktionen, 8. Aufl., Verlag Ernst & Sohn, Berlin., 1986
Prerequisites / NoticeDie Vorlesung ist mit einer halbtägigen Exkursion verbunden.

Voraussetzungen: Grundkenntnisse der Baustoffkunde
Major in Transport Systems
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0427-01LSystem and Network PlanningO6 credits4GU. A. Weidmann
AbstractPublic transports in the context of the transport systems; customer needs in the transport market; service planning processes for regular public transport services; long distance, regional and urban public transport service strategies; access to public transport and the last mile
ObjectiveStudents will develop a basic knowledge of all stages of the public transport planning process from market demand to service planning; they will understand the most relevant planning methods and will be able to use them
Content(1) Fundamentals of system and network planning: Mobility and transport systems; public transport systems; customer needs versus supply characteristics of regular services. (2) System and network planning in public passenger services: Goals of the system and network planning; generic planning process; demarcation, analysis of the situation, setting of targets; design of public transport services; evaluation and optimization; system planning. (3) Public transport services: long distance service offers; suburban and urban service offers; regional and local service offers; access to public transport and the last mile.
Lecture notesA script in German will be provided for the course. The slides are made available.
LiteratureReferences to technical literature will be included in the course script. An additional list of literature will be given during the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeNo remarks.
101-0437-00LTraffic EngineeringO6 credits4GM. Menendez
AbstractFundamentals of traffic flow theory and operations.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to fully understand the fundamentals of traffic flow theory in order to effectively manage traffic operations. By the end of this course students should be able to apply basic techniques to model different aspects of urban and inter-urban traffic performance, including congestion.
ContentIntroduction to fundamentals of traffic flow theory and operations. Includes understanding of traffic data collection and processing techniques, as well as data analysis, and traffic modeling.
Lecture notesThe lecture notes and additional handouts will be provided during the lectures.
LiteratureAdditional literature recommendations will be provided during the lectures.
Prerequisites / NoticeVerkehr III - Road Transport Systems 6th Sem. BSc (101-0415-00L)
Special permission from the instructor can be requested if the student has not taken Verkehr III
101-0417-00LTransport Planning MethodsW6 credits4GK. W. Axhausen
AbstractThe course provides the necessary knowledge to develop models supporting the solution of given planning problems. This is done by dividing the forecasting problem into sub-problems.
The course is composed of a lecture part, providing the theoretical knowledge, and a applied part, in which students develop their own models.
Objective- Knowledge of methods and algorithms commonly used in transport planning
- Ability to independently develop a transport model able to solve / answer the given problem / questions
- Understanding of algorithms and their implementations commonly used in transport planning
ContentThe course provides the necessary knowledge to develop models supporting the solution of given planning problems. Examples of such planning problems are the estimation of traffic volumes, prediction of estimated utilization of new public transport lines, and evaluation of effects (e.g. change in emissions of a city) triggered by building new infrastructure and changes to operational regulations.

To cope with the forecasting problem it is first divided into sub-problems. Then, these are solved using various algorithms like iterative proportional fitting, shortest path algorithms and the method of successive averages.

The course is composed of a lecture part, providing the theoretical knowledge, and a applied part, in which students create their own models. This part takes place in form of a tutorial and consists in the development of a computer program. The programming part is closely guided and particularly suitable for students with little programming experience.
Lecture notesThe slides of the lecture are provided electronically.
LiteratureWillumsen, P. and J. de D. Ortuzar (2003) Modelling Transport, Wiley, Chichester.

Cascetta, E. (2001) Transportation Systems Engineering: Theory and Methods, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht.

Sheffi, Y. (1985) Urban Transportation Networks: Equilibrium Analysis with Mathematical Programming Methods, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs.
401-0647-00LIntroduction to Mathematical Optimization Information W5 credits2V + 1UD. Adjiashvili
AbstractIntroduction to basic techniques and problems in mathematical optimization, and their applications to problems in engineering.
ObjectiveThe goal of the course is to obtain a good understanding of some of the most fundamental mathematical optimization techniques used to solve linear programs and basic combinatorial optimization problems. The students will also practice applying the learned models to problems in engineering.
ContentTopics covered in this course include:
- Linear programming (simplex method, duality theory, shadow prices, ...).
- Basic combinatorial optimization problems (spanning trees, network flows, knapsack problem, ...).
- Modelling with mathematical optimization: applications of mathematical programming in engineering.
LiteratureInformation about relevant literature will be given in the lecture.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course is meant for students who did not already attend the course "Mathematical Optimization", which is a more advance lecture covering similar topics and more.
103-0317-00LSustainable Spatial Development I
Only for master students, otherwise a special permisson by the lecturer is required.
W3 credits2GB. Scholl
AbstractThe lectures imparts important knowledge for solving spatial relevant conflicts and problems. Case studies will be used to demonstrate the implementation in practice.
ObjectiveSpatial development deals with the development and the design of our living space. To meet the expectations, the interests and the plans of the different actors, it is needed a planning approach considering the overview of both the actual and future situation.
The concept of sustainable development in spatial planning leads necessarily to an efficient management of the resources, especially regarding the resource land. The basics of this important discipline will be the subject of this lecture, which is therefore organised in three parts:
- Inner development
- Integrated spatial and infrastructure development
- Cross-border issues in spatial development
ContentContents

Tasks of Spatial Planning and development
Issues of local and supra-local interest
Recurring spatial changes, impacts and key figures
Formal and informal instruments and procedures in spatial planning
Spatial Design - Ideas about the future
Reasoning and assessing the situation in spatial planning
Spatial planning as a sequence of decisions and interventions
Process and procedures management
Focus issues - Inner development before external development
Focus issues - Cross-border tasks
Focus Issues - Integrated spatial and infrastructure development
Lecture notesFuther information and the documents for the lecture can be found on the homepage of the Chair of Spatial Development.
101-0499-00LBasics in Air TransportW4 credits3GP. Wild
AbstractThe course explains main principles of air transport in general and elaborates on simple interdisciplinary topics.
Since working on broad topics like aerodynamics, manufacturers, airport operation, business aviation, business models etc. the students gets a good overview in air Transportation.
ObjectiveUnderstand and explain basics, principles and contexts in the broader air transport industry.
Lay the foundation of working in or with the air transport industry.
Ideal foundation for Aviation II - Management of Air Transport
ContentWeekly: 1h independent preparation; 2h lectures and 1 h training with an expert in the respective field

Concept: This course will be tought as Aviation I. A subsequent course is under evaluation.

Content: Transport as part of the overall transportation scheme; Aerodynamics; Aircraft (A/C) Designs & Structures; A/C Operations; Law Enforcement; Maintenance & Manufacturers; Airport Operations & Planning; Customs & Security; ATC & Airspace; Air Freight; General Aviation; Business Jet Operations; Business models within Airline Industry; Military Operations.

Technical visit: This course includes a guided tour at Zurich Airport (baggage sorting system, apron, ATC Tower).

Examination: written, 60 min, open books (Examination in German; Answers may be given in English)
Lecture notesSlides are provided prior to each class
LiteratureLiterature will be provided by the lecturers respective there will be additional Information upon registration
Prerequisites / NoticeWe will also use English papers
101-0491-01LAgent Based Modeling in Transportation (Additional JAVA Exercises)
Recommended for students without JAVA skills in addition to LE101-0491-00 Agent Based Modeling in Transportation.
W3 credits2UF. Ciari, M. Balac
AbstractThis course provides the basic concepts of high level programming languages to students without previous programming training. The language used is Java. Since this course is preparatory for the course Agent Based model in Transportation, the same simulation software, MATSim, will be used for several excercises.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to make the students familiar with some basic concepts of object oriented programming and to give a short introduction to the Multi-agent transport simulation (MATSim) which will be used in the lecture (Agent Based Modeling in Transportation) following this one. The programming language used in the course is Java. This course, therefore, has the main goal of providing the students without previous programming training the skills necessary for the successful completion of the Agent Based Modeling in Transportation course.
ContentThe main Java concepts explained in the course are:
1) Types, Variables, Operators
2) Methods, Conditionals, Loops, Arrays
3) Objects and Classes
4) Access control, Class scope, Packages, Java API
5) Design, Debugging, Interfaces
6) Inheritance, Exceptions, File I/O

MATSim will be introduced on a basic level and its basic functionalities will be explained.
Weekly exercises will be focused on building Java knowledge through various examples using the MATSim environment.
Prerequisites / NoticeKeine
Major in Hydraulic Engineering and Water Resources Management
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0247-01LHydraulic structures II
Information: Enrolment of Hydraulic Engineering II is not recommended without having attended Hydraulic Engineering (101-0206-00L) previously since Hydraulic Engineering II is strongly based on Hydraulic Engineering (101-0206-00L).
O6 credits4GR. Boes
AbstractHydraulic structures and their function within a hydraulic scheme are explained. The basic concepts of their layout and design with regard to economy and safety are provided.
ObjectiveKnowledge of hydraulic structures and their function within a hydraulic scheme. Skills for the layout and design of hydraulic structures with regard to economy and safety.
ContentWeirs: Weir stability, gates, inflatable dams, appurtenant structures.
Conduits: Design of headraces, pressure shafts, and penstocks, constructive details and construction.
Power plants: Power house and turbine types, design, structure, construction.
Dams: Dam types, appurtenant structures (diversion, spillways, bottom outlet), dam type selection criteria, layout and design of gravity dams, buttress dams, arch dams, rockfill dams with central core or concrete face, measures in the foundation, mass concrete, RCC dams, reservoir siltation and sediment management, dam surveillance.
Artificial reservoirs: Purpose, layout, sealing, appurtenant structures, environmental aspects.
Lecture notesmanuscript and further documentation
Literatureis specified in the lecture and in the manuscript
Prerequisites / NoticeInformation: Enrolment of Hydraulic Engineering II is not recommended without having attended Hydraulic Engineering (101-0206-00L) previously since Hydraulic Engineering II is strongly based on Hydraulic Engineering (101-0206-00L).
101-0267-01LNumerical Hydraulics Information O3 credits2GM. Holzner
AbstractIn the course Numerical Hydraulics the basics of numerical modelling of flows are presented.
ObjectiveThe goal of the course is to develop the understanding of the students for numerical simulation of flows to an extent that they can later use commercial software in a responsible and critical way.
ContentThe basic equations are derived from first principles. Possible simplifications relevant for practical problems are shown and their applicability is discussed. Using the example of non-steady state pipe flow numerical methods such as the method of characteristics and finite difference methods are introduced. The finite volume method as well as the method of characteristics are used for the solution of the shallow water equations. Special aspects such as wave propagation and turbulence modelling are also treated.

All methods discussed are applied pratically in exercises. This is done using programs in MATLAB which partially are programmed by the students themselves. Further, some generelly available softwares such as Hydraulic Systems and HEC RAS for non-steady flows are used.
Lecture notesLecture notes, powerpoints shown in the lecture and programs used can be downloaded. They are also available in German.
LiteratureGiven in lecture
102-0237-00LHydrology IIW3 credits2GP. Burlando, S. Fatichi
AbstractThe course presents advanced hydrological analyses of rainfall-runoff processes. The course is given in English.
ObjectiveTools for hydrological modelling are discussed at the event and continuous scale. The focus is on the description of physical processes and their modelisation with practical examples.
ContentMonitoring of hydrological systems (point and space monitoring, remote sensing). The use of GIS in hydrology (practical applications). General concepts of watershed modelling. Infiltration. IUH models. Event based rainfall-runoff modelling. Continuous rainfall-runoff models (components and prrocesses). Example of modelling with the PRMS model. Calibration and validation of models. Flood routing (unsteady flow, hydrologic routing, examples). The course contains an extensive semester project.
Lecture notesParts of the script for "Hydrology I" are used. Also available are the overhead transparencies used in the lectures. The semester project consists of a two part instruction manual.
LiteratureAdditional literature is presented during the course.
102-0455-01LGroundwater IW3 credits2GM. Willmann
AbstractThe course provides an introduction into quantitavie analysis of groundwater flow and transport. It is focussed on formulating flow and transport problems in groundwater, which are to be solved analytically or numerically.
Objectivea) Students understand the basic concepts of flow and contaminant transport processes and boundary conditions in groundwater.

b) Students are able to formulate simple practical flow and transport problems.

c) Students are able to understand and apply simple analytical solutions to simple flow and transport problems.

d) Students are able to use simple numerical codes to adequately solve simple flow (and transport) problems.
ContentIntrodiction, aquifers, groundwater use, sustainability, porosity.

Properties of porous media.
Exercises: Groundwater use, porosity, grain size analysis.

Flow properties, Darcy's law, filter.

Flow equations, stream function.
Exercises: Darcy's law.

Analytical solutions, confined aquifers, steady-state flow.
Exercises: Head isolines.

Use of superposition principles, transient flow, freee surface flow.
Exercises: Analytical solutions to flow problems.

Finite difference solutions to flow problems I.
Exercises: Analytical solutions to flow problems.

Finite difference solutions to flow problems II.
Exercises: Finite differece formulations to flow problems.

Transport processes.
Exercises: Computer workshop using PMWIN.

Analytical solutions to transport problems I.
Exercises: Computer workshop using PMWIN.

Analytical solutions to transport problems II.
Exercises: Analytical solutions to transport problems.

Path lines, groundwater protection.
Exercises: Analytical solutions to transport problems.

Groundwater remediation, groundwater management.
Exercises: Groundwater remediation.
Lecture notesFolien auf Internet unter www.ihw.ethz.ch/GWH/education/index

Altes Skript auf Internet www.ihw.ethz.ch/GWH/education/index

Weitere Texte auf Internet www.ihw.ethz.ch/GWH/education/index

Didaktische Software auf Internet unter www.ihw.ethz.ch/GWH/education/index
LiteratureJ. Bear, Hydraulics of Groundwater, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1979

P.A. Domenico, F.W. Schwartz, Physical and Chemical Hydrogeology, J. Wilson & Sons, New York, 1990

W. Kinzelbach, R. Rausch, Grundwassermodellierung, Gebrüder Bornträger, Stuttgart, 1995

Krusemann, de Ridder, Untersuchung und Anwendung von Pumpversuchen, Verl. R. Müller, Köln, 1970

G. de Marsily, Quantitative Hydrogeology, Academic Press, 1986
101-0258-00LRiver EngineeringO3 credits2GG. R. Bezzola
AbstractThe lecture addresses the fundamentals to quantitatively describe the flow of water, the transport of sediments and morphological changes like erosion or deposition in watercourses. Further addressed are the design and dimensioning of river engineering works to create and ensure sufficient capacity, channel stability as well as to ensure the ecological functions of the watercourse.
ObjectiveThe students shall
- be able to describe the interrelation between discharge, sediment transport and channel evolution quantitatively
- know the fundamentals and be able to apply the approaches and methods to treat river engineering problems associated with flood protection and river restoration
- be capable to design and dimension river engineering works needed to influence the processes in watercourses
ContentThe first part of the lecture treats the fundamentals required to deal with river engineering problems. Sampling methods for the river bed material and methods to calculate the discharge in alluvial rivers are presented. The process of river bed armoring and the principles of incipient motion, initiation of erosion as well as sediment transport (bed load, suspended load) are treated.
In the second part of the lecture, the procedures to quantify the sediment budget and the morphological changes (erosion, aggradation) in river systems are explained. Furthermore, the process of natural channel formation and the different plan forms of rivers (straight, meandering, braided) are discussed. Own chapters are dedicated to the topics of channel stability, bed forms, river morphology and scour.
The last part of the lecture concentrates on the design and dimensioning of river engineering works. The topics focussed on are the stabilization of banks and of the longitudinal profile of rivers.
Lecture notesLecture notes "River Engineering" (in German, 470 pages, including list of references)
LiteratureThe lecture notes contain a comprehensive list of references for further reading.
Prerequisites / NoticeStrongly recommended lectures:
Hydrology (102-0293-AAL), Hydraulics I (101-0203-01L) and Hydraulic Engineering (101-0206-00L)

A practical exercise (voluntary, unmarked) is offered to deepen the learned subjects.
This exercise bases on field data, which are partly collected by the students on a river in nature. Besides the collection of fundamentals and field data, the exercise comprehends the calculation of the stage-discharge relationship, of the critical discharges for initiation of bed load transport and bed erosion and of the annual sediment load in a given river reach.
Major in Materials and Mechanics
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0617-00LMaterials IV Information W+3 credits2GH. J. Herrmann, I. Burgert, R. J. Flatt, F. Wittel
AbstractThis lecture is focused on current issues of materials research from various fields. It provides an overview on various directions of research on civil engineering materials and is intended to simplify the further choice of courses.
ObjectiveBased on the bachelor courses „Materials I-III“, current, fundamental, and important issues of specific building materials are addressed. Next to aspects of material production, usage and properties, their interaction with the environment e.g. by durability and environmental impact are addressed. This course is intended to simplify the further selection of courses.
ContentThe lecture is segmented into 13 important problems, namely:
1. Materials, Structures, and Sustainability
2. Granular matter: (DEM)
3. Fracture mechanics and size effects in concrete
4. Cyclic failure of asphalt (Fatigue)
5. Mechanics and failure of fiber reinforces materials
6. Wood: from the tree to the beam (multi scale approaches)
7. Transport and degradation in porous building materials
8. Rheology
9. Plasticity
10. Foam (e.g. polymers)
11. Gluing and coating (surfaces)
12. Asbestos, nano particles and hazardous substances
13. Biomimetics in Constructions
Lecture notesdownload from www.ifb.ethz.ch/education
Literaturedownload from www.ifb.ethz.ch/education
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture will be given in english.
402-0809-01LIntroduction to Computational Physics (for Civil Engineers)W4 credits2V + 1UH. J. Herrmann
AbstractThis course offers an introduction to computer simulation methods for physics problems and their implementation on PCs and super computers: classical equations of motion, partial differential equations (wave equation, diffusion equation, Maxwell's equation), Monte Carlo simulations, percolation, phase transitions
Objective
ContentEinführung in die rechnergestützte Simulation physikalischer Probleme. Anhand einfacher Modelle aus der klassischen Mechanik, Elektrodynamik und statistischen Mechanik sowie interdisziplinären Anwendungen werden die wichtigsten objektorientierten Programmiermethoden für numerische Simulationen (überwiegend in C++) erläutert. Daneben wird eine Einführung in die Programmierung von Vektorsupercomputern und parallelen Rechnern, sowie ein Überblick über vorhandene Softwarebibliotheken für numerische Simulationen geboten.
Prerequisites / NoticeLecture and exercse lessons in english
101-0677-00LConcrete TechnologyW2 credits2GG. Martinola, M. Bäuml
AbstractOpportunities and limitations of concrete technology.
Commodities and leading edge specialties.
ObjectiveAdvanced education in concrete technology for civil engineers who are designing, specifying and executing concrete structures.
ContentBased on the lecture 'Werkstoffe I' students receive deep concrete technology training. A comprehensive knowledge of the most important properties of conventional concrete and the current areas of research in concrete technology will be presented. The course covers various topics.
The content of the course is:
- concrete components
- concrete properties
- concrete mix design
- production, transport, casting
- demoulding, curing and additional protective measures
- durability
- standards
- high performance concretes
1. high strength and ultra high strength concrete
2. fiber reinforced concrete
3. self compacting concrete
4. shotcrete
5. light weight concrete
6. low shrinkage concrete
7. low heat concrete for mass structures
8. frost and wear resistant concrete
9. concrete for low and high ambient temperatures
Lecture notesSlides provided for download.
101-0177-00LBuilding Physics: Moisture and Durability Information W3 credits2GJ. Carmeliet, T. Defraeye
AbstractMoisture transport and related degradation processes in building and civil engineering materials and structures; concepts of poromechanics and multiscale analysis; analysis of damage cases.
Objective- Basic knowledge of moisture transport and related degradation processes in building and civil engineering materials and structures
- Introduction to concepts of poromechanics and multiscale analysis
- Application of knowledge by the analysis of damage cases
Content1. Introduction
Moisture damage: problem statement
Durability

2. Moisture Transport
Description of moisture transport
Determination of moisture transport properties
Hysteresis
Transport in cracked materials
Damage and moisture transport in cracked media

3. Poromechanics
Moisture and mechanics: poro-elasticity
Poro-elasticity and salt crystallisation
Poro-elasticity and damage
Case studies

4. Multiscale analysis
Problem statement
Multiscale transport model
Multiscale coupled transport - damage model
101-0648-00LMetallic Materials and CorrosionW3 credits2GB. Elsener
AbstractMetals in civil engineering (steels, high strength steel, Al-alloys, stainless steels). Mechanisms to improve the mechanical properties, plastic deformation (dislocations), mechanical tests. Corrosion, stress corrosion. The goal is the understanding of the relation between chemical composition, microstructure and mechanical properties and durability (corrosion) of metallic materials. Case studies.
ObjectiveKnowledge and comprehension of the fundamentals of material science of metallic materials such as the relation betweeen chemical composition, microstructure and properties of metallic materials. Ability to critically select the appropriate materials for application in civil engineering (fixation elements, reinforcement for concrete structures, high-strength steels).
ContentFundamentals of metallic materials, cristal structure of metallic materials, defects, solidification.
Properties of metallic materials, physical (electrical, magnetic), mechanical (strength, deformation, fracture), chemical (corrosion resistance).
Most important alloys (steels, aluminium alloys, stainless steels)
Examples of application
Lecture notesLecture notes (in german) are distributed at the beginning of the course.
Reprints for selected topics.
LiteratureDonald R. Askeland, Materialwissenschaften, Spektrum Akademischer Verlag, Heidelberg (1996)
ISBN 3-86025-357-3
Kapitel 1 - 13
3. Semester
Major Courses
Major in Construction and Maintenance Management
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0549-00LSelected Topics on Legal Aspects in Civil EngineeringW+3 credits2GH. Briner, D. Trümpy
AbstractBasic knowledge in public and private law of civil engineering. Examples of the subjects treated: space management, protection of the environment, legal procedures, standards for building technology and contracts.
ObjectivePart 1: The students shall acquire basic knowledge of the public law concerning civil engineering:
space management, conception of buildings, protection of the environment, procedures
Part 2: The students shall acquire basic knowledge of the private law concerning civil engineering
ContentTeil 1: Jede Lektion behandelt für ein bestimmtes Stadium des Projekts ein Thema des öffentlichen Baurechts wie Bau- und Zonenordnungen, Quartierpläne, Umweltverträglichkeitsprüfungen, Baubewilligungsverfahren etc..
Teil 2: Grundzüge des privaten Baurechts wie Abnahme und Genehmigung von Bauwerken, Vollmacht des Architekten / Ingenieurs zu Rechtshandlungen namens des Bauherrn, Mängelrüge im Bauwesen, Mehrheit ersatzpflichtiger Baubeteiligter, Generalunternehmervertrag, Haftung des Baumaterialverkäufers, Bauhandwerkerpfandrecht, Grundzüge der SIA-Norm 118, Baukonsortium, technische Normen, internationale Bauverträge, Architekten / Ingenieure als Gerichtsexperten, Aspekte des Bauzivilprozesses
Lecture notesD. Trümpy: Tafeln zu den Grundzügen des schweizerischen Bauvertragsrechts (Vorlesungsunterlage)
H. Briner: Tafeln zu den Grundzügen des öffentlichen Raumplanungs-, Bau- und Umweltrechts (Vorlesungsunterlage)
Literature- Stöckli P./Siegenthaler Th. (Hrsg.) Die Planerverträge, Schulthess 2013
- Gauch Peter, Werkvertrag, 5. Auflage, Schulthess 2011
- Lendi, M.; Nef, U.Chr.; Trümpy, D. (Hrsg.): Das private Baurecht in der Schweiz, vdf Zürich 1994
- Trümpy, D.: Architektenvertragstypen unter Berücksichtigung der Ausgabe 1984 der SIA-Ordnung 102, Zürcher Studien zum Privatrecht Nr. 67, Zürich 1989
Prerequisites / NoticeDie Teilnehmer sollen stets ein Exemplar der SIA-Norm 118, der SIA-LHO 103 sowie die Gesetzesausgaben von OR und ZGB bei sich haben.
101-0577-00LAn Introduction to Sustainable Development in the Built EnvironmentO3 credits2GG. Habert
AbstractThis year the UN Conference in Paris will shape future world objectives to tackle climate change.
This course provides an introduction to the notion of sustainable development when applied to our built environment
ObjectiveAt the end of the semester, the students have an understanding of the term of sustainable development, its history, the current political and scientific discourses and its relevance for our built environment.

In order to address current challenges of climate change mitigation and resource depletion, students will learn a holistic approach of sustainable development. Ecological, economical and social constraints will be presented and students will learn about methods for argumentation and tools for assessment (i.e. life cycle assessment).

For this purpose an overview of sustainable development is presented with an introduction to the history of sustainability and its today definition as well as the role of cities, urbanisation and material resources (i.e. energy, construction material) in social economic and environmetal aspects.

The course aims to promote an integral view and understanding of sustainability and describing different spheres (social/cultural, ecological, economical, and institutional) that influence our built environment.

Students will acquire critical knowledge and understand the role of involved stakeholders, their motivations and constraints, learn how to evaluate challenges, identify deficits and define strategies to promote a more sustainable construction.

After the course students should be able to define the relevance of specific local, regional or territorial aspects to achieve coherent and applicable solutions toward sustainable development.

The course offers an environmental, socio-economic and socio-technical perspective focussing on buildings, cities and their transition to resilience with sustainable development. Students will learn on theory and application of current scientific pathways towards sustainable development.
ContentThe following topics give an overview of the themes that are to be worked on during the lecture.

- Overview on the history and emergence of sustainable development
- Overview on the current understanding and definition of sustainable development

- Case Study 1: Sustainable construction, the role of construction industry (national/international)
- Case Study 2: Cities, forms of settlements
- Case Study 3: Material resources, scenarios, energy, construction materials, urban metabolism
- Case Study 4: Buildings, heating/cooling, consumers, prosumers and other stakeholder, cooperations

- Method 1: Life cycle assessment (planning, construction, operation/use, deconstruction)
- Method 2: Economics for sustainable construction
- Method 3: Construction, flexibility, modularity

- Synthesis 1: Climate Change mitigation and adaptation in cities
- Synthesis 2: Transition to sustainable development
Lecture notesAll relevant information will be online available before the lectures. For each lecture slides of the lecture will be provided.
LiteratureA list of the basic literature will be offered on a specific online platform, that could be used by all students attending the lectures.
101-0587-00LWorkshop on Sustainable Building Certification Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 25
W+3 credits2GD. Kellenberger
AbstractBuilding labels are used to certify buildings and neighbourhoods in term of sustainability. Many different labels have been developed and can be used in Switzerland (LEED, DGNB, SNBS, Minergie). In this course the differences between the certification labels and its application on 3 emblematic case study buildings will be discussed.
ObjectiveAfter this course, the students are able to understand and use the different certification labels.
They have a clear view of what the labels take into consideration and what they don't.
ContentThree buildings case study will be presented.

Different certification schemes, including LEED (American standard), DGNB (German Standard with Swiss adaptation), SNBS, MINERGIE-ECO and 2000-Watt-Society (Swiss standards) will be presented and explained by experts.

After this overall general presentation and in order to have a closer look to specific aspects of sustainability, students will work in groups and assess during one or two weeks this specific criteria on one of the case studies presented before. This practical hands on the label will end with a presentation and a discussion where we will highlight differences between the labels.

This alternance of working session on one specific criteria for one specific building followed by a group presentation and discussion to compare labels is repeated for the different focus point (operation energy, mobility, daylight, indoor air quality).
Lecture notesThe slides from the presentations will be made available.
LiteratureAll documents for certification labels as well as detail plans of the buildings will be available for the students.
101-0439-00LIntroduction to Economic Analysis - A Case Study Approach with Cost Benefit Analysis in TransportW6 credits4GK. W. Axhausen, R. Schubert
AbstractThe course presents cost benefit analysis and related evaluation methods in transport and introduces the survey methods used to derive the monetary values of non-market goods.
ObjectiveFamiliarity with the essential methods of project appraisal
ContentCost-Benefit-Analysis; multi-criteria analysis; European guidelines; stated response methods; travel cost approach and others; Valuation of travel time savings; valuation of traffic safety
Lecture notesHandouts
LiteratureVSS (2006) SN 640 820: Kosten-Nutzen-Analysen im Strassenverkehr, VSS, Zürich.

Boardman, A.E., D.H. Greenberg, A.R. Vining und D.L. Weimer (2001) Cost – Benefit – Analysis: Concepts and Practise, Prentice-Hall, Upper Saddle River.

ecoplan and metron (2005) Kosten-Nutzen-Analysen im Strassenverkehr: Kommentar zu SN 640 820, UVEK, Bern.
101-0419-00LRailway Construction and MaintenanceW4 credits4GU. A. Weidmann, P. Güldenapfel, M. Kohler, M. J. Manhart, further speakers
AbstractTrack geometry including calculation and measuring as well as related data systems; interaction between track and vehicles, vehicle dynamics, stress; track construction including special features of railway bridges and tunnels; track diagnostics and forcast; track maintenance and related methods
ObjectiveThe lecture gives a deeper insight into track geometry, the interaction between track and vehicles as well as in construction and dimensioning of the track. Methods for the diagnosis of the state of the track and its forcast are shown. State-of-the-art maintenance strategies and technologies are presented.
ContentTrack geometry including calculation and measuring as well as related data systems; interaction between track and vehicles, vehicle dynamics, stress; track construction including special features of railway bridges and tunnels; track diagnostics and forcast; track maintenance and related methods
Lecture notesThe slides will be made available.
LiteratureA list with related technical literature will be handed out.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture Railway Infrastructures (Transportation II) is recommended.
Major in Geotechnical Engineering
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0329-00LTunnelling IIIW4 credits2GG. Anagnostou, E. Pimentel, M. Ramoni
AbstractDeepen the knowledge on selected topics of underground construction as well as learning working out conceptual solutions of complex problems.
ObjectiveLecture: Deepen the knowledge on selected topics of underground construction.
Exercises: Conceptual solutions of complex problems.
ContentCaverns: Geometry, construction methods, support.
Shafts: Construction methods, support.
Urban tunnelling: Boundary conditions, system choice, alignement, design.
Field measurements: Principles, monitoring layout, applications, interpretation.
Cut and cover tunnels: Modelling, design.
Exercising conceptual solution of complex tunnelling problems based upon discussion of current tunnel cases with particularly demanding problems in small groups.
Lecture notesAutographieblätter
LiteratureEmpfehlungen
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite: BSc course "Tunnelling", MSc courses "Tunnelling I" and "Tunnelling II".
101-0339-00LEnvironmental GeotechnicsW3 credits2GM. Plötze
AbstractIntroduction of basic knowledge about problems with contaminated sites, investigation of this sites, risque management, remediation and reclamation techniques as well as monitoring systems.
Introduction in landfill design and engineering with focus on barrier- and drainage systems and lining materials, evaluation of geotechnical problems, e.g. stability
ObjectiveIntroduction of basic knowledge about problems with contaminated sites, investigation of this sites, risque management, remediation and reclamation techniques as well as monitoring systems.
Introduction in landfill design and engineering with focus on barrier- and drainage systems as wellas lining materials, evaluation of geotechnical problems, e.g. stability
ContentDefinition of contaminated sites, site investigation methods, historical research and technical investigation, risque assessment, contamination transport, remediation, clean-up and retaining techniques (e.g. bioremediation, incineration, retaining walls, pump-and-treat, permeable reactive barriers), monitoring, research projects and results

waste, waste disposal, treatment and management, multi-barrier-systems, site investigation, lining systems and recovering systems of landfill (e.g. materials, drainage systems, geosynthetics), stability, research projects and results
Lecture notesDr. R. Hermanns Stengele, Dr. M. Plötze: Environmental Geotechnics (german) digital
Prerequisites / Noticeexcursion
101-0359-00LPhysical Modelling in Geotechnics
Does not take place this semester.
W3 credits2Gto be announced
AbstractAspects of both physical modelling in geotechnical engineering complemented by application of numerical modelling: appreciation of typical mechanisms pertaining to ultimate & serviceability limit state; influence on resulting design methods
ObjectiveLeading to an appreciation of the typical mechanisms pertaining to ultimate & serviceability limit state
Influence on resulting design methods.
ContentPrinciples of physical modelling:
Centrifuge (physics, scaling laws, errors)
Experimental methods:
Geotechnical (sand/clay model making, site investigation), mechanical (packages, actuators), electronic (data acquisition)
Application of physical modelling for typical geotechnical problems, validated or calibrated by finite element analysis (learnt and applied in an earlier course).
Review of mechanisms observed, comparison between modelling, numerical and/or classical plasticity methods, implications for design.

From:- Foundations (shallow and deep), bridge abutments, reinforced soils, soil nailing & anchorages, tunnels & deep excavations, earthquake effects, dynamic problems, environmental geomechanics, transport processes, dams, embankments & slopes, cold regions engineering.
Lecture notesHandout notes,
Example worksheets
http://geotip.igt.ethz.ch
Literature- Taylor, R.N. (Ed) (1995): Geotechnical centrifuge technology, Blackie Academic & Professional, London.
- Craig, W.H.; James, R.G.; Schofield, A.N. (Eds) (1998): Centrifuges in soil mechanics, Balkema, Rotterdam.
- Britto, A.M.; Gunn, M. (1987): Finite elements with critical state soil mechanics, Ellis Horwood, London.
- Springman, S.M. (Ed.) (2002): Constitutive & Centrifuge Modelling: Two Extremes, Swets & Zeitlinger, Lisse, The Netherlands.
- Springman, S.M.; Laue, J.; Seward, L.J. (Eds.) (2010) Physical Modelling in Geotechnics ICPMG 2010 Vols. 1 & 2
Prerequisites / NoticeA simple soil structure interaction boundary value problem will be selected (e.g., foundation, embankment, slope) as the exercise topic, which will modelled, in various forms, throughout the course. A predictive (class A) numerical analysis will be carried out by the students, followed by a centrifuge test on the same geometry to validate the numerical calculations. Subsequently a Class C2 numerical analysis will be conducted, calibrated by the physical modelling event.
101-0367-00LGeotechnical Engineering in TransportationW3 credits2GC. Rabaiotti
AbstractRoad design criteria, Technology of road construction materials, geotechnical testing methods in Laboratory and in situ, Planning, monitoring and interpretation of soil field tests, Soil classification for traffic construction, Compaction of road structures and dams, Frost characteristics of soil materials, soil stabilization
ObjectiveAim of the course is to teach students the most important aspects of the road structure, its building and design methods. An essential part of the course is devoted to understand the influence of the insitu
conditions: soil, underground, climate, water, as well as of the charachteristics of building materials and of road surface on the durability of the pavement.
ContentRoad design criteria, Technology of road construction materials, geotechnical testing methods in Laboratory and in situ, Planning, monitoring and interpretation of soil field tests, Soil classification for traffic construction, Compaction of road structures and dams, Frost characteristics of soil materials, soil stabilization
Lecture notesAutographie, Uebungsblätter, Handouts
Literatureas indicated in the course
Prerequisites / NoticeIn den Vorlesungen und Übungen werden verschiedene Demonstrationsmaterialien verwendet.

Voraussetzungen: Grundlagenkenntnisse in "Bodenmechanik/Grundbau" sowie in "Projektierung von Verkehrsanlagen"
Major in Structural Engineering
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0119-00LStructural Masonry Information W3 credits2GN. Mojsilovic
AbstractKnowledge of the engineering properties of materials for masonry construction.
Technical understanding of the structural behaviour of load-bearing masonry structures subjected to in-plane forces and combined actions.
Develop a technical competence for design procedures for load-bearing masonry structures by means of exercises.
ObjectiveKnowledge of the engineering properties of materials for masonry construction.
Technical understanding of the structural behaviour of load-bearing masonry structures subjected to in-plane forces and combined actions.
Develop a technical competence for design procedures for load-bearing masonry structures by means of exercises.
ContentHistorical Development of Masonry Construction
Detailing and Execution
Construction Materials
Structural Behaviour and Modelling
Structural Analysis and Dimensioning
Reinforced Masonry
Seismic Behaviour
Lecture notesLecture notes
Literature"Mauerwerk", Zimmerli Bruno, Schwartz Joseph und Schwegler Gregor, Birkhäuser Verlag Basel, 1999
"Mauerwerk, Bemessungsbeispiele zur Norm SIA 266", SIA Dokumentation D0257, 2015
"Mauerwerk", Norm SIA 266, 2015
"Mauerwerk - Ergänzende Festlegungen", Norm SIA 266/1, 2015
Prerequisites / NoticeStructural Concrete III
101-0129-00LExisting StructuresW3 credits2GT. Vogel
AbstractTreatment of the topic primarily from the perspective of a consulting engineer dealing with a single object.
Elaboration of a systematic procedure for respective projects. Consolidation for concrete structures and extension to other construction methods.
Uncovering of interfaces between owners, architects, contractors and specialists.
ObjectiveTreatment of the topic primarily from the perspective of a consulting engineer dealing with a single object.
Elaboration of a systematic procedure for respective projects. Consolidation for concrete structures and extension to other construction methods.
Uncovering of interfaces between owners, architects, contractors and specialists.
ContentSystematics of existing structures, examination (condition survey, condition examination, recommendation of remedial measures), non-destructive testing methods, natural stone masonry, strengthening methods (esp. plate bonding)
Lecture notesLecture notes
LiteratureNormen SIA 269, 269/1 bis 269/6,
SIA-Dokumentationen D 0239 und D 0240 der Einführungskurse
101-0149-00LPlate and Shell StructuresW3 credits2GT. Vogel, S. Fricker
AbstractBasic load bearing behaviour of plate and shell structures
ObjectiveComprehension of basic load bearing behaviour of plate and shell structures; knowledge of typical applications of different materials, ability to reasonably interpret and check results of numerical calculations; establish access to technical literature.
ContentIn-plane loaded plates (cartesian and polar coordinates)
Kinematics of in-plane loaded plates
Folded plate structures
Thin plates with small deflections
Circular plates
Thin plates with large deflections
Geometry of curved surfaces
Shells (basics, membrane theory, bending theory, form finding)
Lecture notesAutographie "Flächentragwerke"
LiteratureEmpfohlen:
- Girkmann, K.: "Flächentragwerke", Springer-Verlag, Wien, 1963, 632 pp.
- Flügge, S.: "Stresses in Shells", Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1967, 499 pp.
- Hake, E. ; Meskouris,K. : "Statik der Flächentragwerke", Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 2001
- Timoshenko, S.P.; Woinowsky-Krieger, S.: "Theory of Plates and Shells", McGraw-Hill, New-York, 1959, 580 pp.
101-0159-00LMethod of Finite Elements IIW3 credits2GE. Chatzi
AbstractBasic theoretical and procedural concepts of the method of finite elements (FE) for the analysis of nonlinear & dynamic systems are introduced. Kinematic and material nonlinear effects and the dynamic analysis of structures in terms of modal and time domain analysis are described.
The course is complemented by Homework Sessions using computing tools and FE software such as MATLAB, ABAQUS & ANSYS.
ObjectiveBasic theoretical and procedural concepts of the method of finite elements (FE) for the analysis of nonlinear & dynamic systems are introduced. Kinematic and material nonlinear effects and the dynamic analysis of structures in terms of modal and time domain analysis are described.
The course is complemented by Homework Sessions using computing tools and FE software such as MATLAB, ABAQUS & ANSYS.
ContentIntroduction to finite element nonlinear analysis in structural engineering.
Formulation and solution of nonlinear problems.
Nonlinear constitutive relations.
Dynamic finite element analysis.
Solution of eigen value problems.
Practical application of the finite element nonlinear and/or dynamic analysis
Problem solution using MATLAB, ABAQUS and ANSYS
Lecture notesHandouts, Course Script available on http://www.ibk.ethz.ch/ibk/ibk/ch/education/femII/index_EN
LiteratureCourse Script available on http://www.ibk.ethz.ch/ibk/ibk/ch/education/femII/index_EN

Useful Reading:
"Nonlinear Finite Elements of Continua and Structures" by T. Belytschko, W.K. Liu, and B. Moran.
Bathe, K.J., Finite Element Procedures, Prentice Hall, 1996.
101-0169-00LTimber Structures II Restricted registration - show details
Prerequisite: Timber Structures I (101-0168-00L)
W3 credits2GA. Frangi, R. Jockwer, R. Steiger
AbstractBasic knowledge of structural timber design including material behaviour especially anisotropy, moisture and long duration effects and their consideration in structural analysis and detailing. Design, detailing and structural analysis of timber roof structures, buildings and bridges.
ObjectiveComprehension and application of basic knowledge of structural timber design including material behaviour especially anisotropy, moisture and long duration effects and their consideration in structural analysis and detailing. Design, detailing and structural analysis of timber roof structures, buildings and bridges.
ContentField of application of timber structures; Timber as building material (wood structure, physical and mechanical properties of wood and wood-based products); Durability; Principles of design and dimensioning; Connections (dowels, nails, screws, glued connections); Timber components and assemblies (mechanically jointed beams, trusses); Design and detaling of timber roof structures, buildings and bridges.
Lecture notesAutography Timber Structures
Copies of lecture slides
LiteratureTimber design tables HBT 1, Lignum (2012)
Swiss Standard SIA 265 (2012)
Swiss Standard SIA 265/1 (2009)
Prerequisites / NoticeTimber Structures I
101-0189-00LSeismic Design of Structures IIW3 credits2GB. Stojadinovic
AbstractThe following advanced topics are covered: 1) behavior and non-linear response of structural systems under earthquake excitation; 2) seismic behavior and design of moment frame, braced frame, shear wall and masonry structures; 3) fundamentals of seismic isolation; and 4) assessment and retrofit of existing buildings. These topics are discussed in terms of performance-based seismic design.
ObjectiveAfter successfully completing this course the students will be able to:
1. Use the knowledge of nonlinear dynamic response of structures to interpret the design code provisions and apply them in seismic design structural systems.
2. Explain the seismic behavior of moment frame, braced frame and shear wall structural systems and successfully design such systems to achieve the performance objectives stipulated by the design codes.
3. Determine the performance of structures under earthquake loading using modern performance assessment methods and analysis tools.
ContentThis course completes the series of two courses on seismic design of structures at ETHZ. Building on the material covered in Seismic Design of Structures I, the following advanced topics will be covered in this course: 1) behavior and non-linear response of structural systems under earthquake excitation; 2) seismic behavior and design of moment frame, braced frame and shear wall structures; 3) fundamentals of seismic isolation; and 4) assessment and retrofit of existing buildings. These topics will be discussed from the standpoint of performance-based design.
Lecture notesThe electronic copies of the learning material will be uploaded to ILIAS and available through myStudies. The learning material includes the lecture presentations, additional reading, and exercise problems and solutions.
LiteratureEarthquake Engineering: From Engineering Seismology to Performance-Based Engineering, Yousef Borzorgnia and Vitelmo Bertero, Eds., CRC Press, 2004

Dynamics of Structures: Theory and Applications to Earthquake Engineering, 4th edition, Anil Chopra, Prentice Hall, 2014

Erdbebensicherung von Bauwerken, 2nd edition, Hugo Bachmann, Birkhäuser, Basel, 2002
Prerequisites / NoticeETH Seismic Design of Structures I course, or equivalent. Students are expected to understand the seismological nature of earthquakes, to characterize the ground motion excitation, to analyze the response of elastic single- and multiple-degree-of-freedom systems to earthquake excitation, to use the concept of response and design spectrum, to compute the equivalent seismic loads on simple structures, and to perform code-based seismic design of simple structures. Familiarity with structural analysis software, such as SAP2000, and general-purpose numerical analysis software, such as Matlab, is expected.
101-0179-00LProbabilistic Seismic Risk Analysis and Management for Civil SystemsW3 credits2GB. Stojadinovic, M. Broccardo, S. Esposito, P. Galanis
AbstractAdvanced topics covered in this course are: 1) probabilistic seismic hazard analysis; 2) probabilistic seismic risk analysis; 3) seismic risk management using structural and financial engineering means; and, time permitting, 4) advanced topics in systemic probabilistic risk evaluation.
ObjectiveAfter successfully completing this course the students will be able to:

1. Gather the necessary data and conduct a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis for a site.
2. Gather the necessary data and conduct a probabilistic vulnerability analysis of a building or an element of a civil infrastructure system at a site.
3. Design structural and/or financial engineering solutions to mitigate the seismic risk at a site.
ContentThis course extends the series of two courses on seismic design of structures at ETHZ and introduces the topic of probabilistic seismic risk analysis and seismic risk management for the build environment and civil infrastructure systems. The following advanced topics will be covered in this course: 1) probabilistic seismic hazard analysis; 2) probabilistic seismic risk analysis; 3) seismic risk management using structural and financial engineering means; and, time permitting, 4) advanced topics in systemic probabilistic risk evaluation.
Lecture notesThe electronic copies of the learning material will be uploaded to ILIAS and available through myStudies. This will include the lecture notes, additional reading, and exercise problems and solutions. There is no textbook for this course.
LiteratureReading material:
- Jack R Benjamin, C. Allin Cornell (2014) Probability, Statistics, and Decision for Civil Engineers
- A. H-S. Ang (Author), W. H. Tang Probability Concepts in Engineering: Emphasis on Applications to Civil and Environmental Engineering
- P.E. Pinto, R. Giannini and P. Franchin (2004) Seismic reliability analysis of structures, IUSSPress. Pavia;
- McGuire, R.K. 2004. Seismic hazard and risk analysis: EERI Monograph MNO-10, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.
- A Mc. Neil, R. Frey and P. Embrechts, Quantitative Risk Management, Concepts, Techniques and Tools, Princeton University Press, 2015
- R. Rees, A. Wambach, The Microeconomics of Insurance, Foundations and Trends in Microeconomics, Vol. 4, Mps. 1-2 (2008), pp. 1- 163, DOI: 10.1561/0700000023
- Earthquake Engineering: From Engineering Seismology to Performance-Based Engineering, Yousef Borzorgnia and Vitelmo Bertero, Eds., CRC Press, 2004
- Dynamics of Structures: Theory and Applications to Earthquake Engineering, 4th edition, Anil Chopra, Prentice Hall, 2012
- Erdbebensicherung von Bauwerken, 2nd edition, Hugo Bachmann, Birkhäuser, Basel, 2002

References:
-Norm SIA 261: Einwirkungen auf Tragwerke (Actions on Structures). Schweizerischer Ingenieur- und Architekten-Verein, Zürich, 2003

Software:
- Bispec: software for unidirectional and bidirectional dynamic time-history and spectral seismic analysis of a simple dynamic system. http://eqsols.com/Bispec.aspx
- SAP2000 v15.1: general-purpose 3D nonlinear structural analysis software. http://www.csiberkeley.com/sap2000
- OpenSees: Open System for Earthquake Engineering Simulation, is an object-oriented, open- source software framework. http://opensees.berkeley.edu/
Prerequisites / NoticeETH Seismic Design of Structures I course (101-0188-00), or equivalent. Students are expected to understand the seismological nature of earthquakes, to characterize the ground motion excitation, to analyze the response of elastic single- and multiple-degree-of-freedom systems to earthquake excitation, to use the concept of response and design spectrum, to compute the equivalent seismic loads on simple structures, and to perform code-based seismic design of simple structures.
101-0637-01LWood and Wood Composites
Remark: Until HS15 in major materials and mechanics.
W3 credits2GA. Frangi, I. Burgert, G. Fink, M. Fontana, R. Steiger
AbstractKnowledge of characteristic properties of wood as a anisotropic and porous material and their consideration in structural timber design. History, ecology, structure of timber, drying, material properties, influence of moisture and creep. Durability and grading.
Solid timber, glued laminated timber and wood composites.
Fire behaviour and fire design.
ObjectiveKnowledge of characteristic properties of wood as a anisotropic and porous material and their consideration in structural timber design. Knowledge about history, ecology, structure of timber, drying, material properties, influence of moisture and creep, durability and grading.
Knowledge about material properties and field of applications of solid timber, glued laminated timber and wood composites.
Design of timber in fire.
ContentCharacteristic properties of wood as a anisotropic and porous material and their consideration in structural timber design. History, ecology, structure of timber, drying, material properties, influence of moisture and creep, grading. Durability.
Material properties and field of applications of solid timber, glued laminated timber and wood composites.
Fire safety and fire design.
Case studies.
Lecture notesPower Point slides. Further literature.
Literature- U. Lohmann: Holzhandbuch, 2. Aufl., DRW-Verlag Stuttgart, 1982
- R. von Halasz, C. Scheer (Hrsg.): Holzbau-Taschenbuch, Band 1: Grundlagen, Entwurf und Konstruktionen, 8. Aufl., Verlag Ernst & Sohn, Berlin., 1986
Prerequisites / NoticeDie Vorlesung ist mit einer halbtägigen Exkursion verbunden.

Voraussetzungen: Grundkenntnisse der Baustoffkunde
101-0190-06LTopics on Signal Processing and IdentificationW2 credits2VS. Pakzad
AbstractIn this course some fundamental topics on digital signal processing will be reviewed. This includes an introduction to digital signals In time, frequency and z-domain, as well as sampling theory and digital filter design. We will then discuss the state space model of dynamic systems and introduce methods of identification of such systems, with an emphasis on using data from mobile sensors.
ObjectiveThe students will be able to analyse digital signals and systems in time-, z-, and frequency domains, and create, implement, and identify digital systems. The examples and sample data are measured from civil structures.
Major in Transport Systems
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0439-00LIntroduction to Economic Analysis - A Case Study Approach with Cost Benefit Analysis in TransportW6 credits4GK. W. Axhausen, R. Schubert
AbstractThe course presents cost benefit analysis and related evaluation methods in transport and introduces the survey methods used to derive the monetary values of non-market goods.
ObjectiveFamiliarity with the essential methods of project appraisal
ContentCost-Benefit-Analysis; multi-criteria analysis; European guidelines; stated response methods; travel cost approach and others; Valuation of travel time savings; valuation of traffic safety
Lecture notesHandouts
LiteratureVSS (2006) SN 640 820: Kosten-Nutzen-Analysen im Strassenverkehr, VSS, Zürich.

Boardman, A.E., D.H. Greenberg, A.R. Vining und D.L. Weimer (2001) Cost – Benefit – Analysis: Concepts and Practise, Prentice-Hall, Upper Saddle River.

ecoplan and metron (2005) Kosten-Nutzen-Analysen im Strassenverkehr: Kommentar zu SN 640 820, UVEK, Bern.
101-0469-00LRoad SafetyW6 credits4GH. Schüller, M. Deublein
AbstractThe collection and the methods of statistical and geographical analysis of road accidents are important fundamentals of this course. Safety Aspects in design of urban roads are discussed and measures for improving the safety situation are presented. Procedures of infrastructure safety management for administrations and police are another topic.
ObjectiveImparting knowledge base about road safety and the event of accident, presenting possibilities to increase road safety
ContentAccident origin, collection of road accidents, statistical (descriptive and multivariate, accident prediction models) and geographical analysis of road accidents, risk analysis and rehabilitation measures, road safety instruments for infrastructure with focus on road safety audit, Swiss and international transport policy
LiteratureBasic literature: message Via sicura; Directive 2008/96/EC on road infrastructure safety management; ELVIK, R.; VAA, T. (2004). The Handbook of Road Safety Measures. Oxford: ELSEVIER Ltd.; EU-Projekt RiPCORD-iSEREST (http://ripcord.bast.de/)
Further literature: will be presented during the course
101-0419-00LRailway Construction and MaintenanceW4 credits4GU. A. Weidmann, P. Güldenapfel, M. Kohler, M. J. Manhart, further speakers
AbstractTrack geometry including calculation and measuring as well as related data systems; interaction between track and vehicles, vehicle dynamics, stress; track construction including special features of railway bridges and tunnels; track diagnostics and forcast; track maintenance and related methods
ObjectiveThe lecture gives a deeper insight into track geometry, the interaction between track and vehicles as well as in construction and dimensioning of the track. Methods for the diagnosis of the state of the track and its forcast are shown. State-of-the-art maintenance strategies and technologies are presented.
ContentTrack geometry including calculation and measuring as well as related data systems; interaction between track and vehicles, vehicle dynamics, stress; track construction including special features of railway bridges and tunnels; track diagnostics and forcast; track maintenance and related methods
Lecture notesThe slides will be made available.
LiteratureA list with related technical literature will be handed out.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture Railway Infrastructures (Transportation II) is recommended.
101-0479-00LSafety and Reliability of Railway SystemsW3 credits3GU. A. Weidmann, A. Bomhauer-Beins, O. Fink, M. Montigel
AbstractRailway safety policies and safety concepts, command and control technologies for railways, optimization systems, European Train Control System, reliability availability maintainability safety (RAMS) of railway systems.
ObjectiveThe students comprehend the main principles of safety, reliability and optimization for railway systems and understand the basic concepts of command and control technologies for railways.
ContentRailway safety strategies
o Safety in public transport
o Safety relevant characteristic of railway transport
o Safety requirements for railway transport
o Safety concepts

Command and control technologies for railway systems
o protective functions
o ensure the sequence/spacing of trains
o ensure route protection
o ensure level crossing protection
o technical realization for protective functions
o European Train Control System

operational command/control systems
o dispatching
o operational control systems
o concepts of optimization

RAMS for railway systems
o accident investigation methods
o RAMS standards for railways
o risk analysis and hazard control
o RAMS methods
o design principles for availability and safety
o maintenance strategies
o Life Cycle Costs (LCC)
o Human Factor
o safety in long railway tunnels

tutorials in Railway Operation Laboratory
field trip to Siemens Wallisellen (command and control technologies)
Lecture notesThe slides will be provided in German.
LiteratureReferences will be included in the lecture notes. An additional list of literature will be given during the course.
Prerequisites / Noticesome of the tutorials will be held at the IVTs Railway Operation Laboratory. The lecture Systems Dimensioning and Capacity is recommended.
101-0449-00LManagement, Marketing, Quality
Does not take place this semester.
W6 credits4GU. A. Weidmann
AbstractTransport and administrative policy, international and national regulation, business management of public transport companies, marketing, advertising and pricing; quality management
ObjectiveComprehension of the transport and administrative policy as well as of the regulation of public transport companies. To develop a full understanding of the three important public transport system operations management processes: (1) Business management; (2) Marketing; (3) Quality control. The course will teach essential working techniques in each of these processes.
Content(1) Transport and administrative policy: Goals of the state related to public transports, governmental activities in public transport, regulation. (2) Business management in public transport enterprises: goals of public transport companies, goals of the business management; management of public transport on the different management levels, business organization. (3) Marketing, advertising and pricing: Fundamentals and goals; marketing strategies and concepts in public transports; marketing tools; putting marketing into action. (4) Quality control: Quality in transport systems; goals of quality management; structuring quality control measures; collecting quality data in an operating service; use of quality control systems for service optimization.
Lecture notesCourse notes will be provided in German. Slides will be made available.
LiteratureReferences to technical literature will be included in the course script. An additional list of literature will be given during the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeLectures System and Network Planning as well as Systems Dimensioning and Capacity recommended.
101-0579-00LInfrastructure Maintenance Processes
Does not take place this semester.
101-0579-00L "Infrastructure Maintenance Processes" will be offered from FS17 on with new title 101-0579-00L "Infrastructure Management 2: Evaluation Tools".
W3 credits2GB. T. Adey
AbstractThis course provides an introduction to the tools that can be used to evaluate infrastructure. In particular tools:
- to measure the level of service being obtained from infrastructure,
- to predict slow changes in infrastructure over time, and
- to predict fast changes in infrastructure over time,fits of monitoring.
Objectiveto equip students with tools to be used to evaluate infrastructure and the level of service being provided from infrastructure
ContentIntroduction
Levels of service
Reliability of infrastructure
Availability and maintainability of infrastructure
Mechanistic-empirical models
Regression analysis
Event trees
Fault trees
Markov chains
Neural networks
Bayesian networks
Conclusion
Lecture notesAll necessary materials (e.g. transparencies and hand-outs) will be distributed before class.
LiteratureAppropriate reading material will be assigned when necessary.
101-0509-00LInfrastructure Management 1: ProcessW3 credits2GB. T. Adey
AbstractThe course provides an introduction to the steps included in the infrastructure management process. The lectures are given by a mixture of external people in German and internal people in English.
ObjectiveUpon completion of the course, students will
- understand the steps required to manage infrastructure effectively,
- understand the complexity of these steps, and
- have an overview of the tools that they can use in each of the steps.
Content- The infrastructure management process and guidelines
- Knowing the infrastructure - Dealing with data
- Establishing goals and constraints
- Establishing organization structure and processes
- Making predictions
- Selecting strategies
- Developing programs
- Planning interventions
- Conducting impact analysis
- Reviewing the process
Lecture notesAppropriate reading / and study material will be handed out during the course.
Transparencies will be handed out at the beginning of each class.
LiteratureAppropriate literature will be handed out when required.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe courses will be given half in English and half in German. Students should have a minimum of level B2 in both to register for the course.
103-0417-02LTheory and Methodology of Spatial Planning
Only for master students, otherwise a special permisson by the lecturer is required.
W3 credits2GM. Nollert
AbstractIn order to solve problems in spatial planning it is necessary to explore actions and to judge them; finally, one has to argue why a certain option should be preferred to others. Assessments of the situation are the basis for the problems to treat. Specific knowledge, represented in an adequate manner, is required.
ObjectiveThe participants know the interdependencies between the assessment of a situation, decision making, knowlegde and language. They know the nature of a decision dilemma und maximes, how to deal with it. Especially they learn that the requirement of information for a decision depends upon the preferences of the deciding acteur. They are also familiar with difficulties and pitfalls within these contexts and know what can be done against it.
ContentAssessment of the situation, deciding, language and knowledge are the main parts.
101-0491-00LAgent Based Modeling in TransportationW3 credits2GF. Ciari, M. Balac
AbstractThe main topics of the lecture are:
1) Introduction to the agent-based paradigm and overview on existing agent-based models in transportation, including MATSim
2) Learn how to setup MATSim for policy analysis
3) Learn about the interfaces available to enhances the software (includes Java programming)
4) Create, run and analyse a policy study
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to make the students familiar with agent-based models and in particular with the software MATSim. They will learn the pros and cons of this type of approach versus traditional transport models and will learn to use the simulation. They will design a policy study and run simulations to evaluate the impacts of the proposed policies.
ContentThe main topics are:
1) Introduction to the agent-based paradigm and overview on existing agent-based models in transportation, including MATSim
2) Introduction of basic building blocks of simulation approaches (random numbers generation, experimental design, variance control, response surface estimation)
3) Revision of the key submodels and their parameters and concepts (value of time, Wardrop (Nash) equilibirum, etc.)
3) Learn how to setup MATSim for policy analysis
4) Learn about the interfaces available to enhances the software (includes Java programming)
5) Create, run and analyse a policy study
LiteratureAgent-based modeling in general
Helbing, D (2012) Social Self-Organization, Understanding Complex Systems, Springer, Berlin.
Heppenstall, A., A. T. Crooks, L. M. See and M. Batty (2012) Agent-Based Models of Geographical Systems, Springer, Dordrecht.

MATSim

Horni, A., K. Nagel and K.W. Axhausen (eds.) (2016) The Multi-Agent Transport Simulation MATSim, Ubiquity, London
(http://www.matsim.org/the-book)

Additional relevant readings, mostly scientific articles, will be recommended throughout the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeThere are no strict preconditions in terms of which lectures the students should have previously attended. However, it is expected that the students have some experience with some high level programming language (i.e. C, C++, Fortran or Java). If this is not the case, attending the additional java exercises (101-0491-00U) is strongly encouraged.
101-0492-00LSimulation of Traffic OperationsW3 credits2GH. He
AbstractThe course introduces basics of microscopic traffic simulation, including model development, calibration, validation, data analysis, identification of strategies for improving traffic performance, and evaluation of such strategies. The modelling software used is VISSIM.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to introduce basic concepts in microscopic traffic simulation and conduct a realistic traffic engineering project from beginning to end. The students will first familiarize themselves with microscopic traffic simulation models. They will then use a simulation for modeling and analyzing the traffic operations. The emphasis is not only on building the simulation model, but also understanding of the models behind and logically evaluating results. The final goal is to make valid and concrete engineering proposals based on the simulation model.
ContentIn this course the students will first learn some microscopic simulation concepts and then complete a traffic engineering project with microscopic traffic simulator VISSIM.

Microscopic simulation concepts will include:
1) Car following models
2) Lane change models

Specific tasks for the project will include:
1) Building a model with the simulator VISSIM in order to replicate and analyze the traffic conditions measured/observed.
2) Calibrating and validating the simulation model.
3) Redesigning/extending the model to improve the traffic performance.
Lecture notesThe lecture notes and additional handouts will be provided before the lectures.
LiteratureAdditional literature recommendations will be provided at the lectures.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents need to know some basic road transport concepts. The course Road Transport Systems (Verkehr III), or simultaneously taking the course Traffic Engineering is encouraged. The course Transport Simulation (101-0438-00 G) and previous experience with VISSIM is helpful but not mandatory.
Major in Hydraulic Engineering and Water Resources Management
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0249-00LSelected Topics on Hydraulic Engineering
Prerequisites: 101-0247-01L Hydraulic Engineering II or equivalent course.
W3 credits2SR. Boes, I. Albayrak
AbstractThe lecture focuses on selected topics in hydraulic engineering, water management and aquatic ecology relating to hydropower and flood protection projects.
Objectiveto deepen knowledge on special aspects in hydraulic engineering and to understand the procedures and the planning sequence of hydropower projects
ContentDifferent selected topics in hydraulic engineering will be focused on, e.g. dam safety, possible problems at reservoirs like sedimentation or natural hazards by impulse waves, the hydraulics of river flows, spillways and intake structures at dams and weirs, hydropower and ecology like fish-ecological aspects at low-head hydropower plants and eco-hydraulics like flow-vegetation interaction. Another focus will be put on typical approaches and procedures in the planning process of hydropower projects.
Lecture notesLecture notes/handouts will be available online.
Literatureis specified in the lecture.
Prerequisites / NoticeExternal speakers will present current topics and projects in Switzerland and abroad.
101-0289-00LApplied Glaciology Information W3 credits2GM. Funk, A. Bauder, D. Farinotti
AbstractWe will explain the fundamentals of physics of glaciers which are necessary for treating applied problems. We will go into climate-glacier interactions, flow of glaciers, lake ice and hydrology of glaciers.
ObjectiveTo understand the fundamental physical processes in glaciology.
To learn some basic numerical modelling techniques for glacier flow.
To identify glaciological hazards and to learn some assessment and mitigation possibilities.
ContentBasics in physical glaciology
Dynamics of glaciers: deformation of glacier ice, role of water in glacier motion, reaction of glaciers to climate changes, glacier calving, surges
Ice falls, ice avalanches
Glacier floods
Lake ice and bearing capacity
Lecture notesHandouts are available
LiteratureRelevante Literatur wird während der Vorlesung angegeben.
Prerequisites / NoticeFür aktuelle Fallbeispiele werden risikobasierte Massnahmen bei glaziologischen Naturgefahren diskutiert.

Voraussetzungen: Es werden Grundkenntnisse in Mechanik und Physik vorausgesetzt.
101-1249-00LHydraulics of Engineering Structures
Former Title until HS15: Wastewater Hydraulics.
W3 credits2GH. Fuchs, I. Albayrak, L. Schmocker
AbstractHydraulic fundamentals are applied to hydraulic structures for wastewater, flood protection and hydropower. Typical case studies from engineering practice are further described.
ObjectiveUnderstanding and quantification of fundamental hydraulic processes with particular focus on hydraulic structures for wastewater, flood protection and hydropower
Content1. Introduction & Basic equations
2. Losses in flow & Maximum discharge
3. Uniform flow & Critical flow
4. Hydraulic jump & Stilling basins
5. Backwater curves
6. Weirs/End overfalls & Venturi
7. Mobile discharge measurements & Culverts/restrictors/inverted siphons
8. Fall manholes & Vortex drop
9. Conjunctions & Shock waves at abrupt wall deflections
10. Air/water flows and bottom outlets
11. Driftwood retention racks
12. Vegetated flows - Introduction
13. Vegetated flows - Application
14. Summary & questions/preparations for examination
Lecture notesText books

Hager, W.H. (2010). Wastewater hydraulics. Springer: New York.
LiteratureExhaustive references are contained in the suggested text book.
102-0215-00LUrban Water Management II Information W3 credits2GM. Maurer, P. Staufer
AbstractTechnical networks in urban water engineering. Water supply: Optimization, water hammer, corrosion and hygiene. Urban drainage: Urban hydrology, non stationary flow, pollutant transport, infiltration of rainwater, wet weather pollution control. General planning, organisation and operation of regional drainage systems.
ObjectiveConsolidation of the basic procedures for design and operation of technical networks in water engineering.
ContentDemand Side Management versus Supply Side Management
Optimierung von Wasserverteilnetzen
Druckstösse
Kalkausfällung, Korrosion von Leitungen
Hygiene in Verteilsystemen
Siedlungshydrologie: Niederschlag, Abflussbildung
Instationäre Strömungen in Kanalisationen
Stofftransport in der Kanalisation
Einleitbedingungen bei Regenwetter
Versickerung von Regenwasser
Generelle Entwässerungsplanung (GEP)
Lecture notesWritten material and copies of the overheads will be available.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite: Introduction to Urban Water Management
Major in Materials and Mechanics
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0619-00LMechanics of Building Materials Information W3 credits2GF. Wittel
AbstractMaterial models comprise our knowledge on the physical behavior of materials. Based on a short introduction to solid mechanics, 3D material laws for elastic, visco-elastic behavior, plasticity and damage mechanics are discussed. We focus on material laws for concrete, metals, wood and other composites, how to obtain parameters from mechanical tests and their application in FEM calculations.
ObjectiveThis introductory course aims to bridge the gap between phenomenological, qualitative comprehension of processes in building materials, their characterization in mechanical testing and the ability to apply those for practical design purposes via constitutive models.

Upon completion of the course you should be able to:

- classify different material behavior (e.g. linear/non-linear elastic, elasto-plastic, creep) with respect to types of constitutive material models (total /incremental strain models, damage / plasticity models, linear visco-elasticity),

- review how incremental strain models (e.g. elasto-plastic) are algorithmically implemented in Finite Element software (UMat of Abaqus),

- formulate the main approach and assumptions to the most import models for building materials and discuss their limitations,

- propose experimental campaigns for obtaining relevant material parameters for non-linear material models.
Content- Introduction to constitutive models for materials
- Fundaments of mechanics of materials
- Cauchy-, hyper- and hypoelastic material descriptions
- Constitutive Models for Concrete (non-linear elastic)
- Introduction to metall and concrete plasticity
- Introduction to ABAQUS UMAT Programming
- Damage continuum mechanics
- Linear visco-elastic materials
Lecture notesWill be provided during the lecture.
101-0639-01LScience and Engineering of Glass and Natural Stone in Construction Information
Does not take place this semester.
W3 credits2GF. Wittel, T. Wangler
AbstractThe course offers an overview of relevant practical issues and present technological challenges for glass and natural stones in constructions. Students gain a good knowledge of the basics of glasses and natural stones, their potential as engineering materials and learn to apply them in the design of civil engineering constructions and to evaluate concepts.
ObjectiveGlass is increasingly used in constructions to ease the construction process, as functional insulation barrier, even for structural applications of impressive size. While everyone has experienced the innovation potential of glass in the last decade, products from natural stone suffer from an unjustified traditional image that often originates from a lack of understanding of the material and its combination with other materials. Culturally important structures often are made from natural stone and their conservation demands an understanding of their deterioration mechanisms, the concepts of which can be applied to other civil engineering materials. Designers and engineers need the knowledge to reconcile materials and system behavior with the entire processing, handling, integration and life time in mind.
In this module students are provided with a broad fundamental as well as practice-oriented education on glass and natural stone in civil engineering applications. Present and future construction and building concepts demand for such materials with optimized properties. Based on the fundamentals from the Bachelor course in materials by the end of this module, you should be able to:

-recognize and choose specific applications from the broad overview you were provided with,

-relate processing technologies to typical products and building applications and recognize (and explain typical damage related to wrong material choice or application,

-explain the nature of glassy and crystalline materials and interpret their physical behavior against this background,

-explain the major deterioration mechanisms in natural stone and how this relates to durability,

-analyze material combinations and appraise their application in future products as well as integration in existing constructions,

- summarize with appropriate guidance publications on a related topic in an oral presentation and short report.
ContentLecture 1: An introduction to science and engineering of glass and natural stone in construction (FW/TW)

Lecture 2: Glass chemistry including historical development of glass composition, use of raw materials, melts, chemical stability and corrosion. (FW)

Lecture 3: Geology and mineralogy of stones used in construction. Formation processes, chemistry, crystal structure. (TW)

Lecture 4: Microscopic models for glassy materials. Physics of glass transition. From microscopic physical models to thermodynamics, rheology and mechanics of glassy materials. (FW)

Lecture 5: Stone properties and behavior: microstructure, density, porosity, mechanical properties (TW)

Lecture 6: Glass physics: Optical properties (transmission, reflection, emission, refraction, polarization and birefringence, testing methods); Mechanical properties (density, thermal, mechanical, electric properties, glass testing) (FW)

Lecture 7: Stone properties and durability: transport, moisture and thermal cycling (TW)

Lecture 8: Forming and processing of glass: (plate and molded glass, drawing, slumping, profiling etc.; Processing: Cutting, mechanical processing, tempering, gluing, bending, laminating of glass Surface treatments: coating, sputtering, enameling, printing, etching, chemical pre-stressing.) (FW)

Lecture 9: Durability: Salt crystallization, freezing, biodeterioration (TW)

Lecture 10: Glass products for civil engineering applications: (Molded glasses, fiber glass, foam glass, plate glass); construction glass (insulation glass, structural glass, protective glass, intelligent glass, codes); (FW)

Lecture 11: Conservation: Consolidation, cleaning, and other treatments (TW). Practical aspects (guest lecturer)

Lecture 12: Glass in constructions. (modelling, application and regulation, typical damage in glass) (FW)

Lecture 13: Student presentations; exam questions (FW/TW)
Lecture notesWill be handed out in the lectures
LiteratureWerkstoffe II script (download via the IFB homepage). Rest will be handed out in the lectures
Prerequisites / NoticeWerkstoffe I/II of the bachelor studies or equivalent introductory materials lecture.
101-0659-01LDurability and Maintenance of Reinforced ConcreteW3 credits2VB. Elsener, U. Angst
AbstractThe course focuses on durability of RC structures, in particular the corrosion of steel in concrete. The main emphasis lies on understanding the mechanisms, design and execution aspects related to durability of new and existing structures. New methods and materials for preventative measures, condition assessment and repair techniques are treated with lectures and practice related exercises.
ObjectiveUnderstand the mechanism of deterioration of RC structures, in particular reinforcement corrosion.
Know the relevant parameters affecting durability of reinforced concrete, in particular cover depth, concrete quality, moisture, and the ways to control durability
Understand the current approaches for design for durability (exposure classes, prescriptive) and be aware of their limitations
Know the future performance-based models for durability design and the difficulties in defining input parameters (such as critical chloride content).
Know and understand different ways to improve durability of RC structures (e.g. stainless steel reinforcement)
Know the particular problems with post-tensioned structures and ways to overcome them (electrically isolated tendons).
Know and understand the non-destructive methods for inspection and condition assessment (especially half-cell potential mapping) and be aware of the limitations
Know and understand repair methods such as conventional repair, electrochemical methods (in particular cathodic protection)
Be aware of differences in performance of the new blended cements (especially CEM II with limestone) respect to the traditional Portland cement and the possible future problems for durability.
ContentReinforced concrete combines the good compressive strength of concrete with the high tensile strength of steel and has proven to be successful in terms of structural performance and durability. However, there are instances of premature failure of reinforced concrete and prestressed concrete components due to corrosion of the reinforcing steel with very high economic implications of such damage. This course focuses on the chloride and carbonation induced corrosion of steel in concrete, presenting transport mechanisms and electrochemical concepts. The main emphasis lies on design and execution aspects related to durability of new and existing structures. New methods and materials for preventative measures, condition assessment and repair techniques are discussed. The course is a point of reference for engineers and materials scientists involved in research and practice of corrosion protection, rehabilitation and maintenance of reinforced concrete structures and components.

Content of the course in detail:

Lecture 1
Administrative issues, literature, what do students expect to learn? Introduction (economic relevance of durability, transition from building to maintenance). Fundamentals of corrosion and durability / Passivity and pitting corrosion

Lecture 2
Reinforced concrete / Corrosion protection / Degradation mechanism corrosion (chlorides/carbonation) / electrochemical mechanism / controlling parameters / cracks and spalling on surface, danger of localized corrosion

Lecture 3
Other degradation mechanisms: sulphate attack, ASR, frost attack
Various examples, frequency of occurrence of individual deterioration mechanisms

Lecture 4
Service life: initiation stage & propagation stage. Durability design: prescriptive approach, constructive detailing, importance of moisture for almost all degradation mechanisms. Performance based approach, simple diffusion approach for chloride ingress, Critical chloride content (influencing parameters)

Lecture 5
Stainless steel as reinforcing steel for concrete / different types of stainless steels / mechanical properties / corrosion resistance, passivity / coupling with black reinforcing steel / examples of application / life-cycle-costs

Lecture 6
Inspection and condition assessment I: visual inspection / destructive testing (chloride profiles, carbonation depth, thin section analysis, etc.)

Lectures 7
Inspection and condition assessment II: non-destructive testing (potential mapping, cover depth measurement, resistivity measurement). Potential mapping: measurement principle / effect of carbonated cover zone / effect of moisture / examples

Lecture 8
Post-tensioned structures / problem with existing structures: no NDT method / approach for protection (multiple barrier) / new systems with polymer ducts / electrically isolated tendons / fib guidelines / Swiss guideline / Monitoring techniques / Applications

Lecture 9
Repair methods I: conventional repair / coatings / inhibitors / limitations

Lecture 10
Repair methods II: electrochemical repair methods (ECR, ER, CP) / principles / electrochemical chloride removal (theory and examples) / electrochemical realkalization (theory and examples) / when can these methods be applied ? / cost aspects

Lecture 11
Repair methods III: cathodic protection (theory, technical solutions, anode systems, etc and examples). Monitoring of CP.

Lecture 12
New cements, issue of CO2 reduction. Effects of fly ash, slag, limestone on workability, diffusion coefficient, resistivity, pH (including a discussion of the pozzolanic reaction and it's consequences with respect to pH buffering Portlandite reserve). Discuss products on the Swiss market.

Lecture 13
Summary of most important points of this course given by the students. Open discussion about durability design, use of new cements, new materials and repair methods. Expected consequences for practice ? Course evaluation and time for asking questions.
Lecture notesThe course is based on the book
Corrosion of steel in concrete - prevention diagnosis repair (WILEY 2013) by L. Bertolini, B. Elsener, P. Pedeferri and R. Polder)
Slides of the lectures will be distributed in advance
Special hand outs and reprints for particular topics will be distributed
LiteratureA first overview can be found in: B. Elsener, Corrosion of Steel in Concrete, in "Corrosion and Environmental Degradation", ed. M. Schütze, WILEY VCH (2000) Vol.2 pp. 391 - 431

Backbone of the course: Corrosion of Steel in Concrete - Prevention diagnosis repair, L. Bertolini, B. Elsener, P. Pedeferri, R. Polder, WILEY VCH 2nd edition (2013)
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents are encouraged to actively participate during the lectures. Students are expected to work on all the exercises (four). For one exercise a detailed written solution of the exercise has to be delivered (after the discussion).

Students should have passed the exams on Werkstoffe I and II.
101-0669-00LBituminous MaterialsW3 credits2GM. Partl
AbstractIntroduction into special aspects of the mechanical and chemo-physical properties as well as the structure and application of bituminous materials for road and waterproofing application considering also new R&D trends
ObjectiveIntroduction into special aspects of the mechanical and chemo-physikal properties as well as the structure and application of bituminous materials for road and waterproofing application considering also new R&D trends
ContentBasics of mechanical behavior: Viscosity, rheological models, viscoelasticity, time-temperature superposition, fatigue, viscoplasticity.
Bituminous binders: Tar-related issues, bitumen, natural asphalt, polymer modified bitumen, technological tests, mechanical-physical properties, binder classification, bitumen emulsions, foam bitumen.
Asphalt pavements: material structure and concepts, production, mixture testing and characterization, mixture types, recycling
Waterproofing membranes: tack- coats, structure of polymer modified waterproofing membranes, production, typical tests, system-related properties, conastruction and application
Lecture notesScript, handed out during lecture
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture comprises two written exercises and one literature exercise with short presentation that are requested to be done.
101-0689-00LShrinkage and Cracking of Concrete: Mechanisms and Impact on DurabilityW3 credits2VP. Lura
AbstractConcrete is generally viewed as a durable construction material. However, the long-term performance of a concrete structure can be greatly compromised by early-age cracking. This course will explain how shrinkage of concrete leads to cracking and how control of shrinkage allows increasing the expected durability of a concrete structure.
ObjectiveThis course will begin with a brief introduction about hydration and microstructure development in cement paste and concrete. The students will learn the main causes of cracking at early ages, namely plastic, drying, thermal and autogenous shrinkage, with special emphasis on the driving mechanisms. The importance of concrete curing, especially in the first few days after casting, will be explained. Building on the knowledge of the driving forces of shrinkage, the way of action of shrinkage-reducing admixtures will be clarified and different applications illustrated. As an extension of external curing, the students will become familiar with internal water curing by means of saturated lightweight aggregate and superabsorbent polymer.
Most concrete members are restrained by adjacent structures. When shrinkage is restrained, cracks may develop. The students will learn how to apply different criteria for assessing concrete cracking and how to retrieve the mechanical properties of the concrete, especially stiffness and creep, relevant for the calculations.
In addition to macroscopic cracks, microcracking may occur in the cement paste due to inner restraint offered by the aggregates. Both macroscopic cracks and diffuse microcracking within a concrete may facilitate the ingress of harmful substances (e.g. chloride and sulfate ions) into the concrete; these may react with the concrete or with the reinforcement and create further deterioration. The students will acquire an understanding of the mechanisms of transport through cracked concrete, with special focus on experimental evidence and on techniques able to visualize the transport process and follow it in time.
As a final outcome of the course, the students will be able to estimate the impact of cracking on the expected durability of concrete structures and to implement different types of measures to reduce the extent of cracking.
ContentConcrete is generally viewed as a long-lasting construction material. However, the durability of a concrete structure can be jeopardized by shrinkage-induced cracking. In addition to being unsightly, cracks have the potential to act as weak planes for further distress or as conduits for accelerated ingress of aggressive agents that may reduce durability.
Advances in concrete technology over the past decades have led to the practical use of concrete with a low water to binder ratio and with different types of mineral and organic admixtures. Another recent development is self-compacting concrete, which avoids concrete vibration and reduces labor during placing. Unfortunately, these concretes are especially prone to cracking at an early age, unless special precautions are taken. Proper curing becomes in this case the key to achieve better performance in various environmental and load conditions.
Specific topics covered by the course:
- Hydration and microstructure development
- Plastic shrinkage
- Development of mechanical properties
- Thermal deformation
- Autogenous deformation
- Drying shrinkage
- Curing
- Shrinkage-reducing admixtures
- Internal curing: saturated lightweight aggregate and superabsorbent polymer
- Fracture and microcracking
- Transport in cracked concrete
- Impact of cracking on concrete durability
Lecture notesFor each lecture, lecture notes will be provided. In addition, one or two research papers for each lecture will be indicated as supportive information.
The students will be also provided with a DVD containing the teaching material of a previous course on the same topic, including 16 hours of filmed lectures.
LiteratureCopies of one to two research papers relevant to the topic of each lecture will be provided to the students as supportive information.
Prerequisites / NoticeA basic knowledge of concrete technology is preferable.
151-0353-00LMechanics of Composite Materials Information W4 credits2V + 1UG. Kress
AbstractThe course Mechanics of Composite Materials is dedicated to modeling problems following from the complex mechanical behavior of these anisotropic material structures. and modeling of continuous fibre reinforced composites. Participants will be able to design parts for the mechanical, automotive and aerospace industry.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of the mechanical properties of fiber reinforced composites with regard to analysis and design of lightweight structures for mechanical, transportation and aerospace applications.
Content1. Introduction and Elastic Anisotropy
2. Laminate Theory
3. Thick-Walled Laminates and Interlaminar Stresses
4. Edge Effects at Multidirectional Laminates
5. Micromechanics
6. Failure Hypotheses and Damage Predictction
7. Fatigue Response
8. Joining and Bonding Techniques
9. Sandwich Designs
Lecture notesManuscript and handouts in printed form and as PDF-files:
http://www.structures.ethz.ch/education/master/intro/compulsory/mechanics
LiteratureThe lecture material is covered by the script and further literature is referenced in there.
151-0833-00LPrinciples of Nonlinear Finite-Element-Methods Information W5 credits2V + 2UN. Manopulo, B. Berisha, P. Hora
AbstractMost problems in engineering are of nonlinear nature. The nonlinearities are caused basically due to the nonlinear material behavior, contact conditions and instability of structures. The principles of the nonlinear Finite-Element-Method (FEM) will be introduced in the scope of this lecture for treating such problems.
ObjectiveThe goal of the lecture is to provide the students with the fundamentals of the non linear Finite Element Method (FEM). The lecture focuses on the principles of the nonlinear Finite-Element-Method based on explicit and implicit formulations. Typical applications of the nonlinear Finite-Element-Methods are simulations of:

- Crash
- Collapse of structures
- Materials in Biomechanics (soft materials)
- General forming processes

Special attention will be paid to the modeling of the nonlinear material behavior, thermo-mechanical processes and processes with large plastic deformations. The ability to independently create a virtual model which describes the complex non linear systems will be acquired through accompanying exercises. These will include the Matlab programming of important model components such as constitutive equations
Content- Fundamentals of continuum mechanics to characterize large plastic deformations
- Elasto-plastic material models
- Updated-Lagrange (UL), Euler and combined Euler-Lagrange (ALE) approaches
- FEM implementation of constitutive equations
- Element formulations
- Implicit and explicit FEM methods
- FEM formulations of coupled thermo-mechanical problems
- Modeling of tool contact and the influence of friction
- Solvers and convergence
- Modeling of crack propagation
- Introduction of advanced FE-Methods
Lecture notesyes
LiteratureBathe, K. J., Finite-Element-Procedures, Prentice-Hall, 1996
Prerequisites / NoticeIf we will have a large number of students, two dates for the exercises will be offered.
101-0637-10LStructures of Wood and Function Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 15.

Remark: Replaces 701-1801-00L
Thus, Students having already assigned to 701-1801-00 are not allowed to assign to 101-0637-10.
W3 credits2GI. Burgert, E. R. Zürcher
AbstractThe lecture Wood structure and function conveys basic knowledge on the microstructure of softwoods and hardwoods as well as general and species-specific relationships between growth processes, wood properties and wood function in the living tree.
ObjectiveLearning target is a basic understanding of the anatomy of wood and the related impact of endogenous and exogenous factors. The students can learn how to distinguish common central European wood species at the macroscopic and microscopic level. A deeper insight will be given by wood identification exercises for softwood species. Further the students will gain insight into the relationships between tree growth and wood properties with a specific focus on the wood function in the living tree.
ContentIn an introduction to wood anatomy, the general structural features of softwoods and hardwoods will be explained and factors of diversity and variability will be discussed. A specific focus is laid on common central European tree species with relevance in the wood sector, which will be studied in macro-and microstructural investigations. For softwoods, exercises for the identification of species will be conducted. In the following, relationships between wood structure, properties and function in the living tree will be in the focus of the lecture. Topics covered are mechanical stability and water transport, branches, reaction wood formation (compression wood, tension wood), spiral growth, growth stresses as well as adaptive growth of trees.
101-0637-20LFundamentals of Wood Elaboration and Woodmachining
Remark: Replaces 701-1803-00. Thus, students having already assigned to 701-1803-00 are not allowed to assign to 101-0637-20.
W3 credits2GI. Burgert, O. F. Kläusler
AbstractThe lecture Wood processing conveys knowledge on technological properties of wood and wood-based materials as well as on industrial processes for the fabrication of a vast variety of wood products.
ObjectiveLearning target is a fundamental understanding of the dominating wood machining processes, which are applied to fabricate common wood products. Students will be introduced to the economic relevance of the renewable resource wood and are trained in its technological properties. The students will learn to identify the relationships between wood species and their properties as well as the suitable wood machining processes to fabricate targeted wood products.
ContentThe general introduction shows the economic relevance of the resource wood in a global, European and Swiss context and reflects aspects of sustainability in wood production and certification. In terms of bulk wood products a specific focus in laid on sawn timber production and drying processes. With regard to wood veneer production, steaming, veneer cutting and assembly to veneer lumber products are presented. Further the common technologies for the production of particle boards and fibre boards as well as paper will be discussed. In the following, the topics are related to wood gluing and wood protection as well as potentials and limitations in the application of wood and wood-based products. At the end of the lecture an excursion to a Swiss wood manufacturer is planned, in order to facilitate practical experience.
151-0735-00LDynamic Behavior of Materials and Structures
Does not take place this semester.
W4 credits2V + 2UD. Mohr
AbstractLectures and computer labs concerned with the modeling of the deformation response and failure of engineering materials (metals, polymers and composites) subject to extreme loadings during manufacturing, crash, impact and blast events.
ObjectiveStudents will learn to apply, understand and develop computational models of a large spectrum of engineering materials to predict their dynamic deformation response and failure in finite element simulations. Students will become familiar with important dynamic testing techniques to identify material model parameters from experiments. The ultimate goal is to provide the students with the knowledge and skills required to engineer modern multi-material solutions for high performance structures in automotive, aerospace and navel engineering.
ContentTopics include viscoelasticity, temperature and rate dependent plasticity, dynamic brittle and ductile fracture; impulse transfer, impact and wave propagation in solids; computational aspects of material model implementation into hydrocodes; simulation of dynamic failure of structures;
Lecture notesSlides of the lectures, relevant journal papers and users manuals will be provided.
LiteratureVarious books will be recommended covering the topics discussed in class
Prerequisites / NoticeCourse in continuum mechanics (mandatory), finite element method (recommended)
151-0513-00LMechanics of Soft Materials and TissuesW4 credits3GA. E. Ehret
AbstractAn introduction to concepts for the constitutive modelling of highly deformable materials with non-linear properties is given in application to rubber-like materials and soft biological tissues. Related experimental methods for materials characterization and computational methods for simulation are addressed.
ObjectiveThe objective of the course is to provide an overview of the wide range of non-linear mechanical behaviors displayed by soft materials and tissues together with a basic understanding of their physical origin, to familiarize students with appropriate mathematical concepts for their modelling, and to illustrate the application of these concepts in different fields in mechanics.
ContentSoft solids: rubber-like materials, gels, soft biological tissues
Non-linear continuum mechanics: kinematics, stress, balance laws
Mechanical characterization: experiments and their interpretation
Constitutive modeling: basic principles
Large strain elasticity: hyperelastic materials
Rubber-elasticity: statistical vs. phenomenological models
Biomechanics of soft tissues: composites, anisotropy, heterogeneity
Dissipative behavior: examples and the concept of internal variables.
Lecture notesAccompanying learning materials will be provided or made available for download during the course.
LiteratureRecommended text:
G.A. Holzapfel, Nonlinear Solid Mechanics - A continuum approach for engineering, 2000
L.R.G. Treloar, The physics of rubber elasticity, 3rd ed., 2005
P. Haupt, Continuum Mechanics and Theory of Materials, 2nd ed., 2002
Prerequisites / NoticeA good knowledge base in continuum mechanics, ideally a completed course in non-linear continuum mechanics, is recommended.
Projects
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0198-01LProject on Construction Engineering Restricted registration - show details W9 credits18AProfessors
AbstractWorking on a concrete task in Construction Engineering
ObjectivePromote independent, structured and scientific work; learn to apply engineering methods; deepen the knowledge in the field of the treated task.
ContentThe project work is supervised by a professor. Students can choose from different subjects and tasks.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe project work requires normally 250 to 300 hours of work.
101-0298-01LProject on Hydraulic Engineering and Water Resources Management Restricted registration - show details W9 credits18ALecturers
AbstractWorking on a concrete task in Hydraulic Engineering
ObjectivePromote independent, structured and scientific work; learn to apply engineering methods; deepen the knowledge in the field of the treated task.
ContentThe project work is supervised by a professor. Students can choose from different subjects and tasks.
101-0398-01LProject on Geotechnical Engineering Restricted registration - show details W9 credits18ALecturers
AbstractWorking on a concrete task in Geotechnical Engineering
ObjectivePromote independent, structured and scientific work; learn to apply engineering methods; deepen the knowledge in the field of the treated task.
ContentThe project work is supervised by a professor. Students can choose from different subjects and tasks.
101-0498-01LProject on Transport Systems Restricted registration - show details W9 credits18ALecturers
AbstractWorking on a concrete task on Transport Systems
ObjectivePromote independent, structured and scientific work; learn to apply engineering methods; deepen the knowledge in the field of the treated task.
ContentThe project work is supervised by a professor. Students can choose from different subjects and tasks.
101-0598-01LProject on Construction and Maintenance Management Restricted registration - show details W9 credits18ALecturers
AbstractWorking on a concrete task in Construction Engineering and Management
ObjectivePromote independent, structured and scientific work; learn to apply engineering methods; deepen the knowledge in the field of the treated task.
ContentThe project work is supervised by a professor. Students can choose from different subjects and tasks.
101-0698-01LProject on Materials and Mechanics Restricted registration - show details W9 credits18ALecturers
AbstractWorking on a concrete task in Materials and Mechanics
ObjectivePromote independent, structured and scientific work; learn to apply engineering methods; deepen the knowledge in the field of the treated task.
ContentThe project work is supervised by a professor. Students can choose from different subjects and tasks.
Electives
The entire course programs of ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich are open to the students to individual selection.
Electives ETH Zurich
» Course Catalogue of ETH Zurich
Recommended Electives of Master Programme
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
051-0781-16LCostruire correttamente/Constructing Correctly: Curve and Fold to Bear Loads and Forces Restricted registration - show details W2 credits2GG. Birindelli
AbstractIn line with the approach of P.L. Nervi's book, our study is based on factors that, outlined by him, are still today all the more relevant as a lesson for architecturally and structurally justified buildings. We will observe selected buildings both of our time and of the past for their space, architecture and construction, understand them and interpret them according to universal values of design.
Objective'Costruire correttamente' (Constructing Correctly), the 1955 book published by Pier Luigi Nervi, covers crucial factors for building that, outlined by him, are still today all the more relevant as a lesson for architecturally and structurally justified buildings. His thoughts represent valuable criteria and indispensable tools for observation and carrying out investigations of the built environment.
Lessons learned from this can enrich the design work of today's and tomorrow's architects.
All of these (see abstract) i.e. analyses, observances, hypotheses, groupings and cross-comparisons, will help the students in their careers to find their own strategies and approaches to design and to be aware of them. And so, according to the advice of Pier Luigi Nervi : "...At every stage of his training, the future architect should be constantly and methodically guided to search for essential elements in each problem, be it large or small. The study of the architectural works of the past should consist in the critical examination of their functional and structural solutions and of the relation between these and form, in order to show that form is a consequence and not a determinant of functional and structural needs." [P.L. Nervi: Costruire correttamente, Milano 1955; English version titled "Structures", 1956, p.28].
ContentThe main thread of this course, that runs over two semesters (*), are buildings of all ages that could be categorised under notions such as « most viewed », « most technically daring », « most unknown », « most discussed » or « most worthly of discussion », and carry instructive aspects of the teachings of Pier Luigi Nervi ("costruire correttamente"). In the lecture, these buildings will be investigated on-the-spot, described from the designers' point-of-view and will be commented on with reference to any redesign resulting from the interplay of architectural and structural concepts. Harmonies and discords should be discovered.
Occasionally there will be guest lectures. These people, who were directly involved with a certain building, will portray the emergence and development of the project.
In this sense, the course is also intended for civil / structural engineering students and presents a possible bridge between the two prospective project partners - architect and engineer.

(*) Begins in the autumn semester. Entry into the course in the spring is possible.
Lecture notesNone for the time being
363-1065-00LDesign Thinking: Human-Centred Solutions to Real World Challenges Restricted registration - show details
Due to didactic reasons, the number of participants is limited to 30.

All interested students are invited to apply for this course by sending a one-page motivation letter until 14.9.16 to Florian Rittiner (frittiner@ethz.ch).

Additionally please enroll via mystudies. Places will be assigned after the first lecture on the basis of your motivation letter and commitment for the class.
W5 credits5GA. Cabello Llamas, F. Rittiner, S. Brusoni, C. Hölscher, M. Meboldt
AbstractThe goal of this course is to engage students in a multidisciplinary collaboration to tackle real world problems. Following a design thinking approach, students will work in teams to solve a set of design challenges that are organized as a one-week, a three-week, and a final six-week project in collaboration with an external project partner.

Information and application: www.sparklabs.ch/ethz
ObjectiveDuring the course, students will learn about different design thinking methods and tools. This will enable them to:
- Generate deep insights through the systematic observation and interaction of key stakeholders.
- Engage in collaborative ideation with a multidisciplinary (student) team.
- Rapidly prototype and iteratively test ideas and concepts by using various materials and techniques.
ContentThe purpose of this course is to equip the students with methods and tools to tackle a broad range of problems. Following a Design Thinking approach, the students will learn how to observe and interact with key stakeholders in order to develop an in-depth understanding of what is truly important and emotionally meaningful to the people at the center of a problem. Based on these insights, the students ideate on possible solutions and immediately validated them through quick iterations of prototyping and testing using different tools and materials. The students will work in multidisciplinary teams on a set of challenges that are organized as a one-week, a three-week, and a final six-week project with an external project partner. In this course, the students will learn about the different Design Thinking methods and tools that are needed to generate deep insights, to engage in collaborative ideation, rapid prototyping and iterative testing.

Design Thinking is a deeply human process that taps into the creative abilities we all have, but that get often overlooked by more conventional problem solving practices. It relies on our ability to be intuitive, to recognize patterns, to construct ideas that are emotionally meaningful as well as functional, and to express ourselves through means beyond words or symbols. Design Thinking provides an integrated way by incorporating tools, processes and techniques from design, engineering, the humanities and social sciences to identify, define and address diverse challenges. This integration leads to a highly productive collaboration between different disciplines.

For more information and the application visit: http://sparklabs.ch/ethz
Prerequisites / NoticeClass attendance and active participation is crucial as much of the learning occurs through the work in teams during class. Therefore, attendance is obligatory for every session. Please also note that the group work outside class is an essential element of this course, so that students must expect an above-average workload.
363-1047-00LEconomics of Urban TransportationW3 credits2GA. Russo
AbstractThe first part of the course will present some basic principles of transportation economics, applied to the main issues in urban transport policy (e.g. road pricing, public transport tariffs, investment in infrastructure etc.). The second part of the course will consider some case studies where we will apply the tools acquired in the first part to actual policy issues.
ObjectiveThe main objective of this course is to provide students with some basic tools to analyze transport policy decisions from an economic perspective. Can economics help us reduce road congestion problems? Should drivers be asked to pay for using urban roads? Should public transport tariffs depend on how roads are priced? How should the investment in transport infrastructure be financed? These are some of the questions that students should be able to tackle after completing the course.
ContentCOURSE OUTLINE (preliminary):

1. Introduction
2. Travel demand :
a. travel cost and value of time
b. mode choice
3. Road congestion and first-best pricing
a. Static congestion model
b. Dynamic congestion models
c. Examples: London Congestion Charge, Stockholm Congestion Charge
4. Second-best pricing
a. Pricing roads with unpriced alternatives. Examples: tolled and toll-free highways
b. Public transport: pricing with road congestion and with (or without) road tolls
5. Investment in infrastructure: public transport and roads
a. Roads: Investment with and without pricing
b. induced demand
c. Economies of scale/density in public transport
6. Topics:
a. Political economy of road pricing: why do we see road pricing in so few cities (London, Stockholm...) and not in many other cities (NYC, Manchester, Paris...)?
b. What are the alternatives to road pricing to reduce congestion? Parking tariffs, traffic regulation (speed bumps, low emission zones), road space reduction. Examples: Zurich, San Francisco (SFPark), Paris.
c. Transport and land use: value of housing and transport services. Road congestion, transport subsidies and urban sprawl.
Lecture notesCourse slides will be made available to students prior to each class.
LiteratureSYLLABUS (preliminary):

course slides will be made available to students.

Additional material:

Part 1 to 5: textbook: Small and Verhoef (The economics of urban transportation, 2007).

Part 6: Topics to be covered on research papers/case studies.
GESS Science in Perspective
» Recommended GESS Science in Perspective (Type B) for D-BAUG.
» see GESS Science in Perspective: Type A: Enhancement of Reflection Capability
» see GESS Science in Perspective: Language Courses ETH/UZH
Master's Thesis
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0010-00LMaster's Thesis Restricted registration - show details
Only students who fulfill the following criteria are allowed to begin with their master thesis:
a. successful completion of the bachelor programme;
b. fulfilling of any additional requirements necessary to gain admission to the master programme.
O24 credits47DSupervisors
AbstractThe Master Programme concludes with the Master Thesis, which has to be done in one of the chosen Majors and has to be completed within 16 weeks. The Master Thesis is supervised by a professor and shall attest the students ability to work independently and to produce scientifically structured work.
ObjectiveTo work independently and to produce a scientifically structured work.
ContentThe topics of the Mastrer Thesis are published by the professors. The Topic can be set also in consultation between the student and the professor.