Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2017

GESS Science in Perspective Information
Only the topics listed in this paragraph can be chosen as "GESS Science in Perspective" course.
Further below you will find the "type B courses Reflections about subject specific methods and content" as well as the language courses.

6 ECTS need to be acquired during the BA and 2 ECTS during the MA

Students who already took a course within their main study program are NOT allowed to take the course again.

These course units are also listed under "Type A", which basically means all students can enroll
Type A: Enhancement of Reflection Competence
Students who already took a course within their main study program are NOT allowed to take the course again.
History
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
853-0726-00LHistory II: Global (Anti-Imperialism and Decolonisation, 1905-1975)W3 credits2VH. Fischer-Tiné
AbstractThe lecture will give an insight into the formation of anticolonial nationalist movements in Asia and Africa from the beginning of the 20th century onwards and discuss the various dimensions of dismantling of colonial empires.
ObjectiveThe lecture will give students an insight into the history of the non-European world, looking specifically into the political, economic, social and cultural transformation on the backgrounds of colonial penetration strategies and the resistance of anti-colonial movements. The aim is to show that societies in Asia and Africa are not just the product of colonial penetration or anti-colonial resistance, but that both aspects influenced the present political, economic, social and cultural perception of these parts of the world to a considerable extent. A nuanced knowledge of the long and arduous process of decolonisation is hence important to understand today's geopolitical constellation, still characterised by the struggle for a just post-imperial world order.
LiteratureJansen, J.C. und Osterhammel, J., Decolonization: A short History, Princeton and London 2017.
Prerequisites / NoticeA detailed syllabus will be available from Feb 22nd 2016 at http://www.gmw.ethz.ch/en/teaching/lehrveranstaltungen.html
851-0101-07LScience and Colonialism
Does not take place this semester.
W3 credits2SH. Fischer-Tiné
AbstractThe course explores the multifaceted entanglements between inperialism and science. It provides a detailed anlaysis of the relevance colonial constellations had for the rise of disciplines such as geography, anthropology, botany, tropical medicine, "race science", etc.
ObjectiveThis course is designed to enable students to critically contextualise the production of scientific and technological knowledge. Besides, it aims at making them understand complex theory-oriented writings in the humanities and social sciences and become acquainted with the method of advanced historical source analysis.
LiteratureINTRODUCTORY LITERATURE:

COHN, Bernard, Colonialism and its Forms of Know¬ledge The British in India, Delhi 1997, S. 3-15.

BALLANTYNE, Tony, ‘Colonial Knowledge’, in: S. Stockwell (Hg.), The British Empire: Themes and Perspectives, Malden-Oxford-Carlton, 2008, S. 177-197.

FISCHER-TINE, Harald, Pidgin-Knowledge: Wissen und Kolonialismus, Zürich-Berlin 2013.
Prerequisites / NoticeA detailed syllabus will be available as from 15 February 2016
http://www.gmw.ethz.ch/en/teaching/lehrveranstaltungen.html
851-0554-04LCultural and Scientific History of East-AsiaW2 credits2VV. Eschbach-Szabo
AbstractThis course deals with the cultural and scientific history of East-Asia. It comprises lectures on new research work on stagnation and innovation in different fields: it is an overview of history and an introduction into the Chinese writing system, philosophical concepts and their influence on various cultural phenomena and scientific areas of natural sciences in China, Japan and Korea.
ObjectiveThe Cultural and Scientific History of East Asia

The lecture on the cultural and scientific history of East Asia is intended as an introduction to the cultural and scholarly history of China, Japan and Korea. Cultural and scientific developments may have different origins. Although East Asia and the West have never functioned as separate entities, there are certain distinct characteristics concerning cultural understanding and different levels of development of stagnation and innovation.

The Chinese writing system was adapted in different countries. The same canonical texts are known in Japan and Korea. Firstly an overview of history and an introduction into philosophical concepts as Taoism, Confucianism, Shinto, and Buddhism will be presented in order to point out there influence on various cultural phenomena and scientific areas: rites, gardening, architecture, calligraphy, Mathematics, Biology, Medicine, Astrology and Astronomy and modern technical developments.

It is intended for everyone, to gain a basic insight into this specific region and to enable students to do research on scientific topics in East Asia.
ContentIntroduction, Early Chinese History
Confucianism and the reading of a text of Confucius in Chinese
Further development of the Chinese Writing System in East Asia
Cultural and scientific contacts between China and Europe
Buddhism, garden
Taoism, Medicine, Astrology
Christian influences in East Asia
Modern China and Japan
Concepts for Person, Gender in Japan
Intercultural communication inJapan
Globalization and East Asia
Language policy and writing technology
Lecture notesLecture notes, handouts will be available for purchase at the cost of reproduction for the most lectures.
LiteratureNeedham, Joseph: Science and Civilisation in China. Abridged by Colin A. Ronan. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 1978.
851-0812-07LHeureka IV: Ancient Cities: The Significance of Urban Centers in the Greco-Roman WorldW2 credits2VC. Utzinger, M. Amann, B. Beer, A. Broger, F. Egli Utzinger, R. Harder
AbstractA Lecture Series on Ancient Greece and Rome and Their Impact on Later Periods
ObjectiveInsights into some important fields relating to urban centers in antiquity (topography, archaeology, history, culture, economy, ideology).
ContentUnsere Kultur und wissenschaftliche Tradition haben eine lange Geschichte. Am Anfang steht die griechische Kultur (und die römische, die eine erste Rezeption der griechischen darstellt). In der aktuellen Heureka-Reihe soll diese Kultur ausgehend von der Stadt als dem Ort menschlichen Zusammenlebens und -wirkens beleuchtet werden. Der (weiten) Frage "Was ist eine Stadt?" wird unter topographisch-archäologischen, historischen, politischen, soziokulturellen, wirtschaftlichen und ideologischen Aspekten nachgegangen.
Die Vorlesungsreihe gliedert sich in sechs thematische Module (1-6):
Sitzung 1-2 (Modul 1): Athen: Wie eine Stadt zu einer Grossstadt wurde
Sitzung 3-4 (Modul 2): Alexandria: Schmelztiegel von Kulturen und Stadt der Wissenschaft
Sitzung 5-6 (Modul 3): Byzanz - Konstantinopel - Istanbul: Die christliche Hauptstadt und ihre Anziehungskraft
Sitzung 7-8 (Modul 4): Rom: Die ewige Stadt
Sitzung 9-10 (Modul 5): Der Golf von Neapel: Die Goldküste Roms
Sitzung 11-12 (Modul 6): Troia: Untergang einer Stadt. Der Mythos vom trojanischen Krieg und seine Bedeutung für das antike Geschichtsbild
Sitzung 13: Lernzielkontrolle
051-0312-00LHistory of Art and Architecture IV Information
This course is offered the last time in FS18.
W3 credits2VL. Stalder
AbstractThe two-semester course offers an introduction to the history and theory of architecture from the industrial revolution up to now. Based on current questions a variety of case studies will be discussed.
ObjectiveThe aim is to give an overview on crucial events, works of art, buildings and theories since the beginning of the 19th century up to now. The course should enhance the comprehension of historical and theoretical issues, and allow the students to localize their own practice within a broader historical context.
ContentThe subject of this lecture course is the history and theory of architecture since the beginning of the 19th century up to now. It examines the architectural answers to the changing technical inventions and social practices. Consequently, the focus will be less on individual architects or buildings than on various themes that determined the architecture of the period.
Lecture noteshttp://www.stalder.arch.ethz.ch/courses
051-0364-00LHistory of Urban Design II Information W2 credits2VV. Magnago Lampugnani
AbstractThe lecture covers the time from the beginning of urban culture until the mid 19th century. With selected examples it emphasizes on the historical plannings and methods of European cities. Each specific urban development will be presented within a broader context.
ObjectiveThis course analyzes the history of urban architecture primarily in its existing three dimensional form as a complex human artefact. It also explores the inspirations that prompted the creation of this artefact: philosophical and religious concepts, social conditions, property relationships and the mechanisms that exploit the economics of real estate and the influence of building technology. Intellectual, literary or artistic modes of thought will also be assessed with regard to their impact on urban development. Urbanism has its own distinctive approach as a discipline, but it is also clearly responsive to the influence of related disciplines. Study is made of actual cities and urban expansion plans which are in the process of implementation, as well as unrealized projects and visions of the future. These projects sometimes illustrate ways of thinking that are equal to, or clearer than, actual urban situations.
ContentThe immense urban changes of the 19th century are presented along with their impacts on the developments until the interwar period.

23.02. Company Towns in Great Britain during the Industrial Revolution: The social utopia city concepts of Robert Owens and Charles Fourier

02.03. Garden Cities for tomorrow: Ebenezer Howard and the green alternative for the metropolis

09.03. Civilized wilderness and City Beautiful: from Frederick Law Olmsteds park movement to the urban planning of Daniel H. Burnham

16.03. Antagonists in the shadow of the 'Ringstrasse': the 'infinite city' of Otto Wagner, the artistic urban development of Camillo Sitte and the 'retrogressive utopia' of Adolf Loos

30.03. 'Impressionistic' city architecture: Hendrik Petrus Berlage and the School of Amsterdam

06.04. Urban design of the Beaux-Arts movement, modern classical period and a socialist skyscraper: The Cité Industrielle of Tony Garnier and the Gratte-Ciel in Villeurbanne

13.04. Ideas of the city in the radical avantgarde movement: futurism in Italy and constructivism in the postrevolutian Soviet Union

27.04. 'walkinglines' of pedestrians and 'movinglines' of the traffic: The modernization of the City of Berlin

04.05. The 'Lebensreform' movement, the 'crown of the city' and the housing schemes of the 'Neue Sachlichkeit'

11.05. Satellite town versus 'Superblock': New Frankfurt and Red Vienna

18.05. Le Corbusier: Theories, Visions and clear cuts in the name of the autorité
Lecture notesTo each lecture an overview is listet within a script (two semesters of the bachelor studies), that can be purchased at the chair for the history of urban design (HIL D 75.2) at the price of SFR 30,-. The script serves as an auxiliary means to the attended lecture compiling the most important illustrations showed and the names and dates of the buildings and its builders along with a short introductory note.
LiteratureFurther recommended literature to consult is listet within the script.
Prerequisites / NoticeUrban architecture from antiquity till the 19th century
851-0551-04LHistory of ETHW3 credits2VD. Gugerli
AbstractThis lecture presents the political shaping of ETHs governance since 1848.
ObjectiveStudents get acquainted with the interdependence between the promises of Swiss science policy on the one hand, and of ETH as an organisation for teaching, learning, and research on the other hand.
Lecture notesDie Unterrichtsmaterialien (Reader) werden zu Beginn des Semesters auf www.tg.ethz.ch zugänglich gemacht.
851-0101-54LSwitzerland in the Age of Empires: 1848 ReconsideredW3 credits2SB. Schär
AbstractSwitzerland never possessed any colonies, yet was still a colonial power. Through networks of mercenaries, trading houses, missionary societies, and science Switzerland took part in the process of European Expansion and was shaped by it. How did 'Swiss expansion' shape the founding of the 1848 federal state?
ObjectiveStudents will become familiarised with new approaches to Global History writing, and new research into the history of 'Colonial Switzerland'.
They shall become acquainted with the biographies of the 23 'founding fathers' of modern Switzerland, who drafted the federal state's 1848 constitution.
Examining those biographies students are expected to analyse how the process of European Expansion shaped the biographies of Switzerland's 'founding fathers' and the modern nation, which they helped to establish.
851-0125-65LA Sampler of Histories and Philosophies of Mathematics
Particularly suitable for students D-CHAB, D-INFK, D-ITET, D-MATH, D-PHYS
W3 credits2VR. Wagner
AbstractThis course will review several case studies from the history of mathematics (Greek geometry, early modern European notions of infinity and 20th century constructive and axiomatic approaches). The case studies will be analyzed from various philosophical perspectives, while rooting them in their historical and cultural contexts.
ObjectiveThe course aims are:
1. To introduce students to the historicity of mathematics
2. To make sense of mathematical practices that appear unreasonable from a contemporary point of view
3. To develop critical reflection concerning the nature of mathematical objects
4. To introduce realist, dialectical, practical and constructivist approaches to the philosophy and history of mathematics
5. To open the students' horizons to the plurality of mathematical cultures and practices
851-0101-33LGlobalgeschichte, Themen und Konjunkturen seit dem 19. Jahrhundert Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30
W3 credits2SH. Fischer-Tiné
AbstractFor more than a century, historians have attempted to transcend a national perspective on historical problems and develop various approaches to adequately deal with transnational phenomena of the past. The first part focusses on six prominent examples of such endeavours the second analyses key texts of of "global history", thereby idenfying the main themes and methods of the emerging field.
ObjectiveThrough intense reading and discussion of the theory oriented secondary literature, the participants will be introduced to one of the most exciting new fields of historical inquiry.
851-0101-36LDrugs and Empires: Perspectives on the Trade, Consumption and Control of Intoxicants (c. 1700-2000) Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30
W3 credits2SH. Fischer-Tiné
AbstractThe course will look at the historical trajectory of the interaction between the politics of colonial or quasi-colonial empires and the cultivation, trade, and consumption of mood altering substances (c.1750-2000). Apart from the economic aspects of trafficking, cultural and social consequences of production and consumption on both sides of the imperial divide are put under scrutiny.
ObjectiveThe course aims at providing historical background knowledge regarding the controversies on international drug trafficking and the fight against it. It is designed to enhance the students' capability to deconstruct normative discourses, thus fostering their analytical skills and sharpening their critical acumen. This does not only relate to the problems of a mere historical nature, as the topic under study still is of critical relevance today.
Literature
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
851-0315-01LWriting: Precision of Language as a Field of Research for Literature Restricted registration - show details W1 credit1GF. Kretzen
AbstractWhen we write a literary text we enter into a set-up for experiments and explore the possibilities ensuing from the specific structure and consistency of such a text. Literary writing allows us to go over to another kind of knowledge. Thus, the question: what is it that I want to write about? is replaced by: what do I write?
ObjectiveIn this course we shall analyze and apply conditions and criteria for literary writing on the basis of our own texts.
The course is intended for persons who are interested in literary approaches to exactitude.
Any attempt to write literature is confronted with an unforeseeable linguistic dynamism whose feasibility is determined by laws and rules quite different from those of science and technology. For the science-oriented writer, experiencing the self-evidence produced by literary approaches in his or her own writing project opens up a field of language with new content and new methods.
ContentIn the natural sciences as well as in engineering we set up experiments, analyze equation systems, and formulate theories. In order to complement these practices, the course «Writing» shall pursue precision in literary writing, its choice of word and its self-evidence.

When we write a literary text we also enter into a set-up for experiments and explore the possibilities ensuing from the specific structure and overall consistency of such a text. This form of writing takes us from the question: what is it that I want to write about? to the question: what do I write?
How do such literary approaches differ from the ways in which the natural sciences use language?
In this course we shall analyze and apply conditions and criteria for literary writing on the basis of our own texts.
The course is intended for persons who are interested in literary approaches to exactitude.
Any attempt to write literature is confronted with an unforeseeable linguistic dynamism whose feasibility is determined by laws and rules quite different from those of science and technology. For the science-oriented writer, experiencing the self-evidence produced by literary approaches in his or her own writing project opens up a field of language with new content and new methods.
Prerequisites / NoticeThose wishing to participate are required to send in between two and three pages text of their own writing that will be discussed in class. It may be an existing text , such as an essay yet from school or a post for a student magazine. The next step will be writing a text on a preset topic as a basis for discussing the various realizations of a given task.
851-0365-02LIntroduction to English Literature: Science and Fiction Part IIW2 credits2SA. Brand-Kilcher
AbstractWho are we? Why are we here? Both science and literature alike are often motivated by a deep desire to answer life's big questions. We will look at differences and similarities in approach, methods and output in search for answers.
ObjectiveFind out more about shared ground between sciences and humanities and how that relationship changed over the last three centuries.
Develop a critical awareness about concepts such as a neat distinction between dry objectivity and emotional subjectivity which breaks down when the human identity of scientists is considered.
ContentWhat will save us in the end: surgery or poetry? That is one of the questions posed in Ian McEwan's novel "Saturday". Mc Ewan's novel and other texts and essays will be read and discussed.
Today there is not one scientific style anymore but rather a multiplicity of scientific genres. You can bring your own scientific text to class in order to analyze, discuss and possibly improve it.
LiteratureRecommended reading: Ian Mc Ewan: Saturday (2005);
Charlotte Sleigh: Literature and Science (2011).
851-0301-06LKnowledge of Resentment - Anti-Jewish Textual and Visual TraditionsW3 credits2VH.‑J. Hahn
AbstractThe lecture examines central moments of anti-Jewish production of knowledge from antiquity until today. The guiding question refers to the shifts of paradigms or the reprogramming of these traditions. Apart from textual sources also visual representations of Jewishness from different periods of time (Early Christianity, Late Middle Ages, Protestant Reformation etc.) will be analysed.
ObjectiveThe lecture aims at an exemplary as well as a critical examination of Western culture and science, which had not only generated the idea of human rights but are also affected by traditions of anti-Jewish "knowledge". Apart from seminal positions within research on Antisemitism, also current discussions in the field of research on Racism are included in the analysis. Additionally the lecture will present different aesthetic strategies within a variety of media in which anti-Jewish images of Jewishness are reproduced, tightened or critically deconstructed.
ContentDas Wissen vom Anderen dient dem Entwurf des Eigenen. So produziert gerade der moderne Antisemitismus, dessen Anfänge in der Ablehnung der Emanzipation seit dem ausgehenden 18. Jahrhundert liegen, ein sich ständig wandelndes, flexibles und anpassungsfähiges Wissen des Ressentiments. Insbesondere im 19. Jahrhundert sind dabei Wissenschaft und Antisemitismus vielfach miteinander verknüpft. Eine Wissensgeschichte des Antisemitismus geht deshalb von dem wissenschaftlichen Anspruch aus, der dem in den 1870er Jahren geprägten Neologismus unmittelbar eingeschrieben ist, und fragt, welche älteren Text- und Bildtraditionen jeweils aufgegriffen und transformiert werden und wie dieses gewissermaßen toxische Wissen zur Begründung von Gemeinschaften dient. Ganz grundsätzlich wird so die Frage nach den prägenden Faktoren zeitbedingter Vorstellungen von Wissenschaftlichkeit gestellt. Während antisemitische Vorstellungen um 1900 herum selbstverständlich in Disziplinen wie der Nationalökonomie, der Psychologie, den Gesellschaftswissenschaften oder der Philosophie anzutreffen sind, sind auch technische Fächer betroffen. Insbesondere bei der Wahrnehmung moderner Technologien lassen sich etwa in kulturkritischen Texten aus der ersten Hälfte des 20. Jahrhunderts antisemitische Deutungsmuster beobachten.
851-0334-01LMemoire of Occupied Paris: The Oeuvre by Patrick ModianoW3 credits2VO. Barrot
AbstractIn France Patrick Modiano embodies the absolute figure of the great author. In 2014 he obtained the Nobel Prize in Literature. Peter Englund of the Swedish Academy considered him as the "Marcel Proust of our times". His work has been translated in 40 languages. The course will provide with the necessary tools to approach his inspiration, style and universe.
Objective1. Paris
2. The Occupation of Paris by Nazi
3. The Style of Modiano

During the course we will familiarize with 3 books (available in the collection Folio) and 2 films by Patrick Modiano: "La Place de l'Etoile", his first novel (1968), "Dora Bruder" (a story of a 15-year-old-girl of Eastern European Jewish immigrants, who disappears in 1942 (1999)), "Un pedigree", his first attempt of autobiographical writing (2005); "Lacombe Lucien", a film by Louis Malle, of which Modiano wrote the original scenario (1974); "Le Parfum d'Yvonne", a film adapted from "Villa triste" by Patrice Leconte (1995).
851-0301-07LNarrating Time? Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30
W3 credits2SC. Jany
AbstractIt seems quite natural to capture past times by way of narrative representation. Certain philosophers and historians even claimed that time is inherently narrative and therefore articulated best in the form of narrations. But is it even possible to narrate time? What kind of translation is that? And, above all, what are the costs of, and the resistances to, such a translation?
ObjectiveThis course means to train the students' ability to thoroughly read and critically penetrate literary texts. Its second aim is to introduce basic problems of narrative representation, above all the relation between temporal development and narrative processes. The third aim is to develop the question of whether literature is, unlike historiography, aware of the fundamental unavailability of time, as that of how such knowledge is expressed.
LiteratureReadings may include: Nietzsche, Storm, Thomas Bernhard, Max Frisch, Paul Ricoeur, Hayden White, Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht.
851-0300-71LFantastic Literature and Occult Knowledge
Information for UZH students:
Enrolment to this course unit only possible at ETH. No enrolment to module 550cm0 and 167c at UZH.

Please mind the ETH enrolment deadlines for UZH students: Link
W3 credits2VA. Kilcher
AbstractThe course focuses on the complex relation between the Fantastic and Occultism, which is understood as part of the history of knowledge of the imaginary after the 18th century.
ObjectiveThe course aims at conveying a general overview on various theoretical and literary conceptions of the Fantastic. At the same time it wishes to transmit the knowledge of occultism and its forms of representation.
ContentThe Fantastic may be understood as the conflictual surpassing of the fundamental literary function of fantasy during the modern age. Fantasy no longer structures an autonomous wonderful world, but it breaks in on the real as the imaginary. After 1800, and in the form of the imaginary, the fantastic breaks into a world that is thought to be rational and scientifically explainable while dissolving the causative correlations of the Enlightenment. In the backdrop of such tensed evolution, the Fantastic establishes itself within the context of the secularisation and of the scientification of knowledge. Yet, the Fantastic also promotes new forms of knowledge that come into conflict with the academic sciences during the 18th and 19th centuries and assert themselves as counterknowledge. This becomes evident and comprehensible in relation to occult sciences, namely theosophy, occultism, spiritism etc. With reference to the Fantastic counterknowledge becomes evident in a wide variety of distinctive images, and narratives, that relate of the uncanny, the gothic, the grotesque, the demonic, the surreal etc. At the same time, occult sciences look for the proximity to the arts of the Fantastic, that promise a new aesthetic -- as well as their possibilities in the media -- for the representation and the narration of the imaginary and the obscure.

The course has a twofold goal. It wishes to understand the notion and the history of Fantastic literature beginning with the 19th century, taking as case studies crucial and intriguing writers such as E.T.A. Hoffmann, Gustav Meyrink and Jorge Louis Borges. At the same time, the course aims at ascertaining the notion "occult knowledge" (resp. occult sciences) and its epistemological aspiration in conflict with academic knowledge. The lecture, therefore, aims at the reconstruction of the complex interrelation between the Fantastic and Occultism as a part of the history of knowledge of the imaginary right up to Psychoanalysis.
851-0300-59LUniversal Science. Models of Encyclopedia Between Philosphy and Literature (1600-2000)
Information for UZH students:
Enrolment to this course unit only possible at ETH. No enrolment to module 173 at UZH.

Please mind the ETH enrolment deadlines for UZH students: Link
W3 credits2SA. Kilcher
AbstractThe form of encyclopedia is central to knowledge since the modern era. It claims to embrace all phenomena of nature, history and culture and to represent this totality in a universally valid form. Despite its demand for universality the form of encyclopedia changes strongly throughout the centuries. The seminar is going to discover this development from renaissance to the present day.
Objective1) Overview of the most important encyclopedia projects from renaissance to the present; 2) theoretical understanding of different encyclopedia models; 3) comprehension of the aesthetic aspects of encyclopedia; 4) role of encyclopedic models in theory and history of the novel.
ContentThe form of encyclopedia is central to knowledge in modern era. Such knowledge claims to embrace all phenomena of nature, history and culture. Encyclopedia, in this context, is claimed to be the universal form which can describe this totality. However, if we look at the history of encyclopedia, it shows clearly that this was not at all a universally valid form. In fact, the actual form of encyclopedia changes various times: Combinative models in the 16th century were replaced in the 17th century by rational systems. In 18th and 19th century these rational systems were exchanged for alphabetic lexicons. And these lexicon got substituted for networks such as the Internet. The seminar will investigate, on the one hand, a historical approach to the changing models of encyclopedia. On the other hand, it is interested in an epistemological and poetological analysis of encyclopedic models. We will therefore focus both aesthetic aspects and the role of encyclopedia for certain literary genres, such as the novel.
LiteratureAndreas B. Kilcher: Mathesis und Poiesis. Die Enzyklopädik der Literatur 1600-2000. München: Fink 2003
851-0334-02LA Country Without Heroes: Romance and National Identity in Modern ItalyW3 credits2VS. Jossa
AbstractThe course aims to focus on some of the symbolic passages in the process of nation-building in Italy in the 19th and 20th centuries, as Italy reached its unity only in 1861.
ObjectiveThrough the study of Foscolo's Last Letters of Jacopo Ortis (1798), Collodi's Pinocchio (1880), Calvino's The Path to the Nest of Spiders (1947), and Tomasi di Lampedusa's The Leopard (1958) the course aims to give students an understanding of how and why Italy was born so late as a political entity. By focussing on the different stages of the process of Nation building in Italy, the course also aims to make students aware of how Italy's national identity developed: two books (Foscolo's and Collodi's) were written in the 19th century, and will help students to understand the pre-Risorgimento (the making of Italy), and the post-Risorgimento (the making of the Italians); whereas the other two books (Calvino's and Tomasi's) come from the 20th century, and will help students to understand the Resistenza (the making of the Republic), and the post-war Italy (the crisis of nationhood).
The course also aims to discuss the problem of the absence of a national hero in the Italian literary tradition, such as Wilhelm Tell for Switzerland or D'Artagnan for France or Robin Hood for Britain.
Economics
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
851-0252-04LBehavioral Studies Colloquium Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 50.
W2 credits2KE. Stern, H.‑D. Daniel, D. Helbing, C. Hölscher, B. Rütsche, R. Schubert, C. Stadtfeld
AbstractThis colloquium offers an opportunity for students to discuss their ongoing research and scientific ideas in the behavioral sciences, both at the micro- and macro-levels of cognitive, behavioral and social science. It also offers an opportunity for students from other disciplines to discuss their research ideas in relation to behavioral science. The colloquium also features invited research talks.
ObjectiveStudents know and can apply autonomously up-to-date investigation methods and techniques in the behavioral sciences. They achieve the ability to develop their own ideas in the field and to communicate their ideas in oral presentations and in written papers. The credits will be obtained by a written report of approximately 10 pages.
ContentThis colloquium offers an opportunity for students to discuss their ongoing research and scientific ideas in the behavioral sciences, both at the micro- and macro-levels of cognitive, behavioral and social science. It also offers an opportunity for students from other disciplines to discuss their ideas in so far as they have some relation to behavioral science. The possible research areas are wide and may include theoretical as well as empirical approaches in Social Psychology and Research on Higher Education, Sociology, Modeling and Simulation in Sociology, Decision Theory and Behavioral Game Theory, Economics, Research on Learning and Instruction, Cognitive Psychology and Cognitive Science. Ideally the students (from Bachelor, Master, Ph.D. and Post-Doc programs) have started to start work on their thesis or on any other term paper.
Course credit can be obtained either based on a talk in the colloquium plus a written essay, or by writing an essay about a topic related to one of the other talks in the course. Students interested in giving a talk should contact the course organizers (Rütsche, Stern) before the first session of the semester. Priority will be given to advanced / doctoral students for oral presentations. The course credits will be obtained by a written report of approximately 10 pages. The colloquium also serves as a venue for invited talks by researchers from other universities and institutions related to behavioral and social sciences.
851-0609-04LThe Energy Challenge - The Role of Technology, Business and Society Information
Prerequisites: Knowledge in Economics and Environmental Issues is obligatory.
Particularly suitable for students D-BAUG, ITET, MAVT, USYS
W2 credits2VR. Schubert, T. Schmidt, J. Schmitz
AbstractIn recent years, energy security, risks, access and availability are important issues. Strongly redirecting and accelerating technological change on a sustainable low-carbon path is essential. The transformation of current energy systems into sustainable ones is not only a question of technology but also of the goals and influences of important actors like business, politics and society.
ObjectiveIn this course different options of sustainable energy systems like fossile energies, nuclear energy or all sorts of renewable energies are explained and discussed. The students should be able to understand and identify advantages and disadvantages of the different technological options and discuss their relevance in the business as well as in the societal context.
Lecture notesMaterials will be made available on the electronic learning platform: www.vwl.ethz.ch
LiteratureMaterials will be made available on the electronic learning platform: www.vwl.ethz.ch
Prerequisites / NoticeVarious lectures from different disciplines.
851-0636-00LEconomics IIW2 credits2GP. Schellenbauer
AbstractThe course in economics extends over two semesters. The focus during the winter term is on the introduction to economic theory and thought. These considerations provide the fundamental requirements for the analysis of land, habitation and space from an economic perspective in the summer term.
Objective
ContentThe course in economics extends over two semesters. The focus during the Fall term is on an introduction to economic thought. These considerations provide the fundamental requirements for the economic analysis of land, housing and urban markets in the following Spring term.

The Fall semester focuses on the economic way of thinking. We shall discover why A. Marshall defined economics as "a study of mankind in the ordinary business of life". The course introduces the student to the "big questions" in economics, such as the concept of rationality and its limits, factors driving supply and demand, the working of markets, the importance of the price system and the reasons why markets may fail.

There are many interactions between economic and social phenomena on the one hand, and the built environment on the other. Our knowledge of the fundamental economic principles will allow us to understand the workings of the housing, land, credit and real estate markets - markets of fundamental importance for the future architect. We consider questions such as: which are the major problems of the land market? Which factors determine the price of land? What are the economic drivers that shape the form of our cities? Which are the primary difficulties in designing a reasonable housing policy.
Finally, the courses discusses the main determinants of real estate investment -- both its risks and its opportunities.
851-0157-48LBehavioral-Environmental Economics and Policy
Does not take place this semester.
Diese Lerneinheit wird nicht mehr angeboten.
W3 credits2Vto be announced
AbstractThe goal of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the relationship between behavioral economics and environmental policy and address its implication in areas like climate change, sustainable energy consumption, and biodiversity loss. This will involve discussing a number of experimental applications and insights.
ObjectiveThe course provides an overview of behavioral economics and its application to environmentally relevant behaviors. It pays special attention to behavioral-psychological evidence and discusses related experimental laboratory and field evidence for a variety of themes: cooperation and public goods, social motivation (non-monetary incentives, crowding-out), status and conspicuous consumption, risk perception and prospect theory, fairness preferences, heuristics and biases, framing, and impatience and discounting.
ContentThe course will examine alternative models of individual behavior and discusses their implications for environmental policy and agreements. The effectiveness, equity and efficiency of environmental policies depend very much on the underlying model of individual behavior. Only an empirically founded model of individual action and motivation can guarantee the design of adequate environmental policies and environmental agreements. The dominant theory of environmental policy is based on the standard (neoclassical) economic model of rational, self-interested behavior and stable preferences. This tends to favor environmental policy instruments that attempt to influence behavior through price signals. More recently, behavioral economics has generated considerable experimental evidence that individual behavior deviates from full rationality and pure self-interest.
363-0532-00LEconomics of Sustainable Development Information W3 credits2VL. Bretschger
AbstractConcepts and indicators of sustainable development, paradigms of weak and strong sustainability;
neoclassical and endogenous growth models;
pollution, environmental policy and growth;
role of substitution possibilities and technological progress;
Environmental Kuznets Curve: concept, theory and empirical results;
economic growth in the presence of exhaustible and renewable resources.
ObjectiveThe aim is to develop an understanding of the implications of sustainable development for the long-run development of economies. It is to be shown to which extent the potential for growth to be sustainable depends on substitution possibilities, technological change and environmental policy.
ContentThe lecture introduces different concepts and paradigms of sustainable development. Building on this foundation and following a general introduction to the modelling of economic growth, conditions for growth to be sustainable in the presence of pollution and scarce natural resources are derived. Special attention is devoted to the scope for substitution and role of technological progress in overcoming resource scarcities. Implications of environmental externalities are regarded with respect to the design of environmental policies.
Concepts and indicators of sustainable development, paradigms of weak and strong sustainability, sustainability optimism vs. pessimism;
introduction to neoclassical and endogenous growth models;
pollution, environmental policy and growth;
role of substitution possibilities and technological progress;
Environmental Kuznets Curve: concept, theory and empirical results;
economic growth in the presence of exhaustible and renewable resources, Hartwick rule, resource saving technological change.
Lecture notesWill be provided successively in the course of the semester.
LiteratureBretschger, F. (1999), Growth Theory and Sustainable Development, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.

Bretschger, L. (2004), Wachstumstheorie, Oldenbourg, 3. Auflage, München.

Perman, R., Y. Ma, J. McGilvray and M. Common (2003), Natural Resource and Environmental Economics, Longman , 3d ed., Essex.

Neumayer, E. (2003), Weak and Strong Sustainability, 2nd ed., Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.
364-0576-00LAdvanced Sustainability Economics Information
PhD course, open for MSc students
W3 credits2GL. Bretschger, A. Brausmann
AbstractThe course covers current resource and sustainability economics, including ethical foundations of sustainability, intertemporal optimisation in capital-resource economies, sustainable use of non-renewable and renewable resources, pollution dynamics, population growth, and sectoral heterogeneity. A final part is on empirical contributions, e.g. the resource curse, energy prices, and the EKC.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of the current issues and economic methods in sustainability research; ability to solve typical problems like the calculation of the growth rate under environmental restriction with the help of appropriate model equations.
363-0564-00LEntrepreneurial RisksW3 credits2GD. Sornette
Abstract-General introduction to the different dimensions of risks with
emphasis on entrepreneurial, financial and social risks.

-Development of the concepts and tools to understand these risks,
control and master them.

-Decision making and risks; human cooperation and risks
ObjectiveWe live a in complex world with many nonlinear
negative and positive feedbacks. Entrepreneurship is one of
the leading human activity based on innovation to create
new wealth and new social developments. This course will
analyze the risks (upside and downside) associated with
entrepreneurship and more generally human activity
in the firms, in social networks and in society.
The goal is to present what we believe are the key concepts
and the quantitative tools to understand and manage risks.
An emphasis will be on large and extreme risks, known
to control many systems, and which require novel ways
of thinking and of managing. We will examine the questions
of (i) how much one can manage and control these risks,
(ii) how these actions may feedback positively or negatively
and (iii) how to foster human cooperation for the creation
of wealth and social well-being.

Depending on the number of students and of the interest, the exam
will consist in a project, one for each student or in small groups,
focused on the application of the concepts and tools developed in this
class to problems of practical use to the students in their varied fields.
The choice of the subjects will be jointly decided by the
students and the professor.
ContentThis content is not final and is subjected to change
and adaptation during the development of the course
in order to take into account feedbacks from the
students and participants to the course.

1- Risks in the firm and in entrepreneurship
-What is risk? The four levels.
-Conceptual and technical tools
-Introduction to three different concepts of probability
-Useful notions of probability theory
(Frequentist versus Bayesian approach,
the central limit theorem and its generalizations, extreme value theory)
-Where are the risks for firms? Downside and upside
-Diversification and market risks

2-The world of power law risks
-Stable laws
-power laws and beyond
-calculation tools
-scale invariance, fractal and multifractals
-mechanisms for power laws
-Examples in the corporate, financial and social worlds

3-Risks emerging from collective self-organization
-concept of bottom-up self-organization
-bifurcations, theory of catastrophes, phase transitions
-predictability
-the hierarchical approach to understanding self-organization

4-Measures of risks
-coherent and consistent measures of risks
-origin of risks
-dependence structure of risks
-measures of dependence and of extreme dependences
-introduction to copulas

5-Conceptual and mathematical models of risk processes
-self-excited point processes of economic and financial shocks
-agent-based models applied to collective emergent behavior
in organization of firms and societies and their risks

6-Endogenous versus exogenous origins of crises
-mild crises versus wild catastrophes: black swans and kings
-the dynamics of commercial sales
-the dynamics of Youtube views and internet downloads
-the dynamics of risks in the financial markets
-strategic management and extreme risks

7-Why do markets burst and crash?
-collective behavior, imitation and herding
-humans as social animals and consequence of risks
-bubbles and crashes in human affairs, innovation, new technologies

8-Limits of predictability, of control and of management
-the phenomenon of ``illusion of control''
-the world is a whole: irreducible risks from lack of diversification
-intrinsic limits of predictability
-the concept of pockets of predictability

9-Human-made risks
-political, financial, economics, natural risks
-elements on theories of decision making
-Human cooperation and its lack thereof, mechanisms and design
Lecture notesThe lecture notes will be distributed a the beginning of
each lecture.
LiteratureI will use elements taken from my books

-D. Sornette
Critical Phenomena in Natural Sciences,
Chaos, Fractals, Self-organization and Disorder: Concepts and Tools,
2nd ed. (Springer Series in Synergetics, Heidelberg, 2004)

-Y. Malevergne and D. Sornette
Extreme Financial Risks (From Dependence to Risk Management)
(Springer, Heidelberg, 2006).

-D. Sornette,
Why Stock Markets Crash
(Critical Events in Complex Financial Systems),
(Princeton University Press, 2003)

as well as from a variety of other sources, which will be
indicated to the students during each lecture.
Prerequisites / Notice-A deep curiosity and interest in asking questions and in attempting to
understand and manage the complexity of the corporate, financial
and social world

-quantitative skills in mathematical analysis and algebra
for the modeling part.
363-1039-00LIntroduction to Negotiation Information W3 credits2GM. Ambühl
AbstractThe course combines different lecture formats to provide students with both the theoretical background and the practical appreciation of negotiation. A core element of the course is an introduction to the concept of negotiation engineering.
ObjectiveStudents learn to understand and to identify different negotiation situations, analyze specific cases, and discuss respective negotiation approaches based on important negotiation methods (i.a. Game Theory, Harvard Method).
ContentThe course combines different lecture formats to provide students with both the theoretical background and the practical appreciation of negotiation. A core element is an introduction to the concept of negotiation engineering. The course covers a brief overview of different negotiation approaches, different categories of negotiations, selected negotiation models, as well as in-depth discussions of real-world case studies on international negotiations involving Switzerland. Students learn to deconstruct specific negotiation situations, to differentiate key aspects and to develop and apply a suitable negotiation approach based on important negotiation methods.
LiteratureThe list of relevant references will be distributed in the beginning of the course.
351-0578-00LIntroduction to Economic Policy Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 100.
W2 credits2VH. Mikosch
AbstractFirst approach to the theory of economic policy
ObjectiveFirst approach to the theory of economic policy with a distinction made between the microeconomic approach (regulatory policy, allocation policy, competition policy) and the macroeconomic approach (fiscal policy, monetary policy). Case studies with reference to Switzerland build the bridge from the theory to the practice of economic policy.
ContentDen Studierenden soll ein erster Zugang zur Theorie der Wirtschaftspolitik eröffnet werden, wobei zwischen einem

- mikroökonomischen Zugang (Ordnungspolitik, Allokationspolitik, Wettbewerbspolitik) und einem

- makroökonomischen Zugang (Fiskalpolitik, Geldpolitik)

unterschieden wird.

Anwendungsbeispiele mit einem Bezug zur Schweiz stellen eine Verbindung zwischen der Theorie und der Praxis der Wirtschaftspolitik her.
Lecture notesno
351-0778-00LDiscovering Management
Entry level course in management for BSc, MSc and PHD students at all levels not belonging to D-MTEC.
This course can be complemented with Discovering Management (Excercises) 351-0778-01L.
W3 credits3GB. Clarysse, M. Ambühl, S. Brusoni, L. De Cuyper, E. Fleisch, G. Grote, V. Hoffmann, P. Schönsleben, G. von Krogh, F. von Wangenheim
AbstractDiscovering Management offers an introduction to the field of business management and entrepreneurship for engineers and natural scientists. The module provides an overview of the principles of management, teaches knowledge about management that is highly complementary to the students' technical knowledge, and provides a basis for advancing the knowledge of the various subjects offered at D-MTEC.
ObjectiveDiscovering Management combines in an innovate format a set of lectures and an advanced business game. The learning model for Discovering Management involves 'learning by doing'. The objective is to introduce the students to the relevant topics of the management literature and give them a good introduction in entrepreneurship topics too. The course is a series of lectures on the topics of strategy, innovation, corporate finance, leadership, design thinking and corporate social responsibility. While the 14 different lectures provide the theoretical and conceptual foundations, the experiential learning outcomes result from the interactive business game. The purpose of the business game is to analyse the innovative needs of a large multinational company and develop a business case for the company to grow. This business case is as relevant to someone exploring innovation within an organisation as it is if you are planning to start your own business. By discovering the key aspects of entrepreneurial management, the purpose of the course is to advance students' understanding of factors driving innovation, entrepreneurship, and company success.
ContentDiscovering Management aims to broaden the students' understanding of the principles of business management, emphasizing the interdependence of various topics in the development and management of a firm. The lectures introduce students not only to topics relevant for managing large corporations, but also touch upon the different aspects of starting up your own venture. The lectures will be presented by the respective area specialists at D-MTEC.
The course broadens the view and understanding of technology by linking it with its commercial applications and with society. The lectures are designed to introduce students to topics related to strategy, corporate innovation, leadership, corporate and entrepreneurial finance, value chain analysis, corporate social responsibility, and business model innovation. Practical examples from industry experts will stimulate the students to critically assess these issues. Creative skills will be trained by the business game exercise, a participant-centered learning activity, which provides students with the opportunity to place themselves in the role of Chief Innovation Officer of a large multinational company. As they learn more about the specific case and identify the challenge they are faced with, the students will have to develop an innovative business case for this multinational corporation. Doing so, this exercise will provide an insight into the context of managerial problem-solving and corporate innovation, and enhance the students' appreciation for the complex tasks companies and managers deal with. The business game presents a realistic model of a company and provides a valuable learning platform to integrate the increasingly important development of the skills and competences required to identify entrepreneurial opportunities, analyse the future business environment and successfully respond to it by taking systematic decisions, e.g. critical assessment of technological possibilities.
Prerequisites / NoticeDiscovering Management is designed to suit the needs and expectations of Bachelor students at all levels as well as Master and PhD students not belonging to D-MTEC. By providing an overview of Business Management, this course is an ideal enrichment of the standard curriculum at ETH Zurich.
No prior knowledge of business or economics is required to successfully complete this course.
701-0758-00LEcological Economics: Introduction with Focus on Growth CriticsW2 credits2VI. Seidl
AbstractStudents become acquainted with the basics / central questions / analyses of Ecological Economics. Thereby, central will be the topic of economic growth. What are the positions of Ecological Economics in this regard? What are the theories and concepts to found this position in general and in particular economic areas (e.g. resource consumption, efficiency, consumption, labour market, enterprises)?
ObjectiveBecome acquainted with basics and central questions of Ecological Economics (EE): e.g. 'pre-analytic vision', field of discipline, development EE, contributions of involved disciplines such as ecology or political sciences, ecological-economic analysis of topics such as labour market, consumption, money. Critical analysis of growth and learning about approaches to reduce growth pressures.
ContentWhat is Ecological Economics
Field of the discipline and basics
Resource consumption, its development and measurements
Measurement of economic activity and welfare
Economic growth, growth critics and post-growth society
Consumption, Money, Enterprises, labour market and growth pressures
Starting points for a post-growth society
Lecture notesNo Script. Slides and texts will be provided beforehand.
LiteratureDaly, H. E. / Farley, J. (2004). Ecological Economics. Principles and Applications. Washington, Island Press.

Seidl, I. /Zahrnt A. (2010). Postwachstumsgesellschaft, Marburg, Metropolis.

Ausgewählte wissenschaftliche Artikel.
Prerequisites / NoticeParticipation in a lecture on environmental economics or otherwise basic knowledge of economics (e.g. A-Level)
751-1500-00LDevelopment Economics Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 50.
W2 credits2VI. Günther
AbstractIntroduction into basic theoretical and empirical aspects of economic development. Prescriptive theory of economic policy for poverty reduction and economic growth.
ObjectiveStudents are able to
- critically discuss economic questions in the context of developing countries
- critically discuss policy recommendations for economic development.
Content- measurement of development, poverty and inequality,
- growth theories
- trade and development
- education, health, population and development
- states and institutions
- fiscal,monetary- and exchange rate policies
- economic policies for poverty reduction
- economics of development aid
Lecture notesNone.
LiteratureD. Perkins, S. Radelet, D. Lindauer, S. Block (2012): Economics of Development. 7th Edition, W. W. Norton, New York and London.
Prerequisites / NoticeRequirement: Introduction to economics.
860-0013-00LPolitical Economy
Prerequisite: An introductory course in Economics is required to sign up for this course.
W3 credits2VJ.‑E. Sturm, V. Eichenauer
AbstractThis course takes incentives of politicians into account to form a better understanding of the formation of policy and the role of different political institutions in shaping economic policy.
ObjectiveIn principles courses of economics, the functioning of markets and ways in which the government can shape and influence are discussed. The implicit assumption thereby is that the government will act in the interest of society at large. This course takes incentives of politicians into account to thereby form a better understanding of the formation of policy and the role of different political institutions in shaping economic policy. The course will consist of three blocks. In the first, the basic issues and the tools of modelling political equilibria will be discussed. These will subsequently be used to look into redistributive policies. The focus thereby is on how the interplay between democratic institutions and self-seeking individuals, lobby groups, and parties determines the degree of redistribution in a society. By taking also intertemporal issues into account, the third part allows us to analyse public debt levels, pensions, capital taxation and economic growth.
Prerequisites / NoticeAn introductory course in Economics is required to sign up for this course.
851-0157-75LBehavioral Insights for Environmental and Public Policy Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 24

Particularly suitable for students D-MTEC, D-USYS
W2 credits2VJ. Schmitz, M. Grieder, V. Tiefenbeck
AbstractThe course provides an introduction to behavioral environmental economics, and highlights the importance of understanding human behavior and psychology for tackling current environmental challenges such as climate change, pollution or new technology adoption. We discuss recent scientific evidence on topics such as public goods, risk perception, heuristics and biases, impatience, or "nudging".
ObjectiveAt the end of the course, students understand the importance of economic and psychological forces for determining environmentally relevant decisions of consumers and citizens. Students will learn about the existing scientific evidence regarding the most important behavioral forces and have a good understanding of their consequences for environmental outcomes, and what it means to design effective public policies or marketing strategies that take these behavioral forces into account. Students will also learn the basics of how to use experimental methods to scientifically test the effectiveness of potential policy interventions or marketing strategies targeted at changing people's behavior in a pro-environmental way.
363-1050-00LSimulation of Negotiations: Ukraine-Russia-European Union Relations Restricted registration - show details
Students who wish to register for this course, have to apply no later than February 20, 2017. Please send your application to Sibylle Zürcher: szuercher@ethz.ch, additionally register in mystudies.
W3 credits3VM. Ambühl, V. Butenko, S. C. Zürcher
AbstractThe Global Studies Institute (University of Geneva) is organizing a simulation seminar on Ukraine-Russia-European Union relations in collaboration with SciencesPo Paris and the Chair of Negotiation and Conflict Management (ETH).
ObjectiveStudents will have the possibility to participate in simulated diplomatic negotiations and to analyse and assess the negotiation logic behind the situation. During the course, they should gain insight in the relations between Ukraine, Russia and the European Union as well as on negotiation techniques in general.

The simulation is conducted in collaboration with experts and students during a two days seminar at the University of Geneva.
ContentIn the lectures, students will be provided with basic information on the relations between Ukraine, Russia and the European Union. The historical, political and socio-economic dimensions of these relations, including the various treaties and existing agreements and their evolution will be analyzed. Students will as well participate in an introduction on negotiation techniques, particularly on the negotiation engineering approach. On the basis of the comprehensive analysis, negotiation scenarii will be developed and subsequently tested during a two-day simulation exercise. The simulation exercise will be prepared with the help of experienced negotiators and experts.

The simulation exercise is intended for Masters degree and PhD students. The course will be taught in English. The project is headed by Prof. Micheline Calmy-Rey, Global Studies Institute, University of Geneva.

More details on the program, timetable, reading lists and performance assessment will be published here (ETH-login needed):
https://www.ethz.ch/content/specialinterest/mtec/necom/en/education.html

Students from ETH Zurich and Sciences Po will participate in the seminar sessions via video conferencing. They will come to Geneva for the session scheduled on 31 March and for the simulation exercise on 18 and 19 May 2017.

Dates/Time/Location
GE = University of Geneva;
VC = Video conference (ETH main building: HG D22)

21 February | 10:15-12:00 | 1. Indroductory session (VC)
28 February | 10:15-12:00 | 2. The Deep and Comprehensive Free Trade Area (VC)
7 March | 10:15-12:00 | 3. Implementation of the Minsk Protocol: security dimension (VC)
14 March | 10:15-12:00 | 4. Implementation of the Minsk Protocol: humanitarian aspects (VC)
21 March | 10:15-12:00 | 5. Implementation of the Minsk Protocol: political dimension, position of the separatist group (VC)
31 March | 10:30-17:30 | 6. Introduction to negotiation techniques and discussion on the modalities of the simulation and the set-up of the negotiation tables (GE, Uni Dufour, room 408)
4 April | 10:15-12:00 | 7. Implementation of the Minsk Protocol: political dimension, position of the European Union (VC)
11 April | 10:15-12:00 | 8. Preparation of the negotiation tables (VC)
18 May, 10:00-19:30; 19. May, 8:30 - 19:00 | 9. Simulation of negotiations (GE)
23 May 2017 | 10:15-12:00 | 10. Debriefing (VC)

In preparation of the simulation, students will prepare a half-page summary of their negotiation mandate and draft brief statements, if possible in collaboration with the permanent missions of the respective countries. After the simulation, a report and a press release have to be submitted by 23 May 2017.
(Technical note for registration: At this stage all registered students are on the waiting list)
Prerequisites / NoticeEvaluation:

I. Active participation in class (50%)

1. Attend all seminar sessions either in person or via videoconference and actively participate in discussions. If you cannot attend a session, please notify the teaching assistant in advance. In case of excessive absences, credit points will be reduced;
2. Participate in person in the session of 31 March 2017 and in the two-day simulation exercise (18 and 19 May);
3. Do the required readings and regularly read international newspapers (e.g. Financial Times, The New York Times, The Economist, NZZ).

II. Texts to be submitted before, during and after the simulation (50%)

1. Before the simulation: students will prepare a 4-5 pages summary of their negotiating mandate, including a summary of the position of all the parties (group evaluation). The negotiation mandate should not be longer than 5 pages and should be submitted by April 24.
2. During the simulation: students draft and present an introductory and final statement (group evaluation).
3. After the simulation: a report on the negotiation outcomes to the Organization, State or region they represent (3-4 pages) and a press release (max. 1 page) have to be submitted by 23 May 2017. The report and press release are individually evaluated.
Philosophy
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
851-0101-01LIntroduction to Practical Philosophy
Particularly suitable for students of D-MAVT, D-MATL
W3 credits2GL. Wingert
AbstractPractical philosophy deals in a descriptive and evaluative way with the realm of the practical, that is, with action, practices, norms of action, and values held by people and societies. Ethics and political philosophy are branches of practical philosophy. This introductory course will treat some of the main questions and introduce students to the thinking of central figures in the field.
ObjectiveAt the end of the course, students (1) will be familiar with still highly influential answers to some of the main questions (see below, section "contents") in practical philosophy. (2) They will be able to better evaluate how convincing these answers are. (3) Students' own thinking concerning normative, e.g., ethical issues, will be more precise, due to a more sophisticated use of key concepts such as good, right, morality, law, freedom, etc.
ContentEthics is an account and instruction of the good, that could be reached by conscious, intentional behaviour (=action). Ethics is an essential part of practical philosophy. Therefore one of those central questions, which will be discussed in the course, is:

1. What is the meaning of words like "good" and "bad", used in ethical language? What is meant by "good", if one says: "Working as a volunteer for the <Red Cross> is good"? Does one mean, that doing so is useful, or that it is altruistic, or that is fair?

Further questions, to be discussed in the course, are:

2. Are moral judgements apt to be justified, e.g. judgments like "Lower taxes for rich foreigners in the <Kanton Zug> are unjust" or "Every person ought to be entitled to leave any religious community"? If so, how far a moral judgment's justification can reach? Is one right in arguing: "It is possible to show the truth of the proposition (a):The emissions of nitrogen dioxide in Zurich is far beyond the permissible limit (80 mg/m3). But it is not possible to verify the proposition (b): In our times, the inequal global distribution of wealth is far beyond the permissible limit. Proposition (a) states an objective fact, whereas (b) expresses a mere subjective evaluation, though that evaluation might be widely spread.

3. What are just laws, and what is the relationship between law and morality?

4. Is freedom of a person, though presupposed by criminal law and morality, nevertheless an illusion?

These questions will be partly discussed with reference to seminal authors within the western philosophical tradition (among else Plato, Aristotle, Thomas Hobbes, David Hume, Immanuel Kant). Contemporary philosophers like Jürgen Habermas, Thomas Nagel, Ernst Tugendhat or Bernard Williams will be included, too.
LiteraturePreparatory Literature:

-Dieter Birnbacher, Analytische Einführung in die Ethik, 2. Aufl. Berlin: de Gruyter Verlag 2006.
- Simon Blackburn, Think. A Compelling Introduction to Philosophy, Oxford: University Press (=UP) 1999, chapters 3 und 8.
- Philippa Foot, <Virtues and Vices> in: diess., Virtues and Vices and Other Essays in Moral Philosophy, Oxford: UP 2002, and <Morality, Action and Outcome>, in: dies., Moral Dilemmas and Other Topics in Moral Philosophy, Oxford: UP 2002.
- H.L.A. Hart, <Positivism and the Separation of Law and Morals, in: Harvard Law Review 71 (1958), pp. 593-629.
- Detlef Horster, Rechtsphilosophie zur Einführung, Hamburg: Junius Verlag 2002.
- Robert Kane, <Introduction: The Contours of the Contemporary Free Will Debates>, in: ders., (Hg.), The Oxford Handbook of Free Will, Oxford 2002.
– Thomas Nagel, The Limits of Objectivity, in: The Tanner Lectures on Human Values 1980, Vol I., ed. Sterling McMurrin , Cambridge et al.: UP 1980, pp. 75-139.
- Ulrich Pothast, <Einleitung> in: ders., (Hg.), Seminar: Freies Handeln und Determinismus, Frankfurt/M.: suhrkamp taschenbuch wissenschaft 1978, pp. 7-31.
- Bernard Williams, Morality. An Introduction to Ethics, Cambridge: UP (=Canto Series) 1976.
- Peter Winch, The Idea of a Social Science, 4.Aufl. London 1965, ch. II.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course will be a mixture of lecture and seminar. For getting credit points, essays on given or freely chosen subjects have to be written.
851-0147-01LPhilosophical Reflections on Physics II
Particularly suitable for students of D-PHYS
W3 credits2GN. Sieroka, M. Hampe, R. Wallny
AbstractAccompanying the lecture course "Physics II", this course critically evaluates topics and approaches from electrodynamics against a broader historical and philosophical/systematic background. Attention will be paid, amongst other things, to the role of experiments, the concept of a field theory and the principle of extremal action.
ObjectiveStudents should be able to critically evaluate different topics and approaches in physics, especially in the context of electrodynamics. They should also be enabled to communicate their insights to people from other disciplines and fields.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course is part of the ETH "Critical Thinking" initiative.
851-0125-45LIntroduction to the Philosophy of ChemistryW3 credits2GR. Prentner
AbstractThis introductory course deals with philosophical issues that arise from reflecting on the theories and practices of chemistry. Historical developments as well as current chemical research shall be considered.
Particularly suited for students interested in the conceptual foundations of chemistry.
ObjectiveStudents should be able to name and critically evaluate different philosophical positions related to chemistry.
851-0125-51LPhilosophy of Technology: Man and Machine
Particularly suitable for students of D-CHAB, D-HEST, D-MAVT, D-MATL
W3 credits2GM. Hampe, D. A. Strassberg
AbstractThe lecture gives an overview about the different Man-Machine-Relations since the 16th century. Different modells of machines will be important here: the clockwork, the steam engine and the computer.
ObjectiveOn the one hand modells of machines had a heuristical value in research on man, e.g. in Harvey's discovery of blood circulation in the 17th century or in brain research in the 20th century. On the other hand these modells were always criticised, sometimes polemically, because they are supposedly not adequate for man.
Students should learn about the connections between the history of anthropology and technology and be able at the end of the course to evaluate the critical philosophical arguments that are connected with the metaphor of the machine.
851-0125-64LEnvironmental Philosophy
Does not take place this semester.
W3 credits2Vnot available
AbstractReflecting on Nature as an environment is inescapably entangled with a cultural, political, and technological context. How do concepts such as biodiversity, Anthropocene, or ecosystem services stucture former and ongoing environmental debates in societies? What is the difference between anthropocentric and physiocentric positions? What makes certain images and objects environmental icons?
ObjectiveThe lecture offers an overview on philosophical concepts and problems common in the environmental debate. Using philosophical tools, we will probe the different uses of concepts, their semantic range in terms of historical depth and semantic fields and finally their logical coherence. Another important topic is the philosophical investigation of methods and objects that can be identified in the environmental sciences. Those methods are for instance Life Cycle Assessment or Adaptive Ecosystem Management, technological objects may be a wind engine or a hydropower plant. The latter raise questions of how renewable energies can be assessed and valuated, including the more general issue of how values and norms can be embedded in technological objects. Another important topic is the political and epistemic potential of iconic images, such as the "blue planet" or the "polar bear on floating iceberg". Again another topic focuses on current deliberations about future ways of existence in the age of the Anthropocene and as a consequence the formation of adequate life styles in our societies. This refers to issues in philosophical and social anthropology and the challenge of climate change.
Each lecture is accompanied by a text that should be prepared in advance by students. It serves to identify philosophical questions relevant for each particular topic. The subject of the student's paper (mandatory) is drawn from the discussions revolving around the texts discussed, various forms of text are possible (essay, article, image interpretation, etc.)
851-0125-65LA Sampler of Histories and Philosophies of Mathematics
Particularly suitable for students D-CHAB, D-INFK, D-ITET, D-MATH, D-PHYS
W3 credits2VR. Wagner
AbstractThis course will review several case studies from the history of mathematics (Greek geometry, early modern European notions of infinity and 20th century constructive and axiomatic approaches). The case studies will be analyzed from various philosophical perspectives, while rooting them in their historical and cultural contexts.
ObjectiveThe course aims are:
1. To introduce students to the historicity of mathematics
2. To make sense of mathematical practices that appear unreasonable from a contemporary point of view
3. To develop critical reflection concerning the nature of mathematical objects
4. To introduce realist, dialectical, practical and constructivist approaches to the philosophy and history of mathematics
5. To open the students' horizons to the plurality of mathematical cultures and practices
851-0125-66LPerspectives on Mathematical Cognition Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 45.

Particularly suitable for students D-CHAB, D-INFK, D-ITET, D-MATH, D-PHYS
W3 credits2SR. Wagner
AbstractThis course will review some approaches to mathematical cognition. It will range from neuro-cognitive theories about the innateness of mathematical capacities to more abstract treatments of mathematical cognition. The theories will be evaluated with respect to historical case studies and philosophical-conceptual analysis.
ObjectiveThe course aims are:
1. To introduce the most popular neuro-cognitive approaches to mathematical cognition
2. To introduce the idea of embodied/extended cognition
3. To introduce non modular approaches to mathematical cognition
4. To reflect on cognitive theories and methodologies from historical and philosophical perspectives

At the end of the course the students will be able to evaluate exiting theories of mathematical cognition and use them in future research.
401-1010-00LThe Foundations of Analysis from a Philosophical and Historical Point of View Restricted registration - show details
Particularly suitable for students of D-MATH
Number of participants limited to 40
W2 credits2SG. Sommaruga, L. Halbeisen
AbstractAccompanying the courses in analysis, the beginning and development of analysis will be considered and discussed from a philosophical perspective. In particular, different approaches towards dealing with the problems sparked off by the infinitesimals will be studied. And finally, a short presentation of non-standard analysis will be given.
ObjectiveThis course aims at enabling the students to have a critical look at the basic philosophical premisses underlying analysis, to analyze them and to reflect on them.
NB. This course is part of the rectorate's critical thinking initiative.
851-0125-52LCentral Questions in Bioethics
Particularly suitable for students of D-BIOL, D-CHAB, D-HEST, D-MATL, D-MAVT
W3 credits2SL. Wingert
AbstractBioethics deals with the evaluation and regulation of technology based interventions into life. What are valid principles guiding bioethical decision, principles like "Protect the dignity of the living being!", or "Respect a person's self-determination!"? Besides answering such questions, the social, scientific and political processes linked with biotechnologies should be taken into account.
ObjectiveDürfen Embryonen unter dem Aspekt selektiert werden, ob sie als Rettungsgeschwister geeignet sind, deren Zellgewebe einem schon geborenen anderen Kind durch Implantation das Leben retten kann? Soll die Forschung an Pillen erlaubt sein, die das menschliche Gedächtnis teilweise auslöschen und damit zum Beispiel traumatische Erlebnisse beseitigen können? Spricht wirklich mehr gegen Hirndoping als gegen Kaffeekonsum? Darf es Patente auf menschliche Stammzellen geben? Das sind Fragen der Bioethik.
Der Kurs hat das Ziel, einige der wichtigsten bioethischen Fragen zu erforschen.
Es sollen normative Prinzipien identifiziert werden, die oft faktisch bioethischen Entscheidungen zu Grunde liegen.
Und es sollen überzeugende Prinzipien ermittelt werden.
Zugleich sollen die Teilnehmer Kenntnisse erwerben über die Entwicklungen in zeitgenössischen Gesellschaften westlichen Typs (mit individuellen Grundrechten, kapitalistischer Marktwirtschaft und systematische wissenschaftlicher Forschung), die mit der Dynamik von Biotechniken zusammenhängen.
LiteratureLiterature:

1.Dieter Sturma/Bert Heinrichs (Hg.), Handbuch Bioethik, Stuttgart: Metzler 2015.

2. Bettina Schöne-Siefert, Grundlagen der Medizinethik: Stuttgart: Kröner 2007.

3. Tom L. Beauchamp/James Childress, Principles of Biomedical Ethics, 7th ed. Oxford: University Press 2013.

4. Oliver Müller, Formen der Technisierung des Gehirns, in: O.Müller, Zwischen Mensch und Maschine. Vom Glück und Unglück des Homo faber, Berlin: Suhrkamp 2010.

5. Helmut Dubiel, Tief im Gehirn, München: Kunstmann 2006.

6. Jürgen Habermas, The Future of Human Nature. Cambridge: Polity Press 2003.

7. Norman Daniels, When are health inequalities unjust?, in N.Daniels, Just Health: Meeting Health Needs Fairly, Cambridge 2008.
Political Science
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
853-0058-01LSwiss Foreign and Security Politics Since 1945 (without Tutorial)W2 credits2VA. Wenger
AbstractThis course provides students with an overview of the main features of Swiss foreign and security policy since 1945. The focus is on the emergence and development of security policy strategies and instruments in a historical context.
ObjectiveThe participants have a solid overview of the evolution of Swiss foreign and security policy since 1945.
ContentThe first part of the lecture clarifies the term "security" and analyzes the change of its meaning in politics and academia over time. The focus of the second part is on the development of Swiss security policy since 1945. We will look at the different concepts of security policy, which range from "total defense" to cooperative security. We then will analyze the gap between planning and execution, focusing on the two key developments of security policy, that is foreign policy and armed forces.
LiteratureMandatory reading: Spillman, Kurt R., Andreas Wenger, Christoph Breitenmoser and Marcel Gerber. Schweizer Sicherheitspolitik seit 1945: Zwischen Autonomie und Kooperation. Zürich: Verlag neue Zürcher Zeitung, 2001.

The book is out of print, students can access the text in the virtual class room (Moodle).
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture is supported by a virtual class room. If you have questions concerning the lecture, please contact Lukas Meyer, lukas.meyer@sipo.gess.ethz.ch.
853-0034-02LLeadership IIW3 credits2VM. Holenweger, F. Demont
AbstractThe lecture "Leadership II" refers to the lecture "Leadership I". However, it is possible to attend this course as a stand-alone lecture. In the lecture "Leadership II" we analyze specific leadership processes such as problem solving, planning, organizing, intercultural management, group-dynamics, crisis leadership and typical characteristics of successful leaders.
ObjectiveThe aim of this lecture is to give the students an insight into practical aspects of interactional and organizational leadership, such as problem solving and decision making, group-dynamics and crisis leadership. In addition, they will understand the importance of intercultural leadership in modern organizations and can transfer their insights into their future working environment. Finally, typical characteristics of successful leadership behavior will be presented and discussed.
227-0664-00LTechnology and Policy of Electrical Energy Storage Information W3 credits2GV. Wood, T. Schmidt
AbstractWith the global emphasis on decreasing CO2 emissions, achieving fossil fuel independence and growing the use of renewables, developing & implementing energy storage solutions for electric mobility & grid stabilization represent a key technology & policy challenge. This course primarily uses lithium ion batteries as a case study to understand the interplay between technology, economics & policy.
ObjectiveThe students will learn of the complexity involved in battery research, design, production, as well as in investment, economics and policy making around batteries. Students from technical disciplines will gain insights into policy, while students from social science backgrounds will gain insights into technology.
ContentWith the global emphasis on decreasing CO2 emissions, achieving fossil fuel independence, and integrating renewables on the electric grid, developing and implementing energy storage solutions for electric mobility and grid stabilization represent a key technology and policy challenge. The class will focus on lithium ion batteries since they are poised to enter a variety of markets where policy decisions will affect their production, adoption, and usage scenarios. The course considers the interplay between technology, economics, and policy.

* intro to energy storage for electric mobility and grid-stabilization
* basics of battery operation, manufacturing, and integration
* hands-on fabrication and testing of a cell
* intro to the role of policy for energy storage innovation & diffusion
* discussion of complexities involved in policy and politics of energy storage
Lecture notesMaterials will be made available on the website.
LiteratureMaterials will be made available on the website.
Prerequisites / NoticeStrong interest in energy and technology policy.
853-0048-01LInternational Politics: Theory and MethodsW3 credits3GF. Schimmelfennig
AbstractThe course covers the main theories (realism, institutionalism, liberalism, transnationalism and constructivism) as well as core problems of international politics such as war, peace, international cooperation and integration.
ObjectiveFirst, the course seeks to generate a better understanding of the central and specific problems of politics in the international realm, which result from the absence of centralized rule enforcement ("anarchy") . In addition, participants become familiar with the main theories of International Relations and the mechanisms and conditions these identify for solving international problems of security and cooperation. Case studies on areas and issues of international politics provide an overview of current international developments and an exemplary application of IR theory.
Content1. The subject-matter and problems of international politics

Theories
2. Power and Balances: Realism
3. Interdependence and Institutions: Institutionalism
4. Democracy and Society: Liberalism
5. Transnational Actors and Governance in Networks: Transnationalism
6. Identity and Community: Constructivism

Issue Areas and Relationships
7. War: New Wars
8. Peace: The "long" and the "democratic" peace
9. Security cooperation: the new NATO
10. Economic cooperation: the world trade order
11. Human rights cooperation: global and regional human rights regimes
12. Regional integration: the European Economic and Monetary Union
13. Legitimacy and Democracy in Global Governance
Lecture notesSchimmelfennig, Frank: Internationale Politik. Paderborn: Schöningh Verlag, 4. Auflage, 2015.
853-0010-01LConflict Research II: Challenges of Contemporary Conflicts (without Exercices)W3 credits2VL.‑E. Cederman
AbstractThe second part of the course on international conflict research focuses on current challenges posed by civil wars. The course investigates the nature of such wars in general, as well as issues during and after conflict. A concluding module on regional influences of and on civil wars is enriched through several lectures on regional case studies.
ObjectiveDeveloping an understanding of basic concepts and debates in current research on civil wars, and particularly of the dynamics during and after the conclusion of a conflict. Additionally, the students are meant to develop a basic understanding of several important conflict regions.
Prerequisites / NoticeParticipation in the preceding course, Causes of War in a Historical Context (Conflict Research I), is a prerequisite.
Psychology, Pedagogics
Suitable for all students
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
851-0240-01LDesigning Learning Environments for School (EW2 TD) Information Restricted registration - show details
Prerequisites: successful participation in 851-0240-00L "Human Learning (EW1)".

Adresses to students enrolled either in Teaching Diploma* (TD) or Teaching Certificate (TC) in Computer Science, Mathematics or Physics.
*Except for students of Sport Teaching Diploma, who complete the sport-specific course unit EW2.
W3 credits2VE. Stern, J. Egli, P. Greutmann
AbstractTeaching is a complex skill. The lecture comprises (a) presentations about the theoretical background of this skill, (b) discussions of practical aspects, and (c) practical exercises.
ObjectiveThe participants have the conceptual und procedural knowledge, and skills necessary for long-term planning, preparing, and implementing good lessons. They can apply this knowledge on different topics of their scientific STEM-background.
ContentWe discuss characteristics of successful lessons and how to design such lessons by using curricula and lesson plans, teaching goals and a variety of teaching methods.
Lecture notesThe lecture comprises interactive parts where the participants elaborate and extend their knowledge and skills. Thus, there is no comprehensive written documentation of the lecture. The participants can download presentation slides, learning materials, and templates from "Moodle".
LiteratureThe necessary literature can be downloaded from "Moodle".
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture EW2 can only be attended by students who already successfully completed the lecture Human Learning (EW1).
There will be two independent lectures for different groups of students. You will get further information in an email at the beginning of the semester.
To get the Credits you have to
- regularly attend to the lecture
- have the grade 4 or higher in the final written exam.
851-0240-17LDesigning Learning Environments for School: Educational Foundations (EW2 TC) Information
- Prerequisite: successful participation in 851-0240-00L "Human Learning (EW1)".
- Addresses to students enrolled in "Teaching Certificate in a non-college Discipline (TC)".
- The simultaneous enrolment in course 851-0240-25 Designing Learning Environments for School: Vocational Education (EW2 TC)" is recommended, but not a mandatory prerequisite.
W2 credits1GE. Stern, P. Edelsbrunner, L. Schalk
AbstractTeaching is also a craft. In this lecture, students get to know and, wherever possible, also practice practical aspects of the teaching profession within the framework of relevant theories rom the Learning Sciences.
ObjectiveStudents acquire basic knowledge and skills needed for planning, preparing, and implementing effective instruction. They can reflect and adapt these skills based on knowledge about findings from research in the learning sciences.
ContentWe discuss characteristics of successful lessons and how to design such lessons by using curricula and lesson plans, teaching goals, classroom management, and a variety of teaching methods.
Lecture notesThe lecture comprises interactive parts where the participants elaborate and extend their knowledge and skills. Thus, there is no comprehensive written documentation of the lecture. The participants can download presentation slides, learning materials, and templates from "Moodle".
LiteratureThe necessary literature can be downloaded from "Moodle".
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture EW2 can only be attended by students who already successfully completed the lecture Human Learning (EW1).
There will be two independent lectures for different groups of students. You will get further information in an email at the beginning of the semester.
851-0252-01LHuman-Computer Interaction: Cognition and Usability Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30.

Particularly suitable for students of D-ITET
W3 credits2SC. Hölscher, I. Barisic, S. Ognjanovic
AbstractThis seminar introduces theory and methods in human-computer interaction and usability. Cognitive Science provides a theoretical framework for designing user interfaces as well as a range of methods for assessing usability (user testing, cognitive walkthrough, GOMS). The seminar will provide an opportunity to experience some of the methods in applied group projects.
ObjectiveThis seminar will introduce key topics, theories and methodology in human-computer interaction (HCI) and usability. Presentations will cover the basics of human-computer interaction and selected topics like mobile interaction, adaptive systems, human error and attention. A focus of the seminar will be on getting to know evaluation techniques in HCI. Students will work in groups and will first familiarize themselves with a select usability evaluation method (e.g. user testing, GOMS, task analysis, heuristic evaluation, questionnaires or Cognitive Walkthrough). They will then apply the methods to a human-computer interaction setting (e.g. an existing software or hardware interface) and present the method as well as their procedure and results to the plenary. Active participation is vital for the success of the seminar, and students are expected to contribute to presentations of foundational themes, methods and results of their chosen group project. In order to obtain course credit a written essay / report will be required (details to be specified in the introductory session of the course).
851-0252-03LCognition in Architecture - Designing Orientation and Navigation for Building Users Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 40

Particularly suitable for students of D-ARCH
W3 credits2SV. Schinazi, B. Emo Nax, T. Thrash
AbstractHow can Behavioral and Cognitive Science inform architecture? This project-oriented seminar investigates contributions of cognition to architectural design, with an emphasis on orientation & navigation in complex buildings and urban settings. This includes theories about spatial memory and decision-making as well as hands-on observation of behavior in real settings and virtual reality simulation.
ObjectiveTaking the perspectives of the building users (occupants and visitors) is vital for a human-centered design approach. Students will learn about relevant theory and methods in cognitive science and environmental psychology that can be used to address human cognitive and behavioral needs in built environments. The foundations of environmental psychology and human spatial cognition will be introduced. A focus of the seminar will be on how people perceive their surroundings, how they orient in a building, how they memorize the environment and how they find they way from A to B. Students will learn about a range of methods including real-world observation, virtual reality experiments, eye-tracking and behavior simulation in design. Students will reflect the roles of designers and other stakeholders with respect to human-centered design as well as an evidence-based design perspective. The seminar is geared towards a mix of students from architecture / planning, engineering, computer science and behavioral science as well as anybody interested in the relation between design and cognition. Architecture students can obtain course credit in Vertiefungsfach" or "Wahlfach".
851-0252-04LBehavioral Studies Colloquium Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 50.
W2 credits2KE. Stern, H.‑D. Daniel, D. Helbing, C. Hölscher, B. Rütsche, R. Schubert, C. Stadtfeld
AbstractThis colloquium offers an opportunity for students to discuss their ongoing research and scientific ideas in the behavioral sciences, both at the micro- and macro-levels of cognitive, behavioral and social science. It also offers an opportunity for students from other disciplines to discuss their research ideas in relation to behavioral science. The colloquium also features invited research talks.
ObjectiveStudents know and can apply autonomously up-to-date investigation methods and techniques in the behavioral sciences. They achieve the ability to develop their own ideas in the field and to communicate their ideas in oral presentations and in written papers. The credits will be obtained by a written report of approximately 10 pages.
ContentThis colloquium offers an opportunity for students to discuss their ongoing research and scientific ideas in the behavioral sciences, both at the micro- and macro-levels of cognitive, behavioral and social science. It also offers an opportunity for students from other disciplines to discuss their ideas in so far as they have some relation to behavioral science. The possible research areas are wide and may include theoretical as well as empirical approaches in Social Psychology and Research on Higher Education, Sociology, Modeling and Simulation in Sociology, Decision Theory and Behavioral Game Theory, Economics, Research on Learning and Instruction, Cognitive Psychology and Cognitive Science. Ideally the students (from Bachelor, Master, Ph.D. and Post-Doc programs) have started to start work on their thesis or on any other term paper.
Course credit can be obtained either based on a talk in the colloquium plus a written essay, or by writing an essay about a topic related to one of the other talks in the course. Students interested in giving a talk should contact the course organizers (Rütsche, Stern) before the first session of the semester. Priority will be given to advanced / doctoral students for oral presentations. The course credits will be obtained by a written report of approximately 10 pages. The colloquium also serves as a venue for invited talks by researchers from other universities and institutions related to behavioral and social sciences.
851-0232-00LSocial Psychology of Effective TeamworkW2 credits2VR. Mutz
AbstractThe lecture covers the main topics of social interactions in groups as a basis for effective teamwork in organisations: group; group structure; group dynamics and performance; group analysis; examples of applications.
ObjectiveTeamwork is of growing importance in business and administration. The aim of this lecture / exercise is to provide a scientific understanding of social interactions in groups as a basis for effective teamwork in organisations.
ContentInhalte der Lehrveranstaltung sind:
- Gruppe: Definition und Typen
- Gruppenstruktur: Rollen und Führung
- Gruppenprozesse: Konformität und Konflikte in Gruppen
- Gruppenleistung: Leistungsvorteile von Gruppen
- Gruppenanalyse: Interaktionsprozessanalyse und Soziometrie
- Anwendungsbeispiele: Assessment-Center, teilautonome Gruppen
Lecture notesEs können Folien, die in der Vorlesung verwendet werden, im Anschluss an die Veranstaltung von einer Austauchplattform heruntergeladen werden.
LiteratureDie Literatur wird in Form eines Readers mit für die Themen der Vorlesung relevanten Textauszügen aus Fachbüchern angeboten.
Prerequisites / NoticeDie Übungen dienen dazu, einzelne Themenbereiche der Vorlesung an praktischen Beispielen exemplarisch zu vertiefen.
851-0242-03LIntroduction to General Pedagogy Restricted registration - show details
Enrolment only possible with matriculation in Teaching Diploma or Teaching Certificate.

Prerequisite: successful participation in 851-0240-00L "Human Learning (EW1)".
W2 credits2GL. Haag
AbstractThe basics of educational science and the field of activity of the school are conveyed in as much as they are of relevance to the field of activity of the teachers. Basic knowledge is taught methodically by the lecturers which is further deepened by the reading of selected texts and corresponding work assignments in individual and small groups.
Objective1. Basics of educational science
1.1 Historical survey of education and school
1.2 Fundamental educational terms
- Education as field of activity of the school
- Education at school
- Socialization
2. Field of activity of the school
2.1 Theory of school
- Theory of school
- Curriculum theory
- School development
2.2 Theory of instruction
- Didactic analysis
- Principles of learning
- Handling of heterogeneity
851-0585-14LEvaluation ResearchW2 credits2GH.‑D. Daniel
AbstractThe course will provide an overview on different kinds of evaluation in education, especially higher education (e. g., course evaluation, study programme evaluation, peer review, multi-stage evaluation procedures). The course will focus on the reliability, fairness, and validity of the different kind of evaluation procedures.
ObjectiveTo design and analyse evaluations according to scientific principles independently.
701-0782-00LDiffering Views of Practice and Science: Mutual Learning for Successful Collaboration
Does not take place this semester.
W1 credit1G
AbstractTypical problems during implementation of scientific facts into practice are analyzed and explained by means of theories of philosophy of science. The students recognize different views of actor groups and learn to apply methods from knowledge management within their own case studies. The students acquire experiences which are essential for their professional life between science and practice.
ObjectiveThe lecture enables the students to acquire experiences and skills which are essential for their professional life between science and practice. The students recognize the importance of mutual learning among the actors. They experience the views of different actor groups and learn to apply knowledge management methods for a successful collaboration. Special emphasis is given to the use of videos.
ContentDie Lehrveranstaltung greift Umsetzungsprobleme zwischen Forschung und Praxis im Umweltbereich auf, liefert wissenschaftlich fundierte Erklärungen dafür und stellt erprobte Methoden der "Wissensarbeit" aus der Privatwirtschaft vor, welche den Wissensaustausch zwischen den Akteuren fördert.

Folgende Fragestellungen werden in der Lehrveranstaltung behandelt:
1. Weshalb sind Lernprozesse zwischen den Akteurgruppen wichtig und wie können diese ermöglicht werden?
Der Berufsalltag an der Schnittstelle zwischen Forschung und Praxis ist anspruchsvoll: Einerseits muss das Wissen aus verschiedenen Disziplinen zusammengeführt werden. Andererseits muss das wissenschaftliche Wissen in praxisrelevante Handlungen übersetzt werden. Dies ist eine grosse Herausforderung. Praxisrelevantes Handlungswissen wird mit allen beteiligten Akteuren gemeinsam erarbeitet. Ein gegenseitiger Lernprozess ist dabei eine wichtige Voraussetzung.

2. Wie können unterschiedliche Sichtweisen der Akteure erkannt und zugelassen werden?
An der Schnittstelle zwischen Forschung und Praxis treffen Akteure mit unterschiedlichen Wertorientierungen (Zielen, Interessen, Methoden), unterschiedlichem Hintergrund und unterschiedlichen Fachsprachen aufeinander. Ein Fallbeispiel aus dem Bodenschutz (FRY 2001) dient als roter Faden, um die unterschiedlichen Sichtweisen zu analysieren und geeignete Methoden vorzustellen. Dabei wird der Einsatz von Video als Prozessgestaltungsmethode speziell diskutiert. Methoden, die unterschiedliche Sichtweisen berücksichtigen, werden von den Studierenden in eigenen Fallbeispielen angewendet und diskutiert.

3. Welche theoretischen Grundlagen sind für die Wissensarbeit relevant und welche Methoden können für den Umweltschutz angewendet werden?
Die für die Umsetzung relevanten klassischen Theorien aus der Wissenschaftsforschung, insbesondere die Theorie des impliziten Wissens (POLANYI) und die Lehre des Denkstils (FLECK) werden vorgestellt. Auf diesen Theorien bauen verschiedene praxiserprobte Methoden der Wissensarbeit aus der Privatwirtschaft auf (DAVENPORT und PRUSAK 1998). Diese Methoden, aber auch die Rahmenbedingungen, unter denen
sie funktionieren, werden in der Lehrveranstaltung anhand von eigenen Fallstudien ausführlich diskutiert.
Lecture notesHandouts and literature. The book "Bauernsicht und Forscherblick" will serve as a basis (Fry 2001).
Literature- - FRY, P. (2015): Social learning videos: A Method for successful collaboration between science and practice. In: Padmanabhan, Martina (editor). Transdisciplinarity: How research is changing to meet the challenges of sustainability. Routledge Series: Studies in Environment, Culture and Society. Editors: Bernhard Glaeser & Heike Egner. Being published.
- RAVN, Johan E. 2004. Cross-System Knowledge Chains: The Team Dynamics of Knowledge Development. Systemic Practice and Action Research 17 (3):161-175.
- ROUX, Dirk J., Kevin H. Rogers, Harry C. Biggs, Peter J. Ashton, and Anne Sergeant. 2006. Bridging the Science-Management Divide: Moving from Unidirectional Knowledge Transfer to Knowledge Interfacing and Sharing. Ecology and Society 11 (1):4. [online] URL: http://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol11/iss1/art4.
- DAVENPORT, T.H., L. PRUSAK 1998: Working Knowledge. How Organisations Manage What They Know. Harvard Business School Press. Boston Massachusetts. 199 S.
- FRY, P. 2001: Bodenfruchtbarkeit - Bauernsicht und Forscherblick. Reihe Kommunikation und Beratung. Hrsg. H. Boland, V. Hoffmann und U.J. Nagel. Margraf-Verlag, Weikersheim. 170 S.
-Fleck, L 1979. Genesis and Development of a Scientific Fact.
Chicago/London: University of Chicago Press.
- POLANYI, M., 1985: Implizites Wissen. Suhrkamp. Frankfurt am Main. 94 S.
-Application of video and accompagnying groups for implementation:
www.vonbauernfuerbauern.ch
www.nfp61.ch
Prerequisites / NoticeSoil protection will serve as a thread within the whole lecture. We will meet several actors from soil protection. The succesful project "From farmer to farmer" uses film and networks as means for implementation. The students apply the lessons learnt on a chosen topic. Several methods will be used which allow active participaton of the students: Presentations, discussions, working groups, excursions, analysis of film etc.

Conditions: The lecture is an ideal preparation and/or possibilty to reflect practical training and case studies. Being interested in practice related questions is a necessary prerequisite.
363-1039-00LIntroduction to Negotiation Information W3 credits2GM. Ambühl
AbstractThe course combines different lecture formats to provide students with both the theoretical background and the practical appreciation of negotiation. A core element of the course is an introduction to the concept of negotiation engineering.
ObjectiveStudents learn to understand and to identify different negotiation situations, analyze specific cases, and discuss respective negotiation approaches based on important negotiation methods (i.a. Game Theory, Harvard Method).
ContentThe course combines different lecture formats to provide students with both the theoretical background and the practical appreciation of negotiation. A core element is an introduction to the concept of negotiation engineering. The course covers a brief overview of different negotiation approaches, different categories of negotiations, selected negotiation models, as well as in-depth discussions of real-world case studies on international negotiations involving Switzerland. Students learn to deconstruct specific negotiation situations, to differentiate key aspects and to develop and apply a suitable negotiation approach based on important negotiation methods.
LiteratureThe list of relevant references will be distributed in the beginning of the course.
851-0252-08LCognition in Studio Design - Analytic Tools for Evidence-Based Design Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 25
W3 credits2SB. Emo Nax, M. Brösamle, C. Hölscher
AbstractHow can Behavioral and Cognitive Science inform architecture? In this project-oriented course, students are introduced to cognitive and analytical methods to evaluate their design projects. Existing theories are introduced and complemented with hands-on sessions, in which students learn how to implement a range of methods. The course is tailored for students from relevant design studios.
ObjectiveTaking the perspectives of the end user (occupants and visitors) is vital for a human-centered design approach. Students will learn about relevant theory and methods in cognitive science and environmental psychology that can be used to address human cognitive and behavioral needs in built environments. The foundations of environmental psychology and human spatial cognition will be introduced. A focus of the course will be on how people perceive their surroundings and orient in space. Students will learn about a range of methods including real-world observation, and methods of architectural analysis such as space syntax. Students will also be exposed to behavior simulation in design, virtual reality experiments, and eye-tracking. Students will reflect the roles of designers and other stakeholders with respect to human-centered design as well as an evidence-based design perspective. The course is tailored for students from a relevant design studio. Upon registering, students should send an email about their design studio to b.emo@gess.ethz.ch. As an alternative to obtaining D-GESS credit, architecture students can obtain course credit in "Vertiefungsfach" or "Wahlfach".
851-0253-00LEmbodied Cognition Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 40.

Particularly suitable for students D-MAVT.
W2 credits2SK. Stocker
AbstractThis seminar offers an introduction to embodiment. Does the representation of thought and emotion depend upon the sensory and motor system? Highlights: the figurative processing of "go" still evokes voltage changes in foot muscles, conceptualizing time activates the eyes to look along a mental time line, abstract causality might still be grounded in motor control, emotion shows in the way we walk
ObjectiveLooking at the degree of embodiment in cognition and emotion naturally leads to the question how the mind works. What is the nature of human thoughts and emotions? How deeply are they dependent upon features of our physical body as an agent? Do the sensory and motor system play a physically constitutive role in conceptualizing thought and emotion? We will look at these questions by examining the degree of embodiment in basic thinking types of our mind (space, time, and causality thinking) as well as in abstract thought (e.g., logical thinking) and in emotion processing. As will be discussed, the topic of how the mind works is not only of central importance in the humanities (psychology, linguistics, philosophy, anthropology, education), but is also relevant for parts of the natural and technological sciences (physiology, neuroscience, medicine, computer science, artificial intelligence, robotics). Furthermore, embodied cognition is also relevant for the question how the mind is cognitively and emotionally influenced by environmental features, and as such embodied findings are also relevant for fields such as architecture and mechanical engineering.
851-0238-01LSupport and Diagnosis of Knowledge Acquisition Processes (EW3) Restricted registration - show details
Enrolment only possible with matriculation in Teaching Diploma (except for students of Sport Teaching Diploma, who complete the sport-specific course unit EW3) and for students who intend to enrol in the "Teaching Diploma"
Prerequisites: successful participation in 851-0240-00L "Human Learning (EW1)".
W3 credits3SL. Schalk, P. Edelsbrunner
AbstractIn this seminar students learn advanced techniques to support and to diagnose knowledge acquisition processes in school.
ObjectiveThe main goals are:
(1) You have a deep understanding about the cognitive mechanisms of knowledge acquisition.
(2) You have a basic understanding about psychological test theory and can appropriately administer tests.
(3) You know various techniques of formative assessment and can apply these to uncover students' misconceptions.
851-0240-25LDesigning Learning Environments for School: Vocational Education (EW2 TC)
- Prerequisite: successful participation in 851-0240-00L "Human Learning (EW1)".
- Addresses to students enrolled in "Teaching Certificate in a non-college Discipline (TC)".
- The simultaneous enrolment in course 851-0240-17L Designing Learning Environments for School: Educational Foundations (EW2 DZ)" is recommended, but not a mandatory prerequisite.
W2 credits1GG. Kaufmann
AbstractParticipants acquire knowledge in vocational training system and in theory and practice of vocational education. They get to know characteristics of functions, tasks and roles in the professional world. They deduce consequences for the planning and execution of learner-tailored and effective learning in vocational education taking into account the theory and practice of vocational education.
ObjectiveParticipants would be able to structure and execute learner-tailored and effective learning in vocational education taking into account the theory and practice of vocational education.
851-0240-24LDesigning Learning Environments for Schools (EW2 LD) - Portfolio
- Enrolment only possible with simultaneous enrolment in course 851-0240-01L Designing Learning Environments for School (EW2 LD)!

- Prerequisites: successful participation in 851-0240-00L "Human Learning (EW1)".

- Adresses to students enrolled either in Teaching Diploma* (TD) or Teaching Certificate (TC) in Computer Science, Mathematics or Physics.
*Except for students of Sport Teaching Diploma, who complete the sport-specific course unit EW2.
W1 credit2UP. Greutmann, J. Egli
AbstractIn this lecture, you design a portfolio, i.e. a complete and elaborated teaching enviroment for schools, based on your scientific STEM-background
ObjectiveThis lecture is an implementation and transfer of the theoretical inputs provided by the lecture "Designing Learning Environments for School" (EW2).
Law
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-0743-01LLaw and Natural ResourcesW2 credits2VN. Dajcar
AbstractThis course teaches the possibilities and limits of the law in order to protect natural resources and landscapes against harm and nuisance. The learning concept is based on the co-ordinated implementation of the relevant legislations. The complexity of the legal situation will be discussed by analysing virtual and real law cases focused on spatial projects and planning.
ObjectiveThe students know the opportunities and restrictions which are given by the law when using natural resources. They have insights into the complex environmental legal system and their application in conrete cases. The students are able to formulate typical legal questions, to understand the argumentation of courts and to solve simple legal problems with respect to environmental problems.
ContentDie Studierenden werden eingeführt in die für die Nutzung natürlicher Ressourcen und die Gestaltung der Landschaft massgeblichen Rechtsgebiete und deren Interdependenz. Die teils ressourcenspezifischen, teils ressourcenübergreifenden rechtlichen Regelungen und deren Anwendung werden problemorientiert verdeutlicht. Anhand von Rechtsfällen werden praktische Fragen behandelt und grundsätzliche Handlungsansätze erörtert. Der Einzelfall wird dabei in den Gesamtzusammenhang gestellt. Charakteristische Schwierigkeiten, aber auch das Potenzial rechtlicher Lösungsansätze sowie typische Verfahrensabläufe sollen aufgezeigt werden. Der Kurs bietet eine Vertiefung in folgende Rechtsgebiete:
Waldrecht - Natur- und Landschaftsschutzrecht - Wasserrecht - Raumplanungsrecht - Umweltschutzrecht - Verfahrensrecht
Unterrichtssprache: Deutsch
Lecture notesDen Studierenden werden Unterlagen via elektronische Plattform Illias abgegeben.
LiteratureGriffel, A.; Raumplanungs- und Baurecht in a nutshell, Dike Verlag, 2. Auflage, Zürich/St. Gallen 2014
Griffel, A.; Umweltrecht in a nutshell, Dike Verlag, Zürich/St. Gallen 2015
Prerequisites / NoticeDie Veranstaltung ist eine vorwiegend mit konkreten Beispielen arbeitende und auf natürliche Ressourcen, Landschaften und Raumordnung fokussierte Vertiefung. Die Studierenden können eigene "Fälle" aus dem persönlichen Umfeld einbringen. Der Besuch des Kurses "Umweltrecht: Konzepte und Rechtsgebiete" (851-0705-01) wird empfohlen.
851-0708-00LIntroduction to Law Restricted registration - show details
Introduction to Law as GESS Compulsory Elective Course:
Students who have attended or will attend the lecture "Introduction to Law for Architecture" (851-0703-01L), "Introduction to Law for Civil Engineering" (851-0703-03L) or " Introduction to Law" (851-0703-00) , cannot register for this course unit.

Particularly suitable for students of D-HEST, D-MAVT, D-MATL, D-USYS.

Number of participants limited to 300
W2 credits2VS. Bechtold
AbstractThis class introduces students to basic features of the legal system. Questions of constitutional and administrative law, contract law, tort law, corporate law, intellectual property law, as well as procedural law are covered.
ObjectiveIntroduction to fundamental questions of public and private law which serves as a foundation for more advanced law classes.
Content1. Öffentliches Recht
Staatsrecht: Funktion und Quellen des Rechts, Aufbau und Organisation des Staates, Grundrechte, Grundzüge des Völker- und Europarechts. Verwaltungsrecht: Verwaltungsverhältnis, Verfügung, Verwaltungsorganisation, Durchsetzung des Verwaltungsrechts, Verwaltungsverfahrensrecht, Grundzüge des Polizei-, Umwelt- und Raumplanungsrechts.

2. Privatrecht
Vertragsrecht: Vertragsfreiheit, Vertragsentstehung, -erfüllung und -verletzung, Grundzüge des Kauf- und Mietvertrags. Haftungsrecht: Verschuldenshaftung und Kausalhaftung, Beschränkung der Haftung. Grundzüge des Gesellschafts,- Immaterialgüter- und Zivilprozessrechts.
Lecture notesAuf der Moodle-Plattform verfügbar.
LiteratureWeiterführende Informationen sind auf der Moodle-Lernumgebung zur Vorlesung erhältlich (s. http://www.ip.ethz.ch/education/grundzuege).
851-0732-03LIntellectual Property: An Introduction Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 160

Particularly suitable for students of D-ARCH, D-BIOL, D-CHAB, D-INFK, D-ITET, D-MAVT, D- MATL, D-MTEC.
W2 credits2VS. Bechtold
AbstractThe course introduces students to the basics of the intellectual property system and of innovation policy. Areas covered include patent, copyright, trademark, design, know-how protection, open source, and technology transfer. The course looks at Swiss, European, U.S. and international law and uses examples from a broad range of technologies. Insights can be used in academia, industry or start-ups.
ObjectiveIntellectual property issues become more and more important in our society. In order to prepare students for their future challenges in research, industry or start-ups, this course introduces them to the foundations of the intellectual property system. The course covers patent, copyright, trademark, design, know-how protection, open source, and technology transfer law. It explains links to contract, antitrust, Internet, privacy and communications law where appropriate. While the introduction to these areas of the law is designed at a general level, examples and case studies come from various jurisdictions, including Switzerland, the European Union, the United States, and international law.

In addition, the course introduces students to the fundamentals of innovation policy. After exposing students to the economics of intellectual property protection, the course asks questions such as: Why do states grant property rights in inventions? Has the protection of intellectual property gone too far? How do advances in biotechnology and the Internet affect the intellectual property system? What is the relationship between open source, open access and intellectual property? What alternatives to intellectual property protection exist?

Knowing how the intellectual property system works and what kind of protection is available is useful for all students who are interested in working in academia, industry or in starting their own company. Exposing students to the advantages and disadvantages of the intellectual property system enables them to participate in the current policy discussions on intellectual property, innovation and technology law. The course will include practical examples and case studies as well as guest speakers from industry and private practice.
851-0712-00LIntroduction to Public Law (French)W2 credits2VY. Nicole
AbstractThe course Public Law focuses on the fundamental concepts of constitutional law and constitutional and statutory principles of administrative law. The course also touches upon selected topics of administrative law, including the legal regulation of land use, zoning and planning, and construction law.
ObjectiveEnseignement des principes du droit, en particulier du droit privé et du droit public. Introduction au droit.
ContentLe cours de droit civil porte notamment sur le droit des obligations (droit des contrats et responsabilité civile) et sur les droits réels (propriété, gages et servitudes).De plus, il est donné un bref aperçu du droit de la procédure et de l’exécution forcée. Le cours de droit public traite du droit constitutionnel et du droit administratif, avec un accent particulier sur le droit des constructions et de l’aménagement du territoire, ainsi que sur le droit de l’environnement.
LiteratureEditions officielles des lois fédérales, en langue française ou italienne, disponibles auprès de la plupart des librairies.

Sont indispensables:
- en hiver: le Code civil et le Code des obligations;
- en été: la Constitution fédérale et la loi fédérale sur l’aménagement du territoire ainsi que la loi fédérale sur la protection de l’environnement.

Sont conseillés:
- Nef, Urs Ch.: Le droit des obligations à l'usage des ingénieurs et des architectes, trad. Bovay, J., éd. Payot, Lausanne 1992
- Scyboz, G. et. Gilliéron, P.-R., éd.: Edition annotée du Code civil et du Code des obligations, Payot, Lausanne 1999
- Boillod, J.-P.: Manuel de droit, éd Slatkine, Genève 1999
- Biasio, G./Foglia, A.: Introduzione ai codici di diritto privato svizzero, ed. Giappichelli, Torino 1999
Prerequisites / NoticeLe cours de droit civil et le cours de droit public sont l'équivalent des cours "Rechtslehre" et "Baurecht" en langue allemande et des exercices y relatifs.

Les examens peuvent se faire en français ou en italien. Le candidat qui désire être interrogé en langue italienne le précisera lors de l'inscription et avertira les examina-teurs par écrit un mois au plus tard avant l'examen.
851-0732-04LLaw & Business Transactions Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 50.
W2 credits2VG. Hertig
AbstractThis class discusses various business transactions from a legal perspective, taking into account their economic function.
ObjectiveMaking participants familiar with the regulatory strategies adopted by lawmakers and the implications in terms of compliance and enforcement.
ContentThe course will focus on related party transactions, takeovers and other significant transactions, special attention being paid to related financing and limitation of liability strategies.
Lecture notesAnatomy of Corporate Law, 2ed. Oxford University Press 2009 (gilt as Skript)
Prerequisites / NoticeFurther information is available at http://www.hertig.ethz.ch
851-0732-01LWorkshop and Lecture Series in Law and EconomicsW2 credits2SS. Bechtold, G. Hertig
AbstractThe Workshop and Lectures Series in Law and Economics is a joint seminar of ETH Zurich and the Universities of Basel, Lucerne, St. Gallen and Zurich. Legal, economics, and psychology scholars will give a lecture and/or present their current research. All speakers are internationally well-known experts from Europe, the U.S. and beyond.
ObjectiveAfter the workshop and lecture series, participants should be acquainted with interdisciplinary approaches in law and economics. They should also have an overview of current topics of international research in this area.
ContentThe workshop and lecture series will present a mix of speakers who represent the wide range of current social science research methods applied to law. In particular, theoretical models, empirical and experimental research as well as legal research methods will be represented. This series is held each spring semester. In the fall semester, the series is complemented by two specialized law-and-economics series, one on law & finance and one on innovation.
Lecture notesTo be discussed papers are posted in advance on the course web page (http://www.lawecon.ethz.ch/workshop-and-lecture-series/lawecon.html).
851-0702-01LPublic Construction Law
Particularly suitable for students of D-BAUG
W2 credits2VO. Bucher
AbstractStudents will be introduced to the basic principles of planning and public construction legislation (incl. environmental law, development application procedures) that need to be taken into account when planning/realising a construction project.
ObjectiveStudents shall have an understanding for the basic principles of planning and public construction legislation (incl. environmental law, development application procedures) that apply when planning/realising a construction project.
ContentTopics of this unit are: 1. Fundamentals of planning and public construction legislation (development, constitutional and legal foundation, basic principles and aims of spatial planning), 2. Federal, cantonal and communal planning legislation, 3. Public construction law (accessibility, zoning, construction and land use regulations [incl. environmental, water, heritage and energy use law], 4. Development application proceedings (obtaining development consent, appeal proceedings)
Lecture notesALAIN GRIFFEL, Raumplanungs- und Baurecht - in a nutshell, Dike Verlag, 2. A., Zürich 2014

Die Vorlesung basiert auf diesem Lehrbuch.
LiteraturePETER HÄNNI, Planungs-, Bau- und besonderes Umweltschutzrecht, 5. A., Bern 2008

WALTER HALLER/PETER KARLEN, Raumplanungs-, Bau- und Umweltrecht, Bd. I, 3. A., Zürich 1999
Prerequisites / NoticeVoraussetzungen: Vorlesung Rechtslehre GZ (851-0703-00/01)
851-0734-00LInformation Security Law
Particularly suitable for students of D-INFK, D-ITET
W2 credits2VU. Widmer
AbstractIntroduction to Information Security Law for non-legal students respectively prospective decision-makers in companies and public authorities who will have to deal with information security issues (CIOs, COOs, CEOs). The lectures will focus on the legal aspects of the security of ICT infrastructures, including networks (Internet), and of the transported and processed information.
ObjectiveThe objective is to understand the meaning and aims of information security and the legal framework, to become acquainted with legal instruments available to provide effective protection for infrastructures and sensitive legal assets and to present an analysis of possible legal loopholes and potential measures. No prior legal knowledge is required for those wishing to attend these lectures.
ContentThe lectures will deal with industry-specific as well as cross-sector specific themes involving both technology and law from the areas of data protection law, computer crimes, statutory duties of confidentiality, telecommunication surveillance (Internet), electronic signatures, liability etc.
Lecture notesThe lectures will be accompanied by powerpoint slide presentations, downloadable before the lectures begin, or available as hard copy at the lectures themselves.
LiteratureReferences to further literature sources will be given in the lectures.
851-0735-16LSwiss Start Ups Tax LawW2 credits2SP. Pamini
AbstractETH students learn the relevancy of the tax law framework in the context of company start-ups. Based on theory and case studies, the participants discuss which regulatory options the legislator has, how it can promote innovative start-ups and where the typical pitfalls are. The consequences of direct and indirect taxes are debated both at the company and the entrepreneur level.
ObjectiveAfter attending this seminar, you should be able to spot the most important issues from a Swiss tax perspective in connection with start-ups.

Most of the time, scientific knowledge and the resulting technical innovations spread outside of the academic world over the activities of business ventures, specifically by developing new products and processes or by improving existing ones. As an ETH graduate who would like to practically implement her theoretical knowledge, you know the advantages and disadvantages of the manifold legal system set by the legislator, both from a private and from a tax law perspective.

Start-ups differ substantially from normal kinds of enterprises. For instance, ownership can be concentrated in few hands and change over time, being opened to venture investors (e.g. in connection with private equity funds). The corporate governance can be particularly complex (e.g. including dual-class shares or an asymmetry between the degree of financial participation and the share of voting rights). The industry wherein the start-up is doing business can also be typically very volatile, preventing to find sensible comparables to value the start-up; reliable business plans are often missing.

On the one hand, in this seminar you learn the regulatory options that are available to the legislator to promote innovative start-ups. In this context, you are also introduced into financial markets theory, economic policy making, innovation promotion and business strategy. On the other hand, you learn the technical knowledge in Swiss tax law that you need in case of a possible future business venture. You will be also stimulated in approaching complex problems outside of your area of specialisation thinking in a connected way. Pre-knowledge in law or in business administration is useful, but does not represent any necessary condition to participate.

In the first sessions, the lecturer introduces you into the theoretical fundamentals as well as into the Swiss tax system, covering both direct taxes (such as the individual income and wealth taxes and the corporate income and capital taxes) and indirect taxes (such as VAT - value added tax, WHT - withholding tax, and stamp duties). Focusing on the field of start-ups, the discussions will deal both with individuals and corporations. The second part of the seminar will consist of the active discussion, primarily done by the seminar participants themselves, of some hypothetical business cases where the typical tax issues in connection with start-ups can be analysed more specifically.
851-0727-01LTelecommunications Law
Particularly suitable for students of D-INFK, D-ITET
W2 credits2VC. von Zedtwitz
AbstractIntroduction to the basics of Telecommunications Law for non-lawyers.

The course deals with the legal regulations and principles that apply to telecom network operators and telecom service providers (fixed-line and mobile phone).
ObjectiveBy analyzing the most relevant legal provisions for a telecom provider in Switzerland students will learn about the main concepts of Swiss law. No previous legal courses required.
Content1. History of Swiss Telecommunications Law
2. Regulation of network access (essential facility doctrine, types of access)
3. Universal Service
4. Phone service contracts (fixed line and mobile phone service)
5. Mobil communication radiation regulation
6. Telecommunication secrecy
7. SPAM-Avoidance
Lecture notesThe powerpoint slides presented in the course will be made availabe online. In addition, links to relevant legal decisions and regulations will be accessible on the course website.
LiteratureNo mandatory readings.
Prerequisites / NoticeShort written exam at the end of the semester (scope and materials to be defined during the course).
851-0735-11LEnvironmental Regulation: Law and Policy Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 15.

Particularly suitable for students of D-USYS
W3 credits1SJ. van Zeben
AbstractThe aim of this course is to make students with a technical scientific background aware of the legal and political context of environmental policy in order to place technical solutions in their regulatory context.
ObjectiveThe aim of this course is to equip students with a legal and regulatory skill-set that allows them to translate their technical knowledge into a policy brief directed at legally trained regulators. More generally, it aims to inform students with a technical scientific background of the legal and political context of environmental policy. The focus of the course will be on international and European issues and regulatory frameworks - where relevant, the position of Switzerland within these international networks will also be discussed.
ContentTopics covered in lectures:

(1) Environmental Regulation
a. Perspectives
b. Regulatory Challenges of Environment Problems
c. Regulatory Tools
(2) Law: International, European and national laws
a. International law
b. European law
c. National law
(3) Policy: Case studies

Assessment:
(i) Class participation (25%): Students will be expected to contribute to class discussions and prepare short memos on class readings.
(ii) Exam (75%) consisting of three parts:
a. Policy brief - a maximum of 2 pages (including graphs and tables);
b. Background document to the policy brief - this document sets out a more detailed and academic overview of the topic (maximum 8 pages including graphs and tables);
c. Presentation of the policy brief: presentations can use a maximum of 5 slides and can last 7 minutes.
Lecture notesThe course is taught as a small interactive seminar and significant participation is expected from the students. Participation will be capped at 15 in order to maintain the interactive nature of the classes. All classes, readings, and assignments, are in English.

Teaching will take place over two weeks in September and October. The exam date will be in December.

During the second week of the teaching period, students will have individual 30-minute meetings with the lecturer to discuss their project.
LiteratureAn electronic copy of relevant readings will be provided to the students at no cost before the start of the lectures.
Prerequisites / NoticeNo specific pre-existing legal knowledge is required, however all students must have successfully completed Grundzüge des Rechts (851-0708-00 V) or an equivalent course.

The course is (inter)related to materials discussed in Politikwissenschaft: Grundlagen (851-0577-00 V), Ressourcen- und Umweltökonomie (751-1551-00 V), Umweltrecht: Konzepte und Rechtsgebiete (851-0705-01 V), Rechtlicher Umgang mit natürlichen Ressourcen (701-0743-01 V), Environmental Governance (701-1651-00 G), Policy and Economics of Ecosystem Services (701-1653-00 G), International Environmental Politics: Part I (851-0594-00 V).
851-0735-13LSeminar Business Law: Contracts for Projects by Architects and Civil Engineers Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 20

Particularly suitable for students of D-ARCH, D-BAUG
W2 credits2SP. Peyrot
AbstractThe seminar is an introduction into the legal aspects of project agreements in the building industry. It has a specific practical focus as a real life example is used for the case study. Original documents of the case study are used and the responsible project managers will give an introduction into the specific legal issues of the project.
ObjectiveIn Practice, students will invariably have to assume responsibility for project management. This will also include dealing with legal issues. The seminar offers an introduction into the legal basis and the legal issues of managing projects.
ContentTopics:

- law of contracts for sales, work and mandate
- specifics of project contracts: definition of scope, distribution of risk and opportunities, warranties, liability
- typical contract clauses, sample agreements
- specific agreements used in the case study
- contracts and claims management
Lecture notesA script will be published on the moodle platform.
Literaturewill be indicated in the script
Prerequisites / NoticeThe seminar is not an introductory course. Students are required to have attended an introductory lecture (e.g. Business Law by Dr. Paul Peyrot, Construction Law by Prof. Dr. Gerard Hertig, Introduction to Law by Prof. Dr. Stefan Bechtold).

Attendance of all sessions is required for obtaining the grade.

The grade will be a weighted average of an individual paper (answers to questions based on the materials) counting 1/3 and the presentation of the group work (counting 2/3).

The seminar takes place on the following days:

- 8 March 2016, Introduction I, 16:00 to 18:00
- 15 March 2016: Introduction II, 16:00 to 18:00
- N.N.: Whole day on project site in Landquart
- 19 May 2016: Presentations and Closing, 16:00 to 20:00

To cover the costs of lunch and of room rental in Landquart, a fee of CHF 60.-- shall be paid.
851-0735-14LSeminar Business Law: Contracts for Projects by Mechanical Engineers Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 20

Particularly suitable for students of D-MAVT
W2 credits2SP. Peyrot
AbstractThis seminar provides an introduction into the legal aspects of projects in the machine and plant construction industries. The seminar has specific practical focus as a real life case of an industry company will be studied.
ObjectiveIn practice, students will invariably have to assume responsibility for project management. This will also include dealing with legal issues. The seminar offers an introduction into the legal basis and the legal issues of managing projects.
ContentTopics:

- law of contracts for sales, work and mandate
- specifics of project contracts: definition of scope, distribution of risk and opportunities, warranties, liability
- typical contract clauses, sample agreements
- specific agreements used in the case study
- contracts and claims management

The students will be introduced into the original agreements of the real life case and the responsible persons will give introductions into the legal issues encountered during the completion of the project
Lecture notesThe script will be provided on the moodle platform.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe seminar is not an introductory course. Students are required to have attended an introductory lecture (e.g. Business Law by Dr. Paul Peyrot, Construction Law by Prof. Dr. Gerard Hertig, Introduction to Law by Prof. Dr. Stefan Bechtold).

For the successful completion of the seminar and for obtaining the grade, all parts of the seminar must be attended. All participants are required to participate in a group effort which has to be presented on the last day of the seminar.

The grade will be a wheighted average of an individual paper based on questions out of the materials (1/3) and the group presentation (2/3).

The seminar will take place on the following days:

- 7 March 2016: Introduction I, 16 - 18
- 14 March 2016: Introduction II, 16 - 18
- N.N. Whole day seminar (at industrial company)
- 7 April 2016: Final Session (presentations), 16-18
851-0735-15LSeminar Business Law: Contracts for Projects by IT Engineers Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 20

Particularly suitable for students of D-INFK, D-ITET
W2 credits2SP. Peyrot
AbstractThis seminar provides an introduction into the legal aspects of projects in the IT industry. The seminar has specific practical focus as a real life case will be studied.
ObjectiveIn Practice, students will invariably have to assume responsibility for project management. This will also include dealing with legal issues. The seminar offers an introduction into the legal basis and the legal issues of managing projects.
ContentTopics:

- law of contracts for sales, work and mandate
- specifics of project contracts: definition of scope, distribution of risk and opportunities, warranties, liability
- typical contract clauses, sample agreements
- specific agreements used in the case study
- contracts and claims management

In a whole day seminar with an industry company, the responsible persons of this company will give an introduction into the specific agreements and the legal issues of a project.
Lecture notesThe script will be provided on the moodle platform.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe seminar is not an introductory course. Students are required to have attended an introductory lecture (e.g. Business Law by Dr. Paul Peyrot, Construction Law by Prof. Dr. Gerard Hertig, Introduction to Law by Prof. Dr. Stefan Bechtold).

For the grading all parts of the seminar have to be attended.

The grade will be a weighted average of the answers to a questionnaire based upon the materials and introductory sessions (1/3) and the presentation of the case study (group work).

The seminar takes place on the following dates:

- 9 March 2016: Introduction I, 16 - 18
- 16 March 2016: Introduction II, 16 - 18
- N.N.: whole day seminar
- 20 May 2016: Presentations and closing, 16 - 20
851-0740-00LInternet Architecture & Policy Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 20
W3 credits2SS. Bechtold, T. Roscoe
AbstractThis course examines and critiques the design of the Internet, with a focus on the connection between the engineering features and principles of the network and the legal, economic, and political concerns which have followed its evolution.
ObjectiveThis course examines and critiques the design of the Internet (broadly defined), with a focus on the connection between the engineering features and principles of the network (packet switching, global addressing, the end-to-end argument, etc.) and the legal, economic, and political concerns which have followed its evolution (security properties, censorship and censorship resistance, "net neutrality", etc.). No prior knowledge of networking technologies is required; conversely the course will focus only on those features of the Internet design which have strong political and legal implications (and vice versa). The course consists of two parts: lectures and seminars in one part provide an introduction and discussion of the technical, legal, and political aspects of the Internet design. The other part consists of a specific case study of some aspect of the Internet by individual students.
Sociology
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
851-0597-00LSociological Colloquium: New Findings from Social Science ResearchW2 credits2KA. Diekmann, H. Rauhut, J. Rössel, K. Rost
AbstractThe colloquium is a forum for the presentation of current empirical research in sociology, one in which student participants are provided with a view of social science research in practice. The course requirement is a paper on one of the topics presented in the colloquium.
ObjectiveThe colloquium offers researchers the possibility to present their projects and discuss them with colleagues. Students gain insights into social science research practice.
ContentIn dem Kolloquium werden aktuelle empirische Forschungsarbeiten aus dem Bereich der Soziologie präsentiert und diskutiert. Geplant sind Vorträge von in- und ausländischen Gastreferenten, Mitarbeitern und Studierenden (z.B. Dissertationsprojekte, Lizentiats- oder Semesterarbeiten). Das genaue Programm der Veranstaltung wird zu Beginn des Semesters publiziert unter: Link
851-0588-00LIntroduction to Game Theory Information
Particularly suitable for students of D-MAVT, D-MATL
W3 credits2VH. Nax, B. Pradelski
AbstractThis course introduces the foundations of game theory. It treats models of social interaction, conflict and cooperation, the origin of cooperation, and concepts of strategic decision making behavior. Examples, applications, and the contrast between theory and empirical results are particularly emphasized.
ObjectiveLearn the fundamentals, models, and logic of thinking about game theory.
Apply game theory models to strategic interaction situations and critically assess game theory's capabilities through a wide array of experimental results.
ContentGame theory provides a unified language to study interactions amongst different types of individuals (e.g. humans, firms, nations, animals, etc.). It is often used to analyze situations involving conflict and/or cooperation. The course introduces the basic concepts of both non-cooperative and cooperative game theory (players, strategies, coalitions, rules of games, utilities, etc.) and explains the most prominent game-theoretic solution concepts (Nash equilibrium, sub-game perfection, Core, Shapley Value, etc.). We will also discuss standard extensions (repeated games, incomplete information, evolutionary game theory, signal games, etc.).

In each part of the course, we focus on examples and on selected applications of the theory in different areas. These include analyses of cooperation, social interaction, of institutions and norms, social dilemmas and reciprocity as well as applications on strategic behavior in politics and between countries and companies, the impact of reciprocity, in the labor market, and some applications from biology. Game theory is also applied to control-theoretic problems of transport planning and computer science.

As we present theory and applications, we will also discuss how experimental and other empirical studies have shown that human behavior in the real world often does not meet the strict requirements of rationality from "standard theory", leading us to models of "behavioural" and "experimental" game theory.

By the end of the course, students should be able to apply game-theoretic in diverse areas of analysis including > controlling turbines in a wind park, > nations negotiating international agreements, > firms competing in markets, > humans sharing a common resource, etc.
Lecture notesSee literature below. In addition we will provide additional literature readings and publish the lecture slides directly after each lecture.
LiteratureK Binmore, Fun and games, a text on game theory, 1994, Great Source Education

SR Chakravarty, M Mitra and P Sarkar, A Course on Cooperative Game Theory, 2015, Cambridge University Press

A Diekmann, Spieltheorie: Einführung, Beispiele, Experimente, 2009, Rowolth

MJ Osborne, An Introduction to Game Theory, 2004, Oxford University Press New York

J Nash, Non-Cooperative Games, 1951, Annals of Mathematics

JW Weibull, Evolutionary game theory, 1997, MIT Press

HP Young, Strategic Learning and Its Limits, 2004, Oxford University Press
851-0252-04LBehavioral Studies Colloquium Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 50.
W2 credits2KE. Stern, H.‑D. Daniel, D. Helbing, C. Hölscher, B. Rütsche, R. Schubert, C. Stadtfeld
AbstractThis colloquium offers an opportunity for students to discuss their ongoing research and scientific ideas in the behavioral sciences, both at the micro- and macro-levels of cognitive, behavioral and social science. It also offers an opportunity for students from other disciplines to discuss their research ideas in relation to behavioral science. The colloquium also features invited research talks.
ObjectiveStudents know and can apply autonomously up-to-date investigation methods and techniques in the behavioral sciences. They achieve the ability to develop their own ideas in the field and to communicate their ideas in oral presentations and in written papers. The credits will be obtained by a written report of approximately 10 pages.
ContentThis colloquium offers an opportunity for students to discuss their ongoing research and scientific ideas in the behavioral sciences, both at the micro- and macro-levels of cognitive, behavioral and social science. It also offers an opportunity for students from other disciplines to discuss their ideas in so far as they have some relation to behavioral science. The possible research areas are wide and may include theoretical as well as empirical approaches in Social Psychology and Research on Higher Education, Sociology, Modeling and Simulation in Sociology, Decision Theory and Behavioral Game Theory, Economics, Research on Learning and Instruction, Cognitive Psychology and Cognitive Science. Ideally the students (from Bachelor, Master, Ph.D. and Post-Doc programs) have started to start work on their thesis or on any other term paper.
Course credit can be obtained either based on a talk in the colloquium plus a written essay, or by writing an essay about a topic related to one of the other talks in the course. Students interested in giving a talk should contact the course organizers (Rütsche, Stern) before the first session of the semester. Priority will be given to advanced / doctoral students for oral presentations. The course credits will be obtained by a written report of approximately 10 pages. The colloquium also serves as a venue for invited talks by researchers from other universities and institutions related to behavioral and social sciences.
851-0252-06LIntroduction to Social Networks: Theory, Methods and Applications Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 40.

This course is intended for students interested in data analysis and with basic knowledge of inferential statistics.
W3 credits2GC. Stadtfeld, P. Block, Z. Boda
AbstractHumans are connected by various social relations. When aggregated, we speak of social networks. This course discusses how social networks are structured, how they change over time and how they affect the individuals that they connect. It integrates social theory with practical knowledge of cutting-edge statistical methods and applications from a number of scientific disciplines.
ObjectiveThe aim is to enable students to contribute to social networks research and to be discriminating consumers of modern literature on social networks. Students will acquire a thorough understanding of social networks theory (1), practical skills in cutting-edge statistical methods (2) and their applications in a number of scientific fields (3).
In particular, at the end of the course students will
- Know the fundamental theories in social networks research (1)
- Understand core concepts of social networks and their relevance in different contexts (1, 3)
- Be able to describe and visualize networks data in the R environment (2)
- Understand differences regarding analysis and collection of network data and other type of survey data (2)
- Know state-of-the-art inferential statistical methods and how they are used in R (2)
- Be familiar with the core empirical studies in social networks research (2, 3)
- Know how network methods can be employed in a variety of scientific disciplines (3)
851-0513-00LEconomic SociologyW2 credits2VT. Hinz
AbstractEconony and society are closely interconnected. The lecture presents classical and new sociological approaches to address the complex relationship between economic action and social structure. Issues of specific interest are: rational decision making, consumer behavior, social networks, state and economy, entrepreneurship and discrimination.
ObjectiveThe lecture gives an overview on the "new eonomic sociology". Students learn to analyze economic processes from a sociological point of view, e.g. the relevance of "embeddedness" into social networks for economic exchange.
ContentIn der Vorlesung Wirtschaftssoziologie soll das Verhältnis von Soziologie und Ökonomie theoretisch wie empirisch fruchtbar bearbeitet werden. Wir beschäftigen uns unter soziologischem Blickwinkel mit der Produktion, der Verteilung, dem Austausch und dem Verbrauch knapper Güter und Dienstleistungen. Austauschprozesse unterliegen strukturellen Rahmenbedingungen und Grenzen, sie bedürfen in vielen Situationen normativer Regelungen und einer unterstützenden institutionellen Umgebung. Eine Definition der Wirtschaftssoziologie könnte so lauten: Wirtschaftssoziologie umfasst alle Beobachtungen, Begriffe, Hypothesen, Gesetzmäßigkeiten und Erklärungsmodelle, die sich auf Zusammenhänge von ökonomischen und sozialen Sachverhalten und Prozessen beziehen. Arbeitsgebiete der Wirtschaftssoziologie sind beispielsweise die soziale Bedingtheit wirtschaftlicher Vorgänge, die Rückwirkung ökonomischer Prozesse für gesellschaftliche Strukturen, die sozialen Dimensionen und Verhaltensprämissen, Ähnlichkeiten und Unterschiede zwischen Gesellschaften bezüglich des wirtschaftlichen Geschehens und Zusammenhänge zwischen sozialem und ökonomischem Wandel.

Die Vorlesung behandelt zunächst knapp die makrosoziologischen Klassiker. Die Gründerväter der Soziologie haben wirtschaftlichem Handeln eine überragende Bedeutung für die Konstitution der Gesellschaft beigemessen – ob Marx, Simmel, Weber oder Durkheim. An der Schnittstelle von Soziologie und Ökonomie sind die Mikrotheorien von herausragender Bedeutung. Die Wirtschaftssoziologie ist ein ideales Terrain für Rational Choice Soziologie. Abweichungen vom Modell des Wettbewerbsmarktes und strikter Rationalität begründen in dieser Theorierichtung besonders interessante Analysen. Die Struktursoziologie (im Extremfall: „how people don't have any choices to make“) wird durch die Konzeption sozialer Netzwerke, in denen Austauschprozesse stattfinden, berücksichtigt. Auch das interpretative Paradigma der Mikrosoziologie kann auf Fragestellungen der Wirtschaftssoziologie („the making of markets“) angewandt werden.

Die Wirtschaftssoziologie versteht sich als empirisches Projekt. In der modernen Wirtschaftssoziologie finden sich eine Vielzahl von Analysen ökonomischer Institutionen, von Markt und Organisation, von Konsumverhalten, Firmennetzwerken und Schwarzmärkten.

Einen Überblick zu Theorien und Anwendungsgebieten der Wirtschaftssoziologie gibt das „Handbook of Economic Sociology“ herausgegeben von Richard Swedberg und Neil Smelser (inzwischen in zweiter Auflage erschienen). Die Vorlesung beruht auf einzelnen Beiträgen, ebenso werden eigene Studien vorgestellt.
Lecture notesPdf files (in German) will be available on ILIAS.
LiteratureAbraham, Martin/Hinz, Thomas (2008): Arbeitsmarktsoziologie. Wiesbaden: VS-Verlag (2. Auflage).

Smelser, Neil/Swedberg, Richard (Hrsg.) (2005) Handbook of Economic Sociology. Princeton: UP (2. Auflage).

Weitere Literatur wird zu Veranstaltungsbeginn bekannt gegeben.
Prerequisites / NoticeTeaching in German.
851-0578-00LIntroduction to Social Network Analysis
Does not take place this semester.
W2 credits2S
AbstractThis course offers an introduction to fundamental concepts, methods, and applications of social network analysis (SNA) on the basis of selected empirical studies and computer exercises.
ObjectiveAfter this course students will be (1) familiar with the relational paradigm, (2) capable of performing basic statistical analysis of social networks with R, and (3) able to assess strengths and weaknesses of the network approach in the social sciences.
ContentSocial network analysis deals with the question of how social actors (people or organizations) are tied together by one or several specific types of interdependency, what patterns and structures emerge from their interactions, and how these structures can be explained by social processes and mechanisms. The course starts with a compilation of graph-theoretic foundations and basic concepts. In the remainder of the semester we cover a new topic in each session such as centrality, brokerage, small worlds, scale free networks, homophily, and diffusion. Students are expected to actively participate in the seminar, to give a short presentation on a scientific article during the semester, solve assignments, and to conduct a small research project in groups.
LiteratureJackson, Matthew O. 2008. Social and Economic Networks. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Newman, M.E.J. 2010. Networks. An Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Wasserman, S. und K. Faust (1994): Social Network Analysis. Methods and Applications. Cambridge:
Cambridge University Press.
851-0585-38LData Science in Techno-Socio-Economic Systems Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 70.

This course is thought be for students in the 5th semester or above with quantitative skills and interests in modeling and computer simulations.

Particularly suitable for students of D-INFK, D-ITET, D-MAVT, D-MTEC, D-PHYS
W3 credits2VI. Moise, E. Pournaras
AbstractThis course introduces how techno-socio-economic systems in our nowadays digital society can be better understood with techniques and tools of data science. Students shall learn the fundamentals of data science, machine learning, but also advanced distributed real-time data analytics in the Planetary Nervous System. Students shall deliver and present a seminar thesis at the end of the course.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is to qualify students with knowledge on data science as a way to understand complex techno-socio-economic systems in our nowadays digital societies. This course aims to make students capable of applying the most appropriate and effective techniques of data science under different application scenarios. The course aims to engage students in exciting state-of-the-art scientific and collaboration platforms such as the Planetary Nervous System. The course shall increase the awareness level of students about the challenges and open issues of data science in socio-technical domains such as privacy. Finally students have the opportunity to develop their writing, presentation and collaboration skills based on a seminar thesis they have to deliver and present at the end of the course
051-0812-00LSociology II Information W1 credit2GM. Streule Ulloa Nieto, M. A. Glaser, R. Nüssli
AbstractSociology II introduces in the first and second part major current perspectives of analysis in urban studies (Monika Streule and Rahel Nüssli). The third part of the course discusses Housing as social and cultural practice, its history, the establishment of a housing market, and different contemporary models of sustainable housing (Marie Glaser).
ObjectiveThis series of lectures enables students to comprehend the built environment in its social context. It approaches the architectural profession from two different angles: macro-sociological and micro-sociological.
ContentIn the first part Sociology II focuses on current perspectives of analysis in urban studies. Theoretical approaches are presented with the help of concrete case studies. First, the postcolonial perspective in urban studies will be introduced, illustrated with examples of empirical research. This part concludes with an introduction into scientific research by presenting different methods in the analysis of urbanisation processes in Mexico City (lecturer: Monika Streule). In the second part, different forms of the urban in the metropolitan region of Zurich are discussed and some urban configurations and politics of urbanisation are presented (lecturer: Rahel Nüssli). The third part of the course discusses Housing as social and cultural practice, its history, the establishment of a housing market, and different contemporary models of sustainable housing (Marie Glaser).
Lecture notesNo script - Information available at the following link:
http://www.soziologie.arch.ethz.ch/
LiteratureVarious texts, in addition to the lecture will be provided.
701-0786-00LMediation in Environmental Planning: Theory and Case Studies.W2 credits2GK. Siegwart
AbstractThis course is intended to demonstrate how environmental decisions can be optimized and conflicts better dealt by using mediation. Case studies will focus on construction of windmills for electricity purpose, use of fracking, sustainable city-planning in the field of former industrial area or the establishment of a birds- or a forest-management plan.
Objective- Develop comprehension of legal and social responses to environmental conflicts
- Recognize the most important participative techniques and their ranges
- Develop concepts for doing and evaluating mediation processes
- Estimate the potential and limitations of cooperative environmental planning
- Train communicative skills (presentation, moderation, discussion design, negotiation), especially by participating at a mediation
ContentTo this end, we will look at the most important techniques of mediation and put them into the context of today's legislation, participation and conflict culture. The potential and limitations of the individual techniques will be discussed using current Swiss and international case studies, namely in the field of windenergy. Students can do conflict analyses, for instance, as part of individual and group analyses and a half-day mediation-simulation, develop technique concepts and train their own communicative and negotiation skills.
Lecture notesA reader will be handed out.
701-0788-00LMedia Production, Use and Effects Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 25.
W1 credit1VT. Friemel
AbstractThis lecture first addresses the economic and political determinants and impacts on mass media production. Based on this, methods and theories are discussed of how to analyze media content and media use. The domain of media effects finally takes a psychological and sociological standpoint to address the question which impact mass media have on individuals and the society.
ObjectiveThe students learn important models, theories and empirical results of mass communication research. They know the circumstances of media production, are able to analyse media contents in a systematic way and are able to reflect the role of media in their field of future practice.
Lecture notesAll slides will be provided as handouts. Relevant literature will be either listed or distributed.
LiteratureHeinz Bonfadelli, Otfried Jarren und Gabriele Siegert (2010): Publizistik- und Kommunikationswissenschaft - ein transdisziplinäres Fach. In: Heinz Bonfadelli, Otfried Jarren und Gabriele Siegert (Hrsg.): Einführung in die Publizistikwissenschaft (3. Aufl.). Bern: Haupt
701-0712-00LUse and Perception of Nature Among Societies Outside Europe
Does not take place this semester.
W2 credits2V
AbstractViews of what we call "nature“" in traditional societies in Africa, Asia and Southern America are presented and discussed. In such subsistence-oriented ethnic groups "nature" is often perceived as being inhabited by gods and spirits. This view is often regarded as being irrational by natural science. But what are the impacts of such religious views on the sustainable use of natural resources?
ObjectiveThis lecture shall give an overview of worldviews of so called traditional societies in Africa, Asia and Southern America. The aim is to understand the way such societies view what we call nature or environment and their strategies to use natural resources. The lecure shall also provide a critical analysis of such processes based on concrete case studies, in which we will discuss problems of sustainable use of natrual resources and participatory processes in the governance of such resources.
ContentDie Studierenden werden dabei mit Vorstellungen und Ideologien von Natur konfrontiert, die sich nicht mit unserer Logik physisch-chemischer und biologischer Abläufe in der "Natur" decken, und die wir somit als "irrational" empfinden. Wir werden uns mit verschiedenen Konzepten aus dem Bereich der Religions-Ethnologie beschäftigen, die sich insbesondere im Bereich Magie, Hexerei und Orakelbefragung mit der "Rationalität" solcher Umweltvorstellungen auseinandersetzen. Seit der Beschäftigung mit der Ökosystemtheorie durch Roy Rappaport erhielt diese "wilde Denken" eine neue Funktion (Rappaport 1971, 1979). Es wurde in Zusammenhang eines gesamten Ökosystems analysiert, zu dessen Erhaltung und zu dessen Fliessgleichgewicht es diene. Diese Sichtweise, obwohl heftig kritisiert, ist von Bedeutung, weil mit der ökologischen Krise man in der industrialisierte Welt Ausschau nach neuen Konzepten hält. Diese werden teilweise in den uns fremden Bildern aussereuropäischer Völker von der "heiligen Natur" gesehen, welche uns als Lehre dienen und zu nachhaltiger Ressourcennutzung führen könnte. Zudem erscheinen die Umwelt-Bilder und Weltsichten dieser Gesellschaften (heute oftmals indigene Völker genannt) auf der praktischen Ebene als gelebter Naturschutz, den es insbesondere für die Konservierung von Biodiversität zu erhalten gilt. Heilige Orte sollen nun auch für den Schutz von beispielsweise Nationalparks oder Biosphärenreservaten dienen. In diesem Zusammenhang ist ein genauer Blick von Nöten, denn Fehlanalysen sind in diesem Bereich fatal und eine unkritische Instrumentalisierung magischer Weltsichten kontraproduktiv. Wo jedoch religiöse Weltsichten der Natur eine im Sinne der Nachhaltigkeit positive Rolle spielen können, ist der Bereich der Institutionen für das Ressourcenmanagement. Dieser Begriff wird hier im Sinne des Neuen Institutionalismus verwendet: Institutionen sind demnach Regeln, Werte und Normen, die das Handeln der Individuen beeinflussen und eine gewisse Sicherheit bezüglich dem erwarteten Verhalten der anderen Individuen einer Gemeinschaft bieten und dabei die sogenannten Transaktionskosten (Informationsbeschaffung bezüglich dem Verhalten anderer Akteure, Überwachung und Sanktionierung) reduzieren (North 1990. Ostrom 1990, Ensminger 1992). Dieser aus der Ökonomie beeinflusste Ansatz weist meines Erachtens interessante Elemente bezüglich der nachhaltigen Nutzung von Ressourcen auf, was sich bei der Nutzung von Kollektivressourcen (Com
Lecture notesZur Veranstaltung gibt es kein Script, aber es wird rechtzeitig ein Ordner mit der relevanten Literatur bereitgestellt. Am Thema Interessierte Studierende können sich bereits in folgenden zwei Büchern ins Thema einlesen:
- Berkes, Fikret. 1999. Sacred Ecology: Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Resource Managment. Philadelphia: Taylor and Francis.
- Haller, Tobias. 2001. Leere Speicher, erodierte Felder und das Bier der Frauen: Umweltanpassung und Krise bei den Ouldeme und Platha in den Mandarabergen Nord-Kameruns. Studien zur Sozialanthropologie. Berlin: Dietrich Reimer Verlag.
LiteratureBecker, Dustin, C. and Elinor Ostrom,.1995. Human Ecology and Resource Sustainability: The Importance of Institutional Diversity. Annu. Rev. Ecol. Syst.1995. No. 26:113-33.
Berkes, Fikret. 1999. Sacred Ecology: Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Resource Managment. Philadelphia: Taylor and Francis.
Dangwal, Parmesh. 1998. Van Gujjars at Apex of National Park Management. Indigenous Affairs No.4:24-31.
Diener, Paul and Robkin, Eugene E. 1978. Ecology, Evolution, and the Search for Cultural Origins: The Question of Islamic Pig Prohibition. In: Current Anthropology 19, No.3():493-540.
Diener, Paul, Nonini, Donald and Robkin, Eugene E. 1977/78. The Dialectics of the Sacred Cow: Ecological Adaptation versus Political Appropriation in the Origins of Indias Cattle Complex. In: Dialectical Anthropology (Amsterdam) 3: 221-241.
Evans-Pritchard, Edward E. 1978. Hexerei, Magie und Orakel bei den Zande. Frankfurt am Main:Suhrkamp.
Evans-Pritchard, Edward und Mayer Fortes. 1983. Afrikanische politische Systeme, in: Kramer, F. und Siegrist, Ch. eds. Gesellschaften ohne Staat. Frankfurt a. Main:Syndikat: 150-174.
Fairhead, James und Leach, Melissa. 1996. Misreading the African Landscape. Society and ecology in a forest-savanna mosaic. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Freed, Stanley A. and Freed, Ruth, S. 1981.Sacred Cows and Water Buffalo in India: The Uses of Ethnography. In. Current Anthropology 22, No.5: 483-502.
Haller, Tobias. 1995.Raub der „Seelenschatten in Nord-Kamerun. Krankheit bei den Ouldeme und Platha in den Mandarabergen“. In: Keller, Frank-Beat (Hg.). Krank warum? Vorstellung der Völker, Heiler und Mediziner, Katalog zur gleichnamigen Ausstellung. Ostfildern: Cantz Verlag. pp.302-306.
Haller, Tobias. 2000. Bodendegradierung und Ernährungskrise bei den Ouldeme und Platha. Umwelt- und Ernährungsprobleme bei zwei Feldbauerngruppen in den Mandarabergen Nord-Kameruns: Eine Folge der Adaptation an Monetarisierung und Wandel traditioneller institutioneller Rahmenbedingungen. In: Zeitschrift für Ethnologie 124 (1999): 335–354.
Haller, Tobias. 2001. Leere Speicher, erodierte Felder und das Bier der Frauen: Umweltanpassung und Krise bei den Ouldeme und Platha in den Mandarabergen Nord-Kameruns. Studien zur Sozialanthropologie. Berlin: Dietrich Reimer Verlag.
Haller, Tobias. 2002a. „Spiel gegen Risiken in der ‘Natur’“, In: Giordano et al (Hrsg.). Ordnung, Risiko und Gefährdung. Reader des Blockseminars der Schweizerischen
Prerequisites / NoticeDie Veranstaltung beginnt in einem ersten Teil mit einer Reihe von Vorlesungen und wird in einem zweiten Teil mit Lesen und Diskutieren von Texten (Kurzvorträge von den Studierenden) fortgesetzt (nähere Erläuterungen und Programm am Anfang der Veranstaltung).
701-0729-00LSocial Research MethodsW2 credits2GM. Stauffacher, C. Hartmann, H. Mieg
AbstractThis course covers the basic methodological principles of social-scientific research, and provides an insight into its underlying theoretical and methodological rationale and its concrete procedures. Methods and concepts are demonstrated in the context of guided interviews and questionnaire research. Exercises deepen the knowledge gained in the course.
ObjectiveStudents are able to
- describe the significance of method-supported procedures in the social sciences.
- explain the basic principles of social-scientific research.
- critically interpret the results of social-scientific research .
- conduct small-scale interviews and surveys via questionnaires.
ContentAlle Teilnehmenden verpflichten sich zur aktiven Mitarbeit in Form von drei Übungen (leitfadengestütztes Interview, Erstellung von Fragebogen, Auswertung von Daten).
Inhaltsübersicht:
(1) Wozu empirische (Sozial-)Forschung?
(2) Der Forschungsablauf im Überblick, verknüpfen von qualitativen und quantitativen Methoden
(3) Leitfadengestützte Interviews: erstellen Leitfaden, Durchführung und Auswertung
(4) Fragebogen: Hypothesen erarbeiten, Fragebogen erstellen, Durchführung, Daten auswerten, und Resultate darstellen
Lecture notesDie Dozenten arbeiten mit Folien, die als Handout abgegeben werden.
LiteratureZur ergänzenden Begleitlektüre kann folgendes Buch empfohlen werden:
Schutt, R.K. (2006). Investigating the Social World: The Process and Practice of Research, 5th ed. Pine Forge Press: Thousand Oaks, CA
701-0729-01LApplied Empirical Research Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants is limited to 30 for both courses 701-0729-01L and 860-0019-00L.

Priority is given to students of the study programmes Environmental Sciences and Science, Technologies and Policy. Enrollment is possible until February 6th, 2017. The registration will only be effective once confirmed.

Students of the study programme Environmental Sciences can only enroll for 701-0729-01L, but not for 860-0019-00L.
W2 credits2GI. Günther, L. Metzger
AbstractThe course provides an overview of the various methodological approaches in empirical social research and covers the different stages of the research process. Acquired skills are applied in a research project on the topic of "environmental behavior" or "development policy".
ObjectiveUpon completion of the course, students should be familiar with:
(1) The basic principles behind different empirical social-research methods and the conditions under which their use is appropriate
(2) The steps involved in an empirical study
(3) The application of empirical research methods to a research project
ContentEmpirical social research employs a wide variety of research methods, such as surveys or laboratory and non-reactive field experiments. The course will begin with an overview of the various methodological approaches, including their advantages and disadvantages and the conditions under which their use is appropriate. It will continue with a discussion of the different stages of the research process, including hypothesis generation, formulating a research plan, measurement, sampling, data collection and data analysis. This knowledge will be applied to conducting a research project on a suitable topic.
LiteratureBryman, A. (2008). Social Research Methods (3rd ed.). Oxford: University Press.
Diekmann, A. (2007). Empirische Sozialforschung (18. Aufl.). Reinbek bei Hamburg: Rowohlt.
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowledge in applied statistics. Students enrolling in this course should be able to conduct descriptive statistics and simple linear regressions with R, STATA or a similar program.
851-0253-00LEmbodied Cognition Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 40.

Particularly suitable for students D-MAVT.
W2 credits2SK. Stocker
AbstractThis seminar offers an introduction to embodiment. Does the representation of thought and emotion depend upon the sensory and motor system? Highlights: the figurative processing of "go" still evokes voltage changes in foot muscles, conceptualizing time activates the eyes to look along a mental time line, abstract causality might still be grounded in motor control, emotion shows in the way we walk
ObjectiveLooking at the degree of embodiment in cognition and emotion naturally leads to the question how the mind works. What is the nature of human thoughts and emotions? How deeply are they dependent upon features of our physical body as an agent? Do the sensory and motor system play a physically constitutive role in conceptualizing thought and emotion? We will look at these questions by examining the degree of embodiment in basic thinking types of our mind (space, time, and causality thinking) as well as in abstract thought (e.g., logical thinking) and in emotion processing. As will be discussed, the topic of how the mind works is not only of central importance in the humanities (psychology, linguistics, philosophy, anthropology, education), but is also relevant for parts of the natural and technological sciences (physiology, neuroscience, medicine, computer science, artificial intelligence, robotics). Furthermore, embodied cognition is also relevant for the question how the mind is cognitively and emotionally influenced by environmental features, and as such embodied findings are also relevant for fields such as architecture and mechanical engineering.
051-0814-17LSociology: Gentrification in Zürich. Weststrasse in Transformation Information W2 credits2GM. Streule Ulloa Nieto, R. Nüssli
AbstractThis seminar focuses on transformations in central neighborhoods of Zürich. Drawing on the example of Weststrasse, we investigate through observation, interviews, and photographical research, how Weststrasse and the neighborhood has been transformed focusing on built, economic and social aspects. The ethnographic research will be supplemented with discussion of texts and guest presentations.
ObjectiveThis elective course highlights the sociological perspective on architectural practice and provides an introduction to sociological research.
It focuses on two main procedures: on the one hand, a systematic reading and discussion of theoretical texts, and on the other, empirical case studies of social aspects of the production of the built environment. In this course, a wide set of qualitative research methods is used (including various forms of interview, participant observation, image and text analyses). This approach enables students to gain their own experience by dealing with the various participants and constellations in the social field of architecture and building construction, and to familiarize themselves with the approaches and perceptions of various different participants.
ContentIn this seminar, we investigate current urban transformations along Westrasse and the adjacent central neighborhood of Zürich, drawing on ethnographical methods like observation, interviews, and photographical research. Weststrasse massively changed in the past five years: From the urban motorway Westtangente towards traffic calmed neighborhood street. The new traffic policy changed not only the main street, but also the adjacent neighborhood fundamentally. Today, the district is considered to be a trendy neighborhood with attractive residential options for the new influx of high-income tenants. Meanwhile many former residents and shopkeeper cannot afford the raised rents and have to leave the neighborhood.

In this seminar, we analyze this transformation process to delineate other possible urban developments in this specific case.
The main question in this seminar is: How has the Weststrasse and the neighborhood been transformed in the last years considering built, economic and social aspects? Who profits from the new traffic policy? Who doesn't? By an ethnographical research of Weststrasse, we discuss these questions. Transformations in the urban neighborhood and architectural interventions will be analyzed. Thereby we will also deepen our knowledge about ethnographical research technics. Text discussions and guest presentations will supplement our empirical analysis. The goals are to understand contemporary urban transformation processes, and to gain insights about potentials and qualities of urban design.
Lecture notesNo script
851-0585-44LSocial Modelling, Agent-Based Simulation, and Complexity
Particularly suitable for students of D-INFK, D-ITET, D-MAVT
W3 credits2GO. C. Rouly, E. Pournaras
AbstractThis course teaches how to construct computer models of mathematically complex social behavior. Students learn how to use the technology of agent-based modeling (with empirical data, spatial/GIS, and social network inputs) to produce validated, emergent results. Involves lecture, theory, and coding. Study begins with well-known formal models of human cognition, social-behavior and -processes.
ObjectiveThis course aims itself towards ETH students/staff that are either: 1) computer scientists or traditional engineers who have interests in developing a skill for constructing abstract models of social behavior and or large scale models of complicated social interactions, or 2) the social scientist (anthropologist, psychologist, or sociologist, for example) who has significant coding skills but wants more training merging the two divergent specialties. Whether computer scientist, engineer, or social scientist this course will ask the student to learn how to recognize key components in a social situation or problem, develop a mental model of the social process, then become "fluent" in translating those social constructs into computer code for execution and post-processing analysis.
851-0585-45LMachine Learning and Modelling for Social Networks Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 50.
W2 credits1VO. Woolley, N. Antulov-Fantulin, I. Moise, L. Sanders
AbstractThis mini-course covers computational and statistical methods to characterize the structure and dynamics of complex social networks. We cover methods such as clustering, classification, spectral analysis and Montecarlo and also specific applications to social network data and spreading processes on these networks. We discuss current research and ethical questions raised by applications.
ObjectiveThis advanced course will give students insight into the questions that can be answered analyzing network data and into the related challenges. They will be exposed to the main methods that can be used to tackle these questions and learn about the shortcomings of these current methods. We will also raise students awareness of some of the ethical questions raised, mainly in the realm of privacy, by the types of data collected and the influence on individual behavior that can be achieved through technologies built on the methods presented in class. Students will be encouraged to apply their knowledge to a specific network dataset by producing a research proposal.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents must be in their 5th semester or more advanced.
Knowledge of basic: linear algebra, differential equations, probability, statistics and programming.
851-0252-10LResearch Seminar in Behavioural Finance Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 10

Particularly suitable for students of D-MTEC
W2 credits2SS. Andraszewicz, C. Hölscher
AbstractIn this seminar, students will study cognitive processes, behaviour and the underlying biological response to financial decisions. Research methods such as asset market experiments, lottery games, risk preference assessment, psychometrics, neuroimaging and psychophysiology of decision processes will be discussed. Financial bubbles and crashes will be the core interest.
ObjectiveThis course has four main goals:
1) To learn how to conduct behavioural studies, design experiments, plan data collection and experimental tasks
2) To learn about standard research methods in Behavioural Finance
3) To learn about causes of market crashes, factors that influence them, traders' behaviour before, during and after financial crises
4) To investigate a topic of interest, related to behaviour of traders during market crashes.
851-0585-43LExperimental Game Theory Restricted registration - show details W2 credits2VA. Diekmann
AbstractThe course addresses principles and methods of experimental game theory. It focuses on experiments about social interaction, conflict and cooperation, emergence of cooperation and experimental validity of concepts for strategic behaviour in decision-making situations.
ObjectiveLearn the fundamentals and logic of thinking about experimental methods and experimental game theory. Apply experimental game theory methods to strategic interaction situations.
ContentDie Spieltheorie stellt Modelle zur Beschreibung und Analyse sozialer und strategischer Interaktionen zur Verfügung.
Schwerpunkt der Vorlesung sind experimentelle Studien und empirische Anwendungen der Theorie in verschiedenen Bereichen. Dazu zählen sozialtheoretische Analysen von Kooperation, des sozialen Austauschs, von Institutionen und Normen, sozialen Dilemmata und Reziprozität ebenso wie Anwendungen auf strategisches Verhalten in Politik und zwischen Staaten und Firmen, den Auswirkungen von Reziprozitätsnormen auf dem Arbeitsmarkt und einige Anwendungen in der Biologie. Experimentelle Studien zeigen allerdings, dass häufig die strikten Rationalitätsanforderungen der "Standardtheorie" nicht erfüllt sind. Unter dem Stichwort "Behavioural Game Theory" werden in der Vorlesung auch Theorievarianten vorgestellt, die mit den experimentellen Beobachtungen von Entscheidungen "begrenzt rationaler" Akteure besser im Einklang stehen.
Lecture notesFolien der Spieltheorie-Vorlesung und Literatur (Fachartikel, Kapitel aus Lehrbüchern) können auf der Webseite der Vorlesung eingesehen und heruntergeladen werden.
LiteratureKurzer Überblick in Kapitel 10 von Diekmann, Andreas, 2016. Spieltheorie. Einführung, Beispiele, Experimente. 4. Aufl. Reinbek: Rowohlt.
Ausführlich: John H. Kagel und Alvin E. Roth, Hg., 1995, Handbook of Experimental Economics. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press.
(Ein Handapparat dieser und weiterer Literatur wird in der D-GESS-Bibliothek bereitgestellt.)
Literatur zum Download befindet sich auch auf der Webseite:
http://www.socio.ethz.ch/publications/spieltheorie
Prerequisites / NoticeInteresse am Thema und Motivation zur Mitarbeit.
851-0517-06LMeta-science: Evaluating and Combining Scientific EvidenceW2 credits1VM. van Assen
AbstractProviding tools and improving intuitions to enable the evaluation and combining of scientific evidence. After this course participants have basic understanding of meta-analysis, publication bias, replication, traps of statistical intuition, questionable research practices, research misconduct, and properties of big data.
ObjectiveThis course may be relevant to students and researchers of all disciplines, who want to know more about (i) evaluating and interpreting scientific findings, and (ii) recognizing and possibly adjusting for problems when interpreting these findings.
One of the most crucial skills of scientists is to evaluate and interpret scientific findings. This is extremely challenging, because of problems with how the system "science" currently functions. Most problematic are publication bias, the lack of replications, questionable research practices, and research misconduct.
Understanding of basic statistics and meta-analysis is necessary for being able to evaluate and interpret scientific findings. Hence I start with recapitulating basic statistics (including hypothesis testing and power-analysis), and an explanation of meta-analysis. I will illustrate power-analysis and meta-analysis with easy-to-use programs.
A major problem of science is publication bias, i.e., mainly statistically significant findings are published. I will explain the (horrible) effects of publication bias, evidence of publication bias, and ways to detect and correct for publication bias in fields of science and in meta-analyses.
A second problem is the lack of replications, which hampers the correction of the scientific literature (i.e., false positives become undetected). I will present evidence on the reproducibility of science in different fields, and how to assess reproducibility. I explain how to estimate effect size based on an original statistically significant findings, which is likely biased because of publication bias, and a replication study.
What aggravates problems and evaluating scientific findings are poor statistical intuitions of researchers. I'll provide some examples showing that all people, from lay people to students and experts, misinterpret statistical results on findings.
The third problem is questionable research practices. After explaining what questionable research practices are, I discuss their prevalence, their effects on scientific findings, and methods to detect them.
Fourth, I discuss research misconduct in the form of data fabrication and falsification. I'll discuss investigations on research misconduct, and methods to detect it, based on my experiences in the Stapel case.
As an application of problems in evaluating and interpreting scientific findings, I discuss the analysis of big data. Big data are booming in many sciences, such as genetics, medicine, neurosciences, and social sciences, but intuitions on and methods how these data should be analysed are still lagging behind.
851-0585-41LComplexity and Global Systems Science Information Restricted registration - show details
Particularly suitable for students of D-BAUG, D-INFK, D-ITET, D-MAVT, D-MTEC, D-INFK, D-USYS
W3 credits2SK. K. Kleineberg, M. Leiss
AbstractThe specialized PhD seminar aims at three-fold integration: 1)bringing modeling and computer simulation of techno-socio-economic processes and phenomena together with related empirical, experimental, and data-driven work, 2)combining perspectives of different disciplines (e.g. sociology, computer science, physics, complexity science, engineering), 3)bridging between fundamental and applied work.
ObjectiveParticipants of the seminar should understand how tightly connected systems lead to networked risks, and why this can imply systems we do not understand and cannot control well, thereby causing systemic risks and extreme events.

They should also be able to explain how systemic instabilities can be understood by changing the perspective from a component-oriented to an interaction- and network-oriented view, and what fundamental implications this has for the proper design and management of complex dynamical systems.

Computational Social Science and Global Systems Science serve to better understand the emerging digital society with its close co-evolution of information and communication technology (ICT) and society. They make current theories of crises and disasters applicable to the solution of global-scale problems, taking a data-based approach that builds on a serious collaboration between the natural, engineering, and social sciences, i.e. an interdisciplinary integration of knowledge.
Science Research
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-0707-00LAnalysing Texts Information W2 credits2GC. J. Baumberger, G. Hirsch Hadorn
AbstractThis course provides basic knowledge and methods for analyzing, understanding and critically assessing texts and arguments. We use texts on environmental issues and philosophical texts for learning and practicing how to grasp, summarize, analyze and critically evaluate the content of a text and its line of argumentation.
ObjectiveStudents acquire basic knowledge for analyzing texts, and they learn how to grasp, summarize, analyze and critically evaluate the content of a text and its line of argumentation.
ContentThe course provides basic knowledge (theory of speech acts, semiotics, theories of concepts and theories of argumentation) and methods for analyzing, understanding and critically evaluating texts and arguments. Understanding texts and analyzing the structure and validity of arguments is crucial not only within science but also in contact with the public and in issues of everyday life. But when are statements clear and arguments convincing? How to use arguments in debates? How to identify fallacies? We use texts on environmental issues and philosophical texts for learning and practicing how to grasp, summarize, analyze and critically evaluate the content of a text and its line of argumentation.
Lecture notesA textbook will be used.
LiteratureBrun, Georg; Gertrude Hirsch Hadorn 2014. Textanalyse in den Wissenschaften. Inhalte und Argumente analysieren und verstehen. Zürich: vdf/UTB 3139 (2nd edition)
Prerequisites / NoticeFor students in BA Environmental Sciences who choose humanities and for students in other programs of ETH or Zurich University, 2 ECTS-credits are available for solving the exercises, that are distributed during the course.
851-0132-04LWhat is Science for?W3 credits2SA. J. Lustig
AbstractThis course will explore five different ways that investigators since the 17th century have explained the workings of the natural world: natural history, discovering what exists in the cosmos; analysis of nature's component parts; experiment to create new things and phenomena; technoscientific application for power and profit; and hermeneutics, attempts to answer broad questions about meaning.
ObjectiveThis course will explore five different ways of asking questions about the natural world that have characterized the emergence of modern science since the seventeenth century: natural history, the project of enumerating and ordering the kinds and individuals that make up the cosmos; analysis of nature's component parts by breaking larger elements into smaller ones; experiment to create things and phenomena that have never previously existed; technoscientific application to commodify the natural world, for power and profit; and hermeneutics, the attempt to understand or create meaning in and from the cosmos. The course is intended primarily to give students in the sciences, engineering, and mathematics a broader, contextual view of the history of science.
Case studies will include:
for natural history: the development of biological systematics, the quantification projects of the nineteenth century, and the development of the theory of evolution by natural selection;
for analysis: the revolution in astronomy and terrestrial physics of the seventeenth century, the project to analyze all human knowledge in the Encyclopédie of Diderot and d'Alembert, and the invention of rational production;
for experiment: the eighteenth-century science of electricity, the invention of modern plant and animal breeding, and Justus Liebig's invention of a new way to produce chemists and chemistry in the nineteenth century;
for technoscience: industrial R&D and the synthesis of nylon, and tensions between science and commerce embodied in the tobacco industry;
for hermeneutics: seventeenth-century world-readings, eugenics, and "natural" and "human" kinds.
851-0157-71LOf Plants and Men Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 40.

Particularly suitable for students of D-BIOL, D-USYS.
W3 credits2SN. Guettler, M. Wulz
AbstractThe seminar considers the history of a remarkable relation: plants and men. For understanding the human condition the engagement with plants, their morphology, and their locomotion was crucial in different periods. In this course we examine the relation between knowledge on plants and conceptions of the human in historical and philosophical perspective.
ObjectiveIn recent years various forms of the "non-human" - animals, objects or monsters - have strongly shaped cultural studies and their theories (such as animal studies or actor-network theory). Plants, however, are significantly underresearched especially as over the course of history they have repeatedly stimulated ideas of what it meant to be human. This course traces different conceptions of the plant-human relation since the Early Modern period, ranging from botany to ecology, philosophy, art, and popular literature. How did (knowledge on) plants shape anthropological, social, political, and economic concepts? How have "encounters" with plants changed our views of the human and the social? And in which ways does knowledge on plants still influence our visions and dystopias of cohabitation and society (for instance "rhizom" or "invasive species")?
851-0158-09LExperimenting. On the Practice of Scientific ResearchW2 credits1SH. von Sass
AbstractWhat would be left over from the allegedly "robust" or "hard" science if we had no experiments? Hence, the research on science has to understand itself as thinking about what it means to perform experiments. How is the relation between the experimentally shown and the generally claimed going beyond the single experiment? How could we deal with the impossibility of being free from all prejudgemen
ObjectiveIntroduction into basic problems in the philosophy of and the research on science.
851-0157-72LOn the Future of Scientific Publishing Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 20.
W3 credits2SN. Guettler, M. Stadler
AbstractThe aim of this teaching project is to design and develop an innovative, internet-based science magazine in the field of Science and Technology Studies (STS). Students will be given the opportunity to critically engage with the future of digital scientific publishing, both conceptually and practically.
ObjectiveThe project combines an historical and theoretical approach to scientific publishing with the implementation of an actual, digital publication. The aim of the project is to design and develop an innovative, internet-based science magazine in the field of Science and Technology Studies (STS). By conceptualising and developing a prototype magazine students will be given the opportunity to learn about, and engage with, current debates about the future of scientific publishing, while simultaneously shaping it - pro-actively. In the light of recent discussions concerning open access, the digital humanities, and so on, how can we deploy digital technologies more purposefully and attractively to communicate our research results to the wider public? The seminar is a continuation of the seminar "Pulish or Perish, 1800-2016: On the History of Scientific Publishing" (fall term 2016, participation of that course is not a requirement).
851-0157-73LArt and the Machine Since the Early Modern Age Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 40
W3 credits2SV. Wolff
Abstract"I want to be a machine" Andy Warhol famously stated in an Art News interview from the year 1963. For a long time already machines have been seen as ingenious instruments of the artificial or the marvelous. In the course of industrialization the machine would then became the central topos for modernity's critical self-reflection.
ObjectiveBased on a series of exemplary theoretical and artistic positions this seminar traces the historical epistemology of this topos and discusses the relationship between art and the machine from the early modern age until today. We will deal with diverse theories of the machine, with historical debates and criticism concerning the social relation to the machine, as well as with works of art, literature, and architecture that address this relation.
851-0157-49LWhat is life? Introdution Into the History of the Life SciencesW3 credits2VM. Hagner
AbstractThe aim of this lecture is to introduce into the most important theories of life from ancient times until the early 21st century. I will put a focus on philosophical concepts and on the modern life sciences since Chalres Darwin.
ObjectiveIn the lecture course, attendants will learn to distinguish historically and systematically various theories of life.
851-0157-74LPhotography Between Science and Art Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30
W3 credits2SM. Hagner
AbstractThis seminar is devoted to the role of photography in art and science since its beginnings in 1839. We will read selected texts on the theory of photography and analyse photographs for getting an overview over its fascinating history.
ObjectiveWhen photography started to conquer the world in 1839, it was unclear whether it belonged to the arts or to the sciences. Since those times and despite the digital revolution, this double function of photography has not changed significantly. The aim of this seminar is twofold: First, we want to reconstruct the transformations of photography in the trading zone of the sciences and the arts. Second, we want to analyse epistemological and aesthetical theories, which reflect the function of photography. The use of the photography archive of ETH Zurich will be part of the seminar.
851-0157-69LHistory of Astronomy Restricted registration - show details
Particularly suitable for students of D-ERDW, D-MATH, D-PHYS
Number of participants limited to 40
W3 credits2SS. Mastorakou
AbstractThe course is designed to provide an overview of the astronomical developments from the ancient Greek world to the 16th century. We are going to use primary sources tackling historical, technical and philosophical questions. Special attention will be paid to the dramatic change in the way people understood the structure of the heavens and the nature of the physical world.
ObjectiveThe course aims at providing a working knowledge of astronomy and cosmology from the ancient world to the 16th century. Upon its completion the students will be able to describe how our knowledge of the heavens changed from Aristotle's system to the Copernican Revolution. In addition, they will also have acquired an appreciation of the debates about man's place in the cosmos and the philosophical principles underpinning cosmology.