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Suchergebnis: Katalogdaten im Herbstsemester 2017

Robotics, Systems and Control Master Information
Kernfächer
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
151-0107-20LHigh Performance Computing for Science and Engineering (HPCSE) IW4 KP4GP. Koumoutsakos, P. Chatzidoukas
KurzbeschreibungThis course gives an introduction into algorithms and numerical methods for parallel computing for multi and many-core architectures and for applications from problems in science and engineering.
LernzielIntroduction to HPC for scientists and engineers
Fundamental of:
1. Parallel Computing Architectures
2. MultiCores
3. ManyCores
InhaltProgramming models and languages:
1. C++ threading (2 weeks)
2. OpenMP (4 weeks)
3. MPI (5 weeks)

Computers and methods:
1. Hardware and architectures
2. Libraries
3. Particles: N-body solvers
4. Fields: PDEs
5. Stochastics: Monte Carlo
Skripthttp://www.cse-lab.ethz.ch/index.php/teaching/42-teaching/classes/615-hpcse1
Class notes, handouts
151-0323-00LAutonomous Mobility on Demand: From Car to Fleet Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to 20.
W4 KP4GE. Frazzoli, A. Censi
KurzbeschreibungAutonomous Mobility on Demand systems based on self-driving cars will make a huge impact in the world. This class describes the basics of modeling, perception, learning, planning, and control for fleets of self-driving cars. We focus particular regard to the problem of integration and co-design of components and behaviors. The course has a heavy experimental component.
LernzielThe students will learn how to create all parts of an architecture for a complex multi-robot system performing a nontrivial task (an autonomous taxi service).
InhaltPart 1: Single car functionalities (perception-planning-control loop, based on vision data); Part 2: Multiple cars (formal methods for safety, platooning, coordination, fleet-level policy optimization)
SkriptCourse notes will be provided for free in an electronic form.
LiteraturCourse notes will be provided for free in an electronic form. These are some books that can be used to provide background information or consulted as references: (1) Siegwart, Nourbakhsh, Scaramuzza - Introduction to autonomous mobile robots; (2) Norvig, Russell - Artificial Intelligent, a modern approach. (3) Peter Corke - Robotics Vision and Control (4) Oussama Khatib, Bruno Siciliano - Handbook of Robotics
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesStudents should have taken a basic course in probability. Students should be familiar with basic programming and Linux use.
151-0509-00LMicroscale Acoustofluidics Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to 30.
W4 KP3GJ. Dual
KurzbeschreibungIn this lecture the basics as well as practical aspects (from modelling to design and fabrication ) are described from a solid and fluid mechanics perspective with applications to microsystems and lab on a chip devices.
LernzielUnderstanding acoustophoresis, the design of devices and potential applications
InhaltLinear and nonlinear acoustics, foundations of fluid and solid mechanics and piezoelectricity, Gorkov potential, numerical modelling, acoustic streaming, applications from ultrasonic microrobotics to surface acoustic wave devices
SkriptYes, incl. Chapters from the Tutorial: Microscale Acoustofluidics, T. Laurell and A. Lenshof, Ed., Royal Society of Chemistry, 2015
LiteraturMicroscale Acoustofluidics, T. Laurell and A. Lenshof, Ed., Royal Society of Chemistry, 2015
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesSolid and fluid continuum mechanics. Notice: The exercise part is a mixture of presentation, lab session and hand in homework.
151-0563-01LDynamic Programming and Optimal Control Information W4 KP2V + 1UR. D'Andrea
KurzbeschreibungIntroduction to Dynamic Programming and Optimal Control.
LernzielCovers the fundamental concepts of Dynamic Programming & Optimal Control.
InhaltDynamic Programming Algorithm; Deterministic Systems and Shortest Path Problems; Infinite Horizon Problems, Bellman Equation; Deterministic Continuous-Time Optimal Control.
LiteraturDynamic Programming and Optimal Control by Dimitri P. Bertsekas, Vol. I, 3rd edition, 2005, 558 pages, hardcover.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesRequirements: Knowledge of advanced calculus, introductory probability theory, and matrix-vector algebra.
151-0593-00LEmbedded Control SystemsW4 KP6GJ. S. Freudenberg, M. Schmid Daners
KurzbeschreibungThis course provides a comprehensive overview of embedded control systems. The concepts introduced are implemented and verified on a microprocessor-controlled haptic device.
LernzielFamiliarize students with main architectural principles and concepts of embedded control systems.
InhaltAn embedded system is a microprocessor used as a component in another piece of technology, such as cell phones or automobiles. In this intensive two-week block course the students are presented the principles of embedded digital control systems using a haptic device as an example for a mechatronic system. A haptic interface allows for a human to interact with a computer through the sense of touch.

Subjects covered in lectures and practical lab exercises include:
- The application of C-programming on a microprocessor
- Digital I/O and serial communication
- Quadrature decoding for wheel position sensing
- Queued analog-to-digital conversion to interface with the analog world
- Pulse width modulation
- Timer interrupts to create sampling time intervals
- System dynamics and virtual worlds with haptic feedback
- Introduction to rapid prototyping
SkriptLecture notes, lab instructions, supplemental material
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesPrerequisite courses are Control Systems I and Informatics I.

This course is restricted to 33 students due to limited lab infrastructure. Interested students please contact Marianne Schmid (E-Mail: marischm@ethz.ch)
After your reservation has been confirmed please register online at www.mystudies.ethz.ch.

Detailed information can be found on the course website
http://www.idsc.ethz.ch/education/lectures/embedded-control-systems.html
151-0601-00LTheory of Robotics and Mechatronics Information W4 KP3GP. Korba, S. Stoeter
KurzbeschreibungThis course provides an introduction and covers the fundamentals of the field, including rigid motions, homogeneous transformations, forward and inverse kinematics of multiple degree of freedom manipulators, velocity kinematics, motion planning, trajectory generation, sensing, vision, and control. It’s a requirement for the Robotics Vertiefung and for the Masters in Mechatronics and Microsystems.
LernzielRobotics is often viewed from three perspectives: perception (sensing), manipulation (affecting changes in the world), and cognition (intelligence). Robotic systems integrate aspects of all three of these areas. This course provides an introduction to the theory of robotics, and covers the fundamentals of the field, including rigid motions, homogeneous transformations, forward and inverse kinematics of multiple degree of freedom manipulators, velocity kinematics, motion planning, trajectory generation, sensing, vision, and control. This course is a requirement for the Robotics Vertiefung and for the Masters in Mechatronics and Microsystems.
InhaltAn introduction to the theory of robotics, and covers the fundamentals of the field, including rigid motions, homogeneous transformations, forward and inverse kinematics of multiple degree of freedom manipulators, velocity kinematics, motion planning, trajectory generation, sensing, vision, and control.
Skriptavailable.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThe course will be taught in English.
151-0604-00LMicrorobotics Information W4 KP3GB. Nelson
KurzbeschreibungMicrorobotics is an interdisciplinary field that combines aspects of robotics, micro and nanotechnology, biomedical engineering, and materials science. The aim of this course is to expose students to the fundamentals of this emerging field. Throughout the course students are expected to submit assignments. The course concludes with an end-of-semester examination.
LernzielThe objective of this course is to expose students to the fundamental aspects of the emerging field of microrobotics. This includes a focus on physical laws that predominate at the microscale, technologies for fabricating small devices, bio-inspired design, and applications of the field.
InhaltMain topics of the course include:
- Scaling laws at micro/nano scales
- Electrostatics
- Electromagnetism
- Low Reynolds number flows
- Observation tools
- Materials and fabrication methods
- Applications of biomedical microrobots
SkriptThe powerpoint slides presented in the lectures will be mad available as pdf files. Several readings will also be made available electronically.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThe lecture will be taught in English.
151-0623-00LETH Zurich Distinguished Seminar in Robotics, Systems and Controls Information
Findet dieses Semester nicht statt.
Does not take place this semester.
This couse will be offered in Spring Semester 2018 again.

Students for other Master's programmes in Department Mechanical and Process Engineering cannot use the credit in the category Core Courses
W1 KP1SB. Nelson, J. Buchli, M. Chli, M. Hutter, W. Karlen, R. Riener, R. Siegwart
KurzbeschreibungThis course consists of a series of seven lectures given by researchers who have distinguished themselves in the area of Robotics, Systems, and Controls.
LernzielObtain an overview of various topics in Robotics, Systems, and Controls from leaders in the field. Please see Link for a list of upcoming lectures.
InhaltThis course consists of a series of seven lectures given by researchers who have distinguished themselves in the area of Robotics, Systems, and Controls. MSc students in Robotics, Systems, and Controls are required to attend every lecture. Attendance will be monitored. If for some reason a student cannot attend one of the lectures, the student must select another ETH or University of Zurich seminar related to the field and submit a one page description of the seminar topic. Please see Link for a suggestion of other lectures.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesStudents are required to attend all seven lectures to obtain credit. If a student must miss a lecture then attendance at a related special lecture will be accepted that is reported in a one page summary of the attended lecture. No exceptions to this rule are allowed.
151-0632-00LVision Algorithms for Mobile Robotics Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to 55
Registration is on a first come, first served basis and SPACE IS LIMITED!
W4 KP2V + 2UD. Scaramuzza
KurzbeschreibungFor a robot to be autonomous, it has to perceive and understand the world around it. This course introduces you to the key computer vision algorithms used in mobile robotics, such as feature extraction, multiple view geometry, dense reconstruction, tracking, image retrieval, event-based vision, and visual-inertial odometry (the algorithms behind Google Tango, Ms Hololens, and the Mars rovers).
LernzielLearn the fundamental computer vision algorithms used in mobile robotics, in particular: feature extraction, multiple view geometry, dense reconstruction, object tracking, image retrieval, event-based vision, and visual-inertial odometry (the algorithm behind Google Tango).
InhaltEach lecture will be followed by a lab session where you will learn to implement the building block of a visual odometry algorithm in Matlab. By the end of the course, you will integrate all these building blocks into a working visual odometry algorithm.
SkriptLecture slides will be made available on the course official website: http://rpg.ifi.uzh.ch/teaching.html
Literatur[1] Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications, by Richard Szeliski, Springer, 2010.
[2] Robotics Vision and Control: Fundamental Algorithms, by Peter Corke 2011.
[3] An Invitation to 3D Vision, by Y. Ma, S. Soatto, J. Kosecka, S.S. Sastry.
[4] Multiple view Geometry, by R. Hartley and A. Zisserman.
[5] Introduction to autonomous mobile robots 2nd Edition, by R. Siegwart, I.R. Nourbakhsh, and D. Scaramuzza, February, 2011
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesFundamentals of algebra, geomertry, matrix calculus, and Matlab programming.
151-0851-00LRobot Dynamics Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen W4 KP2V + 1UM. Hutter, R. Siegwart
KurzbeschreibungWe will provide an overview on how to kinematically and dynamically model typical robotic systems such as robot arms, legged robots, rotary wing systems, or fixed wing.
LernzielThe primary objective of this course is that the student deepens an applied understanding of how to model the most common robotic systems. The student receives a solid background in kinematics, dynamics, and rotations of multi-body systems. On the basis of state of the art applications, he/she will learn all necessary tools to work in the field of design or control of robotic systems.
InhaltThe course consists of three parts: First, we will refresh and deepen the student's knowledge in kinematics, dynamics, and rotations of multi-body systems. In this context, the learning material will build upon the courses for mechanics and dynamics available at ETH, with the particular focus on their application to robotic systems. The goal is to foster the conceptual understanding of similarities and differences among the various types of robots. In the second part, we will apply the learned material to classical robotic arms as well as legged systems and discuss kinematic constraints and interaction forces. In the third part, focus is put on modeling fixed wing aircraft, along with related design and control concepts. In this context, we also touch aerodynamics and flight mechanics to an extent typically required in robotics. The last part finally covers different helicopter types, with a focus on quadrotors and the coaxial configuration which we see today in many UAV applications. Case studies on all main topics provide the link to real applications and to the state of the art in robotics.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThe contents of the following ETH Bachelor lectures or equivalent are assumed to be known: Mechanics and Dynamics, Control, Basics in Fluid Dynamics.
151-1116-00LEinführung in Flug- und FahrzeugaerodynamikW4 KP3GJ. Wildi
KurzbeschreibungFlugzeugaerodynamik: Atmosphäre; Aerodynamische Kräfte (Auftrieb: Profile, Flügel. Widerstand: Restwiderstand, induzierter Widerstand);Schub.
Fahrzeugaerodynamik: Grundlagen: Luft- und Massenkräfte, Widerstand , Auftrieb. Aerodynamik und Fahrleistungen. Personenwagen; Nutzfahrzeuge; Rennfahrzeuge.
LernzielEinführung in die Grundlagen und Zusammenhänge der Flugzeug- und Fahrzeugaerodynamik vermitteln.
Grundlegende Zusammenhänge der Entstehung aerodynamischer Kräfte (insbesondere Auftrieb, Widerstand) verstehen und diese für einfache Konfigurationen von Flugzeugen und Fahrzeugen berechnen können. Den Einfluss der Formgebung von Flugzeug- und Fahrzeugkomponenten auf die Grösse der aerodynamischen Kräfte erklären können. An Beispielen die wesentlichen Probleme und Resultate illustrieren.
Möglichkeiten und Grenzen experimenteller und theoretischer Verfahren zeigen.
InhaltFlugzeugaerodynamik: Atmosphäre; Aerodynamische Kräfte (Auftrieb: Profile, Flügel. Widerstand: Restwiderstand, induzierter Widerstand);Schub (Übersicht der Antriebssysteme, Aerodynamik des Propellers), Einführung in statische Längsstabilität.

Fahrzeugaerodynamik: Grundlagen: Luft- und Massenkräfte, Widerstand , Auftrieb. Aerodynamik und Fahrleistungen. Personenwagen; Nutzfahrzeuge; Rennfahrzeuge
Skript1.) Grundlagen der Flugtechnik
2.) Einführung in die Fahrzeugaerodynamik
LiteraturFlugtechnik:
- Anderson Jr, John D: Introduction to Flight, Mc Graw Hill, Ed 06, 2007; ISBN: 9780073529394
- Mc Cormick, B.W.: Aerodynamics, Aeronautics and Flight Mechanics, John Wiley and Sons, 1979
- Wilcox, David C, Basic Fluid Mechanics. DCW Industries, Inc., 1997
- Schlichting,H. und truckenbrodt, E: Aerodynamik des Flugzeuges (Bd I und II), Springer Verlag, 1960
- Abbott, I. and van Doenhoff, A.: Theory of Wing Sections, McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., 1949
- Hoerner, S.F.: Fluid Dynamic Drag, Hoerner Fluid Dynamics, 1951/1965
- Hoerner, S.F.: Fluid Dynamic Lift, Hoerner Fluid Dynamics, 1975
- Perkins, C.D. and Hage, R.E.: Airplane Performance, Stability and Control, John Wiley ans Sons, 1949

Fahrzeugaerodynamik
- Hucho, Wolf-Heinrich: Aerodynamik des Automobils, VDI Verlag, 1994
- Gillespi, Thomas D: Fundamentals of Vehicle Dynamics, SAE, 1992
- Katz Joseph: New Directions in Race Car Aerodynamics, Robert Bentley Publishers, 1995
151-0532-00LNonlinear Dynamics and Chaos I Information W4 KP2V + 2UF. Kogelbauer
KurzbeschreibungBasic facts about nonlinear systems; stability and near-equilibrium dynamics; bifurcations; dynamical systems on the plane; non-autonomous dynamical systems; chaotic dynamics.
LernzielThis course is intended for Masters and Ph.D. students in engineering sciences, physics and applied mathematics who are interested in the behavior of nonlinear dynamical systems. It offers an introduction to the qualitative study of nonlinear physical phenomena modeled by differential equations or discrete maps. We discuss applications in classical mechanics, electrical engineering, fluid mechanics, and biology. A more advanced Part II of this class is offered every other year.
Inhalt(1) Basic facts about nonlinear systems: Existence, uniqueness, and dependence on initial data.

(2) Near equilibrium dynamics: Linear and Lyapunov stability

(3) Bifurcations of equilibria: Center manifolds, normal forms, and elementary bifurcations

(4) Nonlinear dynamical systems on the plane: Phase plane techniques, limit sets, and limit cycles.

(5) Time-dependent dynamical systems: Floquet theory, Poincare maps, averaging methods, resonance
SkriptThe class lecture notes will be posted electronically after each lecture. Students should not rely on these but prepare their own notes during the lecture.
Voraussetzungen / Besonderes- Prerequisites: Analysis, linear algebra and a basic course in differential equations.

- Exam: two-hour written exam in English.

- Homework: A homework assignment will be due roughly every other week. Hints to solutions will be posted after the homework due dates.
227-0102-00LDiskrete Ereignissysteme Information W6 KP4GL. Thiele, L. Vanbever, R. Wattenhofer
KurzbeschreibungEinführung in Diskrete Ereignissysteme (DES). Zuerst studieren wir populäre Modelle für DES. Im zweiten Teil analysieren wir DES, aus einer Average-Case und einer Worst-Case Sicht. Stichworte: Automaten und Sprachen, Spezifikationsmodelle, Stochastische DES, Worst-Case Ereignissysteme, Verifikation, Netzwerkalgebra.
LernzielOver the past few decades the rapid evolution of computing, communication, and information technologies has brought about the proliferation of new dynamic systems. A significant part of activity in these systems is governed by operational rules designed by humans. The dynamics of these systems are characterized by asynchronous occurrences of discrete events, some controlled (e.g. hitting a keyboard key, sending a message), some not (e.g. spontaneous failure, packet loss).

The mathematical arsenal centered around differential equations that has been employed in systems engineering to model and study processes governed by the laws of nature is often inadequate or inappropriate for discrete event systems. The challenge is to develop new modeling frameworks, analysis techniques, design tools, testing methods, and optimization processes for this new generation of systems.

In this lecture we give an introduction to discrete event systems. We start out the course by studying popular models of discrete event systems, such as automata and Petri nets. In the second part of the course we analyze discrete event systems. We first examine discrete event systems from an average-case perspective: we model discrete events as stochastic processes, and then apply Markov chains and queuing theory for an understanding of the typical behavior of a system. In the last part of the course we analyze discrete event systems from a worst-case perspective using the theory of online algorithms and adversarial queuing.
Inhalt1. Introduction
2. Automata and Languages
3. Smarter Automata
4. Specification Models
5. Stochastic Discrete Event Systems
6. Worst-Case Event Systems
7. Network Calculus
SkriptAvailable
Literatur[bertsekas] Data Networks
Dimitri Bersekas, Robert Gallager
Prentice Hall, 1991, ISBN: 0132009161

[borodin] Online Computation and Competitive Analysis
Allan Borodin, Ran El-Yaniv.
Cambridge University Press, 1998

[boudec] Network Calculus
J.-Y. Le Boudec, P. Thiran
Springer, 2001

[cassandras] Introduction to Discrete Event Systems
Christos Cassandras, Stéphane Lafortune.
Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1999, ISBN 0-7923-8609-4

[fiat] Online Algorithms: The State of the Art
A. Fiat and G. Woeginger

[hochbaum] Approximation Algorithms for NP-hard Problems (Chapter 13 by S. Irani, A. Karlin)
D. Hochbaum

[schickinger] Diskrete Strukturen (Band 2: Wahrscheinlichkeitstheorie und Statistik)
T. Schickinger, A. Steger
Springer, Berlin, 2001

[sipser] Introduction to the Theory of Computation
Michael Sipser.
PWS Publishing Company, 1996, ISBN 053494728X
227-0103-00LRegelsysteme Information W6 KP2V + 2UF. Dörfler
KurzbeschreibungStudy of concepts and methods for the mathematical description and analysis of dynamical systems. The concept of feedback. Design of control systems for single input - single output and multivariable systems.
LernzielStudy of concepts and methods for the mathematical description and analysis of dynamical systems. The concept of feedback. Design of control systems for single input - single output and multivariable systems.
InhaltProcess automation, concept of control. Modelling of dynamical systems - examples, state space description, linearisation, analytical/numerical solution. Laplace transform, system response for first and second order systems - effect of additional poles and zeros. Closed-loop control - idea of feedback. PID control, Ziegler - Nichols tuning. Stability, Routh-Hurwitz criterion, root locus, frequency response, Bode diagram, Bode gain/phase relationship, controller design via "loop shaping", Nyquist criterion. Feedforward compensation, cascade control. Multivariable systems (transfer matrix, state space representation), multi-loop control, problem of coupling, Relative Gain Array, decoupling, sensitivity to model uncertainty. State space representation (modal description, controllability, control canonical form, observer canonical form), state feedback, pole placement - choice of poles. Observer, observability, duality, separation principle. LQ Regulator, optimal state estimation.
LiteraturK. J. Aström & R. Murray. Feedback Systems: An Introduction for Scientists and Engineers. Princeton University Press, 2010.
R. C. Dorf and R. H. Bishop. Modern Control Systems. Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 2007.
G. F. Franklin, J. D. Powell, and A. Emami-Naeini. Feedback Control of Dynamic Systems. Addison-Wesley, 2010.
J. Lunze. Regelungstechnik 1. Springer, Berlin, 2014.
J. Lunze. Regelungstechnik 2. Springer, Berlin, 2014.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesPrerequisites: Signal and Systems Theory II.

MATLAB is used for system analysis and simulation.
227-0225-00LLinear System TheoryW6 KP5GM. Kamgarpour
KurzbeschreibungThe class is intended to provide a comprehensive overview of the theory of linear dynamical systems, stability analysis, and their use in control and estimation. The focus is on the mathematics behind the physical properties of these systems.
LernzielStudents should be able to apply the fundamental results in linear system theory to analyze and control linear dynamical systems.
Inhalt- Linear spaces, normed linear spaces and Hilbert spaces.
- Ordinary differential equations, existence and uniqueness of solutions.
- Continuous and discrete-time, time-varying linear systems. Time domain solutions. Time invariant systems treated as a special case.
- Controllability and observability, duality. Time invariant systems treated as a special case.
- Stability and stabilization, observers, state and output feedback, separation principle.
SkriptAvailable online on course website.
Voraussetzungen / Besonderes1) Sufficient mathematical maturity with special focus on linear algebra, analysis, and basic logic.
2) Control Systems I (227-0103-00) or equivalent.
227-0247-00LPower Electronic Systems I Information W6 KP4GJ. W. Kolar
KurzbeschreibungBasics of the switching behavior, gate drive and snubber circuits of power semiconductors are discussed. Soft-switching and resonant DC/DC converters are analyzed in detail and high frequency loss mechanisms of magnetic components are explained. Space vector modulation of three-phase inverters is introduced and the main power components are designed for typical industry applications.
LernzielDetailed understanding of the principle of operation and modulation of advanced power electronics converter systems, especially of zero voltage switching and zero current switching non-isolated and isolated DC/DC converter systems and three-phase voltage DC link inverter systems. Furthermore, the course should convey knowledge on the switching frequency related losses of power semiconductors and inductive power components and introduce the concept of space vector calculus which provides a basis for the comprehensive discussion of three-phase PWM converters systems in the lecture Power Electronic Systems II.
InhaltBasics of the switching behavior and gate drive circuits of power semiconductor devices and auxiliary circuits for minimizing the switching losses are explained. Furthermore, zero voltage switching, zero current switching, and resonant DC/DC converters are discussed in detail; the operating behavior of isolated full-bridge DC/DC converters is detailed for different secondary side rectifier topologies; high frequency loss mechanisms of magnetic components of converter circuits are explained and approximate calculation methods are presented; the concept of space vector calculus for analyzing three-phase systems is introduced; finally, phase-oriented and space vector modulation of three-phase inverter systems are discussed related to voltage DC link inverter systems and the design of the main power components based on analytical calculations is explained.
SkriptLecture notes and associated exercises including correct answers, simulation program for interactive self-learning including visualization/animation features.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesPrerequisites: Introductory course on power electronics.
227-0447-00LImage Analysis and Computer Vision Information W6 KP3V + 1UL. Van Gool, O. Göksel, E. Konukoglu
KurzbeschreibungLight and perception. Digital image formation. Image enhancement and feature extraction. Unitary transformations. Color and texture. Image segmentation and deformable shape matching. Motion extraction and tracking. 3D data extraction. Invariant features. Specific object recognition and object class recognition.
LernzielOverview of the most important concepts of image formation, perception and analysis, and Computer Vision. Gaining own experience through practical computer and programming exercises.
InhaltThe first part of the course starts off from an overview of existing and emerging applications that need computer vision. It shows that the realm of image processing is no longer restricted to the factory floor, but is entering several fields of our daily life. First it is investigated how the parameters of the electromagnetic waves are related to our perception. Also the interaction of light with matter is considered. The most important hardware components of technical vision systems, such as cameras, optical devices and illumination sources are discussed. The course then turns to the steps that are necessary to arrive at the discrete images that serve as input to algorithms. The next part describes necessary preprocessing steps of image analysis, that enhance image quality and/or detect specific features. Linear and non-linear filters are introduced for that purpose. The course will continue by analyzing procedures allowing to extract additional types of basic information from multiple images, with motion and depth as two important examples. The estimation of image velocities (optical flow) will get due attention and methods for object tracking will be presented. Several techniques are discussed to extract three-dimensional information about objects and scenes. Finally, approaches for the recognition of specific objects as well as object classes will be discussed and analyzed.
SkriptCourse material Script, computer demonstrations, exercises and problem solutions
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesPrerequisites:
Basic concepts of mathematical analysis and linear algebra. The computer exercises are based on Linux and C.
The course language is English.
227-0526-00LPower System Analysis Information W6 KP4GG. Hug
KurzbeschreibungZiel dieser Vorlesung ist das Verständnis der stationären und dynamischen, bei der elektrischen Energieübertragung auftretenden Vorgänge. Die Herleitung der stationären Modelle der Komponenten des elektrischen Netzes, die Aufstellung der mathematischen Gleichungssysteme, deren spezielle Charakteristiken und Lösungsmethoden stehen im Vordergrund.
LernzielZiel dieser Vorlesung ist das Verständnis der stationären und dynamischen, bei der elektrischen Energieübertragung auftretenden Vorgänge und die Anwendung von Analysemethoden in stationären und dynamischen Zuständen des elektrischen Netzes.
InhaltDer Kurs beinhaltet die Herleitung von stationären und dynamischen Modellen des elektrischen Netzwerks, deren mathematische Darstellungen und spezielle Charakteristiken sowie Lösungsmethoden für die Behandlung von grossen linearen und nichtlinearen Gleichungssystemen im Zusammenhang mit dem elektrischen Netz. Ansätze wie der Netwon-Raphson Algorithmus angewendet auf die Lastflussgleichungen, Superpositions Prinzip für Kurzschlussberechnung, Methoden für Stabilitätsanalysen und Lastflussberechnungsmethoden für das Verteilnetz werden präsentiert.
SkriptVorlesungsskript.
227-0689-00LSystem IdentificationW4 KP2V + 1UR. Smith
KurzbeschreibungTheory and techniques for the identification of dynamic models from experimentally obtained system input-output data.
LernzielTo provide a series of practical techniques for the development of dynamical models from experimental data, with the emphasis being on the development of models suitable for feedback control design purposes. To provide sufficient theory to enable the practitioner to understand the trade-offs between model accuracy, data quality and data quantity.
InhaltIntroduction to modeling: Black-box and grey-box models; Parametric and non-parametric models; ARX, ARMAX (etc.) models.

Predictive, open-loop, black-box identification methods. Time and frequency domain methods. Subspace identification methods.

Optimal experimental design, Cramer-Rao bounds, input signal design.

Parametric identification methods. On-line and batch approaches.

Closed-loop identification strategies. Trade-off between controller performance and information available for identification.
Literatur"System Identification; Theory for the User" Lennart Ljung, Prentice Hall (2nd Ed), 1999.

"Dynamic system identification: Experimental design and data analysis", GC Goodwin and RL Payne, Academic Press, 1977.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesControl systems (227-0216-00L) or equivalent.
227-0697-00LIndustrial Process ControlW4 KP3GG. Maier, A. Horch
KurzbeschreibungIntroduction to process automation and its application in process industry and power generation
LernzielKnowledge of process automation and its application in industry and power generation
InhaltIntroduction to process automation: system architecture, data handling, communication (fieldbusses), process visualization, engineering, etc.
Analysis and design of open loop control problems: discrete automata, decision tables, petri-nets, drive control and object oriented function group automation philosophy, RT-UML.
Engineering: Application programming in IEC61131-3 (function blocks, sequence control, structured text); process visualization and operation; engineering integration from sensor, cabling, topology design, function, visualization, diagnosis, to documentation; Industry standards (e.g. OPC, Profibus); Ergonomic design, safety (IEC61508) and availability, supervision and diagnosis.
Practical examples from process industry, power generation and newspaper production.
SkriptSlides will be available as .PDF documents, see "Learning materials" (for registered students only)
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesExercises: Tuesday 15-16

Practical exercises will illustrate some topics, e.g. some control software coding using industry standard programming tools based on IEC61131-3.
227-0778-00LHardware/Software Codesign Information W6 KP2V + 2UL. Thiele
KurzbeschreibungDie Lehrveranstaltung vermittelt fortgeschrittene Kenntnisse im Entwurf komplexer Computersysteme, vor allem eingebettete Systeme. Speziell werden den Studierenden Modelle und Methoden vermittelt, die grundlegend sind fuer den Entwurf von Systemen, die aus Software- und Hardware Komponenten bestehen.
LernzielDie Lehrveranstaltung vermittelt fortgeschrittene Kenntnisse im Entwurf komplexer Computersysteme, vor allem eingebettete Systeme. Speziell werden den Studierenden Modelle und Methoden vermittelt, die grundlegend sind fuer den Entwurf von Systemen, die aus Software- und Hardware Komponenten bestehen.
InhaltDie Lehrveranstaltung vermittelt die folgenden Kenntnisse: (a) Modelle zur Beschreibung von Hardware und Software, (b) Hardware-Software Schnittstellen (Instruktionssatz, Hardware- und Software Komponenten, rekonfigurierbare Architekturen und FPGAs, heterogene Rechnerarchitekturen, System-on-Chip), (c) Anwendungsspezifische Prozessoren und Codegenerierung, (d) Performanzanalzyse und Schaetzung, (e) Systementwurf (Hardware-Software Partitionierung und Explorationsverfahren).
SkriptUnterlagen zur Übung, Kopien der Vorlesungsunterlagen.
LiteraturPeter Marwedel, Embedded System Design, Springer, ISBN-13 978-94-007-0256-1, 2011.

Wayne Wolf. Computers as Components. Morgan Kaufmann, ISBN-13: 978-0123884367, 2012.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesVoraussetzung zum Besuch der Veranstaltung sind Basiskenntnisse in den folgenden Bereichen: Rechnerarchitektur, Digitaltechnik, Softwareentwurf, eingebettete Systeme
227-0920-00LSeminar in Systems and ControlZ0 KP1SF. Dörfler, R. D'Andrea, J. Lygeros, R. Smith
KurzbeschreibungCurrent topics in Systems and Control presented mostly by external speakers from academia and industry
Lernzielsee above
252-0535-00LMachine Learning Information W8 KP3V + 2U + 2AJ. M. Buhmann
KurzbeschreibungMachine learning algorithms provide analytical methods to search data sets for characteristic patterns. Typical tasks include the classification of data, function fitting and clustering, with applications in image and speech analysis, bioinformatics and exploratory data analysis. This course is accompanied by practical machine learning projects.
LernzielStudents will be familiarized with the most important concepts and algorithms for supervised and unsupervised learning; reinforce the statistics knowledge which is indispensible to solve modeling problems under uncertainty. Key concepts are the generalization ability of algorithms and systematic approaches to modeling and regularization. A machine learning project will provide an opportunity to test the machine learning algorithms on real world data.
InhaltThe theory of fundamental machine learning concepts is presented in the lecture, and illustrated with relevant applications. Students can deepen their understanding by solving both pen-and-paper and programming exercises, where they implement and apply famous algorithms to real-world data.

Topics covered in the lecture include:

- Bayesian theory of optimal decisions
- Maximum likelihood and Bayesian parameter inference
- Classification with discriminant functions: Perceptrons, Fisher's LDA and support vector machines (SVM)
- Ensemble methods: Bagging and Boosting
- Regression: least squares, ridge and LASSO penalization, non-linear regression and the bias-variance trade-off
- Non parametric density estimation: Parzen windows, nearest nieghbour
- Dimension reduction: principal component analysis (PCA) and beyond
SkriptNo lecture notes, but slides will be made available on the course webpage.
LiteraturC. Bishop. Pattern Recognition and Machine Learning. Springer 2007.

R. Duda, P. Hart, and D. Stork. Pattern Classification. John Wiley &
Sons, second edition, 2001.

T. Hastie, R. Tibshirani, and J. Friedman. The Elements of Statistical
Learning: Data Mining, Inference and Prediction. Springer, 2001.

L. Wasserman. All of Statistics: A Concise Course in Statistical
Inference. Springer, 2004.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThe course requires solid basic knowledge in analysis, statistics and numerical methods for CSE as well as practical programming experience for solving assignments.
Students should at least have followed one previous course offered by the Machine Learning Institute (e.g., CIL or LIS) or an equivalent course offered by another institution.
252-1407-00LAlgorithmic Game Theory Information W7 KP3V + 2U + 1AP. Penna
KurzbeschreibungGame theory provides a formal model to study the behavior and interaction of self-interested users and programs in large-scale distributed computer systems without central control. The course discusses algorithmic aspects of game theory.
LernzielLearning the basic concepts of game theory and mechanism design, acquiring the computational paradigm of self-interested agents, and using these concepts in the computational and algorithmic setting.
InhaltThe Internet is a typical example of a large-scale distributed computer system without central control, with users that are typically only interested in their own good. For instance, they are interested in getting high bandwidth for themselves, but don't care about others, and the same is true for computational load or download rates. Game theory provides a particularly well-suited model for the behavior and interaction of such selfish users and programs. Classic game theory dates back to the 1930s and typically does not consider algorithmic aspects at all. Only a few years back, algorithms and game theory have been considered together, in an attempt to reconcile selfish behavior of independent agents with the common good.

This course discusses algorithmic aspects of game-theoretic models, with a focus on recent algorithmic and mathematical developments. Rather than giving an overview of such developments, the course aims to study selected important topics in depth.

Outline:
- Introduction to classic game-theoretic concepts.
- Existence of stable solutions (equilibria), algorithms for computing equilibria, computational complexity.
- Speed of convergence of natural game playing dynamics such as best-response dynamics or regret minimization.
- Techniques for bounding the quality-loss due to selfish behavior versus optimal outcomes under central control (a.k.a. the 'Price of Anarchy').
- Design and analysis of mechanisms that induce truthful behavior or near-optimal outcomes at equilibrium.
- Selected current research topics, such as Google's Sponsored Search Auction, the U.S. FCC Spectrum Auction, Kidney Exchange.
SkriptLecture notes will be usually posted on the website shortly after each lecture.
Literatur"Algorithmic Game Theory", edited by N. Nisan, T. Roughgarden, E. Tardos, and V. Vazirani, Cambridge University Press, 2008;

"Game Theory and Strategy", Philip D. Straffin, The Mathematical Association of America, 5th printing, 2004

Several copies of both books are available in the Computer Science library.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesAudience: Although this is a Computer Science course, we encourage the participation from all students who are interested in this topic.

Requirements: You should enjoy precise mathematical reasoning. You need to have passed a course on algorithms and complexity. No knowledge of game theory is required.
252-3110-00LHuman Computer Interaction Information W4 KP2V + 1UO. Hilliges, M. Norrie
KurzbeschreibungThe course provides an introduction to the field of human-computer interaction, emphasising the central role of the user in system design. Through detailed case studies, students will be introduced to different methods used to analyse the user experience and shown how these can inform the design of new interfaces, systems and technologies.
LernzielThe goal of the course is that students should understand the principles of user-centred design and be able to apply these in practice.
InhaltThe course will introduce students to various methods of analysing the user experience, showing how these can be used at different stages of system development from requirements analysis through to usability testing. Students will get experience of designing and carrying out user studies as well as analysing results. The course will also cover the basic principles of interaction design. Practical exercises related to touch and gesture-based interaction will be used to reinforce the concepts introduced in the lecture. To get students to further think beyond traditional system design, we will discuss issues related to ambient information and awareness.
252-5051-00LAdvanced Topics in Machine Learning Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to 40.
W2 KP2SJ. M. Buhmann, T. Hofmann, A. Krause, G. Rätsch
KurzbeschreibungIn this seminar, recent papers of the pattern recognition and machine learning literature are presented and discussed. Possible topics cover statistical models in computer vision, graphical models and machine learning.
LernzielThe seminar "Advanced Topics in Machine Learning" familiarizes students with recent developments in pattern recognition and machine learning. Original articles have to be presented and critically reviewed. The students will learn how to structure a scientific presentation in English which covers the key ideas of a scientific paper. An important goal of the seminar presentation is to summarize the essential ideas of the paper in sufficient depth while omitting details which are not essential for the understanding of the work. The presentation style will play an important role and should reach the level of professional scientific presentations.
InhaltThe seminar will cover a number of recent papers which have emerged as important contributions to the pattern recognition and machine learning literature. The topics will vary from year to year but they are centered on methodological issues in machine learning like new learning algorithms, ensemble methods or new statistical models for machine learning applications. Frequently, papers are selected from computer vision or bioinformatics - two fields, which relies more and more on machine learning methodology and statistical models.
LiteraturThe papers will be presented in the first session of the seminar.
252-5701-00LAdvanced Topics in Computer Graphics and Vision Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Maximale Teilnehmerzahl: 24
W2 KP2SM. Gross, O. Sorkine Hornung
KurzbeschreibungThis seminar covers advanced topics in computer graphics, such as modeling, rendering, animation, real-time graphics, physical simulation, and computational photography. Each time the course is offered, a collection of research papers is selected and each student presents one paper to the class and leads a discussion about the paper and related topics.
LernzielThe goal is to get an in-depth understanding of actual problems and research topics in the field of computer graphics as well as improve presentations and critical analysis skills.
InhaltThis seminar covers advanced topics in computer graphics,
including both seminal research papers as well as the latest
research results. Each time the course is offered, a collection of
research papers are selected covering topics such as modeling,
rendering, animation, real-time graphics, physical simulation, and
computational photography. Each student presents one paper to the
class and leads a discussion about the paper and related topics.
All students read the papers and participate in the discussion.
Skriptno script
LiteraturIndividual research papers are selected each term. See http://graphics.ethz.ch/ for the current list.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesPrerequisites:
The courses "Computer Graphics I and II" (GDV I & II) are recommended, but not mandatory.
263-5210-00LProbabilistic Artificial Intelligence Information W4 KP2V + 1UA. Krause
KurzbeschreibungThis course introduces core modeling techniques and algorithms from statistics, optimization, planning, and control and study applications in areas such as sensor networks, robotics, and the Internet.
LernzielHow can we build systems that perform well in uncertain environments and unforeseen situations? How can we develop systems that exhibit "intelligent" behavior, without prescribing explicit rules? How can we build systems that learn from experience in order to improve their performance? We will study core modeling techniques and algorithms from statistics, optimization, planning, and control and study applications in areas such as sensor networks, robotics, and the Internet. The course is designed for upper-level undergraduate and graduate students.
InhaltTopics covered:
- Search (BFS, DFS, A*), constraint satisfaction and optimization
- Tutorial in logic (propositional, first-order)
- Probability
- Bayesian Networks (models, exact and approximative inference, learning) - Temporal models (Hidden Markov Models, Dynamic Bayesian Networks)
- Probabilistic palnning (MDPs, POMPDPs)
- Reinforcement learning
- Combining logic and probability
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesSolid basic knowledge in statistics, algorithms and programming
263-5902-00LComputer Vision Information W6 KP3V + 1U + 1AL. Van Gool, V. Ferrari, A. Geiger
KurzbeschreibungThe goal of this course is to provide students with a good understanding of computer vision and image analysis techniques. The main concepts and techniques will be studied in depth and practical algorithms and approaches will be discussed and explored through the exercises.
LernzielThe objectives of this course are:
1. To introduce the fundamental problems of computer vision.
2. To introduce the main concepts and techniques used to solve those.
3. To enable participants to implement solutions for reasonably complex problems.
4. To enable participants to make sense of the computer vision literature.
InhaltCamera models and calibration, invariant features, Multiple-view geometry, Model fitting, Stereo Matching, Segmentation, 2D Shape matching, Shape from Silhouettes, Optical flow, Structure from motion, Tracking, Object recognition, Object category recognition
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesIt is recommended that students have taken the Visual Computing lecture or a similar course introducing basic image processing concepts before taking this course.
376-1279-00LVirtual Reality in Medicine Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Findet dieses Semester nicht statt.
W3 KP2VR. Riener
KurzbeschreibungVirtual Reality has the potential to support medical training and therapy. This lecture will derive the technical principles of multi-modal (audiovisual, haptic, tactile etc.) input devices, displays and rendering techniques. Examples are presented in the fields of surgical training, intra-operative augmentation, and rehabilitation. The lecture is accompanied by practical courses and excursions.
LernzielProvide theoretical and practical knowledge of new principles and applications of multi-modal simulation and interface technologies in medical education, therapy, and rehabilitation.
InhaltVirtual Reality has the potential to provide descriptive and practical information for medical training and therapy while relieving the patient and/or the physician. Multi-modal interactions between the user and the virtual environment facilitate the generation of high-fidelity sensory impressions, by using not only visual and auditory modalities, but also kinesthetic, tactile, and even olfactory feedback. On the basis of the existing physiological constraints, this lecture will derive the technical requirements and principles of multi-modal input devices, displays, and rendering techniques. Several examples are presented that are currently being developed or already applied for surgical training, intra-operative augmentation, and rehabilitation. The lecture will be accompanied by several practical courses on graphical and haptic display devices as well as excursions to facilities equipped with large-scale VR equipment.

Target Group:
Students of higher semesters and PhD students of
- D-HEST, D-MAVT, D-ITET, D-INFK, D-PHYS
- Robotics, Systems and Control Master
- Biomedical Engineering/Movement Science and Sport
- Medical Faculty, University of Zurich
Students of other departments, faculties, courses are also welcome!
LiteraturBook: Virtual Reality in Medicine. Riener, Robert; Harders, Matthias; 2012 Springer.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThe course language is English.
Basic experience in Information Technology and Computer Science will be of advantage
More details will be announced in the lecture.
376-1504-00LPhysical Human Robot Interaction (pHRI) Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to 26.
W4 KP2V + 2UR. Gassert, O. Lambercy
KurzbeschreibungThis course focuses on the emerging, interdisciplinary field of physical human-robot interaction, bringing together themes from robotics, real-time control, human factors, haptics, virtual environments, interaction design and other fields to enable the development of human-oriented robotic systems.
LernzielThe objective of this course is to give an introduction to the fundamentals of physical human robot interaction, through lectures on the underlying theoretical/mechatronics aspects and application fields, in combination with a hands-on lab tutorial. The course will guide students through the design and evaluation process of such systems.

By the end of this course, you should understand the critical elements in human-robot interactions - both in terms of engineering and human factors - and use these to evaluate and de- sign safe and efficient assistive and rehabilitative robotic systems. Specifically, you should be able to:

1) identify critical human factors in physical human-robot interaction and use these to derive design requirements;
2) compare and select mechatronic components that optimally fulfill the defined design requirements;
3) derive a model of the device dynamics to guide and optimize the selection and integration of selected components
into a functional system;
4) design control hardware and software and implement and
test human-interactive control strategies on the physical
setup;
5) characterize and optimize such systems using both engineering and psychophysical evaluation metrics;
6) investigate and optimize one aspect of the physical setup and convey and defend the gained insights in a technical presentation.
InhaltThis course provides an introduction to fundamental aspects of physical human-robot interaction. After an overview of human haptic, visual and auditory sensing, neurophysiology and psychophysics, principles of human-robot interaction systems (kinematics, mechanical transmissions, robot sensors and actuators used in these systems) will be introduced. Throughout the course, students will gain knowledge of interaction control strategies including impedance/admittance and force control, haptic rendering basics and issues in device design for humans such as transparency and stability analysis, safety hardware and procedures. The course is organized into lectures that aim to bring students up to speed with the basics of these systems, readings on classical and current topics in physical human-robot interaction, laboratory sessions and lab visits.
Students will attend periodic laboratory sessions where they will implement the theoretical aspects learned during the lectures. Here the salient features of haptic device design will be identified and theoretical aspects will be implemented in a haptic system based on the haptic paddle (Link), by creating simple dynamic haptic virtual environments and understanding the performance limitations and causes of instabilities (direct/virtual coupling, friction, damping, time delays, sampling rate, sensor quantization, etc.) during rendering of different mechanical properties.
SkriptWill be distributed through the document repository before the lectures.
http://www.relab.ethz.ch/education/courses/phri.html
LiteraturAbbott, J. and Okamura, A. (2005). Effects of position quantization and sampling rate on virtual-wall passivity. Robotics, IEEE Transactions on, 21(5):952 - 964.
Adams, R. and Hannaford, B. (1999). Stable haptic interaction with virtual environments. Robotics and Automation, IEEE Transactions on, 15(3):465 -474.
Buerger, S. and Hogan, N. (2007). Complementary stability and loop shaping for improved human ndash;robot interaction. Robotics, IEEE Transactions on, 23(2):232 -244.
Burdea, G. and Brooks, F. (1996). Force and touch feedback for virtual reality. John Wiley & Sons New York NY.
Colgate, J. and Brown, J. (1994). Factors affecting the z-width of a haptic display. In Robotics and Automation, 1994. Proceedings., 1994 IEEE International Conference on, pages 3205 -3210 vol.4.
Diolaiti, N., Niemeyer, G., Barbagli, F., and Salisbury, J. (2006). Stability of haptic rendering: Discretization, quantization, time delay, and coulomb effects. Robotics, IEEE Transactions on, 22(2):256 -268.
Gillespie, R. and Cutkosky, M. (1996). Stable user-specific haptic rendering of the virtual wall. In Proceedings of the ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exhibition, volume 58, pages 397-406.
Hannaford, B. and Ryu, J.-H. (2002). Time-domain passivity control of haptic interfaces. Robotics and Automation, IEEE Transactions on, 18(1):1 -10.
Hashtrudi-Zaad, K. and Salcudean, S. (2001). Analysis of control architectures for teleoperation systems with impedance/admittance master and slave manipulators. The International Journal of Robotics Research, 20(6):419.
Hayward, V. and Astley, O. (1996). Performance measures for haptic interfaces. In ROBOTICS RESEARCH-INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM-, volume 7, pages 195-206. Citeseer.
Hayward, V. and Maclean, K. (2007). Do it yourself haptics: part i. Robotics Automation Magazine, IEEE, 14(4):88 -104.
Leskovsky, P., Harders, M., and Szeekely, G. (2006). Assessing the fidelity of haptically rendered deformable objects. In Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems, 2006 14th Symposium on, pages 19 - 25.
MacLean, K. and Hayward, V. (2008). Do it yourself haptics: Part ii [tutorial]. Robotics Automation Magazine, IEEE, 15(1):104 -119.
Mahvash, M. and Hayward, V. (2003). Passivity-based high-fidelity haptic rendering of contact. In Robotics and Automation, 2003. Proceedings. ICRA '03. IEEE International Conference on, volume 3, pages 3722 - 3728 vol.3.
Mehling, J., Colgate, J., and Peshkin, M. (2005). Increasing the impedance range of a haptic display by adding electrical damping. In Eurohaptics Conference, 2005 and Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems, 2005. World Haptics 2005. First Joint, pages 257 - 262.
Okamura, A., Richard, C., and Cutkosky, M. (2002). Feeling is believing: Using a force-feedback joystick to teach dynamic systems. JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING EDUCATION-WASHINGTON-, 91(3):345-350.
O'Malley, M. and Goldfarb, M. (2004). The effect of virtual surface stiffness on the haptic perception of detail. Mechatronics, IEEE/ASME Transactions on, 9(2):448 -454.
Richard, C. and Cutkosky, M. (2000). The effects of real and computer generated friction on human performance in a targeting task. In Proceedings of the ASME Dynamic Systems and Control Division, volume 69, page 2.
Salisbury, K., Conti, F., and Barbagli, F. (2004). Haptic rendering: Introductory concepts. Computer Graphics and Applications, IEEE, 24(2):24-32.
Weir, D., Colgate, J., and Peshkin, M. (2008). Measuring and increasing z-width with active electrical damping. In Haptic interfaces for virtual environment and teleoperator systems, 2008. haptics 2008. symposium on, pages 169 -175.
Yasrebi, N. and Constantinescu, D. (2008). Extending the z-width of a haptic device using acceleration feedback. Haptics: Perception, Devices and Scenarios, pages 157-162.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesNotice:
The registration is limited to 26 students
There are 4 credit points for this lecture.
The lecture will be held in English.
The students are expected to have basic control knowledge from previous classes.
http://www.relab.ethz.ch/education/courses/phri.html
636-0007-00LComputational Systems Biology Information W6 KP3V + 2UJ. Stelling
KurzbeschreibungStudy of fundamental concepts, models and computational methods for the analysis of complex biological networks. Topics: Systems approaches in biology, biology and reaction network fundamentals, modeling and simulation approaches (topological, probabilistic, stoichiometric, qualitative, linear / nonlinear ODEs, stochastic), and systems analysis (complexity reduction, stability, identification).
LernzielThe aim of this course is to provide an introductory overview of mathematical and computational methods for the modeling, simulation and analysis of biological networks.
InhaltBiology has witnessed an unprecedented increase in experimental data and, correspondingly, an increased need for computational methods to analyze this data. The explosion of sequenced genomes, and subsequently, of bioinformatics methods for the storage, analysis and comparison of genetic sequences provides a prominent example. Recently, however, an additional area of research, captured by the label "Systems Biology", focuses on how networks, which are more than the mere sum of their parts' properties, establish biological functions. This is essentially a task of reverse engineering. The aim of this course is to provide an introductory overview of corresponding computational methods for the modeling, simulation and analysis of biological networks. We will start with an introduction into the basic units, functions and design principles that are relevant for biology at the level of individual cells. Making extensive use of example systems, the course will then focus on methods and algorithms that allow for the investigation of biological networks with increasing detail. These include (i) graph theoretical approaches for revealing large-scale network organization, (ii) probabilistic (Bayesian) network representations, (iii) structural network analysis based on reaction stoichiometries, (iv) qualitative methods for dynamic modeling and simulation (Boolean and piece-wise linear approaches), (v) mechanistic modeling using ordinary differential equations (ODEs) and finally (vi) stochastic simulation methods.
SkriptLink
LiteraturU. Alon, An introduction to systems biology. Chapman & Hall / CRC, 2006.

Z. Szallasi et al. (eds.), System modeling in cellular biology. MIT Press, 2006.
Multidisziplinfächer
» Gesamtes Lehrangebot der Departemente MAVT, ITET und INFK. In Absprache mit dem Tutor.
GESS Wissenschaft im Kontext
» siehe Studiengang GESS Wissenschaft im Kontext: Typ A: Förderung allgemeiner Reflexionsfähigkeiten
» siehe Studiengang GESS Wissenschaft im Kontext: Sprachkurse ETH/UZH
» Empfehlungen aus dem Bereich GESS Wissenschaft im Kontext (Typ B) für das D-MAVT.
Studienarbeit
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
151-1014-00LSemester Project Robotics, Systems and Control Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Only for Robotics, Systems and Control MSc.

The subject of the Semester Project and the choice of the supervisor (ETH-professor) are to be approved in advance by the tutor.
O8 KP17AProfessor/innen
KurzbeschreibungThe semester project is designed to train the students in the solution of specific engineering problems. This makes use of the technical and social skills acquired during the master's program. Tutors propose the subject of the project, elaborate the project plan, and define the roadmap together with their students, as well as monitor the overall execution.
LernzielThe semester project is designed to train the students in the solution of specific engineering problems. This makes use of the technical and social skills acquired during the master's program.
Industrie-Praxis
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
151-1015-00LIndustrial Internship Robotics, Systems and ControlO8 KPexterne Veranstalter
KurzbeschreibungThe main objective of the 12-week internship is to expose master's students to the work environment in an engineering company or in a research lab outside of the ETH domain. During this period, students have the opportunity to be involved in on-going projects at the host institution.
LernzielThe main objective of the 12-week internship is to expose master's students to the work environment in an engineering company or in a research lab outside of the ETH domain.
Master-Arbeit
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
151-1016-00LMaster's Thesis Robotics, Systems and Control Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Students who fulfill the following criteria are allowed to begin with their Master's Thesis:
a. successful completion of the bachelor program;
b. fulfilling of any additional requirements necessary to gain admission to the master programme;
c. successful completion of the semester project;
d. achievement of 28 ECTS in the category "Core Courses".

The Master's Thesis must be approved in advance by the tutor and is supervised by a professor of ETH Zurich or an adjunct faculty of RSC.
To choose a titular professor as a supervisor, please contact the D-MAVT Student Administration.
O30 KP64DProfessor/innen
KurzbeschreibungMaster's programs are concluded by the master's thesis. The thesis is aimed at enhancing the student's capability to work independently toward the solution of a theoretical or applied problem. The subject of the master's thesis, as well as the project plan and roadmap, are proposed by the tutor and further elaborated with the student.
LernzielThe thesis is aimed at enhancing the student's capability to work independently toward the solution of a theoretical or applied problem.