Das Herbstsemester 2020 findet in einer gemischten Form aus Online- und Präsenzunterricht statt.
Bitte lesen Sie die publizierten Informationen zu den einzelnen Lehrveranstaltungen genau.

Suchergebnis: Katalogdaten im Herbstsemester 2018

Data Science Master Information
Kernfächer
Datenanalyse
Information and Learning
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
252-0535-00LAdvanced Machine Learning Information W8 KP3V + 2U + 2AJ. M. Buhmann
KurzbeschreibungMachine learning algorithms provide analytical methods to search data sets for characteristic patterns. Typical tasks include the classification of data, function fitting and clustering, with applications in image and speech analysis, bioinformatics and exploratory data analysis. This course is accompanied by practical machine learning projects.
LernzielStudents will be familiarized with advanced concepts and algorithms for supervised and unsupervised learning; reinforce the statistics knowledge which is indispensible to solve modeling problems under uncertainty. Key concepts are the generalization ability of algorithms and systematic approaches to modeling and regularization. Machine learning projects will provide an opportunity to test the machine learning algorithms on real world data.
InhaltThe theory of fundamental machine learning concepts is presented in the lecture, and illustrated with relevant applications. Students can deepen their understanding by solving both pen-and-paper and programming exercises, where they implement and apply famous algorithms to real-world data.

Topics covered in the lecture include:

Fundamentals:
What is data?
Bayesian Learning
Computational learning theory

Supervised learning:
Ensembles: Bagging and Boosting
Max Margin methods
Neural networks

Unsupservised learning:
Dimensionality reduction techniques
Clustering
Mixture Models
Non-parametric density estimation
Learning Dynamical Systems
SkriptNo lecture notes, but slides will be made available on the course webpage.
LiteraturC. Bishop. Pattern Recognition and Machine Learning. Springer 2007.

R. Duda, P. Hart, and D. Stork. Pattern Classification. John Wiley &
Sons, second edition, 2001.

T. Hastie, R. Tibshirani, and J. Friedman. The Elements of Statistical
Learning: Data Mining, Inference and Prediction. Springer, 2001.

L. Wasserman. All of Statistics: A Concise Course in Statistical
Inference. Springer, 2004.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThe course requires solid basic knowledge in analysis, statistics and numerical methods for CSE as well as practical programming experience for solving assignments.
Students should have followed at least "Introduction to Machine Learning" or an equivalent course offered by another institution.
Statistics
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
401-3621-00LFundamentals of Mathematical Statistics Information W10 KP4V + 1US. van de Geer
KurzbeschreibungThe course covers the basics of inferential statistics.
Lernziel
Datenmanagement und Datenverarbeitung
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
263-3010-00LBig Data Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen W8 KP3V + 2U + 2AG. Fourny
KurzbeschreibungThe key challenge of the information society is to turn data into information, information into knowledge, knowledge into value. This has become increasingly complex. Data comes in larger volumes, diverse shapes, from different sources. Data is more heterogeneous and less structured than forty years ago. Nevertheless, it still needs to be processed fast, with support for complex operations.
LernzielThis combination of requirements, together with the technologies that have emerged in order to address them, is typically referred to as "Big Data." This revolution has led to a completely new way to do business, e.g., develop new products and business models, but also to do science -- which is sometimes referred to as data-driven science or the "fourth paradigm".

Unfortunately, the quantity of data produced and available -- now in the Zettabyte range (that's 21 zeros) per year -- keeps growing faster than our ability to process it. Hence, new architectures and approaches for processing it were and are still needed. Harnessing them must involve a deep understanding of data not only in the large, but also in the small.

The field of databases evolves at a fast pace. In order to be prepared, to the extent possible, to the (r)evolutions that will take place in the next few decades, the emphasis of the lecture will be on the paradigms and core design ideas, while today's technologies will serve as supporting illustrations thereof.

After visiting this lecture, you should have gained an overview and understanding of the Big Data landscape, which is the basis on which one can make informed decisions, i.e., pick and orchestrate the relevant technologies together for addressing each business use case efficiently and consistently.
InhaltThis course gives an overview of database technologies and of the most important database design principles that lay the foundations of the Big Data universe. The material is organized along three axes: data in the large, data in the small, data in the very small. A broad range of aspects is covered with a focus on how they fit all together in the big picture of the Big Data ecosystem.

- physical storage: distributed file systems (HDFS), object storage(S3), key-value stores

- logical storage: document stores (MongoDB), column stores (HBase), graph databases (neo4j), data warehouses (ROLAP)

- data formats and syntaxes (XML, JSON, RDF, Turtle, CSV, XBRL, YAML, protocol buffers, Avro)

- data shapes and models (tables, trees, graphs, cubes)

- type systems and schemas: atomic types, structured types (arrays, maps), set-based type systems (?, *, +)

- an overview of functional, declarative programming languages across data shapes (SQL, XQuery, JSONiq, Cypher, MDX)

- the most important query paradigms (selection, projection, joining, grouping, ordering, windowing)

- paradigms for parallel processing, two-stage (MapReduce) and DAG-based (Spark)

- resource management (YARN)

- what a data center is made of and why it matters (racks, nodes, ...)

- underlying architectures (internal machinery of HDFS, HBase, Spark, neo4j)

- optimization techniques (functional and declarative paradigms, query plans, rewrites, indexing)

- applications.

Large scale analytics and machine learning are outside of the scope of this course.
LiteraturPapers from scientific conferences and journals. References will be given as part of the course material during the semester.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThis course, in the autumn semester, is only intended for:
- Computer Science students
- Data Science students
- CBB students with a Computer Science background

Mobility students in CS are also welcome and encouraged to attend. If you experience any issue while registering, please contact the study administration and you will be gladly added.

Another version of this course will be offered in Spring for students of other departments. However, if you would like to already start learning about databases now, a course worth taking as a preparation/good prequel to the Spring edition of Big Data is the "Information Systems for Engineers" course, offered this Fall for other departments as well, and introducing relational databases and SQL.
263-4500-10LAdvanced Algorithms (with Project) Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Only for Data Science MSc.
W8 KP2V + 2U + 2P + 1AM. Ghaffari, A. Krause
KurzbeschreibungThis is an advanced course on the design and analysis of algorithms, covering a range of topics and techniques not studied in typical introductory courses on algorithms.
LernzielThis course is intended to familiarize students with (some of) the main tools and techniques developed over the last 15-20 years in algorithm design, which are by now among the key ingredients used in developing efficient algorithms.
Inhaltthe lectures will cover a range of topics, including the following: graph sparsifications while preserving cuts or distances, various approximation algorithms techniques and concepts, metric embeddings and probabilistic tree embeddings, online algorithms, multiplicative weight updates, streaming algorithms, sketching algorithms, and a bried glance at MapReduce algorithms.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThis course is designed for masters and doctoral students and it especially targets those interested in theoretical computer science, but it should also be accessible to last-year bachelor students.

Sufficient comfort with both (A) Algorithm Design & Analysis and (B) Probability & Concentrations. E.g., having passed the course Algorithms, Probability, and Computing (APC) is highly recommended, though not required formally. If you are not sure whether you're ready for this class or not, please consulte the instructor.
Wählbare Kernfächer
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
151-0563-01LDynamic Programming and Optimal Control Information W4 KP2V + 1UR. D'Andrea
KurzbeschreibungIntroduction to Dynamic Programming and Optimal Control.
LernzielCovers the fundamental concepts of Dynamic Programming & Optimal Control.
InhaltDynamic Programming Algorithm; Deterministic Systems and Shortest Path Problems; Infinite Horizon Problems, Bellman Equation; Deterministic Continuous-Time Optimal Control.
LiteraturDynamic Programming and Optimal Control by Dimitri P. Bertsekas, Vol. I, 3rd edition, 2005, 558 pages, hardcover.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesRequirements: Knowledge of advanced calculus, introductory probability theory, and matrix-vector algebra.
252-0417-00LRandomized Algorithms and Probabilistic MethodsW8 KP3V + 2U + 2AA. Steger
KurzbeschreibungLas Vegas & Monte Carlo algorithms; inequalities of Markov, Chebyshev, Chernoff; negative correlation; Markov chains: convergence, rapidly mixing; generating functions; Examples include: min cut, median, balls and bins, routing in hypercubes, 3SAT, card shuffling, random walks
LernzielAfter this course students will know fundamental techniques from probabilistic combinatorics for designing randomized algorithms and will be able to apply them to solve typical problems in these areas.
InhaltRandomized Algorithms are algorithms that "flip coins" to take certain decisions. This concept extends the classical model of deterministic algorithms and has become very popular and useful within the last twenty years. In many cases, randomized algorithms are faster, simpler or just more elegant than deterministic ones. In the course, we will discuss basic principles and techniques and derive from them a number of randomized methods for problems in different areas.
SkriptYes.
Literatur- Randomized Algorithms, Rajeev Motwani and Prabhakar Raghavan, Cambridge University Press (1995)
- Probability and Computing, Michael Mitzenmacher and Eli Upfal, Cambridge University Press (2005)
252-1414-00LSystem Security Information W5 KP2V + 2US. Capkun, A. Perrig
KurzbeschreibungThe first part of the lecture covers individual system aspects starting with tamperproof or tamper-resistant hardware in general over operating system related security mechanisms to application software systems, such as host based intrusion detection systems. In the second part, the focus is on system design and methodologies for building secure systems.
LernzielIn this lecture, students learn about the security requirements and capabilities that are expected from modern hardware, operating systems, and other software environments. An overview of available technologies, algorithms and standards is given, with which these requirements can be met.
InhaltThe first part of the lecture covers individual system's aspects starting with tamperproof or tamperresistant hardware in general over operating system related security mechanisms to application software systems such as host based intrusion detetction systems. The main topics covered are: tamper resistant hardware, CPU support for security, protection mechanisms in the kernel, file system security (permissions / ACLs / network filesystem issues), IPC Security, mechanisms in more modern OS, such as Capabilities and Zones, Libraries and Software tools for security assurance, etc.

In the second part, the focus is on system design and methodologies for building secure systems. Topics include: patch management, common software faults (buffer overflows, etc.), writing secure software (design, architecture, QA, testing), compiler-supported security, language-supported security, logging and auditing (BSM audit, dtrace, ...), cryptographic support, and trustworthy computing (TCG, SGX).

Along the lectures, model cases will be elaborated and evaluated in the exercises.
261-5130-00LResearch in Data ScienceW6 KP13AProfessor/innen
KurzbeschreibungIndependent work under the supervision of a core or adjunct faculty of data science.
LernzielIndependent work under the supervision of a core or adjunct faculty of data science.
An approval of the director of studies is required for a non DS professor.
InhaltProject done under supervision of an approved professor.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesOnly students who have passed at least one core course in Data Management and Processing, and one core course in Data Analysis can start with a research project.

A project description must be submitted at the start of the project to the studies administration.
263-0006-00LAlgorithms Lab
Only for master students, otherwise a special permission by the student administration of D-INFK is required.
W8 KP4P + 3AA. Steger, E. Welzl, P. Widmayer
KurzbeschreibungStudents learn how to solve algorithmic problems given by a textual description (understanding problem setting, finding appropriate modeling, choosing suitable algorithms, and implementing them). Knowledge of basic algorithms and data structures is assumed; more advanced material and usage of standard libraries for combinatorial algorithms are introduced in tutorials.
LernzielThe objective of this course is to learn how to solve algorithmic problems given by a textual description. This includes appropriate problem modeling, choice of suitable (combinatorial) algorithms, and implementing them (using C/C++, STL, CGAL, and BGL).
LiteraturT. Cormen, C. Leiserson, R. Rivest: Introduction to Algorithms, MIT Press, 1990.
J. Hromkovic, Teubner: Theoretische Informatik, Springer, 2004 (English: Theoretical Computer Science, Springer 2003).
J. Kleinberg, É. Tardos: Algorithm Design, Addison Wesley, 2006.
H. R. Lewis, C. H. Papadimitriou: Elements of the Theory of Computation, Prentice Hall, 1998.
T. Ottmann, P. Widmayer: Algorithmen und Datenstrukturen, Spektrum, 2012.
R. Sedgewick: Algorithms in C++: Graph Algorithms, Addison-Wesley, 2001.
263-0007-00LAdvanced Systems Lab Information
Only for master students, otherwise a special permission by the student administration of D-INFK is required.
W8 KP4P + 3AG. Alonso
KurzbeschreibungThe goal of this course is to teach students how to evaluate the performance of complex computer and software systems. Accordingly, the methodology to carry out experiments and measurements is studied.
Furthermore, the modelling of systems with the help of queueing network systems is explained.
LernzielThe goal of this course is to teach students how to evaluate the performance of complex computer and software systems.
263-2400-00LReliable and Interpretable Artificial Intelligence Information W4 KP2V + 1UM. Vechev
KurzbeschreibungCreating reliable and explainable probabilistic models is a fundamental challenge to solving the artificial intelligence problem. This course covers some of the latest and most exciting advances that bring us closer to constructing such models.
LernzielThe main objective of this course is to expose students to the latest and most exciting research in the area of explainable and interpretable artificial intelligence, a topic of fundamental and increasing importance. Upon completion of the course, the students should have mastered the underlying methods and be able to apply them to a variety of problems.

To facilitate deeper understanding, an important part of the course will be a group hands-on programming project where students will build a system based on the learned material.
InhaltThe course covers the following inter-connected directions.

Part I: Robust and Explainable Deep Learning
-------------------------------------------------------------

Deep learning technology has made impressive advances in recent years. Despite this progress however, the fundamental challenge with deep learning remains that of understanding what a trained neural network has actually learned, and how stable that solution is. Forr example: is the network stable to slight perturbations of the input (e.g., an image)? How easy it is to fool the network into mis-classifying obvious inputs? Can we guide the network in a manner beyond simple labeled data?

Topics:
- Attacks: Finding adversarial examples via state-of-the-art attacks (e.g., FGSM, PGD attacks).
- Defenses: Automated methods and tools which guarantee robustness of deep nets (e.g., using abstract domains, mixed-integer solvers)
- Combing differentiable logic with gradient-based methods so to train networks to satisfy richer properties.
- Frameworks: AI2, DiffAI, Reluplex, DQL, DeepPoly, etc.

Part II: Program Synthesis/Induction
------------------------------------------------

Synthesis is a new frontier in AI where the computer programs itself via user provided examples. Synthesis has significant applications for non-programmers as well as for programmers where it can provide massive productivity increase (e.g., wrangling for data scientists). Modern synthesis techniques excel at learning functions over discrete spaces from (partial) intent. There have been a number of recent, exciting breakthroughs in techniques that discover complex, interpretable/explainable functions from few examples, partial sketches and other forms of supervision.

Topics:
- Theory of program synthesis: version spaces, counter-example guided inductive synthesis (CEGIS) with SAT/SMT, lower bounds on learning.
- Applications of techniques: synthesis for end users (e.g., spreadsheets) and data analytics.
- Combining synthesis with learning: application to learning from code.
- Frameworks: PHOG, DeepCode.

Part III: Probabilistic Programming
----------------------------------------------

Probabilistic programming is an emerging direction, recently also pushed by various companies (e.g., Facebook, Uber, Google) whose goal is democratize the construction of probabilistic models. In probabilistic programming, the user specifies a model while inference is left to the underlying solver. The idea is that the higher level of abstraction makes it easier to express, understand and reason about probabilistic models.

Topics:

- Probabilistic Inference: sampling based, exact symbolic inference, semantics
- Applications of probabilistic programming: bias in deep learning, differential privacy (connects to Part I).
- Frameworks: PSI, Edward2, Venture.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThe course material is self-contained: needed background is covered in the lectures and exercises, and additional pointers.
263-2800-00LDesign of Parallel and High-Performance Computing Information W7 KP3V + 2U + 1AT. Hoefler, M. Püschel
KurzbeschreibungAdvanced topics in parallel / concurrent programming.
LernzielUnderstand concurrency paradigms and models from a higher perspective and acquire skills for designing, structuring and developing possibly large concurrent software systems. Become able to distinguish parallelism in problem space and in machine space. Become familiar with important technical concepts and with concurrency folklore.
263-3210-00LDeep Learning Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Maximale Teilnehmerzahl: 300
W4 KP2V + 1UF. Perez Cruz
KurzbeschreibungDeep learning is an area within machine learning that deals with algorithms and models that automatically induce multi-level data representations.
LernzielIn recent years, deep learning and deep networks have significantly improved the state-of-the-art in many application domains such as computer vision, speech recognition, and natural language processing. This class will cover the mathematical foundations of deep learning and provide insights into model design, training, and validation. The main objective is a profound understanding of why these methods work and how. There will also be a rich set of hands-on tasks and practical projects to familiarize students with this emerging technology.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThis is an advanced level course that requires some basic background in machine learning. More importantly, students are expected to have a very solid mathematical foundation, including linear algebra, multivariate calculus, and probability. The course will make heavy use of mathematics and is not (!) meant to be an extended tutorial of how to train deep networks with tools like Torch or Tensorflow, although that may be a side benefit.

The participation in the course is subject to the following conditions:
1) The number of participants is limited to 300 students (MSc and PhDs).
2) Students must have taken the exam in Machine Learning (252-0535-00) or have acquired equivalent knowledge, see exhaustive list below:

Machine Learning
https://ml2.inf.ethz.ch/courses/ml/

Computational Intelligence Lab
http://da.inf.ethz.ch/teaching/2018/CIL/

Learning and Intelligent Systems/Introduction to Machine Learning
https://las.inf.ethz.ch/teaching/introml-S18

Statistical Learning Theory
http://ml2.inf.ethz.ch/courses/slt/

Computational Statistics
https://stat.ethz.ch/lectures/ss18/comp-stats.php

Probabilistic Artificial Intelligence
https://las.inf.ethz.ch/teaching/pai-f17

Data Mining: Learning from Large Data Sets
https://las.inf.ethz.ch/teaching/dm-f17
263-5210-00LProbabilistic Artificial Intelligence Information W4 KP2V + 1UA. Krause
KurzbeschreibungThis course introduces core modeling techniques and algorithms from statistics, optimization, planning, and control and study applications in areas such as sensor networks, robotics, and the Internet.
LernzielHow can we build systems that perform well in uncertain environments and unforeseen situations? How can we develop systems that exhibit "intelligent" behavior, without prescribing explicit rules? How can we build systems that learn from experience in order to improve their performance? We will study core modeling techniques and algorithms from statistics, optimization, planning, and control and study applications in areas such as sensor networks, robotics, and the Internet. The course is designed for upper-level undergraduate and graduate students.
InhaltTopics covered:
- Search (BFS, DFS, A*), constraint satisfaction and optimization
- Tutorial in logic (propositional, first-order)
- Probability
- Bayesian Networks (models, exact and approximative inference, learning) - Temporal models (Hidden Markov Models, Dynamic Bayesian Networks)
- Probabilistic palnning (MDPs, POMPDPs)
- Reinforcement learning
- Combining logic and probability
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesSolid basic knowledge in statistics, algorithms and programming
263-5902-00LComputer Vision Information W6 KP3V + 1U + 1AM. Pollefeys, V. Ferrari, L. Van Gool
KurzbeschreibungThe goal of this course is to provide students with a good understanding of computer vision and image analysis techniques. The main concepts and techniques will be studied in depth and practical algorithms and approaches will be discussed and explored through the exercises.
LernzielThe objectives of this course are:
1. To introduce the fundamental problems of computer vision.
2. To introduce the main concepts and techniques used to solve those.
3. To enable participants to implement solutions for reasonably complex problems.
4. To enable participants to make sense of the computer vision literature.
InhaltCamera models and calibration, invariant features, Multiple-view geometry, Model fitting, Stereo Matching, Segmentation, 2D Shape matching, Shape from Silhouettes, Optical flow, Structure from motion, Tracking, Object recognition, Object category recognition
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesIt is recommended that students have taken the Visual Computing lecture or a similar course introducing basic image processing concepts before taking this course.
401-0625-01LApplied Analysis of Variance and Experimental Design Information W5 KP2V + 1UL. Meier
KurzbeschreibungPrinciples of experimental design, one-way analysis of variance, contrasts and multiple comparisons, multi-factor designs and analysis of variance, complete block designs, Latin square designs, random effects and mixed effects models, split-plot designs, incomplete block designs, two-series factorials and fractional designs, power.
LernzielParticipants will be able to plan and analyze efficient experiments in the fields of natural sciences. They will gain practical experience by using the software R.
InhaltPrinciples of experimental design, one-way analysis of variance, contrasts and multiple comparisons, multi-factor designs and analysis of variance, complete block designs, Latin square designs, random effects and mixed effects models, split-plot designs, incomplete block designs, two-series factorials and fractional designs, power.
LiteraturG. Oehlert: A First Course in Design and Analysis of Experiments, W.H. Freeman and Company, New York, 2000.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThe exercises, but also the classes will be based on procedures from the freely available, open-source statistical software R, for which an introduction will be held.
401-3054-14LProbabilistic Methods in Combinatorics Information W6 KP2V + 1UB. Sudakov
KurzbeschreibungThis course provides a gentle introduction to the Probabilistic Method, with an emphasis on methodology. We will try to illustrate the main ideas by showing the application of probabilistic reasoning to various combinatorial problems.
Lernziel
InhaltThe topics covered in the class will include (but are not limited to): linearity of expectation, the second moment method, the local lemma, correlation inequalities, martingales, large deviation inequalities, Janson and Talagrand inequalities and pseudo-randomness.
Literatur- The Probabilistic Method, by N. Alon and J. H. Spencer, 3rd Edition, Wiley, 2008.
- Random Graphs, by B. Bollobás, 2nd Edition, Cambridge University Press, 2001.
- Random Graphs, by S. Janson, T. Luczak and A. Rucinski, Wiley, 2000.
- Graph Coloring and the Probabilistic Method, by M. Molloy and B. Reed, Springer, 2002.
401-3601-00LProbability Theory Information
Höchstens eines der drei Bachelor-Kernfächer
401-3461-00L Funktionalanalysis I / Functional Analysis I
401-3531-00L Differentialgeometrie I / Differential Geometry I
401-3601-00L Wahrscheinlichkeitstheorie / Probability Theory
ist im Master-Studiengang Mathematik anrechenbar.
W10 KP4V + 1UA.‑S. Sznitman
KurzbeschreibungBasics of probability theory and the theory of stochastic processes in discrete time
LernzielThis course presents the basics of probability theory and the theory of stochastic processes in discrete time. The following topics are planned:
Basics in measure theory, random series, law of large numbers, weak convergence, characteristic functions, central limit theorem, conditional expectation, martingales, convergence theorems for martingales, Galton Watson chain, transition probability, Theorem of Ionescu Tulcea, Markov chains.
InhaltThis course presents the basics of probability theory and the theory of stochastic processes in discrete time. The following topics are planned:
Basics in measure theory, random series, law of large numbers, weak convergence, characteristic functions, central limit theorem, conditional expectation, martingales, convergence theorems for martingales, Galton Watson chain, transition probability, Theorem of Ionescu Tulcea, Markov chains.
Skriptavailable, will be sold in the course
LiteraturR. Durrett, Probability: Theory and examples, Duxbury Press 1996
H. Bauer, Probability Theory, de Gruyter 1996
J. Jacod and P. Protter, Probability essentials, Springer 2004
A. Klenke, Wahrscheinlichkeitstheorie, Springer 2006
D. Williams, Probability with martingales, Cambridge University Press 1991
401-3612-00LStochastic SimulationW5 KP3GF. Sigrist
KurzbeschreibungThis course provides an introduction to statistical Monte Carlo methods. This includes applications of simulations in various fields (Bayesian statistics, statistical mechanics, operations research, financial mathematics), algorithms for the generation of random variables (accept-reject, importance sampling), estimating the precision, variance reduction, introduction to Markov chain Monte Carlo.
LernzielStochastic simulation (also called Monte Carlo method) is the experimental analysis of a stochastic model by implementing it on a computer. Probabilities and expected values can be approximated by averaging simulated values, and the central limit theorem gives an estimate of the error of this approximation. The course shows examples of the many applications of stochastic simulation and explains different algorithms used for simulation. These algorithms are illustrated with the statistical software R.
InhaltExamples of simulations in different fields (computer science, statistics, statistical mechanics, operations research, financial mathematics). Generation of uniform random variables. Generation of random variables with arbitrary distributions (quantile transform, accept-reject, importance sampling), simulation of Gaussian processes and diffusions. The precision of simulations, methods for variance reduction. Introduction to Markov chains and Markov chain Monte Carlo (Metropolis-Hastings, Gibbs sampler, Hamiltonian Monte Carlo, reversible jump MCMC).
SkriptA script will be available in English.
LiteraturP. Glasserman, Monte Carlo Methods in Financial Engineering.
Springer 2004.

B. D. Ripley. Stochastic Simulation. Wiley, 1987.

Ch. Robert, G. Casella. Monte Carlo Statistical Methods.
Springer 2004 (2nd edition).
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesFamiliarity with basic concepts of probability theory (random variables, joint and conditional distributions, laws of large numbers and central limit theorem) will be assumed.
401-3627-00LHigh-Dimensional Statistics
Findet dieses Semester nicht statt.
W4 KP2VP. L. Bühlmann
Kurzbeschreibung"High-Dimensional Statistics" deals with modern methods and theory for statistical inference when the number of unknown parameters is of much larger order than sample size. Statistical estimation and algorithms for complex models and aspects of multiple testing will be discussed.
LernzielKnowledge of methods and basic theory for high-dimensional statistical inference
InhaltLasso and Group Lasso for high-dimensional linear and generalized linear models; Additive models and many smooth univariate functions; Non-convex loss functions and l1-regularization; Stability selection, multiple testing and construction of p-values; Undirected graphical modeling
LiteraturPeter Bühlmann and Sara van de Geer (2011). Statistics for High-Dimensional Data: Methods, Theory and Applications. Springer Verlag.
ISBN 978-3-642-20191-2.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesKnowledge of basic concepts in probability theory, and intermediate knowledge of statistics (e.g. a course in linear models or computational statistics).
401-3901-00LMathematical Optimization Information W11 KP4V + 2UR. Weismantel
KurzbeschreibungMathematical treatment of diverse optimization techniques.
LernzielAdvanced optimization theory and algorithms.
Inhalt1) Linear optimization: The geometry of linear programming, the simplex method for solving linear programming problems, Farkas' Lemma and infeasibility certificates, duality theory of linear programming.

2) Nonlinear optimization: Lagrange relaxation techniques, Newton method and gradient schemes for convex optimization.

3) Integer optimization: Ties between linear and integer optimization, total unimodularity, complexity theory, cutting plane theory.

4) Combinatorial optimization: Network flow problems, structural results and algorithms for matroids, matchings, and, more generally, independence systems.
Literatur1) D. Bertsimas & R. Weismantel, "Optimization over Integers". Dynamic Ideas, 2005.

2) A. Schrijver, "Theory of Linear and Integer Programming". John Wiley, 1986.

3) D. Bertsimas & J.N. Tsitsiklis, "Introduction to Linear Optimization". Athena Scientific, 1997.

4) Y. Nesterov, "Introductory Lectures on Convex Optimization: a Basic Course". Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2003.

5) C.H. Papadimitriou, "Combinatorial Optimization". Prentice-Hall Inc., 1982.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesLinear algebra.
401-4619-67LAdvanced Topics in Computational Statistics
Findet dieses Semester nicht statt.
W4 KP2VN. Meinshausen
KurzbeschreibungThis lecture covers selected advanced topics in computational statistics. This year the focus will be on graphical modelling.
LernzielStudents learn the theoretical foundations of the selected methods, as well as practical skills to apply these methods and to interpret their outcomes.
InhaltThe main focus will be on graphical models in various forms:
Markov properties of undirected graphs; Belief propagation; Hidden Markov Models; Structure estimation and parameter estimation; inference for high-dimensional data; causal graphical models
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesWe assume a solid background in mathematics, an introductory lecture in probability and statistics, and at least one more advanced course in statistics.
401-4623-00LTime Series AnalysisW6 KP3GN. Meinshausen
KurzbeschreibungStatistical analysis and modeling of observations in temporal order, which exhibit dependence. Stationarity, trend estimation, seasonal decomposition, autocorrelations,
spectral and wavelet analysis, ARIMA-, GARCH- and state space models. Implementations in the software R.
LernzielUnderstanding of the basic models and techniques used in time series analysis and their implementation in the statistical software R.
InhaltThis course deals with modeling and analysis of variables which change randomly in time. Their essential feature is the dependence between successive observations.
Applications occur in geophysics, engineering, economics and finance. Topics covered: Stationarity, trend estimation, seasonal decomposition, autocorrelations,
spectral and wavelet analysis, ARIMA-, GARCH- and state space models. The models and techniques are illustrated using the statistical software R.
SkriptNot available
LiteraturA list of references will be distributed during the course.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesBasic knowledge in probability and statistics
227-0101-00LDiscrete-Time and Statistical Signal ProcessingW6 KP4GH.‑A. Loeliger
KurzbeschreibungThe course introduces some fundamental topics of digital signal processing with a bias towards applications in communications: discrete-time linear filters, inverse filters and equalization, DFT, discrete-time stochastic processes, elements of detection theory and estimation theory, LMMSE estimation and LMMSE filtering, LMS algorithm, Viterbi algorithm.
LernzielThe course introduces some fundamental topics of digital signal processing with a bias towards applications in communications. The two main themes are linearity and probability. In the first part of the course, we deepen our understanding of discrete-time linear filters. In the second part of the course, we review the basics of probability theory and discrete-time stochastic processes. We then discuss some basic concepts of detection theory and estimation theory, as well as some practical methods including LMMSE estimation and LMMSE filtering, the LMS algorithm, and the Viterbi algorithm. A recurrent theme throughout the course is the stable and robust "inversion" of a linear filter.
Inhalt1. Discrete-time linear systems and filters:
state-space realizations, z-transform and spectrum,
decimation and interpolation, digital filter design,
stable realizations and robust inversion.

2. The discrete Fourier transform and its use for digital filtering.

3. The statistical perspective:
probability, random variables, discrete-time stochastic processes;
detection and estimation: MAP, ML, Bayesian MMSE, LMMSE;
Wiener filter, LMS adaptive filter, Viterbi algorithm.
SkriptLecture Notes
227-0417-00LInformation Theory IW6 KP4GA. Lapidoth
KurzbeschreibungThis course covers the basic concepts of information theory and of communication theory. Topics covered include the entropy rate of a source, mutual information, typical sequences, the asymptotic equi-partition property, Huffman coding, channel capacity, the channel coding theorem, the source-channel separation theorem, and feedback capacity.
LernzielThe fundamentals of Information Theory including Shannon's source coding and channel coding theorems
InhaltThe entropy rate of a source, Typical sequences, the asymptotic equi-partition property, the source coding theorem, Huffman coding, Arithmetic coding, channel capacity, the channel coding theorem, the source-channel separation theorem, feedback capacity
LiteraturT.M. Cover and J. Thomas, Elements of Information Theory (second edition)
227-0427-00LSignal Analysis, Models, and Machine LearningW6 KP4GH.‑A. Loeliger
KurzbeschreibungMathematical methods in signal processing and machine learning.
I. Linear signal representation and approximation: Hilbert spaces, LMMSE estimation, regularization and sparsity.
II. Learning linear and nonlinear functions and filters: neural networks, kernel methods.
III. Structured statistical models: hidden Markov models, factor graphs, Kalman filter, Gaussian models with sparse events.
LernzielThe course is an introduction to some basic topics in signal processing and machine learning.
InhaltPart I - Linear Signal Representation and Approximation: Hilbert spaces, least squares and LMMSE estimation, projection and estimation by linear filtering, learning linear functions and filters, L2 regularization, L1 regularization and sparsity, singular-value decomposition and pseudo-inverse, principal-components analysis.
Part II - Learning Nonlinear Functions: fundamentals of learning, neural networks, kernel methods.
Part III - Structured Statistical Models and Message Passing Algorithms: hidden Markov models, factor graphs, Gaussian message passing, Kalman filter and recursive least squares, Monte Carlo methods, parameter estimation, expectation maximization, linear Gaussian models with sparse events.
SkriptLecture notes.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesPrerequisites:
- local bachelors: course "Discrete-Time and Statistical Signal Processing" (5. Sem.)
- others: solid basics in linear algebra and probability theory
227-0689-00LSystem IdentificationW4 KP2V + 1UR. Smith
KurzbeschreibungTheory and techniques for the identification of dynamic models from experimentally obtained system input-output data.
LernzielTo provide a series of practical techniques for the development of dynamical models from experimental data, with the emphasis being on the development of models suitable for feedback control design purposes. To provide sufficient theory to enable the practitioner to understand the trade-offs between model accuracy, data quality and data quantity.
InhaltIntroduction to modeling: Black-box and grey-box models; Parametric and non-parametric models; ARX, ARMAX (etc.) models.

Predictive, open-loop, black-box identification methods. Time and frequency domain methods. Subspace identification methods.

Optimal experimental design, Cramer-Rao bounds, input signal design.

Parametric identification methods. On-line and batch approaches.

Closed-loop identification strategies. Trade-off between controller performance and information available for identification.
Literatur"System Identification; Theory for the User" Lennart Ljung, Prentice Hall (2nd Ed), 1999.

"Dynamic system identification: Experimental design and data analysis", GC Goodwin and RL Payne, Academic Press, 1977.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesControl systems (227-0216-00L) or equivalent.
Interdisziplinäre Wahlfächer
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
227-1033-00LNeuromorphic Engineering I Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Registration in this class requires the permission of the instructors. Class size will be limited to available lab spots.
Preference is given to students that require this class as part of their major.
W6 KP2V + 3UT. Delbrück, G. Indiveri, S.‑C. Liu
KurzbeschreibungThis course covers analog circuits with emphasis on neuromorphic engineering: MOS transistors in CMOS technology, static circuits, dynamic circuits, systems (silicon neuron, silicon retina, silicon cochlea) with an introduction to multi-chip systems. The lectures are accompanied by weekly laboratory sessions.
LernzielUnderstanding of the characteristics of neuromorphic circuit elements.
InhaltNeuromorphic circuits are inspired by the organizing principles of biological neural circuits. Their computational primitives are based on physics of semiconductor devices. Neuromorphic architectures often rely on collective computation in parallel networks. Adaptation, learning and memory are implemented locally within the individual computational elements. Transistors are often operated in weak inversion (below threshold), where they exhibit exponential I-V characteristics and low currents. These properties lead to the feasibility of high-density, low-power implementations of functions that are computationally intensive in other paradigms. Application domains of neuromorphic circuits include silicon retinas and cochleas for machine vision and audition, real-time emulations of networks of biological neurons, and the development of autonomous robotic systems. This course covers devices in CMOS technology (MOS transistor below and above threshold, floating-gate MOS transistor, phototransducers), static circuits (differential pair, current mirror, transconductance amplifiers, etc.), dynamic circuits (linear and nonlinear filters, adaptive circuits), systems (silicon neuron, silicon retina and cochlea) and an introduction to multi-chip systems that communicate events analogous to spikes. The lectures are accompanied by weekly laboratory sessions on the characterization of neuromorphic circuits, from elementary devices to systems.
LiteraturS.-C. Liu et al.: Analog VLSI Circuits and Principles; various publications.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesParticular: The course is highly recommended for those who intend to take the spring semester course 'Neuromorphic Engineering II', that teaches the conception, simulation, and physical layout of such circuits with chip design tools.

Prerequisites: Background in basics of semiconductor physics helpful, but not required.
227-0945-00LCell and Molecular Biology for Engineers I
This course is part I of a two-semester course.
W3 KP2GC. Frei
KurzbeschreibungThe course gives an introduction into cellular and molecular biology, specifically for students with a background in engineering. The focus will be on the basic organization of eukaryotic cells, molecular mechanisms and cellular functions. Textbook knowledge will be combined with results from recent research and technological innovations in biology.
LernzielAfter completing this course, engineering students will be able to apply their previous training in the quantitative and physical sciences to modern biology. Students will also learn the principles how biological models are established, and how these models can be tested.
InhaltLectures will include the following topics (part I and II): DNA, chromosomes, RNA, protein, genetics, gene expression, membrane structure and function, vesicular traffic, cellular communication, energy conversion, cytoskeleton, cell cycle, cellular growth, apoptosis, autophagy, cancer, development and stem cells.

In addition, 4 journal clubs will be held, where recent publications will be discussed (2 journal clubs in part I and 2 journal clubs in part II). For each journal club, students (alone or in groups of up to three students) have to write a summary and discussion of the publication. These written documents will be graded and count as 40% for the final grade.
SkriptScripts of all lectures will be available.
Literatur"Molecular Biology of the Cell" (6th edition) by Alberts, Johnson, Lewis, Raff, Roberts, and Walter.
261-5100-00LComputational Biomedicine Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to 60.
W4 KP2V + 1UG. Rätsch
KurzbeschreibungThe course critically reviews central problems in Biomedicine and discusses the technical foundations and solutions for these problems.
LernzielOver the past years, rapid technological advancements have transformed classical disciplines such as biology and medicine into fields of apllied data science. While the sheer amount of the collected data often makes computational approaches inevitable for analysis, it is the domain specific structure and close relation to research and clinic, that call for accurate, robust and efficient algorithms. In this course we will critically review central problems in Biomedicine and will discuss the technical foundations and solutions for these problems.
InhaltThe course will consist of three topic clusters that will cover different aspects of data science problems in Biomedicine:
1) String algorithms for the efficient representation, search, comparison, composition and compression of large sets of strings, mostly originating from DNA or RNA Sequencing. This includes genome assembly, efficient index data structures for strings and graphs, alignment techniques as well as quantitative approaches.
2) Statistical models and algorithms for the assessment and functional analysis of individual genomic variations. this includes the identification of variants, prediction of functional effects, imputation and integration problems as well as the association with clinical phenotypes.
3) Models for organization and representation of large scale biomedical data. This includes ontolgy concepts, biomedical databases, sequence annotation and data compression.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesData Structures & Algorithms, Introduction to Machine Learning, Statistics/Probability, Programming in Python, Unix Command Line
261-5112-00LAdvanced Approaches for Population Scale Compressive Genomics
Number of participants limited to 30.
W3 KP2GA. Kahles
KurzbeschreibungResearch in Biology and Medicine have been transformed into disciplines of applied data science over the past years. Not only size and inherentcomplexity of the data but also requirements on data privacy and complexity of search and access pose a wealth of new research questions.
LernzielThis interactive course will explore the latest research on algorithms and data structures for population scale genomics applications and give insights into both the technical basis as well as the domain questions motivating it.
InhaltOver the duration of the semester, the course will cover three main topics. Each of the topics will consist of 70-80% lecture content and 20-30% seminar content.
1) Algorithms and data structures for text and graph compression. Motivated through applications in compressive genomics, the course will cover succinct indexing schemes for strings, trees and general graphs, compression schemes for binary matrices as well as the efficient representation of haplotypes and genomic variants.
2) Stochastic data structures and algorithms for approximate representation of strings and graphs as well as sets in general. This includes winnowing schemes and minimizers, sketching techniques, (minimal perfect) hashing and approximate membership query data structures.
3) Data structures supporting encryption and data privacy. As an extension to data structures discussed in the earlier topics, this will include secure indexing using homomorphic encryption as well as design for secure storage and distribution of data.
636-0017-00LComputational Biology Information W6 KP3G + 2AT. Stadler, C. Magnus, T. Vaughan
KurzbeschreibungThe aim of the course is to provide up-to-date knowledge on how we can study biological processes using genetic sequencing data. Computational algorithms extracting biological information from genetic sequence data are discussed, and statistical tools to understand this information in detail are introduced.
LernzielAttendees will learn which information is contained in genetic sequencing data and how to extract information from this data using computational tools. The main concepts introduced are:
* stochastic models in molecular evolution
* phylogenetic & phylodynamic inference
* maximum likelihood and Bayesian statistics
Attendees will apply these concepts to a number of applications yielding biological insight into:
* epidemiology
* pathogen evolution
* macroevolution of species
InhaltThe course consists of four parts. We first introduce modern genetic sequencing technology, and algorithms to obtain sequence alignments from the output of the sequencers. We then present methods for direct alignment analysis using approaches such as BLAST and GWAS. Second, we introduce mechanisms and concepts of molecular evolution, i.e. we discuss how genetic sequences change over time. Third, we employ evolutionary concepts to infer ancestral relationships between organisms based on their genetic sequences, i.e. we discuss methods to infer genealogies and phylogenies. Lastly, we introduce the field of phylodynamics, the aim of which is to understand and quantify population dynamic processes (such as transmission in epidemiology or speciation & extinction in macroevolution) based on a phylogeny. Throughout the class, the models and methods are illustrated on different datasets giving insight into the epidemiology and evolution of a range of infectious diseases (e.g. HIV, HCV, influenza, Ebola). Applications of the methods to the field of macroevolution provide insight into the evolution and ecology of different species clades. Students will be trained in the algorithms and their application both on paper and in silico as part of the exercises.
SkriptLecture slides will be available on moodle.
LiteraturThe course is not based on any of the textbooks below, but they are excellent choices as accompanying material:
* Yang, Z. 2006. Computational Molecular Evolution.
* Felsenstein, J. 2004. Inferring Phylogenies.
* Semple, C. & Steel, M. 2003. Phylogenetics.
* Drummond, A. & Bouckaert, R. 2015. Bayesian evolutionary analysis with BEAST.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesBasic knowledge in linear algebra, analysis, and statistics will be helpful. Programming in R will be required for the project work (compulsory continuous performance assessments). We provide an R tutorial and help sessions during the first two weeks of class to learn the required skills. However, in case you do not have any previous experience with R, we strongly recommend to get familiar with R prior to the semester start. For the D-BSSE students, we highly recommend the voluntary course „Introduction to Programming“, which takes place at D-BSSE from Wednesday, September 12 to Friday, September 14, i.e. BEFORE the official semester starting date http://www.cbb.ethz.ch/news-events.html
For the Zurich-based students without R experience, we recommend the R course Link, or working through the script provided as part of this R course.
701-0023-00LAtmosphäre Information W3 KP2VE. M. Fischer, T. Peter
KurzbeschreibungGrundlagen der Atmosphäre, physikalischer Aufbau und chemische Zusammensetzung, Spurengase, Kreisläufe in der Atmosphäre, Zirkulation, Stabilität, Strahlung, Kondensation, Wolken, Oxidationspotential und Ozonschicht.
LernzielVerständnis grundlegender physikalischer und chemischer Prozesse in der Atmosphäre. Kenntnis über die Mechanismen und Zusammenhänge von: Wetter - Klima, Atmosphäre - Ozeane - Kontinente, Troposphäre - Stratosphäre. Verständnis von umweltrelevanten Strukturen und Vorgängen in sehr unterschiedlichem Massstab. Grundlagen für eine modellmässige Darstellung komplexer Zusammenhänge in der Atmosphäre.
InhaltGrundlagen der Atmosphäre, physikalischer Aufbau und chemische Zusammensetzung, Spurengase, Kreisläufe in der Atmosphäre, Zirkulation, Stabilität, Strahlung, Kondensation, Wolken, Oxidationspotential und Ozonschicht.
SkriptSchriftliche Unterlagen werden abgegeben.
Literatur- John H. Seinfeld and Spyros N. Pandis, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics: From Air Pollution to Climate Change, Wiley, New York, 1998.
- Gösta H. Liljequist, Allgemeine Meteorologie, Vieweg, Braunschweig, 1974.
701-0473-00LWettersysteme Information W3 KP2GM. A. Sprenger, F. Scholder-Aemisegger
KurzbeschreibungSatellitenbeobachtungen; Analyse vertikaler Sondierungen; Geostrophischer und thermischer Wind; Tiefdruckwirbel in den mittleren Breiten; globalen Zirkulation; Nordatlantische Oszillation; Atmosphärische Blockierungswetterlagen; Eulersche und Lagrange Perspektive der Dynamik;
Potentielle Vortizität; Alpine Dynamik (Windstürme, Um- und Überströmung von Gebirgen); Planetare Grenzschicht
LernzielDie Studierenden können:
- die gängigen Mess- und Analysemethoden der Atmosphärendynamik erklären
- mathematische Grundlagen der Atmosphärendynamik beispielhaft erklären
- die Dynamik von globalen und synoptisch-skaligen Prozessen erklären
- den Einfluss von Gebirgen auf die Atmosphärendynamik erklären
InhaltSatellitenbeobachtungen; Analyse vertikaler Sondierungen; Geostrophischer und thermischer Wind; Tiefdruckwirbel in den mittleren Breiten; Überblick und Energetik der globalen Zirkulation; Nordatlantische Oszillation; Atmosphärische Blockierungswetterlagen; Eulersche und Lagrange Perspektive der Dynamik;
Potentielle Vortizität; Alpine Dynamik (Windstürme, Um- und Überströmung von Gebirgen); Planetare Grenzschicht
SkriptVorlesungsskript + Folien
LiteraturAtmospheric Science, An Introductory Survey
John M. Wallace and Peter V. Hobbs, Academic Press
701-1251-00LLand-Climate Dynamics Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to 36.
W3 KP2GS. I. Seneviratne, E. L. Davin
KurzbeschreibungThe purpose of this course is to provide fundamental background on the role of land surface processes (vegetation, soil moisture dynamics, land energy and water balances) in the climate system. The course consists of 2 contact hours per week, including lectures, group projects and computer exercises.
LernzielThe students can understand the role of land processes and associated feedbacks in the climate system.
SkriptPowerpoint slides will be made available
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesPrerequisites: Introductory lectures in atmospheric and climate science
Atmospheric physics -> Link
and/or
Climate systems -> Link
101-0417-00LTransport Planning MethodsW6 KP4GK. W. Axhausen
KurzbeschreibungThe course provides the necessary knowledge to develop models supporting and also evaluating the solution of given planning problems.
The course is composed of a lecture part, providing the theoretical knowledge, and an applied part in which students develop their own models in order to evaluate a transport project/ policy by means of cost-benefit analysis.
Lernziel- Knowledge and understanding of statistical methods and algorithms commonly used in transport planning
- Comprehend the reasoning and capabilities of transport models
- Ability to independently develop a transport model able to solve / answer planning problem
- Getting familiar with cost-benefit analysis as a decision-making supporting tool
InhaltThe course provides the necessary knowledge to develop models supporting the solution of given planning problems and also introduces cost-benefit analysis as a decision-making tool. Examples of such planning problems are the estimation of traffic volumes, prediction of estimated utilization of new public transport lines, and evaluation of effects (e.g. change in emissions of a city) triggered by building new infrastructure and changes to operational regulations.

To cope with that, the problem is divided into sub-problems, which are solved using various statistical models (e.g. regression, discrete choice analysis) and algorithms (e.g. iterative proportional fitting, shortest path algorithms, method of successive averages).

The course is composed of a lecture part, providing the theoretical knowledge, and an applied part in which students develop their own models in order to evaluate a transport project/ policy by means of cost-benefit analysis. Interim lab session take place regularly to guide and support students with the applied part of the course.
SkriptMoodle platform (enrollment needed)
LiteraturWillumsen, P. and J. de D. Ortuzar (2003) Modelling Transport, Wiley, Chichester.

Cascetta, E. (2001) Transportation Systems Engineering: Theory and Methods, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht.

Sheffi, Y. (1985) Urban Transportation Networks: Equilibrium Analysis with Mathematical Programming Methods, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs.

Schnabel, W. and D. Lohse (1997) Verkehrsplanung, 2. edn., vol. 2 of Grundlagen der Strassenverkehrstechnik und der Verkehrsplanung, Verlag für Bauwesen, Berlin.

McCarthy, P.S. (2001) Transportation Economics: A case study approach, Blackwell, Oxford.
101-0491-00LAgent Based Modeling in TransportationW6 KP4GT. J. P. Dubernet, M. Balac
KurzbeschreibungThis lectures provides a round tour of agent based models for transportation policy analysis. First, it introduces statistical methods to combine heterogeneous data sources in a usable representation of the population. Then, agent based models are described in details, and applied in a case study.
LernzielAt the end of the course, the students should:
- be aware of the various data sources available for mobility behavior analysis
- be able to combine those data sources in a coherent representation of the transportation demand
- understand what agent based models are, when they are useful, and when they are not
- have working knowledge of the MATSim software, and be able to independently evaluate a transportation problem using it
InhaltThis lecture provides a complete introduction to agent based models for transportation policy analysis. Two important topics are covered:

1) Combination of heterogeneous data sources to produce a representation of the transport system

At the center of agent based models and other transport analyses is the synthetic population, a statistically realistic representation of the population and their transport needs.
This part will present the most common types of data sources and statistical methods to generate such a population.

2) Use of Agent-Based methods to evaluate transport policies

The second part will introduce the agent based paradigm in details, including tradeoffs compared to state-of-practice methods.

An important part of the grade will come from a policy analysis to carry with the MATSim open-source software, which is developed at ETH Zurich and TU Berlin and gets used more and more by practitioners, notably the Swiss rail operator SBB.
LiteraturAgent-based modeling in general
Helbing, D (2012) Social Self-Organization, Understanding Complex Systems, Springer, Berlin.
Heppenstall, A., A. T. Crooks, L. M. See and M. Batty (2012) Agent-Based Models of Geographical Systems, Springer, Dordrecht.

MATSim

Horni, A., K. Nagel and K.W. Axhausen (eds.) (2016) The Multi-Agent Transport Simulation MATSim, Ubiquity, London
(http://www.matsim.org/the-book)

Additional relevant readings, mostly scientific articles, will be recommended throughout the course.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThere are no strict preconditions in terms of which lectures the students should have previously attended. However, knowledge of basic statistical theory is expected, and experience with high-level programming languages (Java, R, Python...) is useful.
103-0227-00LCartography III Information W5 KP4GL. Hurni
KurzbeschreibungGrundlegende Methoden, Technologien, Systeme und Programmierung in der interaktiven Internet-Kartografie.
LernzielKenntnisse über die grundlegenden Methoden, Technologien, Programmierung und Systeme in der interaktiven Internet-Kartografie erwerben. Bestehende Produkte bezüglich der angewendeten Produktionsmethoden beurteilen können und sinnvolle Methoden für konkrete Web-basierte Kartenprojekte bestimmen können.
Inhalt- Web-Kartografie
- Web Map Services (WMS)
- Nutzerschnittstellen-Gestaltung
- Symbolisierung von Internet-Karten
- Programmierung
- JavaScript
- Debugging
- Kartenerstellung mit GIS-Daten
- 3D-Anwendungen in der Kartografie
SkriptEin eigenes Skript zur Vorlesung und Übungsanleitungen werden abgegeben.
Literatur- Grünreich, Dietmar, Hake, Günter and Liqiu Meng (2002): Kartographie, 8. Auflage, Verlag W. de Gruyter, Berlin
- Robinson, Arthur et al. (1995): Elements of Cartography, 6th edition, John Wiley & Sons, New York, ISBN 0-471-55579-7
- Jones, Christopher (1997): Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and Computer Cartography, Longman, Harlow, ISBN 0-582-04439-1
- Stoll, Heinz (2001): Computergestützte Kartografie, SGK-Publikation Nr. 15 (siehe www.kartographie.ch)
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesVoraussetzungen: Kartografie I; Kartografie II; Thematische Kartografie
Weitere Informationen unter http://www.karto.ethz.ch/studium/lehrangebot.html
103-0237-00LGIS IIIW5 KP3GM. Raubal
KurzbeschreibungThe course deals with advanced topics in GIS: GIS project lifecycle, Managing GIS, Legal issues, GIS assets & constraints; Geospatial Web Services; Geostatistics; Geosimulation; Human-Computer Interaction; Cognitive Issues in GIS.
LernzielStudents will get a detailed overview of advanced GIS topics. They will go through all steps of setting up a Web-GIS application in the labs and perform other practical tasks relating to Geosimulation, Human-Computer Interaction, Geostatistics, and Web Processing Services.
SkriptLecture slides will be made available in digital form.
LiteraturFu, P. and Sun, J., Web GIS - Principles and Applications (2011), ESRI Press, Redlands, California.
O'Sullivan, D., & Unwin, D. (2010). Geographic Information Analysis (second ed.). Hoboken, New Jersey: Wiley.
103-0778-00LGIS and Geoinformatics LabW4 KP4PM. Raubal
KurzbeschreibungIndependent study project with (mobile) geoinformation technologies.
LernzielLearn how to work with (mobile) geoinformation technologies (including application design and programming).
227-0575-00LAdvanced Topics in Communication Networks (Autumn 2018) Information W6 KP2V + 2UL. Vanbever
KurzbeschreibungThis class will introduce students to advanced, research-level topics in the area of communication networks, both theoretically and practically. Coverage will vary from semester to semester. Repetition for credit is possible, upon consent of the instructor. During the Fall Semester of 2018, the class will concentrate on network programmability and network data plane programming.
LernzielThe goal of this lecture is to introduce students to the latest advances in the area of computer networks, both theoretically and practically. The course will be divided in two main blocks. The first block (~7 weeks) will interleave classical lectures with practical exercises and paper readings. The second block (~6 weeks) will consist of a practical project involving real network hardware and which will be performed in small groups (~3 students). During the second block, lecture slots will be replaced by feedback sessions where students will be able to ask questions and get feedback about their project. The last week of the semester will be dedicated to student presentations and demonstrations.

During the Fall Semester 2018, the class will focus on programmable network data planes and will involve developing network applications on top of the the latest generation of programmable network hardware: Barefoot Network’s Tofino switch ASICs. By leveraging data-plane programmability, these applications can build deep traffic insights to, for instance, detect traffic anomalies (e.g. using Machine Learning), flexibly adapt forwarding behaviors (to improve performance), speed-up distributed applications (e.g. Map Reduce), or track network-wide health. More importantly, all this can now be done at line-rate, at forwarding speeds that can reach Terabits per second.
InhaltTraditionally, computer networks have been composed of "closed" network devices (routers, switches, middleboxes) whose features, forwarding behaviors and configuration interfaces are exclusively defined on a per-vendor basis. Innovating in such networks is a slow-paced process (if at all possible): it often takes years for new features to make it to mainstream network equipments. Worse yet, managing the network is hard and prone to failures as operators have to painstakingly coordinate the behavior of heterogeneous network devices so that they, collectively, compute a compatible forwarding state. Actually, it has been shown that the majority of the network downtimes are caused by humans, not equipment failures.

Network programmability and Software-Defined Networking (SDN) have recently emerged as a way to fundamentally change the way we build, innovate, and operate computer networks, both at the software *and* at the hardware level. Specifically, programmable networks now allow: (i) to adapt how traffic flows in the entire network through standardized software interfaces; and (ii) to reprogram the hardware pipeline of the network devices, i.e. the ASICs used to forward data packets.

This year, the course will focus on reprogrammable network hardware/ASICs. It will involve hands-on experience on the world's fastest programmable switch to date (i.e. Barefoot Tofino switch ASIC).

Among others, we'll cover the following topics:
- The fundamentals and motivation behind network programmability;
- The design and optimization of network control loops;
- The use of advanced network data structures adapted for in-network execution;
- The P4 programming language and associated runtime environment;
- Hands-on examples of in-network applications solving hard problems in the area of data-centers, wide-area networks, and ISP networks.

The course will be divided in two blocks of 7 weeks. The first block will consist in traditional lectures introducing the concepts along with practical exercises to get acquainted with programmable data planes. The second block will consist of a (mandatory) project to be done in groups of few students (~3 students). The project will involve developing a fully working network application and run it on top of real programmable network hardware. Students will be free to propose their own application or pick one from a list. At the end of the course, each group will present its application in front of the class.
SkriptLecture notes and material will be made available before each course on the course website.
LiteraturRelevant references will be made available through the course website.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesPrerequisites: Communication Networks (227-0120-00L) or equivalents / good programming skills (in any language) are expected as both the exercices and the final project will involve coding.
263-3900-00LCommunication Networks Seminar Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to 20.

The deadline for deregistering expires at the end of the second week of the semester. Students who are still registered after that date, but do not attend the seminar, will officially fail the seminar.
W2 KP2SA. Singla
KurzbeschreibungWe explore recent advances in networking by reading high quality research papers, and discussing open research opportunities, most of which are suitable for students to later take up as thesis or semester projects.
LernzielThe objectives are (a) to understand the state-of-the-art in the field; (b) to learn to read, present and critique papers; (c) to engage in discussion and debate about research questions; and (d) to identify opportunities for new research.

Students are expected to attend the entire seminar, choose a topic for presentation from a given list, make a presentation on that topic, and lead the discussion. Further, for each reading, every student needs to submit a review before the in-class discussion. Students are evaluated on their submitted reviews, their presentation and discussion leadership, and participation in seminar discussions.
LiteraturA program will be posted here: https://ndal.ethz.ch/courses/networks-seminar.html, comprising of a list of papers the seminar group will cover.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesAn undergraduate-level understanding of networking, such that the student is familiar with concepts like reliable transport protocols (like TCP) and basics of Internet routing. ETH courses that fulfill this requirement: Computer Networks (252-0064-00L) and its predecessor (Operating Systems and Networks -- 252-0062-00L). Similar courses at other universities are also sufficient.
401-3922-00LLife Insurance MathematicsW4 KP2VM. Koller
KurzbeschreibungThe classical life insurance model is presented together with the important insurance types (insurance on one and two lives, term and endowment insurance and disability). Besides that the most important terms such as mathematical reserves are introduced and calculated. The profit and loss account and the balance sheet of a life insurance company is explained and illustrated.
Lernziel
401-3925-00LNon-Life Insurance: Mathematics and Statistics Information W8 KP4V + 1UM. V. Wüthrich
KurzbeschreibungThe lecture aims at providing a basis in non-life insurance mathematics which forms a core subject of actuarial sciences. It discusses collective risk modeling, individual claim size modeling, approximations for compound distributions, ruin theory, premium calculation principles, tariffication with generalized linear models, credibility theory, claims reserving and solvency.
LernzielThe student is familiar with the basics in non-life insurance mathematics and statistics. This includes the basic mathematical models for insurance liability modeling, pricing concepts, stochastic claims reserving models and ruin and solvency considerations.
InhaltThe following topics are treated:
Collective Risk Modeling
Individual Claim Size Modeling
Approximations for Compound Distributions
Ruin Theory in Discrete Time
Premium Calculation Principles
Tariffication and Generalized Linear Models
Bayesian Models and Credibility Theory
Claims Reserving
Solvency Considerations
SkriptM. V. Wüthrich, Non-Life Insurance: Mathematics & Statistics
http://ssrn.com/abstract=2319328
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThe exams ONLY take place during the official ETH examination period.

This course will be held in English and counts towards the diploma of "Aktuar SAV". For the latter, see details under www.actuaries.ch.

Prerequisites: knowledge of probability theory, statistics and applied stochastic processes.
401-3928-00LReinsurance AnalyticsW4 KP2VP. Antal, P. Arbenz
KurzbeschreibungThis course provides an actuarial introduction to reinsurance. The objective is to understand the fundamentals of risk transfer through reinsurance, and the mathematical models for extreme events such as natural or man-made catastrophes. The lecture covers reinsurance contracts, Experience and Exposure pricing, natural catastrophe modelling, solvency regulation, and alternative risk transfer
LernzielThis course provides an introduction to reinsurance from an actuarial point of view. The objective is to understand the fundamentals of risk transfer through reinsurance, and the mathematical approaches associated with low frequency high severity events such as natural or man-made catastrophes.
Topics covered include:
- Reinsurance Contracts and Markets: Different forms of reinsurance, their mathematical representation, history of reinsurance, and lines of business.
- Experience Pricing: Modelling of low frequency high severity losses based on historical data, and analytical tools to describe and understand these models
- Exposure Pricing: Loss modelling based on exposure or risk profile information, for both property and casualty risks
- Natural Catastrophe Modelling: History, relevance, structure, and analytical tools used to model natural catastrophes in an insurance context
- Solvency Regulation: Regulatory capital requirements in relation to risks, effects of reinsurance thereon, and differences between the Swiss Solvency Test and Solvency 2
- Alternative Risk Transfer: Alternatives to traditional reinsurance such as insurance linked securities and catastrophe bonds
InhaltThis course provides an introduction to reinsurance from an actuarial point of view. The objective is to understand the fundamentals of risk transfer through reinsurance, and the mathematical approaches associated with low frequency high severity events such as natural or man-made catastrophes.
Topics covered include:
- Reinsurance Contracts and Markets: Different forms of reinsurance, their mathematical representation, history of reinsurance, and lines of business.
- Experience Pricing: Modelling of low frequency high severity losses based on historical data, and analytical tools to describe and understand these models
- Exposure Pricing: Loss modelling based on exposure or risk profile information, for both property and casualty risks
- Natural Catastrophe Modelling: History, relevance, structure, and analytical tools used to model natural catastrophes in an insurance context
- Solvency Regulation: Regulatory capital requirements in relation to risks, effects of reinsurance thereon, and differences between the Swiss Solvency Test and Solvency 2
- Alternative Risk Transfer: Alternatives to traditional reinsurance such as insurance linked securities and catastrophe bonds
SkriptSlides, lecture notes, and references to literature will be made available.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesBasic knowledge in statistics, probability theory, and actuarial techniques
401-4889-00LMathematical Finance Information W11 KP4V + 2UM. Schweizer
KurzbeschreibungAdvanced course on mathematical finance:
- semimartingales and general stochastic integration
- absence of arbitrage and martingale measures
- fundamental theorem of asset pricing
- option pricing and hedging
- hedging duality
- optimal investment problems
- additional topics
LernzielAdvanced course on mathematical finance, presupposing good knowledge in probability theory and stochastic calculus (for continuous processes)
InhaltThis is an advanced course on mathematical finance for students with a good background in probability. We want to give an overview of main concepts, questions and approaches, and we do this mostly in continuous-time models.

Topics include
- semimartingales and general stochastic integration
- absence of arbitrage and martingale measures
- fundamental theorem of asset pricing
- option pricing and hedging
- hedging duality
- optimal investment problems
- and probably others
SkriptThe course is based on different parts from different books as well as on original research literature.

Lecture notes will not be available.
Literatur(will be updated later)
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesPrerequisites are the standard courses
- Probability Theory (for which lecture notes are available)
- Brownian Motion and Stochastic Calculus (for which lecture notes are available)
Those students who already attended "Introduction to Mathematical Finance" will have an advantage in terms of ideas and concepts.

This course is the second of a sequence of two courses on mathematical finance. The first course "Introduction to Mathematical Finance" (MF I), 401-3888-00, focuses on models in finite discrete time. It is advisable that the course MF I is taken prior to the present course, MF II.

For an overview of courses offered in the area of mathematical finance, see Link.
401-8905-00LFinancial Engineering (University of Zurich)
Der Kurs muss direkt an der UZH belegt werden.
UZH Modulkürzel: MFOEC200

Beachten Sie die Einschreibungstermine an der UZH: https://www.uzh.ch/cmsssl/de/studies/application/mobilitaet.html
W6 KP4GUni-Dozierende
KurzbeschreibungThis lecture is intended for students who would like to learn more on equity derivatives modelling and pricing.
LernzielQuantitative models for European option pricing (including stochastic
volatility and jump models), volatility and variance derivatives,
American and exotic options.
InhaltAfter introducing fundamental
concepts of mathematical finance including no-arbitrage, portfolio
replication and risk-neutral measure, we will present the main models
that can be used for pricing and hedging European options e.g. Black-
Scholes model, stochastic and jump-diffusion models, and highlight their
assumptions and limitations. We will cover several types of derivatives
such as European and American options, Barrier options and Variance-
Swaps. Basic knowledge in probability theory and stochastic calculus is
required. Besides attending class, we strongly encourage students to
stay informed on financial matters, especially by reading daily
financial newspapers such as the Financial Times or the Wall Street
Journal.
SkriptScript.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesBasic knowledge of probability theory and stochastic calculus.
Asset Pricing.
851-0252-13LNetwork Modeling
Particularly suitable for students of D-INFK
W3 KP2VC. Stadtfeld, V. Amati
KurzbeschreibungNetwork Science is a distinct domain of data science that focuses on relational systems. Various models have been proposed to describe structures and dynamics of networks. Statistical and numerical methods have been developed to fit these models to empirical data. Emphasis is placed on the statistical analysis of (social) systems and their connection to social theories and data sources.
LernzielStudents will be able to develop hypotheses that relate to the structures and dynamics of (social) networks, and tests those by applying advanced statistical network methods such as stochastic actor-oriented models (SAOMs) and exponential random graph models (ERGMs). Students will be able to explain and compare various network models, and develop an understanding how those can be fit to empirical data. This will enable them to independently address research questions from various social science fields.
851-0252-17LNetwork Analysis Lab (with Exercises) Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Only for Data Science MSc.
W5 KP2V + 1UU. Brandes
KurzbeschreibungThis is a voluntary supplement for the course Network Analysis.
LernzielDeeper understanding of mathematical principles
and practical applications of the methods underlying network analysis.
851-0735-09LWorkshop & Lecture Series on the Law & Economics of Innovation Information W2 KP2SS. Bechtold, H. Gersbach, A. Heinemann
KurzbeschreibungThis series is a joint project by ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich. It provides an overview of interdisciplinary research on intellectual property, innovation, antitrust and technology policy. Scholars from law, economics, management and related fields give a lecture and/or present their current research. All speakers are internationally well-known experts from Europe, the U.S. and beyond.
LernzielAfter the workshop and lecture series, participants should be acquainted with interdisciplinary approaches towards intellectual property, innovation, antitrust and technology policy research. They should also have an overview of current topics of international research in these areas.
InhaltThe workshop and lecture series will present a mix of speakers who represent the wide range of current social science research methods applied to intellectual property, innovation, antitrust policy and technology policy issues. In particular, theoretical models, empirical and experimental research as well as legal research methods will be represented.
SkriptPapers discussed in the workshop and lecture series are posted in advance on the course web page.
LiteraturWilliam Landes / Richard Posner, The Economic Structure of Intellectual Property Law, 2003
Suzanne Scotchmer, Innovation and Incentives, 2004
Peter Menell / Suzanne Scotchmer: Intellectual Property Law, in: Polinsky / Shavell (eds.), Handbook of Law and Economics, Volume 2, Amsterdam 2007, pp. 1471-1570
Bronwyn Hall / Nathan Rosenberg (eds.), Handbook of the Economics of Innovation, 2 volumes, Amsterdam 2010
Bronwyn Hall / Dietmar Harhoff, Recent Research on the Economics of Patents, 2011
Robert Litan (ed.), Handbook on Law, Innovation and Growth, Cheltenham 2011
Paul Belleflamme / Martin Peitz, Industrial Organization: Markets and Strategies, Cambridge, 2nd edition 2015
Einer Elhauge / Damien Geradin, Global Competition Law and Economics, 2nd edition 2011
Martin Peitz / Joel Waldfogel, The Oxford Handbook of the Digital Economy, Oxford 2012
September 2013 issue of the Journal of Industrial Economics, available at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/joie.2013.61.issue-3/issuetoc
Stefan Bechtold, Law and Economics of Copyright and Trademark on the Internet, in: Durlauf/Blume (eds.), The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics, online edition, Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, available at http://www.dictionaryofeconomics.com/article?id=pde2013_L000245
Robert Merges, Economics of Intellectual Property Law, in Parisi (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Law & Economics, Volume 2, 2017
Data Science Projektkurs
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
263-3300-00LData Science Lab Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Only for Data Science MSc.
O14 KP9PA. Krause, C. Zhang
KurzbeschreibungIn this class, we bring together data science applications
provided by ETH researchers outside computer science and
teams of computer science master's students. Two to three
students will form a team working on data science/machine
learning-related research topics provided by scientists in
a diverse range of domains such as astronomy, biology,
social sciences etc.
LernzielThe goal of this class if for students to gain experience
of dealing with data science and machine learning applications
"in the wild". Students are expected to go through the full
process starting from data cleaning, modeling, execution,
debugging, error analysis, and quality/performance refinement.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesPrerequisites: At least 8 KP must have been obtained under Data Analysis and at least 8 KP must have been obtained under Data Management and Processing.
Seminar
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
252-5051-00LAdvanced Topics in Machine Learning Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to 40.

The deadline for deregistering expires at the end of the second week of the semester. Students who are still registered after that date, but do not attend the seminar, will officially fail the seminar.
W2 KP2SJ. M. Buhmann, A. Krause, G. Rätsch
KurzbeschreibungIn this seminar, recent papers of the pattern recognition and machine learning literature are presented and discussed. Possible topics cover statistical models in computer vision, graphical models and machine learning.
LernzielThe seminar "Advanced Topics in Machine Learning" familiarizes students with recent developments in pattern recognition and machine learning. Original articles have to be presented and critically reviewed. The students will learn how to structure a scientific presentation in English which covers the key ideas of a scientific paper. An important goal of the seminar presentation is to summarize the essential ideas of the paper in sufficient depth while omitting details which are not essential for the understanding of the work. The presentation style will play an important role and should reach the level of professional scientific presentations.
InhaltThe seminar will cover a number of recent papers which have emerged as important contributions to the pattern recognition and machine learning literature. The topics will vary from year to year but they are centered on methodological issues in machine learning like new learning algorithms, ensemble methods or new statistical models for machine learning applications. Frequently, papers are selected from computer vision or bioinformatics - two fields, which relies more and more on machine learning methodology and statistical models.
LiteraturThe papers will be presented in the first session of the seminar.
263-3504-00LHardware Acceleration for Data Processing Information
The deadline for deregistering expires at the end of the second week of the semester. Students who are still registered after that date, but do not attend the seminar, will officially fail the seminar.
W2 KP2SG. Alonso, T. Hoefler, C. Zhang
KurzbeschreibungThe seminar will cover topics related to data processing using new hardware in general and hardware accelerators (GPU, FPGA, specialized processors) in particular.
LernzielThe seminar will cover topics related to data processing using new hardware in general and hardware accelerators (GPU, FPGA, specialized processors) in particular.
InhaltThe general application areas are big data and machine learning. The systems covered will include systems from computer architecture, high performance computing, data appliances, and data centers.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesStudents taking this seminar should have the necessary background in systems and low level programming.
GESS Wissenschaft im Kontext
» Empfehlungen aus dem Bereich Wissenschaft im Kontext (Typ B) für das D-INFK
» siehe Studiengang Wissenschaft im Kontext: Sprachkurse ETH/UZH
» siehe Studiengang Wissenschaft im Kontext: Typ A: Förderung allgemeiner Reflexionsfähigkeiten
Master-Arbeit
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
261-0800-00LMaster's Thesis
Zur Master-Arbeit wird nur zugelassen, wer:

 das Bachelor-Studium erfolgreich abgeschlossen hat;
 allfällige Auflagen für die Zulassung zum Studiengang erfüllt hat
 in der Kategorie "Kernfächer" mindestens 50 KP erworben hat, darunter die je minimal erforderlichen 16 KP in den Unterkategorien "Datenanalyse"
sowie "Datenmanagement und Datenverarbeitung" und
 in der Kategorie "Data Science Projektkurs" die erforderlichen 14 KP erworben hat.
O30 KP64DProfessor/innen
Kurzbeschreibung
Lernziel