Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2021

Micro- and Nanosystems Master Information
Core Courses
Recommended Core Courses
Devices and Systems
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0172-00LMicrosystems II: Devices and Applications Information W6 credits3V + 3UC. Hierold, C. I. Roman
AbstractThe students are introduced to the fundamentals and physics of microelectronic devices as well as to microsystems in general (MEMS). They will be able to apply this knowledge for system research and development and to assess and apply principles, concepts and methods from a broad range of technical and scientific disciplines for innovative products.
ObjectiveThe students are introduced to the fundamentals and physics of microelectronic devices as well as to microsystems in general (MEMS), basic electronic circuits for sensors, RF-MEMS, chemical microsystems, BioMEMS and microfluidics, magnetic sensors and optical devices, and in particular to the concepts of Nanosystems (focus on carbon nanotubes), based on the respective state-of-research in the field. They will be able to apply this knowledge for system research and development and to assess and apply principles, concepts and methods from a broad range of technical and scientific disciplines for innovative products.

During the weekly 3 hour module on Mondays dedicated to Übungen the students will learn the basics of Comsol Multiphysics and utilize this software to simulate MEMS devices to understand their operation more deeply and optimize their designs.
ContentTransducer fundamentals and test structures
Pressure sensors and accelerometers
Resonators and gyroscopes
RF MEMS
Acoustic transducers and energy harvesters
Thermal transducers and energy harvesters
Optical and magnetic transducers
Chemical sensors and biosensors, microfluidics and bioMEMS
Nanosystem concepts
Basic electronic circuits for sensors and microsystems
Lecture notesHandouts (on-line)
227-0662-00LOrganic and Nanostructured Optics and Electronics (Course)
Does not take place this semester.
W3 credits2GV. Wood
AbstractThis course examines the optical and electronic properties of excitonic materials that can be leveraged to create thin-film light emitting devices and solar cells. Laboratory sessions provide students with experience in synthesis and optical characterization of nanomaterials as well as fabrication and characterization of thin film devices.
ObjectiveGain the knowledge and practical experience to begin research with organic or nanostructured materials and understand the key challenges in this rapidly emerging field.
Content0-Dimensional Excitonic Materials (organic molecules and colloidal quantum dots)

Energy Levels and Excited States (singlet and triplet states, optical absorption and luminescence).

Excitonic and Polaronic Processes (charge transport, Dexter and Förster energy transfer, and exciton diffusion).

Devices (photodetectors, solar cells, and light emitting devices).
LiteratureLecture notes and reading assignments from current literature to be posted on website.
227-0662-10LOrganic and Nanostructured Optics and Electronics (Project) Information Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
W3 credits2AV. Wood
AbstractThis course examines the optical and electronic properties of excitonic materials that can be leveraged to create thin-film light emitting devices and solar cells. Laboratory sessions provide students with experience in synthesis and optical characterization of nanomaterials as well as fabrication and characterization of thin film devices.
ObjectiveGain the knowledge and practical experience to begin research with organic or nanostructured materials and understand the key challenges in this rapidly emerging field.
Content0-Dimensional Excitonic Materials (organic molecules and colloidal quantum dots)

Energy Levels and Excited States (singlet and triplet states, optical absorption and luminescence).

Excitonic and Polaronic Processes (charge transport, Dexter and Förster energy transfer, and exciton diffusion).

Devices (photodetectors, solar cells, and light emitting devices).
LiteratureLecture notes and reading assignments from current literature to be posted on website.
Prerequisites / NoticeAdmission is conditional to passing 227-0662-00L Organic and Nanostructured Optics and Electronics (Course)
Energy Conversion and Quantum Phenomena
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0060-00LThermodynamics and Transport Phenomena in NanotechnologyW4 credits2V + 2UT. Schutzius, D. Taylor
AbstractThe lecture deals with thermodynamics and transport phenomena in nano- and microscale systems. Typical areas of applications are microelectronics manufacturing and cooling, manufacturing of novel materials and coatings, surface technologies, wetting phenomena and related technologies, and micro- and nanosystems and devices.
ObjectiveThe student will acquire fundamental knowledge of interfacial and micro-nanoscale thermofluidics including electric field and light interaction with surfaces. Furthermore, the student will be exposed to a host of applications ranging from superhydrophobic surfaces and microelectronics cooling to solar energy, all of which will be discussed in the context of the course. The student will also judge state-of-the-art scientific research in these areas.
ContentThermodynamic aspects of intermolecular forces; Interfacial phenomena; Surface tension; Wettability and contact angle; Wettability of Micro/Nanoscale textured surfaces: superhydrophobicity and superhydrophilicity.

Physics of micro- and nanofluidics as well as heat and mass transport phenomena at the nanoscale.

Scientific communication and exposure to state-of-the-art scientific research in the areas of Nanotechnology and the Water-Energy Nexus.
Lecture notesyes
402-0468-15LNanomaterials for PhotonicsW6 credits2V + 1UR. Grange, R. Savo
AbstractThe lecture describes various nanomaterials (semiconductor, metal, dielectric, carbon-based...) for photonic applications (optoelectronics, plasmonics, ordered and disordered structures...). It starts with concepts of light-matter interactions, then the fabrication methods, the optical characterization techniques, the description of the properties and the state-of-the-art applications.
ObjectiveThe students will acquire theoretical and experimental knowledge about the different types of nanomaterials (semiconductors, metals, dielectric, carbon-based, ...) and their uses as building blocks for advanced applications in photonics (optoelectronics, plasmonics, photonic crystal, ...). Together with the exercises, the students will learn (1) to read, summarize and discuss scientific articles related to the lecture, (2) to estimate order of magnitudes with calculations using the theory seen during the lecture, (3) to prepare a short oral presentation and report about one topic related to the lecture, and (4) to imagine an original photonic device.
Content1. Introduction to nanomaterials for photonics
a. Classification of nanomaterials
b. Light-matter interaction at the nanoscale
c. Examples of nanophotonic devices

2. Wave physics for nanophotonics
a. Wavelength, wave equation, wave propagation
b. Dispersion relation
c. Interference
d. Scattering and absorption
e. Coherent and incoherent light

3. Analogies between photons and electrons
a. Quantum wave description
b. How to confine photons and electrons
c. Tunneling effects

4. Characterization of Nanomaterials
a. Optical microscopy: Bright and dark field, fluorescence, confocal, High resolution: PALM (STORM), STED
b. Light scattering techniques: DLS
c. Near field microscopy: SNOM
d. Electron microscopy: SEM, TEM
e. Scanning probe microscopy: STM, AFM
f. X-ray diffraction: XRD, EDS

5. Fabrication of nanomaterials
a. Top-down approach
b. Bottom-up approach

6. Plasmonics
a. What is a plasmon, Drude model
b. Surface plasmon and localized surface plasmon (sphere, rod, shell)
c. Theoretical models to calculate the radiated field: electrostatic approximation and Mie scattering
d. Fabrication of plasmonic structures: Chemical synthesis, Nanofabrication
e. Applications

7. Organic and inorganic nanomaterials
a. Organic quantum-confined structure: nanomers and quantum dots.
b. Carbon nanotubes: properties, bandgap description, fabrication
c. Graphene: motivation, fabrication, devices
d. Nanomarkers for biophotonics

8. Semiconductors
a. Crystalline structure, wave function
b. Quantum well: energy levels equation, confinement
c. Quantum wires, quantum dots
d. Optical properties related to quantum confinement
e. Example of effects: absorption, photoluminescence
f. Solid-state-lasers: edge emitting, surface emitting, quantum cascade

9. Photonic crystals
a. Analogy photonic and electronic crystal, in nature
b. 1D, 2D, 3D photonic crystal
c. Theoretical modelling: frequency and time domain technique
d. Features: band gap, local enhancement, superprism...

10. Nanocomposites
a. Effective medium regime
b. Metamaterials
c. Multiple scattering regime
d. Complex media: structural colour, random lasers, nonlinear disorder
Lecture notesSlides and book chapter will be available for downloading
LiteratureReferences will be given during the lecture
Prerequisites / NoticeBasics of solid-state physics (i.e. energy bands) can help
402-0596-00LElectronic Transport in NanostructuresW6 credits2V + 1UT. M. Ihn
AbstractThe lecture discusses modern topics in quantum transport through nanostructures including the underlying materials. Topics are: the quantum Hall effects with emphasis on the fractional quantum Hall effect, two-dimensional topological insulators, graphene and other 2D layered materials, quantum interferometers, quantum dot qubits for quantum information processing, decoherence of quantum states
ObjectiveStudents are able to understand modern experiments in the field of electronic transport in nanostructures. They can critically reflect published research in this field and explain it to an audience of physicists. Students know and understand the fundamental phenomena of electron transport in the quantum regime and their significance. They are able to apply their knowledge to practical experiments in a modern research lab.
Lecture notesThe lecture is based on the book:
T. Ihn, Semiconductor Nanostructures: Quantum States and Electronic Transport, ISBN 978-0-19-953442-5, Oxford University Press, 2010.
Prerequisites / NoticeA solid basis in quantum mechanics, electrostatics, quantum statistics and in solid state physics is required. Having passed the lecture Semiconductor Nanostructures (fall semester) may be advantageous, but is not required.

Students of the Master in Micro- and Nanosystems should at least have attended the lecture by David Norris, Introduction to quantum mechanics for engineers. They should also have passed the exam of the lecture Semiconductor Nanostructures.
529-0431-00LPhysical Chemistry III: Molecular Quantum Mechanics Information Restricted registration - show details W4 credits4GF. Merkt
AbstractPostulates of quantum mechanics, operator algebra, Schrödinger's equation, state functions and expectation values, matrix representation of operators, particle in a box, tunneling, harmonic oscillator, molecular vibrations, angular momentum and spin, generalised Pauli principle, perturbation theory, electronic structure of atoms and molecules, Born-Oppenheimer approximation.
ObjectiveThis is an introductory course in quantum mechanics. The course starts with an overview of the fundamental concepts of quantum mechanics and introduces the mathematical formalism. The postulates and theorems of quantum mechanics are discussed in the context of experimental and numerical determination of physical quantities. The course develops the tools necessary for the understanding and calculation of elementary quantum phenomena in atoms and molecules.
ContentPostulates and theorems of quantum mechanics: operator algebra, Schrödinger's equation, state functions and expectation values. Linear motions: free particles, particle in a box, quantum mechanical tunneling, the harmonic oscillator and molecular vibrations. Angular momentum: electronic spin and orbital motion, molecular rotations. Electronic structure of atoms and molecules: the Pauli principle, angular momentum coupling, the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Variational principle and perturbation theory. Discussion of bigger systems (solids, nano-structures).
Lecture notesA script written in German will be available. The script is, however, no replacement for personal notes during the lecture and does not cover all aspects discussed.
Modelling and Simulation
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
401-3632-00LComputational StatisticsW8 credits3V + 1UM. Mächler
AbstractWe discuss modern statistical methods for data analysis, including methods for data exploration, prediction and inference. We pay attention to algorithmic aspects, theoretical properties and practical considerations. The class is hands-on and methods are applied using the statistical programming language R.
ObjectiveThe student obtains an overview of modern statistical methods for data analysis, including their algorithmic aspects and theoretical properties. The methods are applied using the statistical programming language R.
ContentSee the class website
Prerequisites / NoticeAt least one semester of (basic) probability and statistics.

Programming experience is helpful but not required.
151-0116-10LHigh Performance Computing for Science and Engineering (HPCSE) for Engineers II Information W4 credits4GP. Koumoutsakos, S. M. Martin
AbstractThis course focuses on programming methods and tools for parallel computing on multi and many-core architectures. Emphasis will be placed on practical and computational aspects of Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation including the implementation of relevant algorithms on HPC architectures.
ObjectiveThe course will teach
- programming models and tools for multi and many-core architectures
- fundamental concepts of Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation (UQ+P) for computational models of systems in Engineering and Life Sciences
ContentHigh Performance Computing:
- Advanced topics in shared-memory programming
- Advanced topics in MPI
- GPU architectures and CUDA programming

Uncertainty Quantification:
- Uncertainty quantification under parametric and non-parametric modeling uncertainty
- Bayesian inference with model class assessment
- Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation
Lecture noteshttps://www.cse-lab.ethz.ch/teaching/hpcse-ii_fs21/
Class notes, handouts
Literature- Class notes
- Introduction to High Performance Computing for Scientists and Engineers, G. Hager and G. Wellein
- CUDA by example, J. Sanders and E. Kandrot
- Data Analysis: A Bayesian Tutorial, D. Sivia and J. Skilling
- An introduction to Bayesian Analysis - Theory and Methods, J. Gosh, N. Delampady and S. Tapas
- Bayesian Data Analysis, A. Gelman, J. Carlin, H. Stern, D. Dunson, A. Vehtari and D. Rubin
- Machine Learning: A Bayesian and Optimization Perspective, S. Theodorides
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents must be familiar with the content of High Performance Computing for Science and Engineering I (151-0107-20L)
Laboratory Course
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0620-00LEmbedded MEMS Lab
Number of participants limited to 20.
W5 credits3PC. Hierold, M. Haluska
AbstractPractical course: Students are introduced to the process steps required for the fabrication of MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical System) and carry out the fabrication and testing steps in the clean rooms themselves. Additionally, they learn the requirements for working in clean rooms. Processing and characterization will be documented and analyzed in a final report.
ObjectiveStudents learn the individual process steps that are required to make a MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical System). Students carry out the process steps themselves in laboratories and clean rooms. Furthermore, participants become familiar with the special requirements (cleanliness, safety, operation of equipment and handling hazardous chemicals) of working in the clean rooms and laboratories. The entire production, processing, and characterization of the MEMS is documented and evaluated in a final report.
ContentWith guidance from a tutor, the individual silicon microsystem process steps that are required for the fabrication of an accelerometer are carried out:
- Photolithography, dry etching, wet etching, sacrificial layer etching, various cleaning procedures
- Packaging and electrical connection of a MEMS device
- Testing and characterization of the MEMS device
- Written documentation and evaluation of the entire production, processing and characterization
Lecture notesA document containing theory, background and practical course content is distributed in the informational meeting.
LiteratureThe document provides sufficient information for the participants to successfully participate in the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeParticipating students are required to attend all scheduled lectures and meetings of the course.

Participating students are required to provide proof that they have personal accident insurance prior to the start of the laboratory portion of the course.

This master's level course is limited to 20 students per semester for safety and efficiency reasons.
If there are more than 20 students registered, we regret to restrict access to this course by the following rules:

Priority 1: master students of the master's program in "Micro and Nanosystems"

Priority 2: master students of the master's program in "Mechanical Engineering" with a specialization in Microsystems and Nanoscale Engineering (MAVT-tutors Profs Dual, Hierold, Koumoutsakos, Nelson, Norris, Poulikakos, Pratsinis, Stemmer), who attended the bachelor course "151-0621-00L Microsystems Technology" successfully.

Priority 3: master students, who attended the bachelor course "151-0621-00L Microsystems Technology" successfully.

Priority 4: all other students (PhD, bachelor, master) with a background in silicon or microsystems process technology.

If there are more students in one of these priority groups than places available, we will decide with respect to (in following order) best achieved grade from 151-0621-00L Microsystems Technology, registration to this practicum at previous semester, and by drawing lots.
Students will be notified at the first lecture of the course (introductory lecture) as to whether they are able to participate.

The course is offered in autumn and spring semester.
Elective Core Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0534-00LAdvanced DynamicsW4 credits3V + 1UP. Tiso
AbstractLagrangian dynamics - Principle of virtual work and virtual power - holonomic and non holonomic contraints - 3D rigid body dynamics - equilibrium - linearization - stability - vibrations - frequency response
ObjectiveThis course provides the students of mechanical engineering with fundamental analytical mechanics for the study of complex mechanical systems .We introduce the powerful techniques of principle of virtual work and virtual power to systematically write the equation of motion of arbitrary systems subjected to holonomic and non-holonomic constraints. The linearisation around equilibrium states is then presented, together with the concept of linearised stability. Linearized models allow the study of small amplitude vibrations for unforced and forced systems. For this, we introduce the concept of vibration modes and frequencies, modal superposition and modal truncation. The case of the vibration of light damped systems is discussed. The kinematics and dynamics of 3D rigid bodies is also extensively treated.
Lecture notesLecture notes are produced in class and are downloadable right after each lecture.
LiteratureThe students will prepare their own notes. A copy of the lecture notes will be available.
Prerequisites / NoticeMechanics III or equivalent; Analysis I-II, or equivalent; Linear Algebra I-II, or equivalent.
151-0622-00LMeasuring on the Nanometer ScaleW2 credits2GA. Stemmer
AbstractIntroduction to theory and practical application of measuring techniques suitable for the nano domain.
ObjectiveIntroduction to theory and practical application of measuring techniques suitable for the nano domain.
ContentConventional techniques to analyze nano structures using photons and electrons: light microscopy with dark field and differential interference contrast; scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy. Interferometric and other techniques to measure distances. Optical traps. Foundations of scanning probe microscopy: tunneling, atomic force, optical near-field. Interactions between specimen and probe. Current trends, including spectroscopy of material parameters.
Lecture notesSlides and recordings available via Moodle (registered participants only).
151-0630-00LNanorobotics Information W4 credits2V + 1US. Pané Vidal
AbstractNanorobotics is an interdisciplinary field that includes topics from nanotechnology and robotics. The aim of this course is to expose students to the fundamental and essential aspects of this emerging field.
ObjectiveThe aim of this course is to expose students to the fundamental and essential aspects of this emerging field. These topics include basic principles of nanorobotics, building parts for nanorobotic systems, powering and locomotion of nanorobots, manipulation, assembly and sensing using nanorobots, molecular motors, and nanorobotics for nanomedicine.
151-0642-00LSeminar on Micro and NanosystemsZ0 credits1SC. Hierold
AbstractScientific presentations from the field of Micro- and Nanosystems
ObjectiveThe students will be informed about the latest news from the state-of-the-art in the field and will take the opportunity to start scientific and challenging discussions with the presenters.
ContentSelected and hot topics from Micro- and Nanosystems, progress reports from PhD projects.
151-0966-00LIntroduction to Quantum Mechanics for EngineersW4 credits2V + 2UD. J. Norris
AbstractThis course provides fundamental knowledge in the principles of quantum mechanics and connects it to applications in engineering.
ObjectiveTo work effectively in many areas of modern engineering, such as renewable energy and nanotechnology, students must possess a basic understanding of quantum mechanics. The aim of this course is to provide this knowledge while making connections to applications of relevancy to engineers. After completing this course, students will understand the basic postulates of quantum mechanics and be able to apply mathematical methods for solving various problems including atoms, molecules, and solids. Additional examples from engineering disciplines will also be integrated.
ContentFundamentals of Quantum Mechanics
- Historical Perspective
- Schrödinger Equation
- Postulates of Quantum Mechanics
- Operators
- Harmonic Oscillator
- Hydrogen atom
- Multielectron Atoms
- Crystalline Systems
- Spectroscopy
- Approximation Methods
- Applications in Engineering
Lecture notesClass Notes and Handouts
LiteratureText: David J. Griffiths and Darrell F. Schroeter, Introduction to Quantum Mechanics, 3rd Edition, Cambridge University Press.
Prerequisites / NoticeAnalysis III, Mechanics III, Physics I, Linear Algebra II
227-0125-00LOptics and PhotonicsW6 credits2V + 2UJ. Leuthold
AbstractThis lecture covers both - the fundamentals of "Optics" such as e.g. "ray optics", "coherence", the "Planck law" or the "Einstein relations" but also the fundamentals of "Photonics" on the generation, processing, transmission and detection of photons.
ObjectiveA sound base for work in the field of optics and photonics will be given.
ContentChapter 1: Ray Optics
Chapter 2: Electromagnetic Optics
Chapter 3: Polarization
Chapter 4: Coherence and Interference
Chapter 5: Fourier Optics and Diffraction
Chapter 6: Guided Wave Optics
Chapter 7: Optical Fibers
Chapter 8: The Laser
Lecture notesLecture notes will be handed out.
Prerequisites / NoticeFundamentals of Electromagnetic Fields (Maxwell Equations) & Bachelor Lectures on Physics.
227-0159-00LSemiconductor Devices: Quantum Transport at the Nanoscale Information W6 credits2V + 2UM. Luisier, A. Emboras
AbstractThis class offers an introduction into quantum transport theory, a rigorous approach to electron transport at the nanoscale. It covers different topics such as bandstructure, Wave Function and Non-equilibrium Green's Function formalisms, and electron interactions with their environment. Matlab exercises accompany the lectures where students learn how to develop their own transport simulator.
ObjectiveThe continuous scaling of electronic devices has given rise to structures whose dimensions do not exceed a few atomic layers. At this size, electrons do not behave as particle any more, but as propagating waves and the classical representation of electron transport as the sum of drift-diffusion processes fails. The purpose of this class is to explore and understand the displacement of electrons through nanoscale device structures based on state-of-the-art quantum transport methods and to get familiar with the underlying equations by developing his own nanoelectronic device simulator.
ContentThe following topics will be addressed:
- Introduction to quantum transport modeling
- Bandstructure representation and effective mass approximation
- Open vs closed boundary conditions to the Schrödinger equation
- Comparison of the Wave Function and Non-equilibrium Green's Function formalisms as solution to the Schrödinger equation
- Self-consistent Schödinger-Poisson simulations
- Quantum transport simulations of resonant tunneling diodes and quantum well nano-transistors
- Top-of-the-barrier simulation approach to nano-transistor
- Electron interactions with their environment (phonon, roughness, impurity,...)
- Multi-band transport models
Lecture notesLecture slides are distributed every week and can be found at
https://iis-students.ee.ethz.ch/lectures/quantum-transport-in-nanoscale-devices/
LiteratureRecommended textbook: "Electronic Transport in Mesoscopic Systems", Supriyo Datta, Cambridge Studies in Semiconductor Physics and Microelectronic Engineering, 1997
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowledge of semiconductor device physics and quantum mechanics
227-0303-00LAdvanced PhotonicsW6 credits2V + 2U + 1AA. Emboras, M. Burla, A. Dorodnyy
AbstractThe lecture gives a comprehensive insight into various types of nano-scale photonic devices, physical fundamentals of their operation, and an overview of the micro/nano-fabrication technologies. Following applications of nano-scale photonic structures are discussed in details: detectors, photovoltaic cells, atomic/ionic opto-electronic devices and integrated microwave photonics.
ObjectiveGeneral training in advanced photonic devices with an in-depth understanding of the fundamentals of theory, fabrication, and characterization. Hands-on experience with photonic and optoelectronic device technologies and theory. The students will learn about the importance of advanced photonic devices in energy, communications, digital and neuromorphic computing applications.
ContentThe following topics will be addressed:
• Photovoltaics: basic thermodynamic principles and fundamental efficiency limitations, physics of semiconductor solar cell, overview of existing solar cell concepts and underlying physical phenomena.
• Micro/nano-fabrication technologies for advanced optoelectronic devices: introduction and device examples.
• Comprehensive insight into the physical mechanisms that govern ionic-atomic devices, present the techniques required to fabricate ultra-scaled nanostructures and show some applications in digital and neuromorphic computing.
• Introduction to microwave photonics (MWP), microwave photonic links, photonic techniques for microwave signal generation and processing.
Lecture notesThe presentation and the lecture notes will be provided every week.
Literature“Atomic/Ionic Devices”:
• Resistive Switching: From Fundamentals of Nanoionic Redox Processes to Memristive Device Applications, Daniele Ielmini and Rainer Waser, Wiley-VCH
• Electrochemical Methods: Fundamentals and Applications, A. Bard and L. Faulkner, John Willey & Sons, Inc.

“Photovoltaics”:
• Prof. Peter Wurfel: Physics of Solar Cells, Wiley

“Micro and nano Fabrication”:
• Prof. H. Gatzen, Prof. Volker Saile, Prof. Juerg Leuthold: Micro and Nano Fabrication, Springer

“Microwave Photonics”:
• D. M. Pozar, Microwave Engineering. J. Wiley & Sons, New York, 2005.
• M. Burla, Advanced integrated optical beam forming networks for broadband phased array antenna systems. Enschede, The Netherlands, 2013. DOI: 10.3990/1.9789036507295
• C.H. Cox, Analog optical links: theory and practice. Cambridge University Press, 2006.
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowledge of semiconductor physics, physics of the electromagnetic filed and thermodynamics.
227-0330-00LEnergy-Efficient Analog Circuits for IoT SystemsW6 credits2V + 2UT. Jang
AbstractWe are facing a new era of the Internet of things, similarly indicated as Industry 4.0, TSensors, Ubiquitous or The Fog. A miniaturized computer is the key to this innovation that senses, collects and processes information from objects. In this class, based on the recent publications, energy efficient analog IC techniques will be introduced which is the main challenge to reduce the battery size.
ObjectiveThis class introduces key analog building blocks such as energy harvester, frequency generator, data converter, sensor interface, power converter based on the recent publications for IoT systems including wearable electronics, bio-implantable devices, and environmental sensors.
ContentUltra-low power circuit design methodology and transistor characteristics; Circuit-level design techniques for amplifier, comparator, voltage reference, on-chip oscillator, switched capacitor; IP-level design techniques for energy harvester, data converter, energy harvester and power converters.
Prerequisites / NoticeAnalog Integrated Circuits
227-0622-00LThermal Modeling: From Semiconductor to Medical Devices and Personalized Therapy PlanningW4 credits2V + 1UE. Neufeld, M. Luisier
AbstractThe course introduces computational techniques to model electromagnetic heating across many orders of magnitudes, from the atomic to the macroscopic scale. Both desired and undesired thermal effects will be covered, e.g. thermal cancer therapies based on tissue heating or Joule heating in semiconductor devices. A wide range of simulation approaches and numerical methods will be introduced.
ObjectiveDuring this course the students will:

- learn the physics governing and computational models describing electromagnetic-induced heating;

- get familiar with computational simulation techniques across a wide range of spatial scales, incl. methods to simulate in vivo heating, considering thermoregulation and perfusion, or quantum mechanical approaches considering heat at the level of atomic vibrations;

- implement and apply simulation techniques within a state-of-the-art open-source simulation platform for computational life sciences, as well as a framework for computer-aided design of semiconductor devices;

- learn about remaining challenges in this field
ContentThe following topics will be discussed during the semester:

- Introduction about electromagnetic heating (from its historical perspective to its application in biology);

- Microscopic/Macroscopic thermal transport (governing equations, numerical methods, examples);

- Numerical algorithms and their implementation in python and/or C++, parallelisation approaches, and high performance computing solutions;

- Practical examples: thermal therapy planning with Sim4Life and technology computer aided design with OMEN;

- Model verification and validation.
Lecture notesLecture slides are distributed every week and can be found at
https://iis-students.ee.ethz.ch/lectures/thermal-modeling/
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course requires an open attitude towards interdisciplinarity, basic python scripting and C++ coding skills, undergraduate entry-level familiarity with electric & magnetic fields/forces, differential equations, calculus, and basic knowledge of biology and quantum mechanics.
227-0669-00LChemistry of Devices and Technologies Restricted registration - show details
Limited to 30 participants.
W4 credits1V + 2UM. Yarema
AbstractThe course covers basics of chemistry and material science, relevant for modern devices and technologies. The course consists from lecture, laboratory, and individual components. Students accomplish individual projects, in which they study and evaluate a chosen technology from chemistry and materials viewpoints.
ObjectiveThe course brings relevant chemistry knowledge, tailored to the needs of electrical engineering students. Students will gain understanding of the basic concepts of chemistry and a chemist's intuition through hands-on workshops that combine tutorials and laboratory sessions as well as guidance through individual projects that require interdisciplinary and critical thinking.
Students will learn which materials, reactions, and device fabrication processes are important for nowadays technologies and products. They will gain important knowledge of state-of-the-art technologies from materials and fabrication viewpoints.
ContentStudents will spend 3h per week in the tutorials and practical sessions and additional 4-6h per week working on individual projects.
The goal of the individual student's project is to understand the chemistry related to the manufacture and operation of a specific device or technology (to be chosen from the list of projects). To ensure continued learning throughout the semester, individual projects are evaluated by three interim project reports and by 10 min final presentation.
LiteratureLecture notes will be made available on the website.
227-0966-00LQuantitative Big Imaging: From Images to StatisticsW4 credits2V + 1UP. A. Kaestner, M. Stampanoni
AbstractThe lecture focuses on the challenging task of extracting robust, quantitative metrics from imaging data and is intended to bridge the gap between pure signal processing and the experimental science of imaging. The course will focus on techniques, scalability, and science-driven analysis.
Objective1. Introduction of applied image processing for research science covering basic image processing, quantitative methods, and statistics.
2. Understanding of imaging as a means to accomplish a scientific goal.
3. Ability to apply quantitative methods to complex 3D data to determine the validity of a hypothesis
ContentImaging is a well established field and is rapidly growing as technological improvements push the limits of resolution in space, time, material and functional sensitivity. These improvements have meant bigger, more diverse datasets being acquired at an ever increasing rate. With methods varying from focused ion beams to X-rays to magnetic resonance, the sources for these images are exceptionally heterogeneous; however, the tools and techniques for processing these images and transforming them into quantitative, biologically or materially meaningful information are similar.
The course consists of equal parts theory and practical analysis of first synthetic and then real imaging datasets. Basic aspects of image processing are covered such as filtering, thresholding, and morphology. From these concepts a series of tools will be developed for analyzing arbitrary images in a very generic manner. Specifically a series of methods will be covered, e.g. characterizing shape, thickness, tortuosity, alignment, and spatial distribution of material features like pores. From these metrics the statistics aspect of the course will be developed where reproducibility, robustness, and sensitivity will be investigated in order to accurately determine the precision and accuracy of these quantitative measurements. A major emphasis of the course will be scalability and the tools of the 'Big Data' trend will be discussed and how cluster, cloud, and new high-performance large dataset techniques can be applied to analyze imaging datasets. In addition, given the importance of multi-scale systems, a data-management and analysis approach based on modern databases will be presented for storing complex hierarchical information in a flexible manner. Finally as a concluding project the students will apply the learned methods on real experimental data from the latest 3D experiments taken from either their own work / research or partnered with an experimental imaging group.
The course provides the necessary background to perform the quantitative evaluation of complicated 3D imaging data in a minimally subjective or arbitrary manner to answer questions coming from the fields of physics, biology, medicine, material science, and paleontology.
Lecture notesAvailable online. https://imaginglectures.github.io/Quantitative-Big-Imaging-2021/weeklyplan.html
LiteratureWill be indicated during the lecture.
Prerequisites / NoticeIdeally, students will have some familiarity with basic manipulation and programming in languages like Python, Matlab, or R. Interested students who are worried about their skill level in this regard are encouraged to contact Anders Kaestner directly (anders.kaestner@psi.ch).

More advanced students who are familiar with Python, C++, (or in some cases Java) will have to opportunity to develop more of their own tools.
402-0448-01LQuantum Information Processing I: Concepts
This theory part QIP I together with the experimental part 402-0448-02L QIP II (both offered in the Spring Semester) combine to the core course in experimental physics "Quantum Information Processing" (totally 10 ECTS credits). This applies to the Master's degree programme in Physics.
W5 credits2V + 1UP. Kammerlander
AbstractThe course will cover the key concepts and ideas of quantum information processing, including descriptions of quantum algorithms which give the quantum computer the power to compute problems outside the reach of any classical supercomputer.
Key concepts such as quantum error correction will be described. These ideas provide fundamental insights into the nature of quantum states and measurement.
ObjectiveBy the end of the course students are able to explain the basic mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics and apply them to quantum information processing problems. They are able to adapt and apply these concepts and methods to analyse and discuss quantum algorithms and other quantum information-processing protocols.
ContentThe topics covered in the course will include quantum circuits, gate decomposition and universal sets of gates, efficiency of quantum circuits, quantum algorithms (Shor, Grover, Deutsch-Josza,..), error correction, fault-tolerant design, entanglement, teleportation and dense conding, teleportation of gates, and cryptography.
Lecture notesMore details to follow.
LiteratureQuantum Computation and Quantum Information
Michael Nielsen and Isaac Chuang
Cambridge University Press
Prerequisites / NoticeA good understanding of linear algebra is recommended.
402-0448-02LQuantum Information Processing II: Implementations
This experimental part QIP II together with the theory part 402-0448-01L QIP I (both offered in the Spring Semester) combine to the core course in experimental physics "Quantum Information Processing" (totally 10 ECTS credits). This applies to the Master's degree programme in Physics.
W5 credits2V + 1UJ. Home
AbstractIntroduction to experimental systems for quantum information processing (QIP). Quantum bits. Coherent Control. Measurement. Decoherence. Microscopic and macroscopic quantum systems. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Photons. Ions and neutral atoms in electromagnetic traps. Charges and spins in quantum dots and NV centers. Charges and flux quanta in superconducting circuits. Novel hybrid systems.
ObjectiveThroughout the past 20 years the realm of quantum physics has entered the domain of information technology in more and more prominent ways. Enormous progress in the physical sciences and in engineering and technology has allowed us to build novel types of information processors based on the concepts of quantum physics. In these processors information is stored in the quantum state of physical systems forming quantum bits (qubits). The interaction between qubits is controlled and the resulting states are read out on the level of single quanta in order to process information. Realizing such challenging tasks is believed to allow constructing an information processor much more powerful than a classical computer. This task is taken on by academic labs, startups and major industry. The aim of this class is to give a thorough introduction to physical implementations pursued in current research for realizing quantum information processors. The field of quantum information science is one of the fastest growing and most active domains of research in modern physics.
ContentIntroduction to experimental systems for quantum information processing (QIP).
- Quantum bits
- Coherent Control
- Measurement
- Decoherence
QIP with
- Ions
- Superconducting Circuits
- Photons
- NMR
- Rydberg atoms
- NV-centers
- Quantum dots
Lecture notesCourse material be made available at www.qudev.ethz.ch and on the Moodle platform for the course. More details to follow.
LiteratureQuantum Computation and Quantum Information
Michael Nielsen and Isaac Chuang
Cambridge University Press
Prerequisites / NoticeThe class will be taught in English language.

Basic knowledge of concepts of quantum physics and quantum systems, e.g from courses such as Phyiscs III, Quantum Mechanics I and II or courses on topics such as atomic physics, solid state physics, quantum electronics are considered helpful.

More information on this class can be found on the web site www.qudev.ethz.ch
529-0625-00LChemical EngineeringW3 credits3GW. J. Stark
AbstractChemical Engineering provides an introduction to production and process design. Beyond different types and operation of chemical or bio-reactors, issues of scaling, new synthesis methods and problems of industrial production are addressed. An introduction in heterogeneous catalysis and transport of impulse, mass and energy connect the new concepts to the basic education in chemistry and biology.
ObjectiveIntended for chemists, chemical engineers, biochemists and biologists, the course Chemical and Bioengineering 4th semester addresses the basics of production and process design. Starting with different reactors, process steps and unit operations in production, the industrial scale usage of chemicals and reagents are discussed and further illustrated by examples. Material and energy balances and the concept of selectivity are used to broaden the students view on the complexity of production and show how modern engineering can contribute to an environmentally sustainable production. In the second part of the lecture, reactors, single cells or living matter are discussed in terms of transport properties. Beyond metabolism or chemical processes, transport of impulse, mass and energy heavily influence chemical and biological processes. They are introduced simultaneously and provide a basis for the understanding of flow, diffusion and heat transport. Dimensionless numbers are used to implement transport properties in unit operations and process design. An introduction to heterogeneous catalysis connects the acquired concepts to chemistry and biology and shows how powerful new processes arise from combining molecular understanding and transport.
ContentElements of chemical transformations: preparation of reactants, reaction process, product work-up and recycling, product purification; continuous, semibatch and batch processes; material balances: chemical reactors and separation processes, multiple systems and multistage systems; energy balances: chemical reactors and separation processes, enthalpy changes, coupled material and energy balances; multiple reactions: optimisation of reactor performance, yield and selectivity; mass transport and chemical reaction: mixing effects in homogeneous and heterogeneous systems, diffusion and reaction in porous materials; heat exchange and chemical reaction: adiabatic reactors, optimum operating conditions for exothermic and endothermic equilibrium reactions, thermal runaway, reactor size and scale up.
Lecture notesSupporting material to the course is available on the homepage www.fml.ethz.ch
LiteratureLiterature and text books are announced at the beginning of the course.
701-1244-00LAerosols II: Applications in Environment and TechnologyW4 credits2V + 1UM. Gysel Beer, D. Bell, J. Slowik
AbstractThe life-cycle of atmospheric aerosols, the evolution of their physical and chemical properties, and their impacts on climate, atmospheric chemistry and health are studied in detail using examples from current research.
ObjectiveThe students achieve a profound knowledge of atmospheric aerosols and their climate and health impacts including the underlying physical and chemical processes. The students know and understand advanced experimental methods and are able to design experiments to study aforementioned impacts and processes.
ContentAtmospheric aerosols:
important sources and sinks, wet and dry deposition, chemical composition and transformation processes, importance for men and environment, interaction with the gas phase, influence on health and climate.
Lecture notesInformation is distributed during the lectures
LiteratureSeinfeld, J.H. and Pandis, S.N., Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics: From Air Pollution to Climate Change. 3rd ed., John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, 2016.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course build up on the lecture "Aerosols I: Physical and Chemical Principles"
752-3000-00LFood Process Engineering IW4 credits3VE. J. Windhab
AbstractTo procure students with the basic physics of food process engineering, especially with the mechanical futures of food systems, i.e. basic principles of engineering mechanics, of thermodynamics, fluid dynamics and of dimension analyses for process design and Non-Newtonian fluid mechanics.
Objective1. Verständnis der Grundprinzipien der Thermodynamik, Fluiddynamik und ingenieurtechnischen Apparateauslegung. 2. Anwendung dieser Prinzipien auf Prozesse der Lebensmittelverfahrenstechnik.3. Molekulares Verständnis der Fliesseigenschaften von Lebensmittelsystemen mit nicht-Newtonschem Fliessverhalten.
Content1. Einführung 2. Grundlagen der Fluiddynamik 3. Grundlagen derThermodynamik 4. Grundlagen der Mechanik 5. Austausch und Transportvorgänge 6. Grundlagen der Ingenieurtechnischen Apparateauslegung 7. Grundlagen der Rheologie 8. Grundlagen der Schüttgutmechanik
Lecture notesVorlesungsskriptum (ca. 100 Seiten, 60 Abbildungen) wird vor der ersten Vorlesung und Folien jeweils vor der Vorlesung bereit gestellt.
Literature- P. Grassmann: Einführung in die thermische Verfahrenstechnik, deGruyter Berlin, 1997 - H.D. Baehr: Thermodynamik, Springer Verlag, Berlin, 1984
Prerequisites / NoticeDie Vorlesung erfordert während des Semesters wöchentliche Vor-/Nachbereitung. Im Unterricht wird aktive Mitarbeit erwartet.
151-0593-00LEmbedded Control SystemsW4 credits6GJ. S. Freudenberg, M. Schmid Daners
AbstractThis course provides a comprehensive overview of embedded control systems. The concepts introduced are implemented and verified on a microprocessor-controlled haptic device.
ObjectiveFamiliarize students with main architectural principles and concepts of embedded control systems.
ContentAn embedded system is a microprocessor used as a component in another piece of technology, such as cell phones or automobiles. In this intensive two-week block course the students are presented the principles of embedded digital control systems using a haptic device as an example for a mechatronic system. A haptic interface allows for a human to interact with a computer through the sense of touch.

Subjects covered in lectures and practical lab exercises include:
- The application of C-programming on a microprocessor
- Digital I/O and serial communication
- Quadrature decoding for wheel position sensing
- Queued analog-to-digital conversion to interface with the analog world
- Pulse width modulation
- Timer interrupts to create sampling time intervals
- System dynamics and virtual worlds with haptic feedback
- Introduction to rapid prototyping
Lecture notesLecture notes, lab instructions, supplemental material
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite courses are Control Systems I and Informatics I.

This course is restricted to 33 students due to limited lab infrastructure. Interested students please contact Marianne Schmid Daners (E-Mail: marischm@ethz.ch)
After your reservation has been confirmed please register online at www.mystudies.ethz.ch.

Detailed information can be found on the course website
http://www.idsc.ethz.ch/education/lectures/embedded-control-systems.html
Multidisciplinary Courses
The students are free to choose individually from the Course Catalogue of ETH Zurich, ETH Lausanne and the Universities of Zurich (https://www.uzh.ch/cmsssl/en/studies/application/chmobilityin.html) and St. Gallen.
» Course Catalogue of ETH Zurich
GESS Science in Perspective
» see Science in Perspective: Type A: Enhancement of Reflection Capability
» Recommended Science in Perspective (Type B) for D-MAVT
» see Science in Perspective: Language Courses ETH/UZH
Semester Project
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-1007-00LSemester Project Micro- and Nanosystems Restricted registration - show details
Only for Micro- and Nanosystems MSc.

The subject of the Semester Project and the choice of the supervisor (ETH-professor) are to be approved in advance by the tutor.
O8 credits17AProfessors
AbstractThe semester project is designed to train the students in the solution of specific engineering problems. This makes use of the technical and social skills acquired during the master's program. Tutors propose the subject of the project, elaborate the project plan, and define the roadmap together with their students, as well as monitor the overall execution.
ObjectiveThe semester project is designed to train the students in the solution of specific engineering problems. This makes use of the technical and social skills acquired during the master's program.
Industrial Internship
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-1090-00LIndustrial Internship
Access to the company list and request for recognition under www.mavt.ethz.ch/praxis.

No registration required via myStudies.
O8 creditsexternal organisers
AbstractThe main objective of the minimum twelve-week internship is to expose Master’s students to the industrial work environment. The aim of the Industrial Internship is to apply engineering knowledge to practical situations.
ObjectiveThe aim of the Industrial Internship is to apply engineering knowledge to practical situations.
Master's Thesis
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-1006-00LMaster's Thesis Micro- and Nanosystems Restricted registration - show details
Students who fulfill the following criteria are allowed to begin with their Master's Thesis:
a. successful completion of the bachelor program;
b. fulfilling of any additional requirements necessary to gain admission to the master programme;
c. successful completion of the semester project;
d. achievement of 32 ECTS in the category "Core Courses".

The Master's Thesis must be approved in advance by the tutor and is supervised by a professor of ETH Zurich.
To choose a titular professor as a supervisor, please contact the D-MAVT Student Administration.
O30 credits64DProfessors
AbstractMaster's programs are concluded by the master's thesis. The thesis is aimed at enhancing the student's capability to work independently toward the solution of a theoretical or applied problem. The subject of the master's thesis, as well as the project plan and roadmap, are proposed by the tutor and further elaborated with the student.
ObjectiveThe thesis is aimed at enhancing the student's capability to work independently toward the solution of a theoretical or applied problem.