Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2021

GESS Science in Perspective Information
Only the courses listed below will be recognized as "GESS Science in Perspective" courses.

Further below you will find courses under the category "Type B courses Reflections about subject specific methods and content" as well as the language courses.

During the Bachelor’s degree Students should acquire at least 6 ECTS and during the Master’s degree 2 ECTS.

Students who already took a course within their main study program are NOT allowed to take the course again.
Type A: Enhancement of Reflection Competence
Suitable for all students.

Students who already took a course within their main study program are NOT allowed to take the course again.
History
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
853-0726-00LHistory II: Global (Anti-Imperialism and Decolonisation, 1919-1975)W3 credits2VB. Schär
AbstractThe lecture will give an insight into the formation of anticolonial nationalist movements in Asia and Africa from the beginning of the 20th century onwards and discuss the various dimensions of dismantling of colonial empires.
ObjectiveThe lecture will give students an insight into the history of the non-European world, looking specifically into the political, economic, social and cultural transformation on the backgrounds of colonial penetration strategies and the resistance of anti-colonial movements. The aim is to show that societies in Asia and Africa are not just the product of colonial penetration or anti-colonial resistance, but that both aspects influenced the present political, economic, social and cultural perception of these parts of the world to a considerable extent. A nuanced knowledge of the long and arduous process of decolonisation is hence important to understand today's geopolitical constellation, still characterised by the struggle for a just post-imperial world order.
LiteratureJansen, J.C. und Osterhammel, J., Dekolonisation: Das Ende der Imperien, München 2013.
Prerequisites / NoticeA detailed syllabus will be available in due course at http://www.gmw.ethz.ch/en/teaching/lehrveranstaltungen.html
851-0105-01LCross-Cultural Competences Arab World Information
Does not take place this semester.
W3 credits2V
AbstractThis lecture will discuss important topics of the Arab culture involving different value systems, world-views, and paradigms pointing to possible areas of misunderstandings and conflict in an inter-cultural setting as well as approaches to deal with these issues.
ObjectiveThis lectures gives an insight into different areas of the Arab culture such as gender roles, significance of family and marriage, concepts of honor and hierarchy, the role of religion in everyday life, being guest or host, obligations in family and society, and others. The aim is to identify different value systems, world-views and paradigms that may cause problems in an cross-cultural setting as well as possible approaches to deal with these issues. Even though most of the topics concern the Arab region as whole, the lecture will focus on the Arab East (not the Maghreb), especially Egypt, the Levant and the Gulf countries.
851-0812-08LHeureka V: Politics and Society in Discussion in Antiquity and TodayW2 credits2VC. Utzinger, M. Amann, B. Beer, A. Broger, F. Egli Utzinger, R. Harder
AbstractA Lecture Series on Ancient Greece and Rome and Their Impact on Later Periods
ObjectiveInsights into some important fields relating to politics and society in antiquity (forms of government, historical development, social context, meaning for the present).
ContentUnsere Kultur und wissenschaftliche Tradition haben eine lange Geschichte.
In der aktuellen Heureka-Reihe soll diese Kultur ausgehend von der Analyse der verschiedenen Staatsformen und der gesellschaftlichen Diskussionen beleuchtet werden. Insbesondere soll der Bezug zur heutigen Gegenwart mit ihren aktuellen staatspolitischen Fragen hergestellt und die Verwurzelung der modernen Diskussionen in der Antike aufgezeigt werden.
Dabei geht es auch um die enge Verflechtung wissenschaftlicher und technischer Entwicklungen und politischer Systeme: Die Entstehung der Demokratie im antiken Athen ging mit einer kulturellen und wissenschaftlichen Vorreiterrolle dieser Stadt einher. Die frühen Naturwissenschaften entwickelten sich parallel zur ersten Demokratie, wurden aber in der folgenden Krisenzeit von der Demokratie bedroht. Heutige Technik (z.B. facebook-Algorithmen) gefährdet umgekehrt die Demokratie.
Wie gehen wir damit um, dass in Diktaturen wissenschaftlich und ökonomisch identifizierte Handlungsfelder, wenn sie politisch anerkannt sind, sofort umgesetzt werden, wie sich aktuell an Chinas Massnahmen zur Verbesserung der Luftqualität zeigt? Naturwissenschaft steht immer im Wechselspiel mit den politischen Systemen und der gesellschaftlichen Matrix, in die sie eingebettet ist.
Veränderungen in der Staatsform können also nie isoliert betrachtet werden. Beispielsweise veränderten materialtechnische Entwicklungen im Heer mehrfach die Truppenzusammensetzung und bewirkten eine Machtverlagerung in der Politik und Gesellschaft.
Die Vorlesungsreihe gliedert sich in sechs thematische Module (1-6):
Sitzung 1-2 (Modul 1): Alle Macht dem Volk? Athenische und moderne Demokratie
Sitzung 3-4 (Modul 2): Fort mit dem König - die römische Republik
Sitzung 5-6 (Modul 3): Ein starker Mann muss her - die römische Kaiserzeit
Sitzung 7-8 (Modul 4): Im Zeichen des Kreuzes - der Aufstieg des Christentums
Sitzung 9-10 (Modul 5): Jetzt sprechen die Philosophen - antike und moderne Staatsutopien
Sitzung 11-12 (Modul 6): Die Macht der Bilder - Bilder der Macht
Sitzung 13: Lernzielkontrolle
052-0806-00LHistory and Theory of Architecture IV Information W2 credits2VL. Stalder
AbstractThis two-semester course is an introduction to the history of architecture from the Second Industrial Revolution in the 1850s to the Oil Crisis in the 1970s in Europe. Students will be able to identify the “things”—technical objects and ensembles—that transformed architecture, and to relate them to the technical, scientific, and cultural concerns that introduced them as key features of modernity.
ObjectiveTo introduce students to the history and theory of architecture, the course has three objectives.
First, students will be able to identify the “things” that transformed architecture in modernity, and the crucial events, buildings, theories, and actors that characterize their history.
Second, students will be able to describe how these “things” operated at different scales, focusing less on the formal level, and naming instead the different forms of expertise that constituted them historically, as well as the processes within which they were embedded.
Third, students will be able to reflect on a series of apparatuses, devices, and building parts that are in fact micro-architectures which have often been neglected, despite their pivotal role in shaping the daily lives of modern societies.
ContentThe course proposes a new approach to the study of the history and theory of architecture in Europe during modernity. It focuses less on single architects or their buildings, and more on those “things” that have brought profound transformations in the built environment and daily life over the last 200 years, such as the revolving door, the clock, and the partition.
The notion of “thing” includes both the concrete building parts and the concerns associated with them, such as material performance, social synchronization, and individual expression. To understand buildings as assemblages of “things,” therefore, does not mean to diminish their significance, but on the contrary to add reality to them, to understand them in terms of the complex, historically situated, and diverse concerns within which they were designed.
Each lecture introduces one “thing” through a genealogy that shaped it, from patents and scientific discoveries and technological advancement, to cinema, the visual arts, and literature. A set of renowned projects as well as lesser-known buildings from all around Europe offer a variety of case studies to describe these “things,” to understand how they operated in relation with one another, and to identify the theories and tactics that architects mobilized to make sense of them.
Lecture noteshttps://stalder.arch.ethz.ch/lectures
Prerequisites / NoticeLocation:
1. hour: Lecture: https://ethz.zoom.us/j/97527521638
2./3. hour: Seminars in groups on Zoom
701-0791-00LEnvironmental History - Introduction and Overview Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 80.
W2 credits2VM. Gisler
AbstractIntroduction into environmental history as a discipline that ask for the human-nature-relationships from a long-term and spatially defined perspective. By presenting a selection of different topics the lecture provides access to new questions and insights.
ObjectiveIntroduction into environmental history; survey of long-term development of human-nature-interrelations; discussion of selected problems. Improved ability to assess current problems from a historical perspective and to critically interrogate one's own standpoint.
ContentHumans live in and with nature, depend on it, change it permanently: as bio- and geological agents they intervene, reshape, leave prints, improve, reproduce and demonize nature; in short, they’re “doing environment”. Namely in the 20th century, the "era of ecology" (Joachim Radkau) or the age of the “Great Acceleration” (John McNeill), human interventions in their environments have increased exponentially. But nature itself is also constantly changing, adapting, striking back. This leads to a constantly changing interrelation between human and nature.
This interdependence is at the core of this lecture. The introduction into “environmental history” offers an overview of the human-environment-relationship in a long-term perspective. It outlines concepts such as the anthropocene, climate and energy as well as questions of environmental policy and the history of the environmental movements. It is meant to expand the competencies for the assessment of current problems and the critical questioning of one's own point of view.
Lecture notesCourse material is provided in digital form.
LiteratureMcNeill, John R. 2000. Something new under the sun: An environmental history of the twentieth-century world, New York: Norton.

Uekötter, Frank (Ed.) 2010. The turning points of environmental history, Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press.

Winiwarter, Verena und Martin Knoll 2007. Umweltgeschichte: Eine Einführung, Köln: Böhlau.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents are asked to write an exam during the last session
851-0080-00LNew Forms and Contents in Nonfiction Writing Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30.
W3 credits2SW. Eilenberger
AbstractThe course will give an introduction into the new forms of reflection, also of topics from the natural sciences, in nonfiction writing.
ObjectiveTo develop an understanding for the functions and forms of contemporary non-fiction. To acquire elementary competences in non-fiction writing.
ContentSachbücher (engl. non-fiction-books) erleben auf dem Buchmarkt derzeit eine Renaissance. Als primärer Zweck dieser Gattung gilt oder galt die Wissensvermittlung, insbesondere als Vermittlung wissenschaftlich generierter Inhalte an ein breites Lesepublikum.
Die Entwicklung der Gattung dient damit als aussagekräftiger Indikator für die Dynamik des Verhältnisses von Wissenschaft, Wissensvermittlung sowie den diesbezüglichen Erwartungshorizonten einer interessierten Öffentlichkeit.
Anhand ausgewählter Publikationen (und daran anschließenden Übungen) wird der Kurs diesen Dynamiken nachgehen und dabei insbesondere neuere formale wie inhaltliche Entwicklungslinien untersuchen, wie etwa der Trend zum narrativen Sachbuch, zu explizit wissenschaftskritischen Sachbüchern oder auch stark prominenzgetragenen Publikationen.
851-0008-00LBan on Alcohol and Science: A Global History of Prohibition 1918-1939 Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
W3 credits2S
AbstractThe seminar deals with an overview on anti-alcohol campaigns since late 19th century. The focus is on prohibition in the interwar period in different regions. The role of scientific experts in the emergence of prohibition will be discussed from a global historical perspective. Formation of international networks and process of knowledge production on the issue of alcohol are subjects of analysis.
ObjectiveThe reconstruction of the development of prohibitionist regimes helps to understand the process of national institution formations, for example health services. Participants analyze interactions between science, international relations and change of social political context in the process of knowledge production and in the definition of daily life norms on drinking habits.
851-0181-00LA New History of Greek Mathematics Restricted registration - show details W3 credits2VR. Wagner
AbstractThis course will review parts of the history of ancient Greek mathematics, evaluate its characteristic features, attempt to explain them, and reflect on their relation to contemporary mathematics.
ObjectiveThe students will have an overview knowledge of Greek mathematics, and will be able to reflect on it in historical terms and in relation to modern mathematics.
ContentWe will follow extracts from Reviel Netz's upcoming monograph entitled "A new history of Greek mathematics".
851-0182-00LFrom Economy to Mathematics and Back: A History of Interactions Restricted registration - show details W3 credits2SR. Wagner
AbstractThis course will review several historical episodes where economy shaped mathematics, and where mathematics re-shaped economy.
ObjectiveStudents will understand how different fields of knowledge can interact in various historical situations. They will also be able to describe various episodes in the history of mathematics and economy.
ContentThe first part of the course will study how practices related to money and commerce affected the development of mathematics in antiquity and the middle ages. The second part will study how mathematical entities shaped the study of various economic problems in the 19th and 20th century. We will review methodologies based on Marxist historiography, sociology of science and contemporary science studies.
851-0297-00LManipulation in Literature and Cultural HistoryW3 credits2VS. S. Leuenberger
AbstractThis lecture focuses on the manipulation and control of individuals and the masses. The power of manipulation is based on subtle use of persuasive linguistic elements and knowledge of the desires and fears of the intended audience. In addition to a theoretical overview, the lecture concentrates on the literary and discursive texts that dispute the control of protagonists.
ObjectiveStudents will learn about manipulation as a linguistic and narrative phenomenon steeped in myth and classical rhetoric. Against the backdrop of cultural-historical developments, particularly with regard to major changes in media technology, we will examine how the reach of manipulation was extended from the individual to the masses. Students will be able to refine their critical discourse analysis skills and interdisciplinary abilities by studying texts from literature, politics, sociology, philosophy and psychoanalysis which reflect this shift in emphasis.
ContentSince the dawn of time mankind has tried to exert influence over others through the utilisation of certain techniques: initially for self-preservation – for example the interpretation of Sigmund Freud in Totem und Tabu. Later, desire became the driving force – centre stage: the desire for pleasure, power and control. Manipulation manifests itself in the form of characters and words, it is an authentically linguistic occurrence: classical antiquity, with the rhetoric, develops a system of verbal power of persuasion and, already then, questions were being raised in literary and discursive texts about how people could, or even should, manipulate. The exertion of influence and its impact will be clearly described, propagated, commented upon, criticised and ironised.
In contrast to oppressive overpowering, the power of manipulation (in Latin, manus hand, plere fill) is on the one hand, based on the subtle use of persuasive linguistic elements – it is always a (literary) discourse, too – and on the other, on knowing precisely what the fantasies, desires and fears of the manipulated are. The discourse of manipulation has its beginnings in the age of sophists and their belief in an omnipotence of language and rhetoric. It underwent further transformation under political and psychological signs in the early modern period through Giordano Bruno and Niccolò Machiavelli and culminated in the 20th century in a critique of the deception strategies of the “culture industry” (T.W Adorno) and “psychotechnology” (B. Stiegler) in global capitalism. Nowadays social media is the “radicalisation machine” (J. Ebner) that present new challenges for society. Written in the 19th century, the Protocols of the Elders of Zion already gave indications of how present-day conspiracy theorists would manipulate their audience, and its impact can still be felt today. Since manipulation is a linguistic, narrative and also literary phenomenon, the central theme of the lecture is how in literature itself this often politically controversial and manipulative behaviour is picked up and reflected through poetry: such as in Tristan from Gottfried von Strassburg, Goethe’s Wilhelm Meister, Friedrich Schiller’s Die Verschwörung des Fiesco zu Genua or Heinrich von Kleist’s Der zerbrochne Krug, the works of Edgar Allan Poe and Thomas Mann (Mario und der Zauberer) and, most recently in Eckhart Nickel’s novel, Hysteria.
851-0525-00LA History of Personal Computing Restricted registration - show details W3 credits2SR. Wichum, M. Mayer
AbstractThe seminar will examine how the personal computer shaped different digital spaces. How personal could a computer actually be? What spaces of user autonomy did operating systems and software create?
ObjectiveStudents become familiar with the interdependence of technical and social change through the history of computers, media and science. It is a text-based seminar. In addition, we practice the handling of source material.
ContentSince the 1980’s computers are placed on office desks or even in a corner of a private hobby room. Silicon chips and developments in microprocessor technology made the size of computers shrink. The personal computer was the result of this technological development. However, how personal could a computer actually be? What spaces of user autonomy did operating systems and software create? The seminar will examine how the personal computer shaped different digital spaces. We research the negotiations between technology and society.
851-0526-00LProducing Emptiness and Working with Nothing. Vacuum Technology in the 20th Century Restricted registration - show details W3 credits2SD. Gugerli, R. Delucchi
AbstractThe seminar examines the powerful effects of emptiness. We want to understand the materiality, the production and the (industrial) effects of the liminal space called “vacuum", on which scientists and engineers worked in the 20th century. We observe pumps, coating systems, rockets and thin films in essays and catalogs, at exhibitions and in patents.
ObjectiveStudents learn to read very different types of text against the grain and understand technical change.
Lecture notesThe reading program is available on Moodle at the beginning of the semester. Participation in the sessions is required. A graded semester performance will take place. Students should complete research tasks resulting from the individual sessions.
Prerequisites / NoticeDie Zahl der Teilnehmenden ist auf 40 beschränkt.
851-0088-00LHistory and Philosophy of Artificial Intelligence Restricted registration - show details W3 credits2SO. Del Fabbro
AbstractIn this course we read important texts in the historical development of the field of artificial intelligence, for example: Alan Turing, Warren McCulloch & Walter Pitts, John Searle's Chinese Room Argument, Ray Kurzweil's Singularity etc. The main focus of the seminar is to trace the development of the field of AI and to better understand what the concept of intelligence means in this context.
ObjectiveStudents should learn to critically assess historical, scientific and philosophical texts. The focus will lie on the field of artificial intelligence and the concept of intelligence. Students should learn about the different types of argumentative texts and scientific theories. They should learn to understand the descriptive and critical value of texts.
851-0173-00LHistory of Formal Logic: The Emergence of Boolean Logic Restricted registration - show details W3 credits2VJ. L. Gastaldi
AbstractThe invention of Boolean logic in the middle of the 19th century is considered a major event in the history of modern thought. However, Boole’s original system does not correspond to what we came to understand as Boolean logic.
We will study the early history of Boolean logic in relation to the mathematics of its epoch, in search of an alternative philosophy of formal knowledge for the present.
ObjectiveDuring the course, students will be able to:
-Acquire a general perspective on the history of formal logic
-Review relevant aspects of the history of modern mathematics
-Obtain philosophical and historical tools for critically assessing the status of formal sciences
-Develop a critical understanding of the notion of formal
-Discuss the methodological capabilities of historical epistemology
ContentThe invention of Boolean logic in the middle of the 19th century is considered a major event in the history of modern thought. Boolean algebras and Boolean rings lay at the basis of propositional logic and digital communication, contributing in a decisive way to the theoretical and technical conditions of our time. However, if attention is paid to Boole’s own work, it will quickly appear that his Calculus of Logic does not correspond to what we came to understand as Boolean logic. Instead of disregarding those differences as inevitable mistakes of any pioneering enterprise, waiting to be corrected by successive developments, we will try to understand them as the sign of an alternative philosophy of logic and formal knowledge, which later developments excluded and forgot, and from which recent advances in formal sciences could take advantage. Such an inquiry will give us the occasion of exploring the philosophical and scientific landscape in which formal logic emerged in the first half of the 19th century (focusing on the works of Babbage, De Morgan and Boole), and to build a critical perspective on the notion of “formal”, at the crossroad of the history and philosophy of mathematics and logic.
851-0009-00LThe 'Dutch East Indies' and Science in German Speaking Europe, c. 1800-1950 Restricted registration - show details W3 credits2SB. Schär, M. Ligtenberg
AbstractBetween about 1800 and 1945 the Netherlands was a small country with a huge empire in what is now Indonesia and the Caribbean. In order to conquer and explore this empire, the Dutch depended also on the help of German-speaking scientists. How did German-speaking science and Dutch imperialism mutually benefit from each other? What consequences did it have for whom?
ObjectiveStudents learn about new approaches to the global history of knowledge. They gain insights into Dutch colonial history in present-day Indonesia, as well as into the history of various disciplines such as geography, biology or anthropology. They will learn to create their own analyses of the relationship between science and imperialism using sources.
ContentAs a small country with the second largest colonial empire after Great Britain, the Netherlands was permanently dependent on more imperial know-how, capital and expertise in the 19th and 20th centuries than it had available on its own territory. This opened up opportunities for development above all for those European regions that late or never formed their own colonial empires overseas. This is particularly true for German-speaking Europe. In the 19th century, German-speaking researchers and universities rose to become the world leaders of their kind. A substantial part of the German-speaking history of science unfolded in the "Dutch East Indies", today's Indonesia. However, the close and long-lasting historical relations between German-speaking science and Dutch imperialism in this region have hardly been examined by historians so far. In this seminar we will first of all use the secondary literature to gain an overview of the development of this relationship. Using case studies and historical source materials, we will then develop a deeper understanding of the ways in which the German-speaking sciences and their research institutions and the project of Dutch imperialism influenced each other. Particular attention will be paid to the question of what role Southeast Asian knowledge Producers played in the colonial construction of German-language scientific knowledge.
851-0010-00LGlobal Histories of the Anthropocene Restricted registration - show details W3 credits2ST. Bartoletti
AbstractThe seminar will critically examine the discursive history of the Anthropocene. It gives an overview of debates on the Anthropocene narrative and its transdisciplinary framework. A global history approach to these debates arises as a substantial contribution to better analyze global processes of exploitation of natural resources, territorial dispossession and imperialism.
ObjectiveThe aim is to examine how natural scientists and historians analyze climate change and the human imprint on the environment, processing data in a transdisciplinary way. Students will select a research project related to climate change, environmental research or similar issues conducted at ETH Zurich and write an essay on how the Anthropocene narrative operates in the scientific agenda.
ContentAccording to the standard Anthropocene narrative, the Industrial Revolution marks the onset of large-scale human modification of the earth. Nevertheless, several scholars, especially from the global south, have noted that the Anthropocene concept constructs a single and unilineal narrative about humans as a species. Only considering measurements of carbon dioxide levels, it naturalizes the specific cultural behaviors (colonialism, inequality, etc.) arguably responsible for climate change. Contrary to ‘pure’ natural science and ‘human species’ explanations, this Eurocentric pattern has been strongly questioned due to its lack of socio-historical differentiation and intra-species distinction. For example, as of 2008, the advanced countries of the ‘North’ accounted for 18.8 percent of the world population and were responsible for 72.7 percent of the carbon dioxide emitted since 1850, while the poorest 45 percent of the human population accounted for 7 percent of emissions. Is it methodologically appropriate to refer to all humans as agents of a new geological era? This seminar will explore the slipping between natural/cultural explanations and critically tackle how the Anthropocene narrative is marking scientific and political agendas.
851-0157-49LWhat is Life? Introdution Into the History of the Life SciencesW3 credits2VM. Hagner
AbstractThe aim of this lecture is to introduce into the most important theories of life from ancient times until the early 21st century. I will put a focus on philosophical concepts and on the modern life sciences since Chalres Darwin.
ObjectiveIn the lecture course, attendants will learn to distinguish historically and systematically various theories of life.
851-0157-74LPhotography Between Science and Art Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 20
W3 credits2SM. Hagner
AbstractThis seminar is devoted to the role of photography in art and science since its beginnings in 1839. We will read selected texts on the theory of photography and analyse photographs for getting an overview over its fascinating history.
ObjectiveWhen photography started to conquer the world in 1839, it was unclear whether it belonged to the arts or to the sciences. Since those times and despite the digital revolution, this double function of photography has not changed significantly. The aim of this seminar is twofold: First, we want to reconstruct the transformations of photography in the trading zone of the sciences and the arts. Second, we want to analyse epistemological and aesthetical theories, which reflect the function of photography. The use of the photography archive of ETH Zurich will be part of the seminar.
Literature
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
851-0080-00LNew Forms and Contents in Nonfiction Writing Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30.
W3 credits2SW. Eilenberger
AbstractThe course will give an introduction into the new forms of reflection, also of topics from the natural sciences, in nonfiction writing.
ObjectiveTo develop an understanding for the functions and forms of contemporary non-fiction. To acquire elementary competences in non-fiction writing.
ContentSachbücher (engl. non-fiction-books) erleben auf dem Buchmarkt derzeit eine Renaissance. Als primärer Zweck dieser Gattung gilt oder galt die Wissensvermittlung, insbesondere als Vermittlung wissenschaftlich generierter Inhalte an ein breites Lesepublikum.
Die Entwicklung der Gattung dient damit als aussagekräftiger Indikator für die Dynamik des Verhältnisses von Wissenschaft, Wissensvermittlung sowie den diesbezüglichen Erwartungshorizonten einer interessierten Öffentlichkeit.
Anhand ausgewählter Publikationen (und daran anschließenden Übungen) wird der Kurs diesen Dynamiken nachgehen und dabei insbesondere neuere formale wie inhaltliche Entwicklungslinien untersuchen, wie etwa der Trend zum narrativen Sachbuch, zu explizit wissenschaftskritischen Sachbüchern oder auch stark prominenzgetragenen Publikationen.
851-0347-00LThe Worlds of LiteratureW3 credits2VD. Eribon
AbstractWe will try to see how literature has tackled multiple historical, social, political questions by inscribing them in individual and collective trajectories, through biographical, autobiographical, autofictional, autoanalytical writing.
ObjectiveIn this light, we will reread French-speaking authors such as Paul Nizan, Aimé Césaire, Léon-Gontran Damas, Edouard Glissant, Maryse Condé, Patrick Chamoiseau, André Gide, Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Jean Genet, Violette Leduc, Annie Ernaux, Edouard Louis… By placing their works next to those of non-French-speaking authors who proceed in a comparable manner.
Content"I was born in 1842" writes Assia Djebar in the first volume of her autobiography, “L’amour, la fantasia”, published in 1985. That is, when the French colonial troops burned down the village of her ancestors. For her, born in 1936, restoring her personal history therefore amounts to restoring and exploring the history of Algeria for a century and a half. Taking this striking example as a starting point, we will try to see how literature has tackled multiple historical, social, political questions by inscribing them in individual and collective trajectories, through biographical, autobiographical, autofictional, autoanalytical writing. In this light, we will reread French-speaking authors such as (among others, of course) Paul Nizan, Aimé Césaire, Léon-Gontran Damas, Edouard Glissant, Maryse Condé, Patrick Chamoiseau, André Gide, Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Jean Genet, Violette Leduc, Annie Ernaux, Edouard Louis… By placing their works next to those of non-French-speaking authors who proceed in a comparable manner.
Prerequisites / NoticeDer Kurs wird online als Webinar stattfinden.
851-0348-00LThe Italian Nation from Risorgimento to Fascism: Images, Symbols, StructuresW3 credits2VA. M. Banti
AbstractThe course will examine the process of formation of a national-patriotic movement in the Italy of the Risorgimento, and then move on to investigate the methods of "nationalization of the masses" in liberal (1861-1922) and fascist (1922-1945) Italy.
ObjectiveI will pay particular attention to the narratives and symbols that give life to the idea of nation, guided by these questions: is there a transformation of the ethical and symbolic materials that structure the national-patriotic discourse from the nineteenth century to the fall of fascism? And what legacy has all this left to Italy today?
ContentThe course will examine the process of formation of a national-patriotic movement in the Italy of the Risorgimento, and then move on to investigate the methods of "nationalization of the masses" in liberal (1861-1922) and fascist (1922-1945) Italy. I will pay particular attention to the narratives and symbols that give life to the idea of nation, guided by these questions: is there a transformation of the ethical and symbolic materials that structure the national-patriotic discourse from the nineteenth century to the fall of fascism? And what legacy has all this left to Italy today?
851-0297-00LManipulation in Literature and Cultural HistoryW3 credits2VS. S. Leuenberger
AbstractThis lecture focuses on the manipulation and control of individuals and the masses. The power of manipulation is based on subtle use of persuasive linguistic elements and knowledge of the desires and fears of the intended audience. In addition to a theoretical overview, the lecture concentrates on the literary and discursive texts that dispute the control of protagonists.
ObjectiveStudents will learn about manipulation as a linguistic and narrative phenomenon steeped in myth and classical rhetoric. Against the backdrop of cultural-historical developments, particularly with regard to major changes in media technology, we will examine how the reach of manipulation was extended from the individual to the masses. Students will be able to refine their critical discourse analysis skills and interdisciplinary abilities by studying texts from literature, politics, sociology, philosophy and psychoanalysis which reflect this shift in emphasis.
ContentSince the dawn of time mankind has tried to exert influence over others through the utilisation of certain techniques: initially for self-preservation – for example the interpretation of Sigmund Freud in Totem und Tabu. Later, desire became the driving force – centre stage: the desire for pleasure, power and control. Manipulation manifests itself in the form of characters and words, it is an authentically linguistic occurrence: classical antiquity, with the rhetoric, develops a system of verbal power of persuasion and, already then, questions were being raised in literary and discursive texts about how people could, or even should, manipulate. The exertion of influence and its impact will be clearly described, propagated, commented upon, criticised and ironised.
In contrast to oppressive overpowering, the power of manipulation (in Latin, manus hand, plere fill) is on the one hand, based on the subtle use of persuasive linguistic elements – it is always a (literary) discourse, too – and on the other, on knowing precisely what the fantasies, desires and fears of the manipulated are. The discourse of manipulation has its beginnings in the age of sophists and their belief in an omnipotence of language and rhetoric. It underwent further transformation under political and psychological signs in the early modern period through Giordano Bruno and Niccolò Machiavelli and culminated in the 20th century in a critique of the deception strategies of the “culture industry” (T.W Adorno) and “psychotechnology” (B. Stiegler) in global capitalism. Nowadays social media is the “radicalisation machine” (J. Ebner) that present new challenges for society. Written in the 19th century, the Protocols of the Elders of Zion already gave indications of how present-day conspiracy theorists would manipulate their audience, and its impact can still be felt today. Since manipulation is a linguistic, narrative and also literary phenomenon, the central theme of the lecture is how in literature itself this often politically controversial and manipulative behaviour is picked up and reflected through poetry: such as in Tristan from Gottfried von Strassburg, Goethe’s Wilhelm Meister, Friedrich Schiller’s Die Verschwörung des Fiesco zu Genua or Heinrich von Kleist’s Der zerbrochne Krug, the works of Edgar Allan Poe and Thomas Mann (Mario und der Zauberer) and, most recently in Eckhart Nickel’s novel, Hysteria.
851-0340-00LWriting Technology: Cyborgs, Cybernetics, and Translating MachinesW3 credits2VP. Gerard
AbstractIn this course we will examine the two sides of writing technology. On the one hand, we will direct our attention to that most conspicuous writing technology of our world: the digital writing of modern computers.
ObjectiveOn the other hand, we will consider a set of fictional works that imagine the future of technology in writing. More profoundly, however, we will explore the nature and limits of the being who both writes and is written by these technologies, the being we used to call human but which, if we follow the reasoning of Donna Haraway, long ago became an organic-mechanical hybrid—a cyborg.
ContentIn this course students will familiarize themselves with ideas central to both the modern study of literature and the historical development of information technologies. Through a mixture of literary and non-literary texts, we will examine notions like “code,” “medium,” and “translation” as concepts, metaphors, and formal practices. Our readings will range from the early work on cybernetics by Norbert Wiener, Alain Turing, and Claude Shannon to texts on media theory by Marshall McLuhan and Friedrich Kittler to classic science fiction novels by Philip K. Dick and Samuel R. Delaney. To give students a sense of the consequences of information theory for literary studies, and to introduce the historical links between communication technology, translation, and Global English, we will compare Edgar Allen Poe’s short story “The Gold Bug” with its translation into BASIC-English, a “universal” language composed of 850 English words selected according to statistical principles. Finally, we will consider the experimental literary form of Samuel Beckett’s Watt, a novel whose prose attains a degree of algorithmic formalization that brings English, as Hugh Kenner once said, “close to the language of digital computers.”
LiteratureNorbert Wiener, The Human Use of Human Beings
Alan Turing, Computing Machinery and Intelligence
Claude Shannon, “The Mathematical Theory of Communication”

Marshall McLuhan, Understanding Media
Friedrich Kittler, Literature, Media, Information Systems
Donna Haraway, A Cyborg Manifesto

Philip K. Dick, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
Samuel R. Delaney, Babel-17
Edgar Allen Poe, “The Gold Bug” / “The Gold Insect”
Samuel Beckett, Watt
851-0303-00LEconomy and LiteratureW3 credits2SA. Kilcher, C. Weidmann
AbstractEconomics and literature are closely related: Literature does not only deal with economic conditions, but follows economic principles on a poetological level. Conversely, the economic knowledge production draws on its poetology. In the seminar, we will look at how a «rhetoric of economics» connects the poetological with methods of natural and social sciences.
Objective- Economic theories from the point of view of cultural studies and sciences
- Poetology from an economic perspective
- Basic literary texts of the modern age
- Poetology of Knowledge
ContentAs different as they may appear at first glance, economy and literature are deeply intertwined. In general, the economic - from the drama of the 18th century (Nathan the Wise, Faust) to the modern novel (Emma Bovary, Oliver Twist, Alice in Wonderland, Buddenbrooks) to the science fiction of the 20th century where technological invention is always organized around economic structures of innovation - is a structural motif that addresses both social, technological and poetological conditions. But literature and economics are, more fundamentally, structurally analogous in many respects: Both are described by scientific disciplines that can hardly be separated from their object of investigation and tend to appropriate methods of other sciences, both deal with issues of resource allocation and contingency management. Money and signs work in the same way, in that (both) their values are neither just real (natural) nor merely simulated (fictitious), but are negotiated in complex social processes. In the seminar, this connection is to be tackled from several angles: on the one hand, with a view on economic motives in literature and their principles of allocation, on the other hand, on the economic prerequisites for writing, and conversely, with regard to the importance of literature for economic argumentation and knowledge production at large (rhetoric of economics). This relationship will prove to be exemplary of how scientific methods (e. g. Econometrics, simulation), the rhetorics at heart of natural and social sciences (e. g. rational agent model, statistics), and historical readings (e. g. economic history) make use of the poetological whenever there is a need to unveil a ‘concealed’ reality, e.g. nature that first has to be understood.
Economics
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
363-0532-00LEconomics of Sustainable DevelopmentW3 credits2VL. Bretschger
AbstractConcepts and indicators of sustainable development, paradigms of weak and strong sustainability;
neoclassical and endogenous growth models;
economic growth in the presence of exhaustible and renewable resources; pollution, environmental policy and growth;
role of substitution and technological progress;
Environmental Kuznets Curve; sustainability policy.
ObjectiveThe aim is to develop an understanding of the implications of sustainable development for the long-run development of economies. It is to be shown to which extent the potential for growth to be sustainable depends on substitution possibilities, technological change and environmental policy.
After successful completion of this course, students are able to
1. understand the causes of long-term economic development
2. analyse the influence of natural resources and pollution on the development of social welfare
3. to appropriately classify the role of politics in the pursuit of sustainability goals.
ContentThe lecture introduces different concepts and paradigms of sustainable development. Building on this foundation and following a general introduction to the modelling of economic growth, conditions for growth to be sustainable in the presence of pollution and scarce natural resources are derived. Special attention is devoted to the scope for substitution and role of technological progress in overcoming resource scarcities. Implications of environmental externalities are regarded with respect to the design of environmental policies.
Concepts and indicators of sustainable development, paradigms of weak and strong sustainability, sustainability optimism vs. pessimism;
introduction to neoclassical and endogenous growth models;
pollution, environmental policy and growth;
role of substitution possibilities and technological progress;
Environmental Kuznets Curve: concept, theory and empirical results;
economic growth in the presence of exhaustible and renewable resources, Hartwick rule, resource saving technological change.
Lecture notesWill be provided successively in the course of the semester.
LiteratureBretschger, F. (1999), Growth Theory and Sustainable Development, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.

Bretschger, L. (2004), Wachstumstheorie, Oldenbourg, 3. Auflage, München.

Bretschger, L. (2018), Greening Economy, Graying Society, CER-ETH Press, ETH Zurich.

Perman, R., Y. Ma, J. McGilvray and M. Common (2011), Natural Resource and Environmental Economics, Longman , 4th ed., Essex.

Neumayer, E. (2003), Weak and Strong Sustainability, 2nd ed., Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.
363-0564-00LEntrepreneurial RisksW3 credits2GD. Sornette
AbstractDimensions of risks with emphasis on entrepreneurial, financial and social risks.

What young entrepreneurs need to know from start-up creation to investment in innovation.

Perspectives on the future of innovation and how to better invent and create.

How to innovate and scale up and work with China.

Dynamical risk management and learning from the failure of others.
ObjectiveWe live a in complex world with many nonlinear
negative and positive feedbacks. Entrepreneurship is one of
the leading human activity based on innovation to create
new wealth and new social developments. This course will
analyze the risks (upside and downside) associated with
entrepreneurship and more generally human activity
in the firms, in social networks and in society.
The goal is to present what we believe are the key concepts
and the quantitative tools to understand and manage risks.
An emphasis will be on large and extreme risks, known
to control many systems, and which require novel ways
of thinking and of managing. We will examine the questions
of (i) how much one can manage and control these risks,
(ii) how these actions may feedback positively or negatively
and (iii) how to foster human cooperation for the creation
of wealth and social well-being.

The exam will be in the format of multiple choice questions.
ContentPART I: INTRODUCTION

Lecture 1 (19/02): Risks (and opportunities) in the economic, entrepreneurial and social spheres
(D. Sornette)


PART II: START-UPS AND INVESTMENT IN INNOVATION

Lecture 2 (26/02): Setting the landscape on entrepreneurship and private investment
(P. Cauwels)

Lecture 3 (04/03 and 11/03): Corporate finance
(P. Cauwels)

Lecture 4 (18/03): Legal, governance and management
(P. Cauwels)

Lecture 5 (25/03): Investors in the innovation economy
(P. Cauwels)


PART III: HOW TO PREDICT THE FUTURE

Lecture 6 (01/04): Historical perspective
(P. Cauwels)

Lecture 7 (08/04): The logistic equation of growth and saturation
(D. Sornette)

Lecture 8 (22/04): Future perspective
(P. Cauwels)

Lecture 9 (29/04): The fair reward problem, the illusion of success and how to solve it
(P. Cauwels)


PART IV: HOW TO WORK WITH CHINA
“if China succeeds, the world succeeds; if China fails, the world fails” (D. Sornette).

Lecture 10 (06/05): The macro status in China and the potential opportunity and risks for the world
(K. Wu)

Lecture 11 (13/05): The collision of the two opposite mindsets: Innovation and Entrepreneurship in China and Switzerland
(K. Wu)


PART V: ESSENTIALS ON DYNAMICAL RISK MANAGEMENT

Lecture 12 (20/05): Principles of Risk Management for entrepreneurship
(D. Sornette)

Lecture 13 (27/05): The biology of risks and war principles applied to management
(D. Sornette)
Lecture notesThe lecture notes will be distributed a the beginning of
each lecture.
LiteratureI will use elements taken from my books

-D. Sornette
Critical Phenomena in Natural Sciences,
Chaos, Fractals, Self-organization and Disorder: Concepts and Tools,
2nd ed. (Springer Series in Synergetics, Heidelberg, 2004)

-Y. Malevergne and D. Sornette
Extreme Financial Risks (From Dependence to Risk Management)
(Springer, Heidelberg, 2006).

-D. Sornette,
Why Stock Markets Crash
(Critical Events in Complex Financial Systems),
(Princeton University Press, 2003)

as well as from a variety of other sources, which will be
indicated to the students during each lecture.
Prerequisites / Notice-A deep curiosity and interest in asking questions and in attempting to
understand and manage the complexity of the corporate, financial
and social world

-quantitative skills in mathematical analysis and algebra
for the modeling part.
363-1039-00LIntroduction to NegotiationW3 credits2GM. Ambühl
AbstractThe course introduces students to the concepts, theories, and strategies of negotiation and is enriched with an extensive exploration of real-life case-study examples.
ObjectiveThe objective of the course is to teach students to recognize, understand, and approach different negotiation situations, by relying on a range of primarily quantitative and some qualitative analytical tools.
ContentWe all negotiate on a daily basis – on a personal level with friends, family, and service providers, on a professional level with employers and clients, among others. Additionally, negotiations are constantly unfolding across various issues at the political level, from solving armed conflicts to negotiating trade and market access deals.

The course aims to provide students with a toolbox of analytical methods that can be used to identify and disentangle negotiation situations, as well as serve as a reference point to guide action in practice. The applicability of these analytical methods is illustrated through examples of negotiation situations from international politics and business.

The theoretical part of the course covers diverse perspectives on negotiation: with a key focus on game theory, but also covering Harvard principles of negotiation, as well as the negotiation engineering approach developed by Prof. Ambühl at ETH Zurich. The course also dedicates some time to focus on conflict management as a specific category of negotiation situations and briefly introduces students to the social aspects of negotiation, based on the insights from psychology and behavioral economics.

The empirical part of the course draws on case-studies from the realm of international politics and business, including examples from Prof. Ambühl’s work as a career diplomat. Every year, the course also hosts two guest lecturers – representatives from politics or business leaders, who share practical experience on negotiations from their careers.
LiteratureThe list of relevant references will be distributed in the beginning of the course.
364-0576-00LAdvanced Sustainability Economics Information
PhD course, open for MSc students
W3 credits3GL. Bretschger, A. Pattakou
AbstractThe course covers current resource and sustainability economics, including ethical foundations of sustainability, intertemporal optimisation in capital-resource economies, sustainable use of non-renewable and renewable resources, pollution dynamics, population growth, and sectoral heterogeneity. A final part is on empirical contributions, e.g. the resource curse, energy prices, and the EKC.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of the current issues and economic methods in sustainability research; ability to solve typical problems like the calculation of the growth rate under environmental restriction with the help of appropriate model equations.
351-0578-00LIntroduction to Economic Policy Restricted registration - show details W2 credits2VH. Mikosch
AbstractFirst approach to the theory of economic policy.
ObjectiveFirst approach to the theory of economic policy.
ContentWirtschaftspolitik ist die Gesamtheit aller Massnahmen von staatlichen Institutionen mit denen das Wirtschaftsgeschehen geregelt und gestaltet wird. Die Vorlesung bietet einen ersten Zugang zur Theorie der Wirtschaftspolitik.

Gliederung der Vorlesung:

1.) Wohlfahrtsökonomische Grundlagen: Wohlfahrtsfunktion, Pareto-Optimalität, Wirtschaftspolitik als Mittel-Zweck-Analyse u.a.

2.) Wirtschaftsordnungen: Geplante und ungeplante Ordnung
3.) Wettbewerb und Effizienz: Hauptsätze der Wohlfahrtsökonomik, Effizienz von Wettbewerbsmärkten
4.) Wettbewerbspolitik: Sicherstellung einer wettbewerblichen Ordnung

Gründe für Marktversagen:
5.) Externe Effekte
6.) Öffentliche Güter
7.) Natürliche Monopole
8.) Informationsasymmetrien
9.) Anpassungskosten
10.) Irrationalität

11.) Wirtschaftspolitik und Politische Ökonomie

Die Vorlesung beinhaltet Anwendungsbeispiele und Exkurse, um eine Verbindung zwischen Theorie und Praxis der Wirtschaftspolitik herzustellen. Z. B. Verteilungseffekte von wirtschaftspolitischen Massnahmen, Kartellpolitik am Ölmarkt, Internalisierung externer Effekte durch Emissionshandel, moralisches Risiko am Finanzmarkt, Nudging, zeitinkonsistente Präferenzen im Bereich der Gesundheitspolitik
Lecture notesJa (in Form von Vorlesungsslides).
701-0758-00LEcological Economics: Introduction with Focus on Growth CriticsW2 credits2VI. Seidl
AbstractStudents become acquainted with the basics / central questions / analyses of Ecological Economics. Thereby, central will be the topic of economic growth. What are the positions of Ecological Economics in this regard? What are the theories and concepts to found this position in general and in particular economic areas (e.g. resource consumption, efficiency, consumption, labour market, enterprises)?
ObjectiveBecome acquainted with basics and central questions of Ecological Economics (EE): e.g. 'pre-analytic vision', field of discipline, development EE, contributions of involved disciplines such as ecology or political sciences, ecological-economic analysis of topics such as labour market, consumption, money. Critical analysis of growth and learning about approaches to reduce growth pressures.
ContentWhat is Ecological Economics, what are the topics?
Field of the discipline and basics
Resource consumption, its development and measurements
Measurement of economic activity and welfare
Economic growth, growth critics and post-growth society
Consumption, Money, Enterprises, labour market and growth pressures
Starting points for a post-growth society
Lecture notesNo Script. Slides and texts will be provided beforehand.
LiteratureDaly, H. E. / Farley, J. (2004). Ecological Economics. Principles and Applications. Washington, Island Press.

Seidl, I. /Zahrnt A. (2010). Postwachstumsgesellschaft. Konzepte für die Zukunft, Marburg, Metropolis
Seidl, I. /Zahrnt A. (2019). Tätigsein in der Postwachstumsgesellschaft, Marburg, Metropolis

Ausgewählte wissenschaftliche Artikel.
Prerequisites / NoticeParticipation in a lecture on environmental economics or otherwise basic knowledge of economics (e.g. A-Level)
751-1500-00LDevelopment EconomicsW3 credits2VI. Günther, K. Harttgen
AbstractIntroduction into basic theoretical and empirical aspects of economic development. Prescriptive theory of economic policy for poverty reduction.
ObjectiveThe goal of this lecture is to introduce students to basic development economics and related economic and developmental contexts.
ContentThe course begins with a theoretical and empirical introduction to the concepts of poverty reduction and issues of combating socioeconomic inequality. Based on this, important external and internal drivers of economic development and poverty reduction are discussed as well as economic and development policies to overcome global poverty. In particular, the following topics are discussed:

- measurement of development, poverty and inequality,
- growth theories
- trade and development
- education, health, population and development
- states and institutions
- fiscal,monetary- and exchange rate policies
Lecture notesNone.
LiteratureGünther, Harttgen und Michaelowa (2020): Einführung in die Entwicklungsökonomik.
Prerequisites / NoticeVoraussetzungen:
Grundlagenkenntisse der Mikro- und Makroökonomie.

Besonderes:
Die Veranstaltung besteht aus einem Vorlesungsteil, aus eigener Literatur- und Recherchearbeit sowie der Bearbeitung von Aufgabenblättern.

Die Vorlesung basiert auf: Günther, Harttgen und Michaelowa (2019): Einführung in die Entwicklungsökonomik. Einzelne Kapitel müssen jeweils vor den Veranstaltungen gelesen werden. In den Veranstaltungen wird das Gelesene diskutiert und angewendet. Auch werden offene Fragen der Kapitel und Übungen besprochen.
860-0032-00LIntroductory Macroeconomics Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants is limited to 30.
Prerequisite: An introductory course in Economics is required to sign up for this course.

Priority for Science, Technology, and Policy MSc.
W3 credits2VR. Pleninger
AbstractThis course examines the behaviour of macroeconomic variables, such as gross domestic product, unemployment and inflation rates. It tries to answer questions like: How can we explain fluctuations of national economic activity? What can economic policy do against unemployment and inflation?
ObjectiveThis lecture will introduce the fundamentals of macroeconomic theory and explain their relevance to every-day economic problems.
ContentThis course helps you understand the world in which you live. There are many questions about the macroeconomy that might spark your curiosity. Why are living standards so meagre in many African countries? Why do some countries have high rates of inflation while others have stable prices? Why have some European countries adopted a common currency? These are just a few of the questions that this course will help you answer. Furthermore, this course will give you a better understanding of the potential and limits of economic policy. As a voter, you help choose the policies that guide the allocation of society's resources. When deciding which policies to support, you may find yourself asking various questions about economics. What are the burdens associated with alternative forms of taxation? What are the effects of free trade with other countries? How does the government budget deficit affect the economy? These and similar questions are always on the minds of policy makers.
851-0610-00LThe Role of Finance in Tackling Climate Change Restricted registration - show details
Primarily suited for Master and PhD students.
W3 credits2VB. Steffen, F. M. Egli, A. Stünzi
AbstractThis course focuses on public policy to leverage finance in tackling climate change. We cover international negotiations as well as the role of governments in designing public policy for different financing actors (e.g. public and private) in developing and OECD countries.
Objective- Critically examine the role of finance (e.g. public vs private actors) in climate change and the energy transition
- Develop an understanding of the role and design of public policy to direct and mobilize finance
- Find out about current challenges in climate finance with a focus on Switzerland
ContentReaching the 2°C climate target requires massive investments in low-carbon technologies. In 2015, the Paris Agreement underlined the responsibility of governments to align finance flows with climate change mitigation. Accordingly, a market for low-carbon investments emerged, but the available climate finance falls short of what is needed. Thus, political discussions on the international and national levels concern how public policies can better use the financial system to accelerate climate change mitigation. In this course, students will learn about the role of finance for the low-carbon transition in developing countries, in industrialized countries, and specifically in Switzerland. We will discuss existing policies, their effectiveness and the underlying political economy challenges to implement them. Combining recent academic findings and hands-on insights from guest lecturers, we will analyze structural challenges, conflicting positions in international negotiations and domestic policy-making, and the role of multilateral financial institutions. The course covers four key topics:
- The role of finance in climate change and the importance of public policy
- International climate finance and development
- Climate and energy finance in OECD countries
- Opportunities (and responsibilities) for Switzerland and its financial sector

The course has a highly interactive (seminar-like) character. Students are expected to give a presentation and to actively engage in the discussions. The presentation will also form part of the final grade, together with a final exam.
Lecture notesSlides and reading material will be made available via moodle.ethz.ch (only for registered students).
LiteratureA reading list will be provided via moodle.ethz.ch (only for registered students).
Philosophy
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
851-0101-01LIntroduction to Practical Philosophy
Particularly suitable for students of D-MAVT, D-MATL
W3 credits2GL. Wingert
AbstractPractical philosophy deals in a descriptive and evaluative way with the realm of the practical, that is, with action, practices, norms of action, and values held by people and societies. Ethics and political philosophy are branches of practical philosophy. This introductory course will treat some of the main questions and introduce students to the thinking of central figures in the field.
ObjectiveAt the end of the course, students (1) will be familiar with still highly influential answers to some of the main questions (see below, section "contents") in practical philosophy. (2) They will be able to better evaluate how convincing these answers are. (3) Students' own thinking concerning normative, e.g., ethical issues, will be more precise, due to a more sophisticated use of key concepts such as good, right, morality, law, freedom, etc.
ContentEthics is an account and instruction of the good, that could be reached by conscious, intentional behaviour (=action). Ethics is an essential part of practical philosophy. Therefore one of those central questions, which will be discussed in the course, is:

1. What is the meaning of words like "good" and "bad", used in ethical language? What is meant by "good", if one says: "Working as a volunteer for the <Red Cross> is good"? Does one mean, that doing so is useful, or that it is altruistic, or that is fair?

Further questions, to be discussed in the course, are:

2. Are moral judgements apt to be justified, e.g. judgments like "Lower taxes for rich foreigners in the <Kanton Zug> are unjust" or "Every person ought to be entitled to leave any religious community"? If so, how far a moral judgment's justification can reach? Is one right in arguing: "It is possible to show the truth of the proposition (a):The emissions of nitrogen dioxide in Zurich is far beyond the permissible limit (80 mg/m3). But it is not possible to verify the proposition (b): In our times, the inequal global distribution of wealth is far beyond the permissible limit. Proposition (a) states an objective fact, whereas (b) expresses a mere subjective evaluation, though that evaluation might be widely spread.

3. What are just laws, and what is the relationship between law and morality?

4. Is freedom of a person, though presupposed by criminal law and morality, nevertheless an illusion?

These questions will be partly discussed with reference to seminal authors within the western philosophical tradition (among else Plato, Aristotle, Thomas Hobbes, David Hume, Immanuel Kant). Contemporary philosophers like Jürgen Habermas, Thomas Nagel, Ernst Tugendhat or Bernard Williams will be included, too.
LiteraturePreparatory Literature:

-Dieter Birnbacher, Analytische Einführung in die Ethik, 2. Aufl. Berlin: de Gruyter Verlag 2006.
- Simon Blackburn, Think. A Compelling Introduction to Philosophy, Oxford: University Press (=UP) 1999, chapters 3 und 8.
- Philippa Foot, <Virtues and Vices> in: diess., Virtues and Vices and Other Essays in Moral Philosophy, Oxford: UP 2002, and <Morality, Action and Outcome>, in: dies., Moral Dilemmas and Other Topics in Moral Philosophy, Oxford: UP 2002.
- H.L.A. Hart, <Positivism and the Separation of Law and Morals, in: Harvard Law Review 71 (1958), pp. 593-629.
- Detlef Horster, Rechtsphilosophie zur Einführung, Hamburg: Junius Verlag 2002.
- Robert Kane, <Introduction: The Contours of the Contemporary Free Will Debates>, in: ders., (Hg.), The Oxford Handbook of Free Will, Oxford 2002.
– Thomas Nagel, The Limits of Objectivity, in: The Tanner Lectures on Human Values 1980, Vol I., ed. Sterling McMurrin , Cambridge et al.: UP 1980, pp. 75-139.
- Ulrich Pothast, <Einleitung> in: ders., (Hg.), Seminar: Freies Handeln und Determinismus, Frankfurt/M.: suhrkamp taschenbuch wissenschaft 1978, pp. 7-31.
- Bernard Williams, Morality. An Introduction to Ethics, Cambridge: UP (=Canto Series) 1976.
- Peter Winch, The Idea of a Social Science, 4.Aufl. London 1965, ch. II.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course will be a mixture of lecture and seminar. For getting credit points, essays on given or freely chosen subjects have to be written.
401-1010-00LThe Foundations of Analysis from a Philosophical and Historical Point of View Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
Number of participants limited to 30

Particularly suitable for students of D-MATH
W3 credits2SL. Halbeisen
AbstractAccompanying the courses in analysis, the beginning and development of analysis will be considered and discussed from a philosophical perspective. In particular, different approaches towards dealing with the problems sparked off by the infinitesimals will be studied. And finally, a short presentation of non-standard analysis will be given.
ObjectiveThis course aims at enabling the students to have a critical look at the basic philosophical premisses underlying analysis, to analyze them and to reflect on them.
NB. This course is part of the rectorate's critical thinking initiative.
851-0165-00LQuestions Concerning the Philosophy of Mathematics, Theoretical Physics and Computer Science Restricted registration - show details W3 credits2SG. Sommaruga, S. Wolf
AbstractThis seminar tackles questions of the philosophy of mathematics, of theoretical physics ad computer science which are rather non-standard such as: Are proofs really constitutive of mathematics? Why are applications of mathematics (to nature but also to mathematics itself) so fascinating and so hard to understand? etc.
ObjectiveThe objective is not so much to get acquainted with basic concepts and theories in the philosophy of mathematics, of theoretical physics and computer science, but to reflect in a methodical way about what lies at the origin of these philosophies. Students should learn to articulate questions arising during their studies and to pursue them in a more systematic way.
ContentThis seminar tackles questions of the philosophy of mathematics, of theoretical physics ad computer science which are rather non-standard such as: Are proofs really constitutive of mathematics? Why are applications of mathematics (to nature but also to mathematics itself) so fascinating and so hard to understand? Why do certain physical theories, e.g. quantum mechanics, need an "interpretation" whereas others don't? Is computer science part of discrete mathematics or a natural science? etc.
851-0179-00LEthical Issues in Animal Research Restricted registration - show details W2 credits2GG. Achermann, A. K. Alitalo
AbstractStudents are able to identify, describe and evaluate moral concepts, principles and leading normative approaches in animal ethics, to use these theoretical resources for constructing their own more well-grounded and reasoned positions for or against the use of animals in research and for critically assessing other people’s moral arguments in contemporary debates on animal experimentation.
ObjectiveStudents are able to identify, describe and evaluate moral concepts, principles and leading normative approaches in animal ethics, to use these theoretical resources for constructing their own more well-grounded and reasoned positions for or against the use of animals in research and for critically assessing other people’s moral arguments in contemporary debates on animal experimentation.
ContentI. An introduction into moral reasoning
1. Ethics – the basics: 1.1 What ethics is not… 1.2 Recognising an ethical issue (awareness) 1.3 What is ethics? 1.4 Ethics: a classification
2. Normative Ethics: 2.1 What is normative ethics? 2.2 Three different ways of thinking about ethics: virtue theories, duty-based theories, consequentialist theories
3. Arguments: 3.1 Why arguments? 3.2 The structure of moral arguments 3.3 Two types of arguments 3.4 Assessing moral arguments 3.5 Flaws in arguments/logical fallacies 3.6 The difference between debate and dialogue

II. Bringing moral theory to bear on animal research
1. What is moral status? 1.1 The concept of moral status; 1.2 Moral considerability – criteria for moral status: a) moral individualism (sentience, consciousness), b) moral relationalism; 1.3 Moral significance – three general views: a) the clear line view, b) the moral sliding scale, c) moral equals view; 1.4 Full moral status – the concept of personhood
2. Ethical perspectives on the moral status of animals (moral individualism): 2.1 Indirect theories: Worldviews/theological theories, Rene Descartes, Immanuel Kant, Peter Carruthers; arguments against indirect theories: the argument from species overlap; 2.2 Direct but unequal theories: Carl Cohen, Raymund G. Frey, The concept of dignity; 2.3 Moral equality theories: Peter Singer, Tom Regan
3. Alternatives perspectives on human relations to other animals (moral relationalism): 3.1 Steven Cooke; 3.2 Garret Merriam; 3.3 Nicola Biller-Andorno
4. Conclusions

III. Ethical issues in animal biotechnology
1. Intrinsic concerns
2. Extrinsic concerns

IV. Implications for practice
1. Implications for policy making: 1.1 Normative theories and the political debate 1.2 Regulation in the context of moral disagreement, The overlapping consensus 1.3 The continuing debate…
2. Animal experiments in practice: 2.1 What is an animal experiment? 2.2 Fundamental responsibilities of researchers 2.3 Importance of scientific rigor and scientific validity; The 3R’s; 2.4 The weighing of interests
3. Focus: Experiments on mice
4. Focus: Experiments using non-human primates: Examples of ETH Zurich and University of Zurich; A real case revisited;
5. Focus: Experiments on farmed animals
851-0198-00LPhilosophy of Psychiatry Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
W3 credits2V
AbstractPsychiatry is one of the most controversial areas of medicine because it is concerned with beliefs, moods, relationships, and behaviors. This course offers an overview of some representative topics in philosophy of psychiatry.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to offer historical context and philosophical reflection on mental disorders and psychiatric practices.
ContentPsychiatry is one of the most controversial areas of medicine. All medicine involves some negotiation about assumptions and values, at the professional-patient and societal levels. For example, its clinical categories are imposed on the subject, who is interpreted according to a given physiological (but also political and economical) framework. However, because psychiatry is primarily concerned with beliefs, moods, relationships, and behaviors, this negotiation actually constitutes the bulk of its clinical endeavors. This course offers an overview of some representative topics in philosophy of psychiatry. Some of these are the character of mental disorders, the takeover of the mind by the medical model, the demarcation of normal and abnormal behavior, the influence of culture in the understanding of mental disorders, a critical understanding of the DSM and its evolution, and the interplay between psychiatry and legal responsibility.
851-0097-00LWhat Is Knowledge and Under What Conditions Are We Entitled to Claim Knowledge?W3 credits2GL. Wingert
AbstractThe seminar aims at a clarification of the concept of knowledge, as it is built in our experiential relations to the world. An analysis is needed of the difference between knowledge and belief, of the relation between objectivity and knowledge, and of the role of reasons for having knowledge. Additionally, the legitimacy of different types of knowledge claims should be evaluated.
ObjectiveOn will able to evaluate the arguments pro and con the thesis, that knowledge is justified, true belief. Furthermore, one will gain some insights in the role of reasons for knowledge and in the merits and misgivings of a naturalistic account of knowledge. Finally, one will be a bit more familiar with some theories of philosophical epistemology (e.g. empiricism, rationalism).
851-0166-00LCertainty and Doubt in Science and PhilosophyW3 credits2VM. Hampe
AbstractModern science is a sceptical enterprise. Experiments and peer review are practices that test claims for knowledge. Certainty is a rather alien goal for enlightened science. Some of these practices have roots in philosophy. But in Philosophy the existential relevance of doubt is seen in new light in the last 10 years or so.
ObjectiveGet an overveiw about sceptical practices and practices to produce truths in science and philosophy. Learn about the relevance of claims for knowledge and certainty for individual and collective life.
ContentModern science is a sceptical enterprise. Experiments and peer review are practices that test claims for knowledge. Some of these practices have roots in philosophy. But in Philosophy the existential relevance of doubt is seen in new light in the last 10 years or so.
851-0167-00LWays of Worldmaking Restricted registration - show details W3 credits2SM. Hampe
AbstractWe study Nelson Goodman´s "Ways of Worldmaking" from 1978 and glance at other works relevant for his project like Wittgenstein´s "Tractatus" and Carnaps "Logischer Aufbau der Welt".
ObjectiveUnderstanding modern rational perspectivism.
ContentWe study Nelson Goodman´s "Ways of Worldmaking" from 1978 and glance at other works relevant for his project like Wittgenstein´s "Tractatus" and Carnaps "Logischer Aufbau der Welt”. In the books by Goodman and Wittgenstein the relation between the natural sciences, philosophy and art is discussed. Goodman claims that both the sciences and the arts have the power to make worlds. We will try to find out, how plausible this suggestion is.
851-0197-00LMedieval and Early Modern Science and PhilosophyW3 credits2VE. Sammarchi
AbstractThe course analyses the evolution of the relation between science and philosophy during the Middle Age and the Early Modern Period.
ObjectiveThe course aims are:
- to introduce students to the philosophical dimension of science;
- to develop a critical understanding of scientific notions;
- to acquire skills in order to read and comment scientific texts written in the past ages.
ContentThe course is focused on the investigation of scientific thought between 1000 and 1700, that is to say the period that saw the flourishing of natural philosophy and the birth of the modern scientific method. Several case-studies, taken from different scientific fields (especially algebra, astronomy, and physics) are presented in class in order to examine the relation between science and philosophy and the shift from medieval times to the early modern world.
851-0282-00LOn ClosureW3 credits2SC. Jany
AbstractAll beginnings are difficult, the saying goes. But it is perhaps still more difficult to find an ending under the endless conditions of modernity. Not long ago, the stories of literature defined the closure of actions, while philosophical systems provided the certain rules for sensible conclusions and ends, not to mention religious myths and revelations. What remains of such knowledge today?
ObjectiveReading theoretical and above all literary texts, we will first gather typical concepts, strategies, and representations of how things come to an end. We will then scrutinize this arsenal of "meaningful" ends and endings considering the conditions of modern life. To what extend does this older knowledge of endings live on as concerns both one's own biography and the aims and ends of science.
ContentDie Untersuchung von philosophischen und insbes. literarischen Schlüssen verspricht Einsichten in die allgemeinen Bauformen von Geschichten, Gedankengängen oder ganz allgemein Handlungen. Sie berührt also drei Grundvollzüge der menschlichen Kultur: das Erzählen, das Denken, das praktische Handeln. Auch die Naturwissenschaft und Technik sind auf diese kulturellen Grundvollzüge bezogen und bringen sie zur Anwendung. Insofern lädt das Seminar nicht zuletzt dazu ein, über den Wert und die Funktion von Zwecken, Schlüssen und Enden für das technisch-naturwissenschaftliche Wissen nachzudenken.
052-0518-21LTheory and Practice: Special Turn and Immaterial Space Joseph Beuys versus René Descartes Information W2 credits2GC. Posthofen, A. Brandlhuber
AbstractBoth the rationalism of "radical doubt" in Rene´ Descartes and the "understanding" in Beuys' sense of "standing somewhere else" have philosophical-aesthetic roots and spatial-theoretical and spatial-practical consequences. In dealing with this, the students work on their own position on spatial theory, whereby material and immaterial spatial aspects play a role.
ObjectiveThe students gain insight into the spectrum of epistemological and perceptual theories, learn to read them and analyze and critique their respective requirements. From this work an object relationship model is developing in progress, which serves self-examination in the design process as well as the evaluation of architectural situations in general and in particular. The writing of "scientific diaries" in which the contents of the colloquium are combined with the everyday experience of the students in free form, trains the concentrated result-oriented thinking in general, as well as in architectural situations. The special form of the writing of the "cientific diary" leads abstract theory together with the experience of the students and make the knowledge cratively available in their own way.
ContentSpecial turn and immaterial space. Joseph Beuys “how I explain art to the dead rabbit” versus Rene ‘Descartes“ I think therefore I am ”. Reflections and exercises on the aesthetics of the room.

Both the rationalism of "radical doubt" in Rene 'Descartes, as
also about "understanding" in the Beuysian sense of "standing somewhere else" have philosophical-aesthetic roots and spatial theory and practical consequences. In dispute a.o. with these opposing positions, the seminar participants worked on one own spatial theory position. Both material and intangible spatial aspects play a role.
Lecture notesHand out at the first meeting.
LiteratureRene’Descartes, Meditations, Felix Meiner Verlag, Hamburg 2009; Volker Harland, What is Art? Workshop talk with Beuys, Urachhaus Verlag,
Stuttgart 2001; Harlan, Rappmann, Schata, Soziale Plastik - Material zu Joseph Beuys, Achberger Verlag, Achberg 1984.
851-0349-00LAdvanced Course in Philosophy of Religion: Hilary Putnam’s Philosophy of Religion in Context (UZH)
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at UZH.
UZH Module Code: 23LM020

Mind the enrolment deadlines at UZH:
https://www.uzh.ch/cmsssl/en/studies/application/deadlines.html
W3 credits2VUniversity lecturers
AbstractDo religious forms of life and religious statements refer to a reality distinct from the religious language game? Or is it the case that such reference is only an illusive expression of the self-understanding of religious believers – and thus something philosophical reflection should aim to dispel?
ObjectiveAnd how are the ontological commitments of religious language games related to perceptions and concepts of reality operative in the sciences? The Advanced Course in Philosophy of Religion will take the thinking of Hilary Putnam as an example to address these questions. In order to do so, Putnam’s philosophy of religion will be situated in its (post)analytic and pragmatic context.
851-0350-00LDo We Have a Free Will? Neuroscientific, Philosophical and Theological Perspectives (UZH)
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at UZH.
UZH Module Code: 23SS007

Mind the enrolment deadlines at UZH:
https://www.uzh.ch/cmsssl/en/studies/application/deadlines.html
W3 credits2SUniversity lecturers
AbstractThe question of human free will is one of the big and much debated topics in anthropological thought past and present.
ObjectiveSome neuroscientists, for example, see human free will as an illusion, as all human action is, in their view, determined by neuronal events in the human brain. In a very different key, the question of human free will is debated in theological reflection. Martin Luther, for example, in his debate with Erasmus of Rotterdam denied a freedom of the human will as far as salvation is concerned. Another classical theological problem is how to situate human free will within the doctrine of divine providence: If God is omniscient and foresees everything, how can human beings be really free in their decisions? The course will first examine the controversial philosophical discussions provoked by neuroscientific interpretation of human free will. In a second step, the course will analyze exemplary classical and contemporary points of discussion in theological interpretation of the freedom of the will. Conceptual clarifications will, finally, allow to bring aspects of both fields of discussion into a fruitful dialogue.
Political Science
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
853-0058-01LSwiss Foreign and Security Politics Since 1945 (without Tutorial)W3 credits2VA. Wenger
AbstractThis course provides students with an overview of the main features of Swiss foreign and security policy since 1945. The focus is on the emergence and development of security policy strategies and instruments in a historical context.
ObjectiveThe participants have a solid overview of the evolution of Swiss foreign and security policy since 1945.
ContentThe first part of the lecture clarifies the term "security" and analyzes the change of its meaning in politics and academia over time. The focus of the second part is on the development of Swiss security policy since 1945. We will look at the different concepts of security policy, which range from "total defense" to cooperative security. We then will analyze the gap between planning and execution, focusing on the two key developments of security policy, that is foreign policy and armed forces.
LiteratureMandatory reading: Spillman, Kurt R., Andreas Wenger, Christoph Breitenmoser and Marcel Gerber. Schweizer Sicherheitspolitik seit 1945: Zwischen Autonomie und Kooperation. Zürich: Verlag neue Zürcher Zeitung, 2001.

The book is out of print, students can access the text in the virtual class room (Moodle).
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture is supported by a virtual class room (Moodle).
If you have questions concerning the lecture, please contact Oliver Roos, oliver.roos@sipo.gess.ethz.ch.
853-0010-01LConflict Research II: Civil Wars (without Exercises)W3 credits2VS. Rüegger, L.‑E. Cederman
AbstractIntroduction to research on civil wars. This course covers the causes, processes and solutions to civil conflicts and wars.
Objective- Knowledge on different causes of civil wars.
- Knowledge on processes during civil wars.
- Knowledge on different solutions and strategies to end civil wars.
- Application of theory to current examples of civil wars.
ContentThis course focuses on civil war, which is the most common type of political violence. The course is divided into three blocks: The first part analyses the causes of civil wars. The second part focuses on processes during ongoing civil wars, such as mobilization and conflict diffusion. The third part investigates in the factors that contribute to effective peace building.

Research questions: What are the causes of civil wars? What happens during civil wars? How do civil wars end?
Prerequisites / NoticeParticipation in the preceding course, Conflict Research I: Political Violence, is recommended.
853-0048-01LInternational Politics: Theory and MethodsW3 credits3GJ. Lipps
AbstractThe course covers the main theories (realism, institutionalism, liberalism, transnationalism and constructivism) as well as core problems of international politics such as war, peace, international cooperation and integration.
ObjectiveFirst, the course seeks to generate a better understanding of the central and specific problems of politics in the international realm, which result from the absence of centralized rule enforcement ("anarchy") . In addition, participants become familiar with the main theories of International Relations and the mechanisms and conditions these identify for solving international problems of security and cooperation. Case studies on areas and issues of international politics provide an overview of current international developments and an exemplary application of IR theory.
Content1. The subject-matter and problems of international politics

Theories
2. Power and Balance: Realism
3. Problem structures and negotiations in international politics
4. Interdependence and Institutions: Institutionalism and Transnationalism
5. Democracy and Society: Liberalism
6. Identity and Community: Constructivism

Issue Areas and Relationships
7. War: New Wars
8. Peace: The "long" and the "democratic" peace
9. Security cooperation: the new NATO
10. Economic cooperation: the world trade order
11. Human rights cooperation: global and regional human rights regimes
12. Legitimacy and Democracy in Global Governance
Lecture notesSchimmelfennig, Frank: Internationale Politik. Paderborn: Schöningh Verlag, 5. Auflage, 2017.
227-0664-00LTechnology and Policy of Electrical Energy StorageW3 credits2GV. Wood, T. Schmidt
AbstractWith the global emphasis on decreasing CO2 emissions, achieving fossil fuel independence and growing the use of renewables, developing & implementing energy storage solutions for electric mobility & grid stabilization represent a key technology & policy challenge. This course uses lithium ion batteries as a case study to understand the interplay between technology, economics, and policy.
ObjectiveThe students will learn of the complexity involved in battery research, design, production, as well as in investment, economics and policy making around batteries. Students from technical disciplines will gain insights into policy, while students from social science backgrounds will gain insights into technology.
ContentWith the global emphasis on decreasing CO2 emissions, achieving fossil fuel independence, and integrating renewables on the electric grid, developing and implementing energy storage solutions for electric mobility and grid stabilization represent a key technology and policy challenge. The class will focus on lithium ion batteries since they are poised to enter a variety of markets where policy decisions will affect their production, adoption, and usage scenarios. The course considers the interplay between technology, economics, and policy.

* intro to energy storage for electric mobility and grid-stabilization
* basics of battery operation, manufacturing, and integration
* intro to the role of policy for energy storage innovation & diffusion
* discussion of complexities involved in policy and politics of energy storage
Lecture notesMaterials will be made available on the website.
LiteratureMaterials will be made available on the website.
Prerequisites / NoticeStrong interest in energy and technology policy.
860-0001-00LPublic Institutions and Policy-Making Processes Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 25.

Priority for Science, Technology, and Policy MSc.
W3 credits2GE. K. Smith, S. Bechtold, F. Schimmelfennig
AbstractStudents acquire the contextual knowledge for analyzing public policies. They learn why and how public policies and laws are developed, designed, and implemented at national and international levels, and what challenges arise in this regard.
ObjectivePublic policies result from decision-making processes that take place within formal institutions of the state (parliament, government, public administration, courts). That is, policies are shaped by the characteristics of decision-making processes and the characteristics of public institutions and related actors (e.g. interest groups). In this course, students acquire the contextual knowledge for analyzing public policies. They learn why and how public policies and laws are developed, designed, and implemented at national and international levels, and what challenges arise in this regard. The course is organized in three modules. The first module (Stefan Bechtold) examines basic concepts and the role of law, law-making, and law enforcement in modern societies. The second module (Thomas Bernauer) deals with the functioning of legislatures, governments, and interest groups. The third module (Frank Schimmelfennig) focuses on the European Union and international organisations.
ContentPublic policies result from decision-making processes that take place within formal institutions of the state (parliament, government, public administration, courts). That is, policies are shaped by the characteristics of decision-making processes and the characteristics of public institutions and related actors (e.g. interest groups). In this course, students acquire the contextual knowledge for analyzing public policies. They learn why and how public policies and laws are developed, designed, and implemented at national and international levels, and what challenges arise in this regard. The course is organized in three modules. The first module (Stefan Bechtold) examines basic concepts and the role of law, law-making, and law enforcement in modern societies. The second module (Thomas Bernauer) deals with the functioning of legislatures, governments, and interest groups. The third module (Frank Schimmelfennig) focuses on the European Union and international organisations.
Lecture notesReading materials will be distributed electronically to the students when the semester starts.
LiteratureBaylis, John, Steve Smith, and Patricia Owens (2014): The Globalization of World Politics. An Introduction to International Relations. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Caramani, Daniele (ed.) (2014): Comparative Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Gilardi, Fabrizio (2012): Transnational Diffusion: Norms, Ideas, and Policies, in Carlsnaes, Walter, Thomas Risse and Beth Simmons, Handbook of International Relations, 2nd Edition, London: Sage, pp. 453-477.

Hage, Jaap and Bram Akkermans (eds.) (2nd edition 2017): Introduction to Law, Heidelberg: Springer.

Jolls, Christine (2013): Product Warnings, Debiasing, and Free Speech: The Case of Tobacco Regulation, Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics 169: 53-78.

Lelieveldt, Herman and Sebastiaan Princen (2011): The Politics of European Union. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Lessig, Lawrence (2006): Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace, Version 2.0, New York: Basic Books. Available at http://codev2.cc/download+remix/Lessig-Codev2.pdf.

Schimmelfennig, Frank and Ulrich Sedelmeier (2004): Governance by Conditionality: EU Rule Transfer to the Candidate Countries of Central and Eastern Europe, in: Journal of European Public Policy 11(4): 669-687.

Shipan, Charles V. and Craig Volden (2012): Policy Diffusion: Seven Lessons for Scholars and Practitioners. Public Administration Review 72(6): 788-796.

Sunstein, Cass R. (2014): The Limits of Quantification, California Law Review 102: 1369-1422.

Thaler, Richard H. and Cass R. Sunstein (2003): Libertarian Paternalism. American Economic Review: Papers & Proceedings 93: 175-179.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis is a Master level course. The course is capped at 25 students, with ISTP Master students having priority.
857-0075-01LContemporary European PoliticsW3 credits2SM. Jacob, A. Baysan, S. Hegewald, J. Lipps, N. Olszewska, D. Schraff
AbstractHow have the powers of the European Union expanded until now and what are the problems facing the Union today? This class offers an introduction to theories of European integration. Furthermore, we discuss the challenges of supranational governance in the context of the EU, covering a wide array of policy fields.
ObjectiveSince its start in the fifties, the European Union has evolved into a complex multilevel system, different from the nation state and different from other International Organizations. The course “Contemporary European Politics” introduces students to the institutions of the European Union and the gradual expansion of their competences. Throughout the course, we engage with current debates in EU studies on supranational decision-making in times of crisis. Upon completion, the participants are familiar with the legislative process regulating scientific and every-day life in such diverse policy fields as financial markets, climate policy and data privacy. Based on this knowledge, participants are able to identify chances and challenges of regulation beyond the nation state.
ContentThe sessions cover the following topics:
- EU Institutions
- Decision-making
- Parliamentary Democracy
- Judicial Politics
- European Identity and Public Spheres
- Enlargement and Neighbourhood Policy
- Democratic Backsliding
- Political Conflict in the EU
- Implementation of EU law
- Eurozone
- Inequality
- Euroscepticism and Brexit
- The Future of Integration
853-0057-02LStrategic Studies II (without Exercises)W3 credits2VM. Mantovani, M. Berni, M. Wyss
AbstractThe SiP-accredited lecture series treats high-impact strategic theory from antiquity to the present, emphasizing in particular its specific time-related context as well as the corresponding state of military technology.
ObjectiveThe participants know how the understanding of strategy has evolved over time.
They understand the interplay of strategy's basic components: ends, ways, means.
They know the most important classics of strategy and war theory and can place them in their specific time-related context, focusing in particular on the given state of military technology.
Based on the analysis of historical and contemporary examples, they are aware of the mismatch between declaration and implementation of any given strategy.
They are capable of analyzing original texts and modern scholarly works in the field of strategic studies.
ContentThe two-term lecture series treats classic texts of strategic studies from antiquity to the present. Term 1 covers the theories up until roughly 1900, term 2 treats the theories eversince.
Theories are considered classic if they were prominent in their respective times and if they enjoyed a strong reception thereafter, be it in literature, in academic debates or as guidelines for action. Each out of some 50 theories is discussed in three steps: time-related context, core elements and reception.
Lecture notesPrior to the lectures, the respective slides as well as primary sources and literature (as preparatory readings) are made available on Moodle.
The program is also available online (www.milak.ch).
LiteraturePeter Paret (ed.), Makers of Modern Strategy. From Machiavelli to the Nuclear Age, Princeton 1986

Elinor C. Sloan, Modern Military Strategy. An Introduction, Oxon/New York 2012

Lawrence Freedman, Strategy. A History, New York 2013

John Baylis, James J. Wirtz, and Colin S. Gray (eds.), Strategy in the Contemporary World. An Introduction to Strategic Studies, New York 2018
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture is held in German.
Passive knowledge of English and French are required.
851-0649-00LInternational Development EngineeringW1 credit2VI. Günther, A. Rom, K. Shea, E. Tilley
AbstractIn this seminar, students will learn from researchers around the globe about technological interventions designed to improve human and economic development within complex, low-resource setting. Students will also get familiar with frameworks from social sciences and engineering, helping them to understand, and evaluate the discussed technologies and to put them into a broader context.
Objective• Students will get familiar with frameworks from social sciences and engineering needed for innovation in a complex, low-resource setting.
• Students will learn about concrete examples of technological interventions designed to improve sustainable development and critically reflect on them.
• Students get a broad understanding of some of the most important issues and discussions related to global sustainable development.
ContentIn the introductory class, students will learn about challenges related to global sustainable developments and how they have developed over time. Students will then get exposed to frameworks from social sciences and engineering disciplines, which will help them analyze technologies designed for low-resource settings. In the remaining sessions thought leaders from the field of development engineering will present a wide range of innovations from sectors such as health, water and sanitation, education and governance that will then get discussed with students using the frameworks they learned.
851-0519-00LDeportation as a Mean of Migration and Population ControlW3 credits2VS. M. Scheuzger
AbstractIn the last decades, deportation has developed to a massively and routinely used instrument to control migration and population. The general perception notwithstanding, deportation is an eminently complex mechanism of statecraft. The course discusses the “normalization” of deportation in a global perspective focusing on the manifold involved techniques.
ObjectiveA) The students know central developments of deportation as a means of migration and population control in the last decades in their global dimension. B) They are familiar with the different techniques involved in the deportation of people and their role in these developments. C) They are able to assess the instrument of deportation as well as the deployed techniques in their social contexts.
ContentDeportations appear to be a legitimate and effective solution in dealing with people who cross national borders without authorization or who are no longer allowed to stay within these borders. However, the supposedly simple act of forcibly deporting foreign nationals from national territory is an extraordinarily complex mechanism of state action. The different techniques and technologies on which deportation practices are based contribute to this complexity. The event will focus on the latter. The lecture considers the technologies that have been used to establish deportability, to search and identify persons to be deported, to immobilize them and to deport them. A broad spectrum of technologies of surveillance, identification, communication, confinement, sanitary control or transport is discussed in their modes of operation, their interaction with each other and with other factors (especially with the concept of "assemblages"). A look is also taken at the techniques and technologies used in resistance to state control and deportation. The question will be explored how technologies and their transformation are linked to the legal, political, cultural, and social preconditions of deportation practices and what significance they have acquired in the process. In a contemporary historical dimension, it will be asked what role technologies have played in the development of deportation regimes, especially in the postulated "deportation turn" since the 1990s, i.e. the massive increase in deportations in many countries of the world. The lecture focuses on Europe, the Middle East and Africa on the one hand and North and Central America on the other.
851-0647-00LModel United Nations - International Policy-making Restricted registration - show details W2 credits1SL. Hensgen, F. M. Egli
AbstractThis course takes the UN as a starting point to acquaint students with key competences decisive for effective international policy-making to address the most pressing issues of humanity. These include intercultural negotiation, mediation and complex problem solving skills. Participants receive the opportunity to exchange with UN staff, diplomats and civil society members engaged with the UN.
ObjectiveIntercultural mediation, negotiation, complex problem solving, sustainable development goals and how those are addressed by the UN, team work
ContentTechnical progress led to unprecedented opportunities and challenges for human societies. While we were never as affluent, educated and healthy as today - climate change, biodiversity loss, epidemics and widening inequality, as well as new risks from emerging technologies - such as lethal autonomous weapons and designed pathogens – pose novel challenges. Responding to these challenges requires not only profound technical knowledge but also a profound understanding of societies and the capacity to put technological solutions into practice in a globalized, intercultural and political environment. Thus, increasingly there is a need for engineers with a strong understanding of complex problem solving to address the most pressing challenges of human kind. This course takes the UN as a starting point to address complexity at international policy-making processes and to make students aware of the need for more sustainable solutions in the future. The work on real UN case studies will challenge students to critically assess global problems from different perspectives, to discuss UN resolutions brought forward and to reflect upon their potential implications. Opportunities to exchange with experts, such as UN staff, diplomats and civil society advisors will complement theoretic inputs. In this course, ETH students can complement their technical skills with key competences decisive for effective international policy-making.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course consists of five sessions (March 9th/ March 23rd/ April 6th/ April 27th/ May 4th 5.15 PM- 7.00 PM) that include teaching and discussions about the UN system with external experts as well as the preparation and participation in a MUN in Zurich (May 1st- May 3th 2020). Upon request and at students’ own expense they can also attend a MUN in another location.
The course is co-organized with the ETH MUN. Similar courses are offered at UZH, HSG, University of Bern, University of Geneva.
Psychology, Pedagogics
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
851-0240-01LDesigning Learning Environments for School (EW2 TD) Information Restricted registration - show details
Prerequisites: successful participation in 851-0240-00L "Human Learning (EW1)".

Adresses to students enrolled either in Teaching Diploma* (TD) or Teaching Certificate (TC) in Computer Science, Mathematics or Physics.
*Except for students of Sport Teaching Diploma, who complete the sport-specific course unit EW2.
W3 credits2VE. Stern, P. Greutmann, J. Maue
AbstractTeaching is a complex skill. The lecture comprises (a) presentations about the theoretical background of this skill, (b) discussions of practical aspects, and (c) practical exercises.
ObjectiveThe participants have the conceptual und procedural knowledge, and skills necessary for long-term planning, preparing, and implementing good lessons. They can apply this knowledge on different topics of their scientific STEM-background.
ContentWe discuss characteristics of successful lessons and how to design such lessons by using curricula and lesson plans, teaching goals and a variety of teaching methods.
Lecture notesThe lecture comprises interactive parts where the participants elaborate and extend their knowledge and skills. Thus, there is no comprehensive written documentation of the lecture. The participants can download presentation slides, learning materials, and templates from "Moodle".
LiteratureThe necessary literature can be downloaded from "Moodle".
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture EW2 can only be attended by students who already successfully completed the lecture Human Learning (EW1).
There will be two independent lectures for different groups of students. You will get further information in an email at the beginning of the semester.
To get the Credits you have to
- regularly attend to the lecture
- have the grade 4 or higher in the final written exam.
851-0240-17LDesigning Learning Environments for School: Educational Foundations (EW2 TC)
- Prerequisite: successful participation in 851-0240-00L "Human Learning (EW1)".
- Addresses to students enrolled in "Teaching Certificate in a non-college Discipline (TC)".
- The simultaneous enrolment in course 851-0240-25 Designing Learning Environments for School: Vocational Education (EW2 TC)" is recommended, but not a mandatory prerequisite.
W2 credits1VP. Edelsbrunner, U. Markwalder, E. Stern
AbstractTeaching is also a craft. In this lecture, students get to know and, wherever possible, also practice practical aspects of the teaching profession within the framework of relevant theories rom the Learning Sciences.
ObjectiveStudents acquire basic knowledge and skills needed for planning, preparing, and implementing effective instruction. They can reflect and adapt these skills based on knowledge about findings from research in the learning sciences.
ContentWe discuss characteristics of successful lessons and how to design such lessons by using curricula and lesson plans, teaching goals, classroom management, and a variety of teaching methods.
Lecture notesThe lecture comprises interactive parts where the participants elaborate and extend their knowledge and skills. Thus, there is no comprehensive written documentation of the lecture. The participants can download presentation slides, learning materials, and templates from "Moodle".
LiteratureThe necessary literature can be downloaded from "Moodle".
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture EW2 can only be attended by students who already successfully completed the lecture Human Learning (EW1).
There will be two independent lectures for different groups of students. You will get further information in an email at the beginning of the semester.
851-0252-01LHuman-Computer Interaction: Cognition and Usability Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 40.

Particularly suitable for students of D-ITET
W3 credits2SC. Hölscher, S. Credé, H. Zhao
AbstractThis seminar introduces theory and methods in human-computer interaction and usability. Cognitive Science provides a theoretical framework for designing user interfaces as well as a range of methods for assessing usability (user testing, cognitive walkthrough, GOMS). The seminar will provide an opportunity to experience some of the methods in applied group projects.
ObjectiveThis seminar will introduce key topics, theories and methodology in human-computer interaction (HCI) and usability. Presentations will cover the basics of human-computer interaction and selected topics like mobile interaction, adaptive systems, human error and attention. A focus of the seminar will be on getting to know evaluation techniques in HCI. Students will work in groups and will first familiarize themselves with a select usability evaluation method (e.g. user testing, GOMS, task analysis, heuristic evaluation, questionnaires or Cognitive Walkthrough). They will then apply the methods to a human-computer interaction setting (e.g. an existing software or hardware interface) and present the method as well as their procedure and results to the plenary. Active participation is vital for the success of the seminar, and students are expected to contribute to presentations of foundational themes, methods and results of their chosen group project. In order to obtain course credit a written essay / report will be required (details to be specified in the introductory session of the course).
851-0252-12LThe Science of Learning From Failure Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 60.
W2 credits2SM. Kapur, A. Nardo, E. Ziegler
AbstractWe can learn from failure! But, what does “failure” mean? And, what, how, and why do we learn from failure? This course covers research from the cognitive, educational, and learning sciences that addresses the role of failure in human learning. Students will critically examine how failure affects thinking, knowledge, creativity, problem-solving, etc.
ObjectiveStudents will:
- Critically read and analyze articles on research that addresses failure in learning.
- Participate in in-class problem-solving activities around research in failure.
- Discuss and reflect upon topics in both online and face-to-face formats.
- Engage in activities through the online platform.
- Complete a final paper on a subtopic related to failure in learning.

By the end of the course, students should be able to:
- Demonstrate a critical understanding of the role that failure plays in learning.
- Discuss how and why failure can benefit learning.
- Discuss how and why failure does not facilitate learning.
- Apply understanding to a related sub-topic.
ContentWe learn from our mistakes, or rather, we certainly hope that we do. Another way to say this is that we can learn from failure. But, what does “failure” mean? And, what, how, and why do we learn from failure? This course covers research from the cognitive, educational, and learning sciences that addresses the role of failure in human learning. Students will critically examine how failure affects development of knowledge, creativity, problem-solving, and general thinking and learning. More specifically, they will have the opportunity to question and evaluate the potential relationships between the facets around failure within individual, interactional, cultural, societal, and global contexts through seminal readings and problem-solving activities oriented to real world issues. Students from any discipline are welcome to this course to learn more about how failure can be harnessed to improve our knowledge, capabilities, innovations, teamwork, and contribute to the larger global world.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis seminar is an interactive course, thus attendance and classroom participation are required.

"The course is held as 2 separate courses with each a maximum of 30 students: one course in German and one course in English."
851-0238-01LSupport and Diagnosis of Knowledge Acquisition Processes (EW3) Restricted registration - show details
Enrolment only possible with matriculation in Teaching Diploma (except for students of Sport Teaching Diploma, who complete the sport-specific course unit EW3) and for students who intend to enrol in the "Teaching Diploma"
Prerequisites: successful participation in 851-0240-00L "Human Learning (EW1)".
W3 credits3SP. Edelsbrunner, J. Maue, C. M. Thurn
AbstractIn this seminar students learn advanced techniques to support and to diagnose knowledge acquisition processes in school.
ObjectiveThe main goals are:
(1) You have a deep understanding about the cognitive mechanisms of knowledge acquisition.
(2) You have a basic understanding about psychological test theory and can appropriately administer tests.
(3) You know various techniques of formative assessment and can apply these to uncover students' misconceptions.
851-0240-25LDesigning Learning Environments for School: Vocational Education (EW2 TC)
- Prerequisite: successful participation in 851-0240-00L "Human Learning (EW1)".
- Addresses to students enrolled in "Teaching Certificate in a non-college Discipline (TC)".
- The simultaneous enrolment in course 851-0240-17L Designing Learning Environments for School: Educational Foundations (EW2 DZ)" is recommended, but not a mandatory prerequisite.
W2 credits1VG. Kaufmann
AbstractParticipants acquire knowledge in vocational training system and in theory and practice of vocational education. They get to know characteristics of functions, tasks and roles in the professional world. They deduce consequences for the planning and execution of learner-tailored and effective learning in vocational education taking into account the theory and practice of vocational education.
ObjectiveParticipants would be able to structure and execute learner-tailored and effective learning in vocational education taking into account the theory and practice of vocational education.
363-1039-00LIntroduction to NegotiationW3 credits2GM. Ambühl
AbstractThe course introduces students to the concepts, theories, and strategies of negotiation and is enriched with an extensive exploration of real-life case-study examples.
ObjectiveThe objective of the course is to teach students to recognize, understand, and approach different negotiation situations, by relying on a range of primarily quantitative and some qualitative analytical tools.
ContentWe all negotiate on a daily basis – on a personal level with friends, family, and service providers, on a professional level with employers and clients, among others. Additionally, negotiations are constantly unfolding across various issues at the political level, from solving armed conflicts to negotiating trade and market access deals.

The course aims to provide students with a toolbox of analytical methods that can be used to identify and disentangle negotiation situations, as well as serve as a reference point to guide action in practice. The applicability of these analytical methods is illustrated through examples of negotiation situations from international politics and business.

The theoretical part of the course covers diverse perspectives on negotiation: with a key focus on game theory, but also covering Harvard principles of negotiation, as well as the negotiation engineering approach developed by Prof. Ambühl at ETH Zurich. The course also dedicates some time to focus on conflict management as a specific category of negotiation situations and briefly introduces students to the social aspects of negotiation, based on the insights from psychology and behavioral economics.

The empirical part of the course draws on case-studies from the realm of international politics and business, including examples from Prof. Ambühl’s work as a career diplomat. Every year, the course also hosts two guest lecturers – representatives from politics or business leaders, who share practical experience on negotiations from their careers.
LiteratureThe list of relevant references will be distributed in the beginning of the course.
851-0242-03LIntroduction to General Pedagogy Restricted registration - show details
Enrolment only possible with matriculation in Teaching Diploma or Teaching Certificate.

Prerequisite: successful participation in 851-0240-00L "Human Learning (EW1)".
W2 credits2GL. Haag
AbstractThe basics of educational science and the field of activity of the school are conveyed in as much as they are of relevance to the field of activity of the teachers. Basic knowledge is taught methodically by the lecturers which is further deepened by the reading of selected texts and corresponding work assignments in individual and small groups.
Objective1. Basics of educational science
1.1 Historical survey of education and school
1.2 Fundamental educational terms
- Education as field of activity of the school
- Education at school
- Socialization
2. Field of activity of the school
2.1 Theory of school
- Theory of school
- Curriculum theory
- School development
2.2 Theory of instruction
- Didactic analysis
- Principles of learning
- Handling of heterogeneity
851-0240-24LDesigning Learning Environments for Schools (EW2 LD) - Portfolio
- Enrolment only possible with simultaneous enrolment in course 851-0240-01L Designing Learning Environments for School (EW2 LD)!

- Prerequisites: successful participation in 851-0240-00L "Human Learning (EW1)".

- Adresses to students enrolled either in Teaching Diploma* (TD) or Teaching Certificate (TC) in Computer Science, Mathematics or Physics.
*Except for students of Sport Teaching Diploma, who complete the sport-specific course unit EW2.
W1 credit2UP. Greutmann, J. Maue
AbstractIn this lecture, you design a portfolio, i.e. a complete and elaborated teaching enviroment for schools, based on your scientific STEM-background
ObjectiveThis lecture is an implementation and transfer of the theoretical inputs provided by the lecture "Designing Learning Environments for School" (EW2).
851-0252-08LEvidence-Based Design: Methods and Tools For Evaluating Architectural Design Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 40

Particularly suitable for students of D-ARCH
W3 credits2SM. Gath Morad, C. Hölscher, C. Veddeler
AbstractThe course focus is on pre-occupancy evaluation in architecture to support an evidence-based design process. Students are taught a variety of methods such as virtual reality, agent-based simulations and spatial analysis. The course is project-oriented and is open for architecture and STEM students with an interest in interdisciplinary teamwork.
ObjectiveThis semester, students would focus on evaluating healthcare and office typologies from the perspective of building occupants’ and across scenarios, including routine operation and post-pandemic scenarios. Students will apply the tools learned in the course to compare building typologies, using various metrics including spatial proximity, visibility, orientation and movement. On the basis of this multi-objective evaluation, students would propose and evaluate design interventions across scenarios, identifying the Strength, Weaknesses, Opportunities and threats across the various typologies. The course is tailored for students studying for B-ARCH and M-ARCH degrees and is also suitable for students in STEM faculties. As an alternative to obtaining D-GESS credit, architecture students can obtain course credit in "Vertiefungsfach" or "Wahlfach".
Lecture notesEnglish
851-0253-07LConsciousness Studies Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 40.
W2 credits2SK. Stocker
AbstractCovers research on levels and states of consciousness. Levels: conscious vs. pre-/sub-/nonconscious. States: ordinary (OSC, waking consciousness) vs. altered states of consciousness (ASCs, e.g., sleeping/dreaming, hypnosis, meditation, pharmacologically altered state). Applications in health/clinical psychology, and implications for the scientific mind (insight, flow) are also considered.
ObjectiveTo introduce students to the basics of consciousness studies, and to thus help them to gain a deeper understanding of how the mind works. Includes practical implications for the scientific mind.
ContentThe study of consciousness involves scholars from diverse fields, such as psychology, neuroscience, cognitive science, philosophy, linguistics, computer science, medicine, religious studies, anthropology, as well as literature and art studies. In this course, the study of consciousness is presented from the point of view of psychology. At the same time, the course will additionally also consider interdisciplinary viewpoints.

Psychological consciousness studies involve research on levels and states of consciousness. Psychologically researched levels of consciousness are the conscious, preconscious, unconscious/subconscious, and nonconscious levels of mental processing. Psychological research on states of consciousness takes waking consciousness as the most common state (ordinary state of consciousness, OSC), using it as a baseline against which altered states of consciousness (ASC) are compared. Some of the most prominently researched ASC in psychology will be introduced in this course and include sleeping/dreaming, hypnosis, meditation, as well as ASC that are induced through either sensory deprivation/overload or psychoactive drugs.

In this course, it will also be shown how a growing number of applied consciousness studies investigate the potential of being temporarily in an ASC for promoting/maintaining health (health psychology) or as part of clinical treatment (clinical psychology and psychiatry). Finally, in this course, two mental phenomena that are also highly relevant for the scientific mind – insight and flow – are also introduced from a consciousness-studies perspective.
Law
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
851-0708-00LIntroduction to Law
Introduction to Law as GESS Compulsory Elective Course:
Students who have attended or will attend the lecture "Introduction to Law for Architecture" (851-0703-01L), "Introduction to Law for Civil Engineering" (851-0703-03L) or " Introduction to Law" (851-0703-00) , cannot register for this course unit.

Particularly suitable for students of D-HEST, D-MAVT, D-MATL, D-USYS.
W2 credits2VA. Stremitzer
AbstractThis class introduces students to basic features of the legal system. Questions of constitutional and administrative law, contract law, tort law, corporate law, intellectual property law, as well as procedural law are covered.
ObjectiveIntroduction to fundamental questions of public and private law which serves as a foundation for more advanced law classes.
Content1. Öffentliches Recht
Staatsrecht: Funktion und Quellen des Rechts, Aufbau und Organisation des Staates, Grundrechte, Grundzüge des Völker- und Europarechts. Verwaltungsrecht: Verwaltungsverhältnis, Verfügung, Verwaltungsorganisation, Durchsetzung des Verwaltungsrechts, Verwaltungsverfahrensrecht, Grundzüge des Polizei-, Umwelt- und Raumplanungsrechts.

2. Privatrecht
Vertragsrecht: Vertragsfreiheit, Vertragsentstehung, -erfüllung und -verletzung, Grundzüge des Kauf- und Mietvertrags. Haftungsrecht: Verschuldenshaftung und Kausalhaftung, Beschränkung der Haftung. Grundzüge des Gesellschafts,- Immaterialgüter- und Zivilprozessrechts.
LiteratureWeiterführende Informationen sind auf der Moodle-Lernumgebung zur Vorlesung erhältlich (s. http://www.ip.ethz.ch/education/grundzuege).
851-0732-01LWorkshop and Lecture Series in Law and EconomicsW2 credits2SA. Stremitzer
AbstractThe Workshop and Lectures Series in Law and Economics is a joint seminar of ETH Zurich and the Universities of Basel, Lucerne, St. Gallen and Zurich. Legal, economics, and psychology scholars will give a lecture and/or present their current research. All speakers are internationally well-known experts from Europe, the U.S. and beyond.
ObjectiveAfter the workshop and lecture series, participants should be acquainted with interdisciplinary approaches in law and economics. They should also have an overview of current topics of international research in this area.
ContentThe workshop and lecture series will present a mix of speakers who represent the wide range of current social science research methods applied to law. In particular, theoretical models, empirical and experimental research as well as legal research methods will be represented. This series is held each spring semester. In the fall semester, the series is complemented by two specialized law-and-economics series, one on law & finance and one on innovation.
Lecture notesTo be discussed papers are posted in advance on the course web page (http://www.lawecon.ethz.ch/workshop-and-lecture-series/lawecon.html).
851-0739-01LSequencing Legal DNA: NLP for Law and Political Economy
Particularly suitable for students of D-INFK, D-ITET, D-MTEC
W3 credits2VE. Ash
AbstractThis course explores the application of natural language processing techniques to texts in law, politics, and the news media.
ObjectiveStudents will be introduced to a broad array of tools in natural language processing (NLP). They will learn to evaluate and apply NLP tools to a variety of problems. The applications will focus on social-science contexts, including law, politics, and the news media. Topics include text classification, topic modeling, transformers, model explanation, and bias in language.
ContentNLP technologies have the potential to assist judges and other decision-makers by making tasks more efficient and consistent. On the other hand, language choices could be biased toward some groups, and automated systems could entrench those biases.

We will explore the use of NLP for social science research, not just in the law but also in politics, the economy, and culture. We will explore, critique, and integrate the emerging set of tools for debiasing language models and think carefully about how notions of fairness should be applied in this domain.
Prerequisites / NoticeSome programming experience in Python is required, and some experience with NLP is highly recommended.
851-0732-03LIntellectual Property: An Introduction Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 150

Particularly suitable for students of D-ARCH, D-BIOL, D-CHAB, D-INFK, D-ITET, D-MAVT, D- MATL, D-MTEC.
W2 credits2VS. Bechtold, R. Zingg
AbstractThe course introduces students to the basics of the intellectual property system and of innovation policy. Areas covered include patent, copyright, trademark, design, know-how protection, open source, and technology transfer. The course looks at Swiss, European, U.S. and international law and uses examples from a broad range of technologies. Insights can be used in academia, industry or start-ups.
ObjectiveIntellectual property issues become more and more important in our society. In order to prepare students for their future challenges in research, industry or start-ups, this course introduces them to the foundations of the intellectual property system. The course covers patent, copyright, trademark, design, know-how protection, open source, and technology transfer law. It explains links to contract, antitrust, Internet, privacy and communications law where appropriate. While the introduction to these areas of the law is designed at a general level, examples and case studies come from various jurisdictions, including Switzerland, the European Union, the United States, and international law.

In addition, the course introduces students to the fundamentals of innovation policy. After exposing students to the economics of intellectual property protection, the course asks questions such as: Why do states grant property rights in inventions? Has the protection of intellectual property gone too far? How do advances in biotechnology and the Internet affect the intellectual property system? What is the relationship between open source, open access and intellectual property? What alternatives to intellectual property protection exist?

Knowing how the intellectual property system works and what kind of protection is available is useful for all students who are interested in working in academia, industry or in starting their own company. Exposing students to the advantages and disadvantages of the intellectual property system enables them to participate in the current policy discussions on intellectual property, innovation and technology law. The course will include practical examples and case studies as well as guest speakers from industry and private practice.
851-0740-00LBig Data, Law, and Policy Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 35.
Students will be informed by 1.3.2021 the latest.
W3 credits2SS. Bechtold
AbstractThis course introduces students to societal perspectives on the big data revolution. Discussing important contributions from machine learning and data science, the course explores their legal, economic, ethical, and political implications in the past, present, and future.
ObjectiveThis course is intended both for students of machine learning and data science who want to reflect on the societal implications of their field, and for students from other disciplines who want to explore the societal impact of data sciences. The course will first discuss some of the methodological foundations of machine learning, followed by a discussion of research papers and real-world applications where big data and societal values may clash. Potential topics include the implications of big data for privacy, liability, insurance, health systems, voting, and democratic institutions, as well as the use of predictive algorithms for price discrimination and the criminal justice system. Guest speakers, weekly readings and reaction papers ensure a lively debate among participants from various backgrounds.
851-0712-00LIntroduction to Public Law (French)W2 credits2VY. Nicole
AbstractThe course Public Law focuses on the fundamental concepts of constitutional law and constitutional and statutory principles of administrative law. The course also touches upon selected topics of administrative law, including the legal regulation of land use, zoning and planning, and construction law.
ObjectiveEnseignement des principes du droit, en particulier du droit privé et du droit public. Introduction au droit.
ContentLe cours de droit civil porte notamment sur le droit des obligations (droit des contrats et responsabilité civile) et sur les droits réels (propriété, gages et servitudes).De plus, il est donné un bref aperçu du droit de la procédure et de l’exécution forcée. Le cours de droit public traite du droit constitutionnel et du droit administratif, avec un accent particulier sur le droit des constructions et de l’aménagement du territoire, ainsi que sur le droit de l’environnement.
LiteratureEditions officielles des lois fédérales, en langue française ou italienne, disponibles auprès de la plupart des librairies.

Sont indispensables:
- en hiver: le Code civil et le Code des obligations;
- en été: la Constitution fédérale et la loi fédérale sur l’aménagement du territoire ainsi que la loi fédérale sur la protection de l’environnement.

Sont conseillés:
- Nef, Urs Ch.: Le droit des obligations à l'usage des ingénieurs et des architectes, trad. Bovay, J., éd. Payot, Lausanne 1992
- Scyboz, G. et. Gilliéron, P.-R., éd.: Edition annotée du Code civil et du Code des obligations, Payot, Lausanne 1999
- Boillod, J.-P.: Manuel de droit, éd Slatkine, Genève 1999
- Biasio, G./Foglia, A.: Introduzione ai codici di diritto privato svizzero, ed. Giappichelli, Torino 1999
Prerequisites / NoticeLe cours de droit civil et le cours de droit public sont l'équivalent des cours "Rechtslehre" et "Baurecht" en langue allemande et des exercices y relatifs.

Les examens peuvent se faire en français ou en italien. Le candidat qui désire être interrogé en langue italienne le précisera lors de l'inscription et avertira les examina-teurs par écrit un mois au plus tard avant l'examen.
851-0702-01LPublic Construction Law
Particularly suitable for students of D-BAUG
W2 credits2VO. Bucher
AbstractStudents will be introduced to the basic principles of planning and public construction legislation (development application procedures) as well as to the basics of public procurement law.
ObjectiveStudents shall have an understanding for the basic principles of planning and public construction legislation (incl. environmental law, development application procedures) as well as for the basics of public procurement law.
ContentTopics of this unit are: 1. Fundamentals of planning and public construction legislation (development, constitutional and legal foundation, basic principles and aims of spatial planning), 2. Federal, cantonal and communal planning legislation, 3. Public construction law (accessibility, zoning, construction and land use regulations [incl. environmental, water, heritage and energy use law], 4. Development application proceedings (obtaining development consent, appeal proceedings), 5. Basics of public procurement law
Lecture notesALAIN GRIFFEL, Raumplanungs- und Baurecht - in a nutshell, Dike Verlag, 3. A., Zürich 2017

CLAUDIA SCHNEIDER HEUSI, Vergaberecht - in a nutshell, Dike Verlag, 2. A., Zürich 2018

Die Vorlesung basiert auf diesen Lehrmitteln.
LiteraturePETER HÄNNI, Planungs-, Bau- und besonderes Umweltschutzrecht, 6. A., Bern 2016

WALTER HALLER/PETER KARLEN, Raumplanungs-, Bau- und Umweltrecht, Bd. I, 3. A., Zürich 1999
Prerequisites / NoticeVoraussetzungen: Vorlesung Rechtslehre GZ (851-0703-00/01)
851-0735-16LStart Ups and Taxes Restricted registration - show details W2 credits2SP. Pamini
AbstractETH students learn the relevancy of the tax law framework in the context of company start-ups. Based on theory and case studies, the participants discuss which regulatory options the legislator has, how it can promote innovative start-ups and where the typical pitfalls are. The consequences of direct and indirect taxes are debated both at the company and the entrepreneur level.
ObjectiveMost of the time, scientific knowledge and the resulting technical innovations spread outside of the academic world over the activities of business ventures, specifically by developing new products and processes or by improving existing ones. As an ETH graduate who would like to practically implement her theoretical knowledge, you know the advantages and disadvantages of the manifold legal system set by the legislator, both from a private and from a tax law perspective.

Start-ups differ substantially from normal kinds of enterprises. For instance, ownership can be concentrated in few hands and change over time, being opened to venture investors (e.g. in connection with private equity funds). The corporate governance can be particularly complex (e.g. including dual-class shares or an asymmetry between the degree of financial participation and the share of voting rights). The industry wherein the start-up is doing business can also be typically very volatile, preventing to find sensible comparables to value the start-up; reliable business plans are often missing.

On the one hand, in this seminar you learn the regulatory options that are available to the legislator to promote innovative start-ups. In this context, you are also introduced into financial markets theory, economic policy making, innovation promotion and business strategy. On the other hand, you learn the technical knowledge in Swiss tax law that you need in case of a possible future business venture. You will be also stimulated in approaching complex problems outside of your area of specialisation thinking in a connected way. Pre-knowledge in law or in business administration is useful, but does not represent any necessary condition to participate.

In the first sessions, the lecturer introduces you into the theoretical fundamentals as well as into the Swiss tax system, covering both direct taxes (such as the individual income and wealth taxes and the corporate income and capital taxes) and indirect taxes (such as VAT - value added tax, WHT - withholding tax, and stamp duties). Focusing on the field of start-ups, the discussions will deal both with individuals and corporations. The second part of the seminar will consist of the active discussion, primarily done by the seminar participants themselves, of some hypothetical business cases where the typical tax issues in connection with start-ups can be analysed more specifically.
851-0727-01LTelecommunications Law
Particularly suitable for students of D-INFK, D-ITET
W2 credits2VC. von Zedtwitz
AbstractIntroduction to the basics of Telecommunications Law for non-lawyers.

The course deals with the legal regulations and principles that apply to telecom network operators and telecom service providers (fixed-line and mobile phone).
ObjectiveBy analyzing the most relevant legal provisions for a telecom provider in Switzerland students will learn about the main concepts of Swiss law. No previous legal courses required.
Content1. History of Swiss Telecommunications Law
2. Regulation of network access (essential facility doctrine, types of access)
3. Universal Service
4. Phone service contracts (fixed line and mobile phone service)
5. Mobil communication radiation regulation
6. Telecommunication secrecy
7. SPAM-Avoidance
Lecture notesThe powerpoint slides presented in the course will be made availabe online. In addition, links to relevant legal decisions and regulations will be accessible on the course website.
LiteratureNo mandatory readings.
Prerequisites / NoticeShort written exam at the end of the semester (scope and materials to be defined during the course).
851-0735-11LEnvironmental Regulation: Law and Policy Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 20.

Particularly suitable for students of D-USYS
W3 credits1SJ. van Zeben
AbstractThe aim of this course is to make students with a technical scientific background aware of the legal and political context of environmental policy in order to place technical solutions in their regulatory context.
ObjectiveThe aim of this course is to equip students with a legal and regulatory skill-set that allows them to translate their technical knowledge into a policy brief directed at legally trained regulators. More generally, it aims to inform students with a technical scientific background of the legal and political context of environmental policy. The focus of the course will be on international and European issues and regulatory frameworks - where relevant, the position of Switzerland within these international networks will also be discussed.
ContentTopics covered in lectures:

(1) Environmental Regulation
a. Perspectives
b. Regulatory Challenges of Environment Problems
c. Regulatory Tools
(2) Law: International, European and national laws
a. International law
b. European law
c. National law
(3) Policy: Case studies

Assessment:
(i) Class participation (25%): Students will be expected to contribute to class discussions and prepare short memos on class readings.
(ii) Exam (75%) consisting of two parts:
a. Policy brief - a maximum of 2 pages (including graphs and tables);
b. Background document to the policy brief - this document sets out a more detailed and academic overview of the topic (maximum 8 pages including graphs and tables);
Lecture notesThe course is taught as an interactive seminar and in-class participation is expected from the students. Participation will be capped at 20 in order to maintain the interactive nature of the classes.

All classes, readings, and assignments, are in English.

Teaching will take place over three days in January.
LiteratureThe book for this course is van Zeben and Rowell, A Guide to EU Environmental Law, University of California Press, 2020 - available via https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520295223/a-guide-to-eu-environmental-law.

Electronic copy of remaining readings will be provided to the students at no cost before the start of the lectures.
Prerequisites / NoticeNo specific pre-existing legal knowledge is required, however all students must have successfully completed Grundzüge des Rechts (851-0708-00 V) or an equivalent course.

The course is (inter)related to materials discussed in Politikwissenschaft: Grundlagen (851-0577-00 V), Ressourcen- und Umweltökonomie (751-1551-00 V), Umweltrecht: Konzepte und Rechtsgebiete (851-0705-01 V), Rechtlicher Umgang mit natürlichen Ressourcen (701-0743-01 V), Environmental Governance (701-1651-00 G), Policy and Economics of Ecosystem Services (701-1653-00 G), International Environmental Politics: Part I (851-0594-00 V).
851-0735-14LSeminar Business Law: Contracts for Projects by Mechanical Engineers Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 20

Particularly suitable for students of D-MAVT
W2 credits2SP. Peyrot
AbstractThis seminar provides an introduction into the legal aspects of projects in the machine and plant construction industries. The seminar has specific practical focus as a real life case of an industry company will be studied.
ObjectiveIn practice, students will invariably have to assume responsibility for project management. This will also include dealing with legal issues. The seminar offers an introduction into the legal basis and the legal issues of managing projects.
ContentTopics:

- law of contracts for sales, work and mandate
- specifics of project contracts: definition of scope, distribution of risk and opportunities, warranties, liability
- typical contract clauses, sample agreements
- specific agreements used in the case study
- contracts and claims management

The students will be introduced into the original agreements of the real life case and the responsible persons will give introductions into the legal issues encountered during the completion of the project
Lecture notesThe script will be provided on the moodle platform.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe seminar is not an introductory course. Students are required to have attended an introductory lecture (e.g. Business Law by Dr. Paul Peyrot, Introduction to Law by Prof. Dr. Stefan Bechtold).

For the successful completion of the seminar and for obtaining the grade, all parts of the seminar must be attended. All participants are required to participate in a group effort which has to be presented on the last day of the seminar.

The grade will be a wheighted average of an individual paper based on questions out of the materials (1/3) and the group presentation (2/3).

The seminar will take place on the following days:

Block I: 25. Februar 2021 16:15 bis 20:00
Block II: 4. März 2021 16:15 bis 20:00
Block III: 11. März 2021 16:15 bis 20:00
Block IV: 18. März 2021 extern bei MAN Energy Solutions AG (Zürich), 8:00 bis 18:00
Block V: 15. April 2021 16:15 bis 20:00
Block VI: 22. April 2021 16:15 bis 20:00
701-0743-01LLaw and Natural Resources Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 20.
W2 credits2VN. Dajcar
AbstractThis course teaches the possibilities and limits of the law in order to protect natural resources and landscapes against harm and nuisance. The complexity of the legal situation will be discussed by analysing virtual and real law cases focused on spatial projects and planning. Precise writing is an emportant aspect in this course.
ObjectiveThe students know the opportunities and restrictions which are given by the law when using natural resources. They have insights into the complex environmental legal system and their application in conrete cases. The students are able to formulate typical legal questions, to understand the argumentation of courts and to solve simple legal problems with respect to environmental problems. An important goal ist the writing of precise written answers.
ContentIn this course, the aim is to gain in-depth-knowledge in forest law, law of landscape and nature protection and spatial planning law
Lecture noteseverything necessary will be uploaded on moodle
LiteratureGriffel, A.; Raumplanungs- und Baurecht in a nutshell, Dike Verlag, 3. Auflage, Zürich/St. Gallen 2017
Griffel, A.; Umweltrecht in a nutshell, Dike Verlag, Zürich/St. Gallen 2015
Prerequisites / NoticeIn this course, in-depth knowledge of forest law, landscape- and nature-protection law and spatial planning law can be gained. The webclass consists of team work. There are written works to be done (usually in german) and presentation to be held. A good part of the course is self study work.
851-0739-02LSequencing Legal DNA: NLP for Law and Political Economy (Course Project)
This is the optional course project for "Building a Robot Judge: Data Science for the Law."

Please register only if attending the lecture course or with consent of the instructor.

Some programming experience in Python is required, and some experience with text mining is highly recommended.
W2 credits2VE. Ash
AbstractThis is the companion course for extra credit for a course project, for the course "Sequencing Legal DNA: NLP for Law and Political Economy".
ObjectiveStudents will be introduced to a broad array of tools in natural language processing (NLP). They will learn to evaluate and apply NLP tools to a variety of problems. The applications will focus on social-science contexts, including law, politics, and the news media. Topics include text classification, topic modeling, transformers, model explanation, and bias in language.
851-0744-00LResearch Paper in Law and Tech Restricted registration - show details
There is no need for a written application for students who have taken the pre-requisite Law & Tech course. For students who believe they have the requisite background, they should email aileen.nielsen@gess.ethz.ch with a summary of why they believe they have the relevant background knowledge as well as what topic they would be interested in to address with a research paper.
W1 credit1SA. Stremitzer, J. Merane, A. Nielsen
AbstractA seminar to produce original research with a law and economics foundation on topics related to the intersection of law and technology. This seminar is specifically designed to help students in the sciences conduct interdisciplinary research and writing that can speak to the social science and legal communities about important topics emerging from science and technology.
ObjectiveThis seminar assists students in developing original research on topics related to law and technology. Students will:
Learn how to identify important and cutting edge topics in law and technology
Develop high quality interdisciplinary research
Produce a final work product preparatory to publication or a product launch
ContentThe form and content of each student project will be discussed early in the semester, and the semester will be spent developing the student research topic with feedback from instructors and from peers.

Topics will vary according to student interest, but example scholarly content will also be read and discussed, addressing the following topics
Regulations for trustworthy AI
A review of the feasibility of enforcing deepfake legislation
Competition law and proprietary data sets
Privacy-preserving navigational tools
Prerequisites / NoticeCourse is open only to students who have completed the fall Law & Tech course or with special permission of the lecturer
Sociology
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
851-0252-06LIntroduction to Social Networks: Theory, Methods and Applications
This course is intended for students interested in data analysis and with basic knowledge of inferential statistics.
W3 credits2GC. Stadtfeld, U. Brandes
AbstractHumans are connected by various social relations. When aggregated, we speak of social networks. This course discusses how social networks are structured, how they change over time and how they affect the individuals that they connect. It integrates social theory with practical knowledge of cutting-edge statistical methods and applications from a number of scientific disciplines.
ObjectiveThe aim is to enable students to contribute to social networks research and to be discriminating consumers of modern literature on social networks. Students will acquire a thorough understanding of social networks theory (1), practical skills in cutting-edge statistical methods (2) and their applications in a number of scientific fields (3).
In particular, at the end of the course students will
- Know the fundamental theories in social networks research (1)
- Understand core concepts of social networks and their relevance in different contexts (1, 3)
- Be able to describe and visualize networks data in the R environment (2)
- Understand differences regarding analysis and collection of network data and other type of survey data (2)
- Know state-of-the-art inferential statistical methods and how they are used in R (2)
- Be familiar with the core empirical studies in social networks research (2, 3)
- Know how network methods can be employed in a variety of scientific disciplines (3)
851-0252-10LProject in Behavioural Finance Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
Number of participants limited to 40

Particularly suitable for students of D-MTEC
W3 credits2SC. Hölscher
AbstractThis interactive practical course provides and overview of the key topics in behavioral finance. Along studying information about investor's behavior, decision-making, cognitive, biological and personality markers of risk taking and measuring risk appetite, students train critical thinking, argumentation and presentation. The learning process is based on interactive discussions and presentations.
ObjectiveThis course provides an overview of the key topics in behavioural finance and gives the opportunity for a first hands-on experience in designing, analysing and presenting a behavioural study. In the first half of the semester, students present papers from different topics within behavioural finance, including Judgment and Decision Making, psychometrics and individual differences, and risk perception and eliciting people’s propensity to take risk, biological markers of risk taking and investment behavior and trading games. The paper presentations are informal, require no power-point presentations and are followed by a discussion with the rest of the students in the class. The goal of these presentations is three-fold: in an interactive and engaging way, to provide an overview of the topics contained in the area of behavioural finance, to teach students to extract the most relevant information from scientific papers and be able to communicate them to their peers and to enhance critical thinking during the discussion.
In the middle of the semester, the students pick a topic in which they want to conduct a small study. Some topics will be offered by the lecturers, but students are free to choose a topic of their own.
This is followed by fine-tuning their research questions given found literature, data collection and analysis. At the end of the semester students receive feedback and advice on the data analysis and present the results in a formal presentation with slides. The final assignment is a written report from their study. Active participation in the meetings is mandatory to pass the course. This course does not involve learning by heart.

Key skills after the course completion:
- Overview of topics in behavioural finance
- Communication of research output in an a formal and informal way, in an oral and written form
- Critical thinking
- Argumentation and study design
Content- Giving presentations
- How to quickly "read" a paper
- Judgment and Decision Making, Heuristics and Biases
- Biology on the trading floor
- Psychometrics and individual differences
- Eliciting people's propensity to take risks
- Experimental design in behavioural studies
- Experimental Asset Markets
Lecture notesAll learning materials will be available to students over eDoz platform.
LiteratureTversky, A., & Kahneman, D. (1992). Advance in prospect theory: Cumulative representation of uncertainty. Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, 5(4), 297-323

Rieskamp, J. (2008). The probabilistic nature of preferential choice. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, memory and Cognition, 34(6), 1446-1465

Hertwig, R., & Herzog, S. (2009). Fast and frugal heuristics: Tools of social rationality. Social Cognition, 27(5), 661-698

Coates, J.M., Gurnell, M., & Sarnyai, Z. (2010). From molecule to market: steroid hormones and financial risk taking. Philosophical Transacations of the Royal Society B, 365, 331-343

Cueva, C., Roberts, R.E., Spencer, T., Rani, N., Tempest, M., Tobler, P.N., Herbert, J., & Rustichini (2015). Cortisol and testosterone increase financial risk taking and may destabilize markets. Nature, 5(11206), 1-16

Conlin, A., Kyröläinen, P., Kaakinen, M., Järvelin, M-R., Perttunen, J., & Svento, R. (2015). Personality traits and stock market participation. Journal of Empirical Finance, 33, 34-50

Kosinski, M., Stillwell, D., & Graepel, T. (2013). Private traits and attributes are predictable from digital records of human behavior. Proceedings in National Academy of Sciences, 110, 5802-5805

Oehler, A., Wedlich, F., Wendt, S., & Horn, M. (July 9, 2016). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2807401

Fenton-O'Creevy, M., Nicholson, N., Soane, E., & Willman, P. (2003). Trading on illusions: Unrealistic perceptions of control and trading performance. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, 76, 53-68

Frey, R., Pedroni, A., Mata, R., Rieskamp, J., & Hertwig, R. (2017). Risk preference shares the psychometric structure of major psychological traits. Science Advances, 3, 1-13

Schürmann, O., Andraszewicz, S., & Rieskamp, J. (2017). The importance of losses when eliciting risk preferences. Under review

Andraszewicz, S., Kaszas, D., Zeisberger, S., Murphy, R.O., & Hölscher, C. (2017). Simulating historical market crashes in the laboratory. Manuscript in preparation.

Allenbach, M., Kaszas, D., Andraszewicz, S., & Hölscher, C. (2017). Skin conductance response as marker or risk undertaken by investors. Manuscript in preparation.

Simic, M., Kaszas, D., Andraszewicz, S., & Hölscher, C. (2017). Incentive structure compatibility in a principal agent problem. Manuscript in preparation.

Sornette, D., Andraszewicz, S., Wu, K., Murphy, R.O., Rindlerm P., & Sanadgol, D. (2017). Overpricing persistance in experimental asset markets with intrinsic uncertainty. Under review.

Andraszewicz, S., Wu, K., & Sornette, D. (2017). Behavioural effects and market dynamics in field and laboratory experimental asset markets. Under review.
Prerequisites / NoticeGrading is based the active participation in the class and the final project. There is no exam.
851-0586-03LApplied Network Science: Sports Networks Restricted registration - show details
Number of participant limited to 20
W3 credits2SU. Brandes
AbstractWe study applications of network science methods, this time in the domain of sports.
Topics are selected for diversity in research questions and techniques
with applications such as passing networks, team rankings, and career trajectories.
Student teams present results from the recent literature, possibly with replication, in a mini-conference shortly before the start of EURO 2020 [sic].
ObjectiveNetwork science as a paradigm is entering domains from engineering to the humantities but application is tricky.
By examples from recent research on sports, sports administration, and the sociology of sports, students learn to appreciate that, and how, context matters.
They will be able to assess the appropriateness of approaches
for substantive research problems, and especially when and why quantitative approaches are or are not suitable.
LiteratureOriginal research articles will be introduced in the first session. General introduction:

Wäsche, Dickson, Woll & Brandes (2017). Social Network Analysis in Sport Research: An Emerging Paradigm. European Journal for Sport and Society 14(2):138-165. DOI: 10.1080/16138171.2017.1318198
851-0585-38LData Science in Techno-Socio-Economic Systems Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 80

This course is thought be for students in the 5th semester or above with quantitative skills and interests in modeling and computer simulations.

Particularly suitable for students of D-INFK, D-ITET, D-MAVT, D-MTEC, D-PHYS
W3 credits2VD. Helbing, N. Antulov-Fantulin, V. Vasiliauskaite
AbstractThis course introduces how techno-socio-economic systems in our complex society can be better understood with techniques and tools of data science. Students shall learn how the fundamentals of data science are used to give insights into the research of complexity science, computational social science, economics, finance, and others.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is to qualify students with knowledge on data science to better understand techno-socio-economic systems in our complex societies. This course aims to make students capable of applying the most appropriate and effective techniques of data science under different application scenarios. The course aims to engage students in exciting state-of-the-art scientific tools, methods and techniques of data science.
In particular, lectures will be divided into research talks and tutorials. The course shall increase the awareness level of students of the importance of interdisciplinary research. Finally, students have the opportunity to develop their own data science skills based on a data challenge task, they have to solve, deliver and present at the end of the course.
ContentWill be provided on a separate course webpage.
Lecture notesSlides will be provided.
LiteratureGrus, Joel. "Data Science from Scratch: First Principles with Python". O'Reilly Media, 2019.
https://dl.acm.org/doi/10.5555/2904392

"A high-bias, low-variance introduction to machine learning for physicists"
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0370157319300766

Applications to Techno-Socio-Economic Systems:

"The hidden geometry of complex, network-driven contagion phenomena" (relevant for modeling pandemic spread)
https://science.sciencemag.org/content/342/6164/1337

"A network framework of cultural history"
https://science.sciencemag.org/content/345/6196/558

"Science of science"
https://science.sciencemag.org/content/359/6379/eaao0185.abstract

"Generalized network dismantling"
https://www.pnas.org/content/116/14/6554

Further literature will be recommended in the lectures.
Prerequisites / NoticeGood programming skills and a good understanding of probability & statistics and calculus are expected.
851-0585-43LExperimental Game TheoryW2 credits2VA. Diekmann
AbstractThe course addresses principles and methods of experimental game theory. It focuses on experiments about social interaction, conflict and cooperation, emergence of cooperation and experimental validity of concepts for strategic behaviour in decision-making situations.
ObjectiveLearn the fundamentals and logic of thinking about experimental methods and experimental game theory. Apply experimental game theory methods to strategic interaction situations.
ContentDie Spieltheorie stellt Modelle zur Beschreibung und Analyse sozialer und strategischer Interaktionen zur Verfügung.
Schwerpunkt der Vorlesung sind experimentelle Studien und empirische Anwendungen der Theorie in verschiedenen Bereichen. Dazu zählen sozialtheoretische Analysen von Kooperation, des sozialen Austauschs, von Institutionen und Normen, sozialen Dilemmata und Reziprozität ebenso wie Anwendungen auf strategisches Verhalten in Politik und zwischen Staaten und Firmen, den Auswirkungen von Reziprozitätsnormen auf dem Arbeitsmarkt und einige Anwendungen in der Biologie. Experimentelle Studien zeigen allerdings, dass häufig die strikten Rationalitätsanforderungen der "Standardtheorie" nicht erfüllt sind. Unter dem Stichwort "Behavioural Game Theory" werden in der Vorlesung auch Theorievarianten vorgestellt, die mit den experimentellen Beobachtungen von Entscheidungen "begrenzt rationaler" Akteure besser im Einklang stehen.
Lecture notesFolien der Spieltheorie-Vorlesung und Literatur (Fachartikel, Kapitel aus Lehrbüchern) können auf der Webseite der Vorlesung eingesehen und heruntergeladen werden.
LiteratureKurzer Überblick in Kapitel 10 von Diekmann, Andreas, 2016. Spieltheorie. Einführung, Beispiele, Experimente. 4. Aufl. Reinbek: Rowohlt.
Ausführlich: John H. Kagel und Alvin E. Roth, Hg., 1995, Handbook of Experimental Economics. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press.
(Ein Handapparat dieser und weiterer Literatur wird in der D-GESS-Bibliothek bereitgestellt.)
Literatur zum Download befindet sich auch auf der Webseite:
Link
Prerequisites / NoticeInteresse am Thema und Motivation zur Mitarbeit.
851-0513-00LEconomic SociologyW2 credits2VT. Hinz
AbstractEconony and society are closely interconnected. The lecture presents classical and new sociological approaches to address the complex relationship between economic action and social structure. Issues of specific interest are: rational decision making, consumer behavior, social networks, state and economy, entrepreneurship and discrimination.
ObjectiveThe lecture gives an overview on the "new eonomic sociology". Students learn to analyze economic processes from a sociological point of view, e.g. the relevance of "embeddedness" into social networks for economic exchange.
ContentIn der Vorlesung Wirtschaftssoziologie soll das Verhältnis von Soziologie und Ökonomie theoretisch wie empirisch fruchtbar bearbeitet werden. Wir beschäftigen uns unter soziologischem Blickwinkel mit der Produktion, der Verteilung, dem Austausch und dem Verbrauch knapper Güter und Dienstleistungen. Austauschprozesse unterliegen strukturellen Rahmenbedingungen und Grenzen, sie bedürfen in vielen Situationen normativer Regelungen und einer unterstützenden institutionellen Umgebung. Eine Definition der Wirtschaftssoziologie könnte so lauten: Wirtschaftssoziologie umfasst alle Beobachtungen, Begriffe, Hypothesen, Gesetzmäßigkeiten und Erklärungsmodelle, die sich auf Zusammenhänge von ökonomischen und sozialen Sachverhalten und Prozessen beziehen. Arbeitsgebiete der Wirtschaftssoziologie sind beispielsweise die soziale Bedingtheit wirtschaftlicher Vorgänge, die Rückwirkung ökonomischer Prozesse für gesellschaftliche Strukturen, die sozialen Dimensionen und Verhaltensprämissen, Ähnlichkeiten und Unterschiede zwischen Gesellschaften bezüglich des wirtschaftlichen Geschehens und Zusammenhänge zwischen sozialem und ökonomischem Wandel.

Die Vorlesung behandelt zunächst knapp die makrosoziologischen Klassiker. Die Gründerväter der Soziologie haben wirtschaftlichem Handeln eine überragende Bedeutung für die Konstitution der Gesellschaft beigemessen – ob Marx, Simmel, Weber oder Durkheim. An der Schnittstelle von Soziologie und Ökonomie sind die Mikrotheorien von herausragender Bedeutung. Die Wirtschaftssoziologie ist ein ideales Terrain für Rational Choice Soziologie. Abweichungen vom Modell des Wettbewerbsmarktes und strikter Rationalität begründen in dieser Theorierichtung besonders interessante Analysen. Die Struktursoziologie (im Extremfall: „how people don't have any choices to make“) wird durch die Konzeption sozialer Netzwerke, in denen Austauschprozesse stattfinden, berücksichtigt. Auch das interpretative Paradigma der Mikrosoziologie kann auf Fragestellungen der Wirtschaftssoziologie („the making of markets“) angewandt werden.

Die Wirtschaftssoziologie versteht sich als empirisches Projekt. In der modernen Wirtschaftssoziologie finden sich eine Vielzahl von Analysen ökonomischer Institutionen, von Markt und Organisation, von Konsumverhalten, Firmennetzwerken und Schwarzmärkten.

Einen Überblick zu Theorien und Anwendungsgebieten der Wirtschaftssoziologie gibt das „Handbook of Economic Sociology“ herausgegeben von Richard Swedberg und Neil Smelser (inzwischen in zweiter Auflage erschienen). Die Vorlesung beruht auf einzelnen Beiträgen, ebenso werden eigene Studien vorgestellt.
Lecture notesPdf files (in German) will be available on ILIAS.
LiteratureAbraham, Martin/Hinz, Thomas (2008): Arbeitsmarktsoziologie. Wiesbaden: VS-Verlag (2. Auflage).

Braun, Norman/Keuschnigg, Marc/Wolbring, Tobias (2012) Wirtschaftssoziologie (2 Bände). München: Oldenbourg.

Smelser, Neil/Swedberg, Richard (Hrsg.) (2005) Handbook of Economic Sociology. Princeton: UP (2. Auflage).

Weitere Literatur wird zu Veranstaltungsbeginn bekannt gegeben.
Prerequisites / NoticeTeaching in German.
701-0712-00LUse and Perception of Nature Among Societies Outside Europe
Does not take place this semester.
W2 credits2V
AbstractViews of what we call "nature“" in traditional societies in Africa, Asia and Southern America are presented and discussed. In such subsistence-oriented ethnic groups "nature" is often perceived as being inhabited by gods and spirits. This view is often regarded as being irrational by natural science. But what are the impacts of such religious views on the sustainable use of natural resources?
ObjectiveThis lecture shall give an overview of worldviews of so called traditional societies in Africa, Asia and Southern America. The aim is to understand the way such societies view what we call nature or environment and their strategies to use natural resources. The lecure shall also provide a critical analysis of such processes based on concrete case studies, in which we will discuss problems of sustainable use of natrual resources and participatory processes in the governance of such resources.
ContentDie Studierenden werden dabei mit Vorstellungen und Ideologien von Natur konfrontiert, die sich nicht mit unserer Logik physisch-chemischer und biologischer Abläufe in der "Natur" decken, und die wir somit als "irrational" empfinden. Wir werden uns mit verschiedenen Konzepten aus dem Bereich der Religions-Ethnologie beschäftigen, die sich insbesondere im Bereich Magie, Hexerei und Orakelbefragung mit der "Rationalität" solcher Umweltvorstellungen auseinandersetzen. Seit der Beschäftigung mit der Ökosystemtheorie durch Roy Rappaport erhielt diese "wilde Denken" eine neue Funktion (Rappaport 1971, 1979). Es wurde in Zusammenhang eines gesamten Ökosystems analysiert, zu dessen Erhaltung und zu dessen Fliessgleichgewicht es diene. Diese Sichtweise, obwohl heftig kritisiert, ist von Bedeutung, weil mit der ökologischen Krise man in der industrialisierte Welt Ausschau nach neuen Konzepten hält. Diese werden teilweise in den uns fremden Bildern aussereuropäischer Völker von der "heiligen Natur" gesehen, welche uns als Lehre dienen und zu nachhaltiger Ressourcennutzung führen könnte. Zudem erscheinen die Umwelt-Bilder und Weltsichten dieser Gesellschaften (heute oftmals indigene Völker genannt) auf der praktischen Ebene als gelebter Naturschutz, den es insbesondere für die Konservierung von Biodiversität zu erhalten gilt. Heilige Orte sollen nun auch für den Schutz von beispielsweise Nationalparks oder Biosphärenreservaten dienen. In diesem Zusammenhang ist ein genauer Blick von Nöten, denn Fehlanalysen sind in diesem Bereich fatal und eine unkritische Instrumentalisierung magischer Weltsichten kontraproduktiv. Wo jedoch religiöse Weltsichten der Natur eine im Sinne der Nachhaltigkeit positive Rolle spielen können, ist der Bereich der Institutionen für das Ressourcenmanagement. Dieser Begriff wird hier im Sinne des Neuen Institutionalismus verwendet: Institutionen sind demnach Regeln, Werte und Normen, die das Handeln der Individuen beeinflussen und eine gewisse Sicherheit bezüglich dem erwarteten Verhalten der anderen Individuen einer Gemeinschaft bieten und dabei die sogenannten Transaktionskosten (Informationsbeschaffung bezüglich dem Verhalten anderer Akteure, Überwachung und Sanktionierung) reduzieren (North 1990. Ostrom 1990, Ensminger 1992). Dieser aus der Ökonomie beeinflusste Ansatz weist meines Erachtens interessante Elemente bezüglich der nachhaltigen Nutzung von Ressourcen auf, was sich bei der Nutzung von Kollektivressourcen (Com
Lecture notesZur Veranstaltung gibt es kein Script, aber es wird rechtzeitig ein Ordner mit der relevanten Literatur bereitgestellt. Am Thema Interessierte Studierende können sich bereits in folgenden zwei Büchern ins Thema einlesen:
- Berkes, Fikret. 1999. Sacred Ecology: Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Resource Managment. Philadelphia: Taylor and Francis.
- Haller, Tobias. 2001. Leere Speicher, erodierte Felder und das Bier der Frauen: Umweltanpassung und Krise bei den Ouldeme und Platha in den Mandarabergen Nord-Kameruns. Studien zur Sozialanthropologie. Berlin: Dietrich Reimer Verlag.
LiteratureBecker, Dustin, C. and Elinor Ostrom,.1995. Human Ecology and Resource Sustainability: The Importance of Institutional Diversity. Annu. Rev. Ecol. Syst.1995. No. 26:113-33.
Berkes, Fikret. 1999. Sacred Ecology: Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Resource Managment. Philadelphia: Taylor and Francis.
Dangwal, Parmesh. 1998. Van Gujjars at Apex of National Park Management. Indigenous Affairs No.4:24-31.
Diener, Paul and Robkin, Eugene E. 1978. Ecology, Evolution, and the Search for Cultural Origins: The Question of Islamic Pig Prohibition. In: Current Anthropology 19, No.3():493-540.
Diener, Paul, Nonini, Donald and Robkin, Eugene E. 1977/78. The Dialectics of the Sacred Cow: Ecological Adaptation versus Political Appropriation in the Origins of Indias Cattle Complex. In: Dialectical Anthropology (Amsterdam) 3: 221-241.
Evans-Pritchard, Edward E. 1978. Hexerei, Magie und Orakel bei den Zande. Frankfurt am Main:Suhrkamp.
Evans-Pritchard, Edward und Mayer Fortes. 1983. Afrikanische politische Systeme, in: Kramer, F. und Siegrist, Ch. eds. Gesellschaften ohne Staat. Frankfurt a. Main:Syndikat: 150-174.
Fairhead, James und Leach, Melissa. 1996. Misreading the African Landscape. Society and ecology in a forest-savanna mosaic. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Freed, Stanley A. and Freed, Ruth, S. 1981.Sacred Cows and Water Buffalo in India: The Uses of Ethnography. In. Current Anthropology 22, No.5: 483-502.
Haller, Tobias. 1995.Raub der „Seelenschatten in Nord-Kamerun. Krankheit bei den Ouldeme und Platha in den Mandarabergen“. In: Keller, Frank-Beat (Hg.). Krank warum? Vorstellung der Völker, Heiler und Mediziner, Katalog zur gleichnamigen Ausstellung. Ostfildern: Cantz Verlag. pp.302-306.
Haller, Tobias. 2000. Bodendegradierung und Ernährungskrise bei den Ouldeme und Platha. Umwelt- und Ernährungsprobleme bei zwei Feldbauerngruppen in den Mandarabergen Nord-Kameruns: Eine Folge der Adaptation an Monetarisierung und Wandel traditioneller institutioneller Rahmenbedingungen. In: Zeitschrift für Ethnologie 124 (1999): 335–354.
Haller, Tobias. 2001. Leere Speicher, erodierte Felder und das Bier der Frauen: Umweltanpassung und Krise bei den Ouldeme und Platha in den Mandarabergen Nord-Kameruns. Studien zur Sozialanthropologie. Berlin: Dietrich Reimer Verlag.
Haller, Tobias. 2002a. „Spiel gegen Risiken in der ‘Natur’“, In: Giordano et al (Hrsg.). Ordnung, Risiko und Gefährdung. Reader des Blockseminars der Schweizerischen
Prerequisites / NoticeDie Veranstaltung beginnt in einem ersten Teil mit einer Reihe von Vorlesungen und wird in einem zweiten Teil mit Lesen und Diskutieren von Texten (Kurzvorträge von den Studierenden) fortgesetzt (nähere Erläuterungen und Programm am Anfang der Veranstaltung).
701-0729-00LSocial Research Methods Restricted registration - show details
Target group: students of BSc Environmental Sciences
W3 credits2GM. Stauffacher, A. Bearth, O. Ejderyan
AbstractThe aim of this course is to impart methodological principles of social science research and thus to stimulate a critical reflection of social science findings. The course provides an insight into the concrete approach and methods of guideline-based interview techniques and questionnaire research.
ObjectiveStudents are able to
- describe the significance of method-supported procedures in the social sciences.
- explain the basic principles of social-scientific research.
- critically interpret the results of social-scientific research .
- conduct small-scale interviews and surveys via questionnaires.
ContentAlle Teilnehmenden verpflichten sich zur aktiven Mitarbeit in Form von drei Übungen (leitfadengestütztes Interview, Erstellung von Fragebogen, Erhebung und Auswertung von Fragebogen).

Inhaltsübersicht:
(1) Wozu empirische (Sozial-)Forschung?
(2) Der Forschungsablauf im Überblick, verknüpfen von qualitativen und quantitativen Methoden
(3) Leitfadengestützte Interviews: erstellen Leitfaden, Durchführung und Auswertung
(4) Fragebogen: Hypothesen erarbeiten, Fragebogen erstellen, Durchführung, Daten auswerten, und Resultate darstellen
Lecture notesDie Dozierenden arbeiten mit Folien, die als Handout abgegeben werden.
LiteratureZur ergänzenden Begleitlektüre kann folgendes Buch empfohlen werden:
Bryman, A. (2012, 4th edition). Social research methods. New York: Oxford University Press.
701-0786-00LMediation in Environmental Planning: Theory and Case Studies.W2 credits2GK. Siegwart
AbstractThis course is intended to demonstrate how environmental decisions can be optimized and conflicts better dealt by using mediation. Case studies will focus on construction of windmills for electricity purpose, use of fracking, sustainable city-planning in the field of former industrial area or the establishment of a birds- or a forest-management plan.
Objective- Develop comprehension of legal and social responses to environmental conflicts
- Recognize the most important participative techniques and their ranges
- Develop concepts for doing and evaluating mediation processes
- Estimate the potential and limitations of cooperative environmental planning
- Train communicative skills (presentation, moderation, discussion design, negotiation), especially by participating at a mediation
ContentTo this end, we will look at the most important techniques of mediation and put them into the context of today's legislation, participation and conflict culture. The potential and limitations of the individual techniques will be discussed using current Swiss and international case studies, namely in the field of windenergy. Students can do conflict analyses, for instance, as part of individual and group analyses and a half-day mediation-simulation, develop technique concepts and train their own communicative and negotiation skills.
Lecture notesA reader will be handed out.
052-0704-00LSociology II Information W2 credits2VC. Schmid, I. Apostol, M. A. Glaser, L. Howe, M. Streule Ulloa Nieto
AbstractSociology II introduces current perspectives and methods on urban studies in the first and second part (Monika Streule and Lindsay Blair Howe). The third and fourth parts of the course discuss housing as social and cultural practice, and neighborhood life in the right to the city context (Marie Glaser and Ileana Apostol).
ObjectiveThis series of lectures enables students to comprehend the built environment in its social context. It approaches the architectural profession from two different angles: macro-sociological and micro-sociological.
ContentIn the first part, Sociology II focuses on current perspectives of analysis in urban studies. Theoretical approaches are presented with the help of concrete case studies. First, the postcolonial perspective in urban studies will be introduced, illustrated with examples of empirical research. This part concludes with an introduction into scientific research by presenting different methods in the analysis of urbanization processes in Mexico City, Tokyo and San Francisco (lecturer: Monika Streule). In the second part, transdisciplinary research initiatives and planning processes will be presented using examples from Sub-Saharan and East Africa (lecturer: Lindsay Blair Howe). In the third part, various models of housing are discussed (lecturer: Marie Glaser), and in the fourth part, urbanity and the quality of life in the neighborhood are placed in the right to the city context (lecturer: Ileana Apostol).
Lecture notesNo script - Information available at the following link: http://www.soziologie.arch.ethz.ch/
LiteratureVarious texts, in addition to the lecture will be provided.
860-0024-00LDigital Society: Ethical, Societal and Economic Challenges Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants is limited to 30.
W3 credits2VD. Helbing, C. I. Hausladen
AbstractThis seminar will address ethical challenges coming along with new digital technologies such as cloud computing, Big Data, artificial
intelligence, cognitive computing, quantum computing, robots, drones, Internet of Things, virtual reality, blockchain technology, and more...
ObjectiveParticipants shall learn to understand that any technology implies not only opportunities, but also risks. It is important to understand these well in order to minimize the risks and maximize the benefits. In some cases, it is highly non-trivial to identify and avoid undesired side effects of technologies. The seminar will sharpen the attention how to design technologies for values,
also called value-sensitive design or ethically aligned design.
ContentWill be provided on a complementary website of the course.
Lecture notesWill be provided on a complementary website of the course.
LiteratureEthically Aligned Design
Version 1: Link
Version 2: Link

Value-Sensitive Design
Link

Handbook of Ethics, Values and Technological Design
Link

Thinking Ahead
https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783319150772

Towards Digital Enlightenment
https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-3-319-90869-4

Künstliche Intelligenz und Maschinisierung des Menschen
Link

Move Fast and Break Things: How Facebook, Google, and Amazon Cornered Culture and Undermined Democracy (J Taplin)
Link

How Humans Judge Machines
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Humans-Judge-Machines-Cesar-Hidalgo/dp/0262045524/

Further literature will be recommended in the lectures.
Prerequisites / NoticeTo earn credit points, students will have to read the relevant literature on one of the above technologies and give a
presentation about the ethical implications. Both, potential problems and possible solutions shall be carefully discussed.
860-0022-00LComplexity and Global Systems Science Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 50.

Prerequisites: solid mathematical skills.

Particularly suitable for students of D-ITET, D-MAVT and ISTP
W3 credits2SD. Helbing, S. Mahajan
AbstractThis course discusses complex techno-socio-economic systems, their counter-intuitive behaviors, and how their theoretical understanding empowers us to solve some long-standing problems that are currently bothering the world.
ObjectiveParticipants should learn to get an overview of the state of the art in the field, to present it in a well understandable way to an interdisciplinary scientific audience, to develop models for open problems, to analyze them, and to defend their results in response to critical questions. In essence, participants should improve their scientific skills and learn to think scientifically about complex dynamical systems.
ContentThis course starts with a discussion of the typical and often counter-intuitive features of complex dynamical systems such as self-organization, emergence, (sudden) phase transitions at "tipping points", multi-stability, systemic instability, deterministic chaos, and turbulence. It then discusses phenomena in networked systems such as feedback, side and cascading effects, and the problem of radical uncertainty. The course progresses by demonstrating the relevance of these properties for understanding societal and, at times, global-scale problems such as traffic jams, crowd disasters, breakdowns of cooperation, crime, conflict, social unrests, political revolutions, bubbles and crashes in financial markets, epidemic spreading, and/or "tragedies of the commons" such as environmental exploitation, overfishing, or climate change. Based on this understanding, the course points to possible ways of mitigating techno-socio-economic-environmental problems, and what data science may contribute to their solution.
Lecture notes"Social Self-Organization
Agent-Based Simulations and Experiments to Study Emergent Social Behavior"
Helbing, Dirk
ISBN 978-3-642-24004-1
LiteraturePhilip Ball
Why Society Is A Complex Matter
https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783642289996

Globally networked risks and how to respond
Nature: https://www.nature.com/articles/nature12047

Global Systems Science and Policy
Link

Managing Complexity: Insights, Concepts, Applications
https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783540752608

Further links:

http://global-systems-science.org

Link

Link

https://ec.europa.eu/digital-single-market/en/global-systems-science

Further literature will be recommended in the lectures.
Prerequisites / NoticeMathematical skills can be helpful
851-0586-02LThe Spectacles of MeasurementW3 credits2VU. Brandes
AbstractIf you can't measure it, you can't manage it. Explorations into mathematical foundations and societal implications of measuring humans, processes, and things in an increasingly datafied world.
ObjectiveStudents have a basic understanding of what makes a property quantifiable. They know the difference between operational and representational measurement, and the consequences this has for both, the collection of data and its use in decision making and control. With a critical attitude toward datafication, contextual differences are appreciated across domains such as science and engineering, business and entertainment, health and sports, governance and policy making.
ContentMeasurement Theory
- representations
- scales and meaningfulness
- direct vs. indirect
- conjoint measurement

Measurement Practice
- units and standards
- sensors and instruments
- items and questionnaires
- indices and datafication

Measurement Politics
- administration and coordination
- discrimination and behavior
- smart living
Lecture notesSlides made available in a course moodle.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents pair up in teams to write an essay on a measurement problem they care about (such as one pertinent to their discipline or research). The essay is pitched to the others in the course during a poster session at the end of the semester (may have to be replaced with an online session in FS21).
851-0745-00LEthics Workshop: The Impact of Digital Life on Society Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30.

Open to all Master level / PhD students.
W2 credits2SE. Vayena, A. Blasimme, C. Brall, F. Gille, M. Schneider, J. Sleigh
AbstractThis workshop focuses on understanding and managing the ethical and social issues arising from the integration of new technologies in various aspects of daily life.
ObjectiveExplain relevant concepts in ethics.
Evaluate the ethical dimensions of new technology uses.
Identify impacted stakeholders and who is ethically responsible.
Engage constructively in the public discourse relating to new technology impacts.
Review tools and resources currently available that facilitate resolutions and ethical practice
Work in a more ethically reflective way
ContentThe workshop offers students an experience that trains their ability for critical analysis and develops awareness of responsibilities as a researcher, consumer and citizen. Learning will occur in the context of three intensive workshop days, which are highly interactive and focus on the development and application of reasoning skills.

The workshop will begin with some fundamentals: the nature of ethics, of consent and big data, of AI ethics, public trust and health ethics. Students will then be introduced to key ethical concepts such as fairness, autonomy, trust, accountability, justice, as well different ways of reasoning about the ethics of digital technologies.

A range of practical problems and issues in the domains of education, news media, society, social media, digital health and justice will be then considered. These six domains are represented respectively by unique and interesting case studies. Each case study has been selected not only for its timely and engaging nature, but also for its relevance. Through the analysis of these case studies key ethical questions (such as fairness, accountability, explain-ability, access etc.) will be highlighted and questions of responsibility and tools for ethical practice will be explored. Throughout, the emphasis will be on learning to make sound arguments about the ethical aspects of policy, practice and research.
851-0585-48LControversies in Game Theory Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 100.
W3 credits2VD. Helbing, H. Nax, H. Rauhut
AbstractThe mini-course 'Controversies in Game Theory' consists of 5 course units that provide an in-depth introduction to issues in game theory motivated by real-world issues related to the tensions that may result from interactions in groups, where individual and collective interests may conflict. The course integrates theory from various disciplines.
ObjectiveStudents are encouraged to think about human interactions, and in particular in the context of game theory, in a way that is traditionally not covered in introductory game theory courses. The aim of the course is to teach students the complex conditional interdependencies in group interactions.
ContentThe course will pay special attention to the dichotomy of cooperative vs non-cooperative game theory through the lense of the pioneering work by John von Neumann (who—which is not very well known--was an undergraduate student at ETH Zurich). We will review the main solution concepts from both fields, work with applications relying on those, and look at the “Nash program” which is a famous attempt to bridge the two.
Lecture notesSlides will be provided.
LiteratureJohn v Neumann and Oskar Morgenstern. 1944. Theory of Games and Economic Behavior. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theory_of_Games_and_Economic_Behavior)

Diekmann, Andreas: Spieltheorie. Rowohlt 2009.

Dixit, Avinash K., and Susan Skeath. Games of Strategy. WW Norton & Company, 2015.

Ken Binmore (1992): Fun and Games. Lexington: Heath.

Camerer, Colin (2003): Behavioral Game Theory. Experiments in Strategic Interaction. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Game Theory Evolving
Link

Evolutionary Game Theory
https://www.amazon.com/Evolutionary-Game-Theory-MIT-Press/dp/0262731215/

Evolutionary Game Theory in Natural, Social and Virtual Worlds
https://www.amazon.com/Evolutionary-Natural-Social-Virtual-Worlds/dp/0199981159/

Evolutionary Dynamics and Extensive Form Games
Link

Evolutionary Games and Population Dynamics
Link

Quantitative Sociodynamics
https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783642115455

Synergistic Selection: How Cooperation Has Shaped Evolution and the Rise of Humankind
Link

Survival of the Nicest
https://www.amazon.com/Survival-Nicest-Altruism-Human-Along/dp/1615190902/

Evolutionary Games with Sociophysics
Link

Statistical Physics and Computational Methods for Computational Game Theory
Link

Games of life
https://www.amazon.com/Games-Life-Explorations-Evolution-Behaviour/dp/0198547838

Further literature will be recommended in the lectures.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course is thought be for students in the 5th semester or above with quantitative skills and interests in modeling and computer simulation.
853-0051-01LMilitary Sociology II (without Exercises)W3 credits2VT. Szvircsev Tresch, S. De Rosa, T. Ferst
AbstractAddressing civil-military relations and the democratic control of armed forces. Highlighting the changes in the structures of European armed forces (technological, social and geostrategic changes). Examining the capability of society and military in Switzerland to maintain the militia principle.
Objective• To understand the development of defense structures in Europe due to social, technological, economic and geostrategic changes and to be able to identify the respective implications;
• to demonstrate the advantages and disadvantages of different systems of conscription;
• to understand the basic principles of exercising democratic control over armed forces;
• to be able to define the terms conscription and militia and to know the corresponding articles of the Federal Constitution;
• to be able to critically question the militia principle of the Swiss Armed Forces within the context of technological and social changes;
• to characterize the three different forms of cooperation in international military operations;
• to discuss technical research questions on the basis of individual research results or projects of the Department of Military Sociology.
ContentThe lecture "Military Sociology II" deals in detail with the question of why societies defend themselves against external threats. The lecture analyzes old and new wars, demonstrates tensions in civil-military relations and examines the influence of civil-democratic control of armed forces. It also provides an overview of current transformations of European armed forces (technological, social, economic, and geostrategic) and their influence on the acceptance and legitimation of the military in Western societies. This leads to the question of recruitment and manpower of armed forces and the societal need for alternative models of civic participation by the population. The lecture thus raises the pressing question of democratic control over societal areas which, due to socio-economic and technological developments, elude the traditional control mechanisms of Western societies. The course also addresses the aspect of diversity in the armed forces. Of organizational sociological interest is whether the armed forces constitute an organization like any other, or whether they represent a special case. Furthermore, the Swiss militia-type army is analyzed and the social prerequisites of maintaining the militia principle, as well as its limits for the Swiss Armed Forces are discussed.
Lecture notesA set of slides and supplementary literature will be provided for each lecture. The texts are accompanied by a set of questions which serve as exam preparation and will be partially discussed in the lecture.
LiteratureA selection of traditional as well as current texts will be distributed in the lecture.
Prerequisites / NoticeNone
851-0174-00LRebooting AI: Human and Social Aspects of Artificial Intelligence Restricted registration - show details
Suitable only for MA and PhD students
W3 credits2GJ. L. Gastaldi, O. Del Fabbro, A. Nardo, D. Trninic
AbstractSeveral researchers from the humanities will propose a critical yet not partisan approach to AI, aiming at elaborating a common perspective on this phenomenon. Sessions will delve into aspects of the way in which AI challenges our understanding of the human, such as “Knowledge”, “Learning”, “Language”, “Freedom” or “Justice”.
ObjectiveDuring the course, students will be able to:
-Discuss relevant aspects of the impact of AI in human and social life
-Obtain theoretical and methodological tools for critically assessing the place of technology in society
-Develop a critical understanding of the conceptual grounds of AI
-Acquire a general perspective on the different fields and points of views in the humanities
-Engage in collaborative work with researchers in the humanities
ContentThe last decades have witnessed a remarkable development in the field of Artificial Intelligence (AI). Although mainly technical feat, such advances have decisive consequences in a wide variety of aspects of human and social life. Even more, AI is challenging in multiple ways our very understanding of what is to be a human. However, despite the significance of the transformations at stake, the perspectives of the humanities -traditionally established as a valid source of critical inquiry into human matters- are generally relegated to a secondary role in the development of AI.

In this seminar, several researchers from the humanities will propose a critical yet not partisan approach to AI, aiming at elaborating a common perspective which could be taken as a legitimate interlocutor in the debates arising around the current stakes of technology in our society. The seminar will take the form of presentations based on critical readings of chosen texts, followed by group discussions. Each session will delve into one aspect of the way in which AI challenges our understanding of the human, such as “Knowledge”, “Learning”, “Language”, “Freedom” or “Justice”, confronting how they are dealt with in state-of-the-art texts in AI and relevant works in the humanities.

We expect students from science, technology, engineering, and mathematics and other fields outside the humanities to actively contribute to a collective construction, which could lead to further collaboration within but also outside this course.

As part of the Turing Centre, this seminar intends to sow the seed of a suitable and long-term environment for the exchange of ideas between multiple fields in the natural sciences and the humanities.

The seminar will be conducted by Olivier Del Frabbro, Juan Luis Gastaldi, Aline Nardo, Vanessa Rampton and Dragan Trninic.
Prerequisites / NoticeSuitable only for MA and PhD students
851-0252-19LApplied Generalized Linear ModelsW3 credits2VV. Amati
AbstractGeneralized linear models are a class of models for the analysis of multivariate datasets. This class subsumes linear models for quantitative response, binomial models for binary response, loglinear models for categorical data, Poisson models for count data. Models are presented and practised from a problem-oriented perspective.
ObjectiveThe course has a strong focus on the application of GLMs in the social, economic and behavioural sciences. Through the presentation and discussion of case studies and the analysis of a variety of data sets (e.g., demographic, social and economic data) using the software R, students will reflect on

1. the social phenomena and the research questions that can be investigated with GLMs

2. the theoretical and practical considerations that must be taken into account to apply GLMs in a rigorous way.

By doing this, students will take away a broader perspective on the standard and unique challenges that the application of GLMs entails.
ContentThe following topics will be covered:

* Introduction to generalized linear models
* The general linear model: ANOVA and ANCOVA
* Models for binary outcomes: logistic regression and probit models
* Models for nominal outcomes: multinomial logistic regression and related models
* Models for ordinal outcomes: ordered logistic regression and probit models
* Models for count outcomes: Poisson and negative binomial models
Lecture notesLecture notes are distributed via the associated course moodle.
Literature* Fox, John. (2016). Applied regression analysis and generalized linear models (Third ed.). Los Angeles: SAGE.
* Fox, John, & Weisberg, Sanford. (2019). An R companion to applied regression (Third ed.). Los Angeles: SAGE.
* Hosmer, David W, Lemeshow, Stanley, & Sturdivant, Rodney X. (2013). Applied logistic regression. Hoboken: Wiley.
* Long, J. Scott. (1997). Regression models for categorical and limited dependent variables. Thousand Oaks, Calif: Sage Publications.
Prerequisites / NoticeA sound understanding of estimation methods, hypothesis testing and linear regression models (OLS) is required
Science Research
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
851-0158-13LEcology and Environmentalism Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 40

Particularly suitable for students of D-ERDW, D-HEST, D-USYS, D-BIOL
W3 credits2SN. Guettler
AbstractThe notion of „ecology“ refers to both, scientific research on environments as well as their protection. But how have academic ecology and the environmental movements intersected throughout history?
ObjectiveIn the seminar, students will read and discuss key sources as well as secondary literature on the knowledge transfers between scientific ecology and the environmental movements of the 19th and 20th century. Topics range from 19th-century homeland movement and the rise of ecological awareness in colonial settings, to the rise of an environmental awareness during the Cold War, with a special focus on „green“ politics in Europe. Apart from scientists and „counter-scientists“ the seminar focuses on concepts and ideas that circulated between academic ecology and different nature movements.
The participants learn to engage historically with original texts as well as to handle independently the extensive historical literature on the history of environmentalism. At the same time, they develop a critical understanding of different political agendas that have shaped academic and popular ecology until the present day. Students also learn to communicate their findings by writing short (and fictive) blog posts on different aspects of this history.