The spring semester 2021 will certainly take place online until Easter. Exceptions: Courses that can only be carried out with on-site presence. Please note the information provided by the lecturers.

Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2015

Electrical Engineering and Information Technology Master Information
Major Courses
A total of 42 CP must be achieved form courses during the Master Program. The individual study plan is subject to the tutor's approval.
Computers and Networks
Core Subjects
These core subjects are particularly recommended for the field of "Computers and Networks".
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0558-00LPrinciples of Distributed Computing Information W6 credits2V + 2U + 1AR. Wattenhofer
AbstractWe study the fundamental issues underlying the design of distributed systems: communication, coordination, fault-tolerance, locality, parallelism, self-organization, symmetry breaking, synchronization, uncertainty. We explore essential algorithmic ideas and lower bound techniques.
ObjectiveDistributed computing is essential in modern computing and communications systems. Examples are on the one hand large-scale networks such as the Internet, and on the other hand multiprocessors such as your new multi-core laptop. This course introduces the principles of distributed computing, emphasizing the fundamental issues underlying the design of distributed systems and networks: communication, coordination, fault-tolerance, locality, parallelism, self-organization, symmetry breaking, synchronization, uncertainty. We explore essential algorithmic ideas and lower bound techniques, basically the "pearls" of distributed computing. We will cover a fresh topic every week.
ContentDistributed computing models and paradigms, e.g. message passing, shared memory, synchronous vs. asynchronous systems, time and message complexity, peer-to-peer systems, small-world networks, social networks, sorting networks, wireless communication, and self-organizing systems.

Distributed algorithms, e.g. leader election, coloring, covering, packing, decomposition, spanning trees, mutual exclusion, store and collect, arrow, ivy, synchronizers, diameter, all-pairs-shortest-path, wake-up, and lower bounds
Lecture notesAvailable. Our course script is used at dozens of other universities around the world.
LiteratureLecture Notes By Roger Wattenhofer. These lecture notes are taught at about a dozen different universities through the world.

Distributed Computing: Fundamentals, Simulations and Advanced Topics
Hagit Attiya, Jennifer Welch.
McGraw-Hill Publishing, 1998, ISBN 0-07-709352 6

Introduction to Algorithms
Thomas Cormen, Charles Leiserson, Ronald Rivest.
The MIT Press, 1998, ISBN 0-262-53091-0 oder 0-262-03141-8

Disseminatin of Information in Communication Networks
Juraj Hromkovic, Ralf Klasing, Andrzej Pelc, Peter Ruzicka, Walter Unger.
Springer-Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg, 2005, ISBN 3-540-00846-2

Introduction to Parallel Algorithms and Architectures: Arrays, Trees, Hypercubes
Frank Thomson Leighton.
Morgan Kaufmann Publishers Inc., San Francisco, CA, 1991, ISBN 1-55860-117-1

Distributed Computing: A Locality-Sensitive Approach
David Peleg.
Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM), 2000, ISBN 0-89871-464-8
Prerequisites / NoticeCourse pre-requisites: Interest in algorithmic problems. (No particular course needed.)
227-0678-00LSpeech Processing II Information
"Speech Processing II" takes place for the last time in spring 2015.
W6 credits2V + 2UB. Pfister
AbstractInterdisciplinary approaches to text-to-speech synthesis and speech recognition (continuation of course speech processing I).
ObjectiveIn this course selected concepts and interdisciplinary approaches to text-to-speech synthesis and speech recognition are presented.
ContentFundamentals of representation and application of linguistic knowledge: Introduction of the theory of formal languages, the Chomsky hierarchy, word analysis, finite state machines, parsing.
Speech synthesis: Natural language analysis (for words and sentences), lexicon, grammar for natural language; generation of the abstract representation of pronunciation (phone sequence, accents, phrases). Additionally, the ETH text-to-speech system SVOX is discussed.
Speech recognition: The statistical approach to speech recognition with hidden Markov models is detailed: Basic algorithms (forward, Viterbi and Baum-Welch algorithm), problems of implementation, HMM training, whole vs. subword modeling, isolated word recognition, continuous speech recognition, statistical and rule-based language models.
Lecture notesThe following textbook will be used: "Sprachverarbeitung - Grundlagen und Methoden der Sprachsynthese und Spracherkennung", B. Pfister und T. Kaufmann, Springer Verlag, ISBN: 978-3-540-75909-6
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
Speech Processing I.
Recommended Subjects
These courses are recommended, but you are free to choose courses from any other special field. Please consult your tutor.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0116-00LVLSI I: From Architectures to VLSI Circuits and FPGAs Information W7 credits5GH. Kaeslin, N. Felber
AbstractThis first course in a series that extends over three consecutive terms is concerned with tailoring algorithms and with devising high performance hardware architectures for their implementation as ASIC or with FPGAs. The focus is on front end design using HDLs and automatic synthesis for producing industrial-quality circuits.
ObjectiveUnderstand Very-Large-Scale Integrated Circuits (VLSI chips), Application-Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC), and Field-Programmable Gate-Arrays (FPGA). Know their organization and be able to identify suitable application areas. Become fluent in front-end design from architectural conception to gate-level netlists. How to model digital circuits with VHDL or SystemVerilog. How to ensure they behave as expected with the aid of simulation, testbenches, and assertions. How to take advantage of automatic synthesis tools to produce industrial-quality VLSI and FPGA circuits. Gain practical experience with the hardware description language VHDL and with industrial Electronic Design Automation (EDA) tools.
ContentThis course is concerned with system-level issues of VLSI design and FPGA implementations. Topics include:
- Overview on design methodologies and fabrication depths.
- Levels of abstraction for circuit modeling.
- Organization and configuration of commercial field-programmable components.
- VLSI and FPGA design flows.
- Dedicated and general purpose architectures compared.
- How to obtain an architecture for a given processing algorithm.
- Meeting throughput, area, and power goals by way of architectural transformations.
- Hardware Description Languages (HDL) and the underlying concepts.
- VHDL and SystemVerilog compared.
- VHDL (IEEE standard 1076) for simulation and synthesis.
- A suitable nine-valued logic system (IEEE standard 1164).
- Register Transfer Level (RTL) synthesis and its limitations.
- Building blocks of digital VLSI circuits.
- Functional verification techniques and their limitations.
- Modular and largely reusable testbenches.
- Assertion-based verification.
- Synchronous versus asynchronous circuits.
- The case for synchronous circuits.
- Periodic events and the Anceau diagram.
- Case studies, ASICs compared to microprocessors, DSPs, and FPGAs.

During the exercises, students learn how to model digital ICs with VHDL. They write testbenches for simulation purposes and synthesize gate-level netlists for VLSI chips and FPGAs. Only commercial EDA software by leading vendors is being used.
Lecture notesTextbook and all further documents in English.
LiteratureH. Kaeslin: "Top-Down Digital VLSI Design, from Architectures to Gate-Level Circuits and FPGAs", Elsevier, 2014, ISBN 9780128007303.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
Basics of digital circuits.

Examination:
In written form following the course semester (spring term). Problems are given in English, answers will be accepted in either English oder German.

Further details:
http://www.iis.ee.ethz.ch/stud_area/vorlesungen/vlsi1.en.html
227-0126-00LAdvanced Topics in Networked Embedded Systems Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 12.
W2 credits1SO. Saukh, J. Beutel, L. Thiele
AbstractThe seminar will cover advanced topics in networked embedded systems. A particular focus are cyber-physical systems and sensor networks in various application domains.
ObjectiveThe goal is to get a deeper understanding on leading edge technologies in the discipline, on classes of applications, and on current as well as future research directions.
ContentThe seminar enables Master students, PhDs and Postdocs to learn about latest breakthroughs in wireless sensor networks, networked embedded systems and devices, and energy-harvesting in several application domains, including environmental monitoring, tracking, smart buildings and control. Participants are requested to actively participate in the organization and preparation of the seminar.
227-0198-00LWearable Systems II: Design and Implementation Information W6 credits4GG. Tröster
AbstractConcepts and methods to integrate mobile computers into clothes.
Textile sensors: strain, pressure, temperature, ECG, EMG,..
New substrates (eTextile, Smart Textile), organic material (foils)
Power and Energy in Wearable Systems
Economical conditions
Evaluation of research institutions, projects and proposals.
ObjectiveTo integrate wearable computers also commercially successful in our daily outfit, innovative sensing and communication technologies as well as economical and ethical aspects have to be considered.

The course deals with
> Textile Sensors: strain, pressure, temperature, ECK, EMG, ...
> Packaging: new substrates (eTextiles), organic material (foils)
> Power and energy in mobile systems.
> Privacy and Ethics

Using a business plan we will practice the commercialisation of our 'Wearable Computers'.

Supported by a wiki-tool the course is organized as a seminar, in which the addressed topics are jointly discussed considering the aspect 'Concept of a research proposal'. According to the ETH 'critical thinking initiative' we will analyse and reflect implementation concepts incorporating the social and scientific context. Presentations alternate with workshops and discussions. Instead of an oral examination a thesis in a form of a project proposal can be submitted.

The audience determines the used language (German or English)
ContentTo integrate wearable computers also commercially successful in our daily outfit, innovative sensing and communication technologies as well as economical and ethical aspects have to be considered.

The course deals with
> Textile Sensors: strain, pressure, temperature, ECK, EMG, ...
> Packaging: new substrates (eTextiles), organic material (foils)
> Power and energy in mobile systems.
> Privacy and Ethics

Using a business plan we will practice the commercialisation of our 'Wearable Computers'.

Supported by a wiki-tool the course is organized as a seminar, in which the addressed topics are jointly discussed considering the aspect 'Concept of a research proposal'. According to the ETH 'critical thinking initiative' we will analyse and reflect implementation concepts incorporating the social and scientific context. Presentations alternate with workshops and discussions. Instead of an oral examination a thesis in a form of a project proposal can be submitted.

The audience determines the used language (German or English)
Lecture notesA wiki-tool will be available for the internal communication; that includes lecture notes for all lessons, assignments and solutions.
http://www.ife.ee.ethz.ch/education/wearable_systems_2/
LiteratureWill be provided in the course material
Prerequisites / NoticeSupported by a wiki-tool the course is organized as a seminar, in which the addressed topics are jointly discussed considering the aspect 'Concept of a research proposal'. According to the ETH 'critical thinking initiative' we will analyse and reflect implementation concepts incorporating the social and scientific context. Presentations alternate with workshops and discussions. Instead of an oral examination a thesis in a form of a project proposal can be submitted.

The audience determines the date and the used language (German or English)

No special prerequisites, also not the participation of 'Wearable Systems 1'
227-0420-00LInformation Theory II Information W6 credits2V + 2US. M. Moser
AbstractThis course builds on Information Theory I. It introduces additional topics in single-user communication, connections between Information Theory and Statistics, and Network Information Theory.
ObjectiveThe course has two objectives: to introduce the students to the key information theoretic results that underlay the design of communication systems and to equip the students with the tools that are needed to conduct research in Information Theory.
ContentDifferential entropy, maximum entropy, the Gaussian channel and water filling, the entropy-power inequality, Sanov's Theorem, Fisher information, the broadcast channel, the multiple-access channel, Slepian-Wolf coding, and the Gelfand-Pinsker problem.
Lecture notesn/a
LiteratureT.M. Cover and J.A. Thomas, Elements of Information Theory, second edition, Wiley 2006
227-0436-00LDigital Communication and Signal Processing Information W6 credits2V + 2UA. Wittneben
AbstractA comprehensive presentation of modern digital modulation, detection and synchronization schemes and relevant aspects of signal processing enables the student to analyze, simulate, implement and research the physical layer of advanced digital communication schemes. The course both covers the underlying theory and provides problem solving and hands-on experience.
ObjectiveDigital communication systems are characterized by ever increasing requirements on data rate, spectral efficiency and reliability. Due to the huge advances in very large scale integration (VLSI) we are now able to implement extremely complex digital signal processing algorithms to meet these challenges. As a result the physical layer (PHY) of digital communication systems has become the dominant function in most state-of-the-art system designs. In this course we discuss the major elements of PHY implementations in a rigorous theoretical fashion and present important practical examples to illustrate the application of the theory. In Part I we treat discrete time linear adaptive filters, which are a core component to handle multiuser and intersymbol interference in time-variant channels. Part II is a seminar block, in which the students develop their analytical and experimental (simulation) problem solving skills. After a review of major aspects of wireless communication we discuss, simulate and present the performance of novel cooperative and adaptive multiuser wireless communication systems. As part of this seminar each students has to give a 15 minute presentation and actively attends the presentations of the classmates. In Part III we cover parameter estimation and synchronization. Based on the classical discrete detection and estimation theory we develop maximum likelihood inspired digital algorithms for symbol timing and frequency synchronization.
ContentPart I: Linear adaptive filters for digital communication
• Finite impulse response (FIR) filter for temporal and spectral shaping
• Wiener filters
• Method of steepest descent
• Least mean square adaptive filters

Part II: Seminar block on cooperative wireless communication
• review of the basic concepts of wireless communication
• multiuser amplify&forward relaying
• performance evaluation of adaptive A&F relaying schemes and student presentations

Part III: Parameter estimation and synchronization
• Discrete detection theory
• Discrete estimation theory
• Synthesis of synchronization algorithms
• Frequency estimation
• Timing adjustment by interpolation
Lecture notesLecture notes.
Literature[1] Oppenheim, A. V., Schafer, R. W., "Discrete-time signal processing", Prentice-Hall, ISBN 0-13-754920-2.
[2] Haykin, S., "Adaptive filter theory", Prentice-Hall, ISBN 0-13-090126-1.
[3] Van Trees, H. L., "Detection , estimation and modulation theory", John Wiley&Sons, ISBN 0-471-09517-6.
[4] Meyr, H., Moeneclaey, M., Fechtel, S. A., "Digital communication receivers: synchronization, channel estimation and signal processing", John Wiley&Sons, ISBN 0-471-50275-8.
Prerequisites / NoticeFormal prerequisites: none
Recommended: Communication Systems or equivalent
227-0559-00LSeminar in Distributed Computing Information W2 credits2SR. Wattenhofer
AbstractIn this seminar participating students present and discuss recent research papers in the area of distributed computing. The seminar consists of algorithmic as well as systems papers in distributed computing theory, peer-to-peer computing, ad hoc and sensor networking, or multi-core computing.
ObjectiveIn the last two decades, we have experienced an unprecedented growth in the area of distributed systems and networks; distributed computing now encompasses many of the activities occurring in today's computer and communications world. This course introduces the basics of distributed computing, highlighting common themes and techniques. We study the fundamental issues underlying the design of distributed systems: communication, coordination, synchronization, uncertainty. We explore essential algorithmic ideas and lower bound techniques.

In this seminar, students present the latest work in this domain.

Seminar language: English
ContentDifferent each year. For details see: www.disco.ethz.ch/courses.html
Lecture notesSlides of presentations will be made available.
LiteraturePapers.
The actual paper selection can be found on www.disco.ethz.ch/courses.html.
252-0407-00LCryptography Information W7 credits3V + 2U + 1AU. Maurer
AbstractFundamentals and applications of cryptography. Cryptography as a mathematical discipline: reductions, constructive cryptography paradigm, security proofs. The discussed primitives include cryptographic functions, pseudo-randomness, symmetric encryption and authentication, public-key encryption, key agreement, and digital signature schemes. Selected cryptanalytic techniques.
ObjectiveThe goals are:
(1) understand the basic theoretical concepts and scientific thinking in cryptography;
(2) understand and apply some core cryptographic techniques and security proof methods;
(3) be prepared and motivated to access the scientific literature and attend specialized courses in cryptography.
ContentSee course description.
Lecture notesyes.
Prerequisites / NoticeFamiliarity with the basic cryptographic concepts as treated for
example in the course "Information Security" is required but can
in principle also be acquired in parallel to attending the course.
252-0408-00LCryptographic Protocols Information W5 credits2V + 2UU. Maurer, M. Hirt
AbstractThe course presents a selection of hot research topics in cryptography. The choice of topics varies and may include provable security, interactive proofs, zero-knowledge protocols, secret sharing, secure multi-party computation, e-voting, etc.
ObjectiveIndroduction to a very active research area with many gems and paradoxical
results. Spark interest in fundamental problems.
ContentThe course presents a selection of hot research topics in cryptography. The choice of topics varies and may include provable security, interactive proofs, zero-knowledge protocols, secret sharing, secure multi-party computation, e-voting, etc.
Lecture notesthe lecture notes are in German, but they are not required as the entire
course material is documented also in other course material (in english).
Prerequisites / NoticeA basic understanding of fundamental cryptographic concepts
(as taught for example in the course Information Security or
in the course Cryptography) is useful, but not required.
851-0734-00LInformation Security LawW2 credits2VU. Widmer
AbstractIntroduction to Information Security Law for non-legal students respectively prospective decision-makers in companies and public authorities who will have to deal with information security issues (CIOs, COOs, CEOs). The lectures will focus on the legal aspects of the security of ICT infrastructures, including networks (Internet), and of the transported and processed information.
ObjectiveThe objective is to understand the meaning and aims of information security and the legal framework, to become acquainted with legal instruments available to provide effective protection for infrastructures and sensitive legal assets and to present an analysis of possible legal loopholes and potential measures. No prior legal knowledge is required for those wishing to attend these lectures.
ContentThe lectures will deal with industry-specific as well as cross-sector specific themes involving both technology and law from the areas of data protection law, computer crimes, statutory duties of confidentiality, telecommunication surveillance (Internet), electronic signatures, liability etc.
Lecture notesThe lectures will be accompanied by powerpoint slide presentations, downloadable before the lectures begin, or available as hard copy at the lectures themselves.
LiteratureReferences to further literature sources will be given in the lectures.
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