Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2015

Physics Master Information
Electives
Electives: Physics and Mathematics
Selection: Environmental Physics
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-1216-00LNumerical Modelling of Weather and ClimateW4 credits3GC. Schär, U. Lohmann
AbstractThe guiding principle of this lecture is that students can understand how weather and climate models are formulated from the governing physical principles and how they are used for climate and weather prediction purposes.
ObjectiveThe guiding principle of this lecture is that students can understand how weather and climate models are formulated from the governing physical principles and how they are used for climate and weather prediction purposes.
ContentThe course provides an introduction into the following themes: numerical methods (finite differences and spectral methods); adiabatic formulation of atmospheric models (vertical coordinates, hydrostatic approximation); parameterization of physical processes (e.g. clouds, convection, boundary layer, radiation); atmospheric data assimilation and weather prediction; predictability (chaos-theory, ensemble methods); climate models (coupled atmospheric, oceanic and biogeochemical models); climate prediction.

Hands-on experience with simple models will be acquired in the tutorials.
Lecture notesSlides and lecture notes will be made available at
Link
LiteratureList of literature will be provided.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: to follow this course, you need some basic background in numerical methods (e.g., "Numerische Methoden in der Umweltphysik", 701-0461-00L)
151-0110-00LCompressible FlowsW4 credits2V + 1UJ.‑P. Kunsch
AbstractTopics: unsteady one-dimensional subsonic and supersonic flows, acoustics, sound propagation, supersonic flows with shocks and Prandtl-Meyer expansions, flow around slender bodies, shock tubes, reaction fronts (deflagration and detonation).
Mathematical tools: method of characteristics and selected numerical methods.
ObjectiveIllustration of compressible flow phenomena and introduction to the corresponding mathematical description methods.
ContentThe interaction of compressibility and inertia is responsible for wave generation in a fluid. The compressibility plays an important role for example in unsteady phenomena, such as oscillations in gas pipelines or exhaust pipes. Compressibility effects are also important in steady subsonic flows with high Mach numbers (M>0.3) and in supersonic flows (e.g. aeronautics, turbomachinery).
The first part of the lecture deals with wave propagation phenomena in one-dimensional subsonic and supersonic flows. The discussion includes waves with small amplitudes in an acoustic approximation and waves with large amplitudes with possible shock formation.
The second part deals with plane, steady supersonic flows. Slender bodies in a parallel flow are considered as small perturbations of the flow and can be treated by means of acoustic methods. The description of the two-dimensional supersonic flow around bodies with arbitrary shapes includes oblique shocks and Prandtl-Meyer expansions etc.. Various boundary conditions, which are imposed for example by walls or free-jet boundaries, and interactions, reflections etc. are taken into account.
Lecture notesnot available
Literaturea list of recommended textbooks is handed out at the beginning of the lecture.
Prerequisites / Noticeprerequisites: Fluiddynamics I and II
402-0573-00LAerosols II: Applications in Environment and TechnologyW4 credits2V + 1UJ. Slowik, U. Baltensperger, H. Burtscher
AbstractMajor topics: Important sources and sinks of atmospheric aerosols and their importance for men and environment. Particle emissions from combustion systems, means to reduce emissions like particle filters.
ObjectiveProfound knowledge about aerosols in the atmosphere and applications of aerosols in technology
ContentAtmospheric aerosols:
important sources and sinks, wet and dry deposition, chemical composition, importance for men and environment, interaction with the gas phase, influence on climate.
Technical aerosols:
combustion aerosols, techniques to reduce emissions, application of aerosols in technology
Lecture notesInformation is distributed during the lectures
Literature- Colbeck I. (ed.) Physical and Chemical Properties of Aerosols, Blackie Academic & Professional, London, 1998.
- Seinfeld, J.H., and S.N. Pandis, Atmospheric chemistry and physics, John Wiley, New York, (1998).
701-1264-00LAtmospheric Physics Lab Work Information W2.5 credits5PJ. Atkinson
AbstractExperiments covering atmospheric physics, meteorology, and aeerosol physics which will be performed in the lab and partly outdoors.
ObjectiveThis course delivers inisghts into various aspects of atmospheric physics. These will be acquired within individual experiments which cover the following topics: Wind and movement of air parcels, evaporation and cooling depending on wind velocity (wind chill), the analysis of particulate matter (aerosol particles), and their influence on the solar radiation that reaches the earth.
ContentDetails about the course are available on the web page (cf. link).
Lecture notesExperiment instructions can be found on the Atmospheric physics lab work web page.
Prerequisites / Notice4 out of 5 available experiments must be carried out. The experiments are conducted in groups of two.
There is an introduction/organization event at the beginning of the semester.
651-1504-00LSnowcover: Physics and Modelling Information W4 credits3GM.  Schneebeli, H. Löwe
AbstractSnow is a fascinating high-temperature material and relevant for applications in glaciology, hydrology, atmospheric sciences, polar climatology, remote sensing and natural hazards. This course introduces key concepts and underlying physical principles of snow, ranging from individual crystals to polar ice sheets.
ObjectiveThe course aims at a cross-disciplinary overview about the phenomenology of relevant processes in the snow cover, traditional and advanced experimental methods for snow measurements and theoretical foundations with key equations required for snow modeling.
ContentTopics include: snow formation, crystal growth, snow microstructure, metamorphism, ice physics, snow mechanics, heat and mass transport in the snowcover, surface energy balance, snow models, wind transport, snow chemistry, electromagnetic properties, experimental techniques.
Lecture notesLecture notes and selected publications.
Prerequisites / NoticeWe offer a voluntary field excursion to Davos on Saturday, 14 March 2015 (if there is sufficient interest). During the excursion the students will conduct snow measurements by themselves in the field and visit the cold laboratories at SLF, Davos.
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