The spring semester 2021 will certainly take place online until Easter. Exceptions: Courses that can only be carried out with on-site presence. Please note the information provided by the lecturers.

Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2016

GESS Compulsory Elective Course Information
Only the topics listed in this paragraph can be chosen as GESS compulsory elective course.
Further below you will find the "type B courses Reflections about subject specific methods and content" as well as the language courses.

6 ECTS need to be acquired during the BA and 2 ECTS during the MA

Students who already took a course within their main study program are NOT allowed to take the course again.
Type A: Enhancement of Reflection Competence
Students who already took a course within their main study program are NOT allowed to take the course again.
History
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
853-0726-00LHistory II: Global (Anti-Imperialism and Decolonisation, 1919-1975)W3 credits2VH. Fischer-Tiné
AbstractThe lecture will give an insight into the formation of anticolonial nationalist movements in Asia and Africa from the beginning of the 20th century onwards and discuss the various dimensions of dismantling of colonial empires.
ObjectiveThe lecture will give students an insight into the history of the non-European world, looking specifically into the political, economic, social and cultural transformation on the backgrounds of colonial penetration strategies and the resistance of anti-colonial movements. The aim is to show that societies in Asia and Africa are not just the product of colonial penetration or anti-colonial resistance, but that both aspects influenced the present political, economic, social and cultural perception of these parts of the world to a considerable extent. A nuanced knowledge of the long and arduous process of decolonisation is hence important to understand today's geopolitical constellation, still characterised by the struggle for a just post-imperial world order.
LiteratureJansen, J.C. und Osterhammel, J., Dekolonisation: Das Ende der Imperien, München 2013.
Prerequisites / NoticeA detailed syllabus will be available from Feb 22nd 2016 at http://www.gmw.ethz.ch/en/teaching/lehrveranstaltungen.html
851-0101-07LScience and ColonialismW3 credits2SH. Fischer-Tiné
AbstractThe course explores the multifaceted entanglements between inperialism and science. It provides a detailed anlaysis of the relevance colonial constellations had for the rise of disciplines such as geography, anthropology, botany, tropical medicine, "race science", etc.
ObjectiveThis course is designed to enable students to critically contextualise the production of scientific and technological knowledge. Besides, it aims at making them understand complex theory-oriented writings in the humanities and social sciences and become acquainted with the method of advanced historical source analysis.
LiteratureINTRODUCTORY LITERATURE:

COHN, Bernard, Colonialism and its Forms of Know¬ledge The British in India, Delhi 1997, S. 3-15.

BALLANTYNE, Tony, ‘Colonial Knowledge’, in: S. Stockwell (Hg.), The British Empire: Themes and Perspectives, Malden-Oxford-Carlton, 2008, S. 177-197.

FISCHER-TINE, Harald, Pidgin-Knowledge: Wissen und Kolonialismus, Zürich-Berlin 2013.
Prerequisites / NoticeA detailed syllabus will be available as from 15 February 2016
http://www.gmw.ethz.ch/en/teaching/lehrveranstaltungen.html
851-0549-11LAdvanced Course History of Technology
Does not take place this semester.
W3 credits2SD. Gugerli
AbstractThis course deals with the patterns and forms of surveillance in late modernity (police, population registers, human resource departments, customer programs, monitoring, market analysis, social media).
ObjectiveIn a blended learning environment (7 classes, 5 online lessons), participants are learning how to deal with theoretical concepts and archival reality checks (both digital and analogue) and are writing a scientific contribution to the history of technology of the knowledge society.
Lecture notesA detailed program and course materials will be made available during the semester on www.tg.ethz.ch.
Prerequisites / NoticeWe recommend the course for students who have participated in the history of technology WebClass.
851-0554-04LCultural and Scientific History of East-AsiaW2 credits2VV. Eschbach-Szabo
AbstractThis course deals with the cultural and scientific history of East-Asia. It comprises lectures on new research work on stagnation and innovation in different fields: it is an overview of history and an introduction into the Chinese writing system, philosophical concepts and their influence on various cultural phenomena and scientific areas of natural sciences in China, Japan and Korea.
ObjectiveThe Cultural and Scientific History of East Asia

The lecture on the cultural and scientific history of East Asia is intended as an introduction to the cultural and scholarly history of China, Japan and Korea. Cultural and scientific developments may have different origins. Although East Asia and the West have never functioned as separate entities, there are certain distinct characteristics concerning cultural understanding and different levels of development of stagnation and innovation.

The Chinese writing system was adapted in different countries. The same canonical texts are known in Japan and Korea. Firstly an overview of history and an introduction into philosophical concepts as Taoism, Confucianism, Shinto, and Buddhism will be presented in order to point out there influence on various cultural phenomena and scientific areas: rites, gardening, architecture, calligraphy, Mathematics, Biology, Medicine, Astrology and Astronomy and modern technical developments.

It is intended for everyone, to gain a basic insight into this specific region and to enable students to do research on scientific topics in East Asia.
ContentIntroduction, Early Chinese History
Confucianism and the reading of a text of Confucius in Chinese
Further development of the Chinese Writing System in East Asia
Cultural and scientific contacts between China and Europe
Buddhism, garden
Taoism, Medicine, Astrology
Christian influences in East Asia
Modern China and Japan
Concepts for Person, Gender in Japan
Intercultural communication inJapan
Globalization and East Asia
Language policy and writing technology
Lecture notesLecture notes, handouts will be available for purchase at the cost of reproduction for the most lectures.
LiteratureNeedham, Joseph: Science and Civilisation in China. Abridged by Colin A. Ronan. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 1978.
851-0549-13LInside Computers. The History of Digital Societies Since 1950s
Particularly suitable for students of MAVT, ITET, INFK, BAUG, HEST, ARCH, MATL
W3 credits2VD. Gugerli
AbstractSince the second half of the 20th century, the world has been put into the computer. This lecture offers problem oriented insights into this sociotechnical process of translation.
ObjectiveStudents become familiar with the mutual interdependence of social and technological change that characterises the history of computing. The teacher is testing his approach.
Lecture notesDie Unterrichtsmaterialien (Reader) werden zu Beginn des Semesters auf www.tg.ethz.ch zugänglich gemacht.
851-0544-05LEnergy Transformations: History and PresentW2 credits2VM. Gisler
AbstractSince Fukushima Energiewende (energy transformation) is on everyone's lips. Technical and economic considerations, however, dominate the discourse while social dimensions are neglected. In this course we focus on the social challenges by linking the current energy transformation with former ones.
ObjectiveOver the last 150 years the energy basis of our society has fundamentally shifted. Not only did energy supply and demand increase manifold but also technology, property and organization as well as industrial use and private consumption changed in profound ways. Students get familiar with both the long-term transformation of our energy basis and short-term phases of irreversible change. By this, they become aware of the historical dimension and the social challenges of today's Energiewende.
Prerequisites / NoticeNachträgliche Aufnahme in den Kurs ist nicht möglich. Falls Sie an der ersten Sitzung verhindert sind, müssen Sie sich vorgängig melden.
851-0101-51LThe Making of Sexuality - Sexology Around 1900 Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
Number of participants limited to 25
W3 credits2S
AbstractThe seminar traces the emergence of sexology as a field of research in German-speaking Europe around 1900. This new discipline and its research questions will be examined with regard to broader debates about sexuality in society. Therefore, the context of the women's movement and the social question will be addressed, as will be the role of race theories, eugenics, and European colonialism.
ObjectiveThe seminar mainly builds on the reading of exemplary texts on sexuality from the period in question, for example by Sigmund Freud, Magnus Hirschfeld, Helene Stöcker, and Wilhelm Reich. The reading of sources will be complemented by secondary literature that provides both context information and a theoretical reflection of sexuality and sexual science.
Based on the exploration of a specific historical subject, the main aim is to teach students to critically approach and analyse historical documents as well as research texts. For advanced/Master students the seminar will provide insight into different fields of historical analysis, namely the history of sexuality and gender, the history of science and ideas, and global and postcolonial history. In addition, the course will open up a critical perspective on sexuality and gender that exceeds the historical time under scrutiny.
851-0812-07LHeureka IV: Ancient Cities: The Significance of Urban Centers in the Greco-Roman WorldW2 credits2VC. Utzinger, M. Amann, B. Beer, A. Broger, F. Egli Utzinger, R. Harder
AbstractA Lecture Series on Ancient Greece and Rome and Their Impact on Later Periods
ObjectiveInsights into some important fields relating to urban centers in antiquity (topography, archaeology, history, culture, economy, ideology).
ContentUnsere Kultur und wissenschaftliche Tradition haben eine lange Geschichte. Am Anfang steht die griechische Kultur (und die römische, die eine erste Rezeption der griechischen darstellt). In der aktuellen Heureka-Reihe soll diese Kultur ausgehend von der Stadt als dem Ort menschlichen Zusammenlebens und -wirkens beleuchtet werden. Der (weiten) Frage "Was ist eine Stadt?" wird unter topographisch-archäologischen, historischen, politischen, soziokulturellen, wirtschaftlichen und ideologischen Aspekten nachgegangen.
Die Vorlesungsreihe gliedert sich in sechs thematische Module (1-6):
Sitzung 1-2 (Modul 1): Athen: Wie eine Stadt zu einer Grossstadt wurde
Sitzung 3-4 (Modul 2): Alexandria: Schmelztiegel von Kulturen und Stadt der Wissenschaft
Sitzung 5-6 (Modul 3): Byzanz - Konstantinopel - Istanbul: Die christliche Hauptstadt und ihre Anziehungskraft
Sitzung 7-8 (Modul 4): Rom: Die ewige Stadt
Sitzung 9-10 (Modul 5): Der Golf von Neapel: Die Goldküste Roms
Sitzung 11-12 (Modul 6): Troia: Untergang einer Stadt. Der Mythos vom trojanischen Krieg und seine Bedeutung für das antike Geschichtsbild
Sitzung 13: Lernzielkontrolle
851-0101-50LIn Search of "Missing Links" in Europe and the Asian-Pacific World, 1859-1920
Particularly suitable for students of D-BIOL, D-ERW, D-BSSE
W3 credits2SB. Schär
AbstractDarwin's theory of evolution (1859) triggered a world wide hunt for humanity's earliest ancestors. While some scientits dug up prehistoric fossils and bones in European soil, others looked for 'savage tribes' in the colonies of the Asian-Pacific world. How did 'the hunt for the missing link' affect and connect people in Europe, Asia, and the Pacific?
ObjectiveThe aim of the seminar is
a) to introduce students to new approaches in the global history of science
b) to familiarize students with the history of Darwinian biology, geology, and anthropology
c) to enable students to examine and interpret historical source material from 'missing link expeditions' between 1860 and 1920.

A particular focus will be placed on Swiss and German research expeditions in the Asian-Pacific world. Students should therefore be able to read German and French sources.
051-0332-00LHistory of Art and Architecture II Information W4 credits4GI. Heinze-Greenberg, B. Nicolai
AbstractIntroduction and outline concerning the history of art and architecture from the Age of Enlightenment to the beginnings of the modern era. (Dr. Ita Heinze-Greenberg)

Introduction and outline concerning the history of art and architecture of the Middle Ages. (Prof. Dr. A. Markschies)
ObjectiveAcquirement of basic knowledge of the history of art and architecture, resp. of methodical basic knowledge of historical working.
ContentIn the Spring Semester the emphasis is on the main tendencies of Western architecture since the Age of Enlightenment: classicism, romantic and historicist architecture, the reform movements of the late 19th century as well as the modern architecture in the years preceding the Great War. Special attention will be given to the impact of the era's socio-political developments - Industrial Revolution and Colonialism - on architecture.
By studying exemplary architecture, significant positions and relevant building types of that period a basic knowledge of architectural history will be imparted. The history of architecture is regarded as a part of a comprehensive history, in which the architectural concepts will be discussed within their cultural, political and social correlations. (Dr. Ita Heinze-Greenberg)

The second section of the lecture provides a historical outline of medieval architecture in France. (Prof. Dr. A. Markschies)
Lecture notesZu beziehen im Sekretariat der Professur Tönnesmann.
051-0312-00LHistory of Art and Architecture IV Information W3 credits2VL. Stalder
AbstractThe two-semester course offers an introduction to the history and theory of architecture from the industrial revolution up to now. Based on current questions a variety of case studies will be discussed.
ObjectiveThe aim is to give an overview on crucial events, works of art, buildings and theories since the beginning of the 19th century up to now. The course should enhance the comprehension of historical and theoretical issues, and allow the students to localize their own practice within a broader historical context.
ContentThe subject of this lecture course is the history and theory of architecture since the beginning of the 19th century up to now. It examines the architectural answers to the changing technical inventions and social practices. Consequently, the focus will be less on individual architects or buildings than on various themes that determined the architecture of the period.
Lecture noteshttp://www.stalder.arch.ethz.ch/courses
051-0364-00LHistory of Urban Design II Information W2 credits2VV. Magnago Lampugnani
AbstractThe lecture covers the time from the beginning of urban culture until the mid 19th century. With selected examples it emphasizes on the historical plannings and methods of European cities. Each specific urban development will be presented within a broader context.
ObjectiveThis course analyzes the history of urban architecture primarily in its existing three dimensional form as a complex human artefact. It also explores the inspirations that prompted the creation of this artefact: philosophical and religious concepts, social conditions, property relationships and the mechanisms that exploit the economics of real estate and the influence of building technology. Intellectual, literary or artistic modes of thought will also be assessed with regard to their impact on urban development. Urbanism has its own distinctive approach as a discipline, but it is also clearly responsive to the influence of related disciplines. Study is made of actual cities and urban expansion plans which are in the process of implementation, as well as unrealized projects and visions of the future. These projects sometimes illustrate ways of thinking that are equal to, or clearer than, actual urban situations.
ContentThe immense urban changes of the 19th century are presented along with their impacts on the developments until the interwar period.

25.02. Company Towns in Great Britain during the Industrial Revolution: The social utopia city concepts of Robert Owens and Charles Fourier

03.03. Garden Cities for tomorrow: Ebenezer Howard and the green alternative for the metropolis

10.03. Civilized wilderness and City Beautiful: from Frederick Law Olmsteds park movement to the urban planning of Daniel H. Burnham

24.03. Antagonists in the shadow of the 'Ringstrasse': the 'infinite city' of Otto Wagner, the artistic urban development of Camillo Sitte and the 'retrogressive utopia' of Adolf Loos

07.04. 'Impressionistic' city architecture: Hendrik Petrus Berlage and the School of Amsterdam

14.04. Urban design of the Beaux-Arts movement, modern classical period and a socialist skyscraper: The Cité Industrielle of Tony Garnier and the Gratte-Ciel in Villeurbanne

21.04. Ideas of the city in the radical avantgarde movement: futurism in Italy and constructivism in the postrevolutian Soviet Union

28.04. 'walkinglines' of pedestrians and 'movinglines' of the traffic: The modernization of the City of Berlin

12.05. The 'Lebensreform' movement, the 'crown of the city' and the housing schemes of the 'Neue Sachlichkeit'

19.05. Satellite town versus 'Superblock': New Frankfurt and Red Vienna
Lecture notesTo each lecture an overview is listet within a script (two semesters of the bachelor studies), that can be purchased at the chair for the history of urban design (HIL D 75.2) at the price of SFR 35,-. The script serves as an auxiliary means to the attended lecture compiling the most important illustrations showed and the names and dates of the buildings and its builders along with a short introductory note.
LiteratureFurther recommended literature to consult is listet within the script.
Prerequisites / NoticeUrban architecture from antiquity till the 19th century
Literature
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
851-0300-89LBelieving and Knowing: Religion within Popular CultureW3 credits2VH.‑J. Hahn
AbstractThe course discusses various social scientific and cultural studies' analyses of the role of religion within (post)modern societies. These theoretical approaches are confronted with a variety of popular cultural "texts" (film, comics, literature, art). Which interrelations exist between religion and other ways of knowledge or in as far can popular culture be regarded as a medium of the religious?
ObjectiveThe course aims towards a better understanding of the complex functions of the religious within modern societies of knowledge while at the same time it attempts to detect and describe different forms of the religious within popular cultural media. Furthermore a variety of theoretical approaches towards the religious from the social sciences, cultural studies and philosophy will be critically examined.
ContentTwo decades ago Pierre Bourdieu stated a "new definition of the religious field" with regard to different observations, which still claim validity: These comprise the crisis of institutionalised religions, the concurrent return of the religious outside the big churches and persuasions, the spread of fundamentalism, the extensive absence of the religious as topic of the cultural elites within Western countries as well as the transformation and replacement of religious traditions by other cultural practices and forms, especially by popular culture.
On the background of this diagnosis on contemporary culture the task of critical cultural studies should be to examine and evaluate the significance of these transformations of religions with regard to the often-postulated "societies of knowledge". As "the other of reason" religion and popular culture form a strained connection to rationalism. At the same time seems the assumption of an ever-increasing secularisation of modern societies in the light of these observations to have become obsolete. With the catchphrase of the "post-secular society", academia and public opinion respond likewise to the challenge of this paradigm.
The course examines in a first step the validity or usefulness of various social scientific and cultural studies analyses of the function of religion within modern or post-modern societies (a.o. Luckmann, Bourdieu). These approaches will then be confronted with texts of different popular cultural media (film, comics, literature, art). Which reciprocity exists between religion and other forms of knowledge and in as far can popular culture be regarded as medium of the religious? For instance Noël Carroll emphasises the affinity of popular culture towards universal emotions and norms, which can be regarded as an aspect of the religious. Apparently religion offers over-arching patterns of orientation, which can determine everyday routines as well as putting different corpuses of knowledge into wider frameworks of interpretation. "Believing and knowing" therefore stand less for a dichotomy than rather for a complex relation of reciprocal influences.
LiteraturePierre Bourdieu, Die Auflösung des Religiösen, in: ders., Rede und Antwort, Frankfurt am Main 1992

Frank Thomas Brinkmann, Comics und Religion: das Medium der "neunten Kunst" in der gegenwärtigen Deutungskultur (Praktische Theologie heute, Bd. 44), Stuttgart 1999

Noël Carroll, A philosophy of mass art, Oxford 1998

Hans-Martin Dober, Filmpredigten, Göttingen ²2011

Clifford Geertz, Dichte Beschreibung. Beiträge zum Verstehen kultureller Systeme, Frankfurt a. M. 1995

Hans-Martin Gutmann, Der Herr der Heerscharen, die Prinzessin der Herzen und der König der Löwen. Religion lehren zwischen Kirche, Schule und populärer Kultur, Gütersloh 1998

Thomas Hausmanninger, Verschwörung und Religion, München 2013

Jörg Herrmann, Sinnmaschine Kino. Sinndeutung und Religion in populären Filmen (=Praktische Theologie und Kultur, Bd. 4), Gütersloh 2001

Inge Kirsner/Michael Wermke (Hgg.), Religion im Kino. Religionspädagogisches Arbeiten mit Filmen, Göttingen 2000

Dies./Olaf Seydel/Harald Schroeter-Wittke (Hgg.), Überzeichnet - Religion in Comics, Wuppertal 2010

Thomas Luckmann, Die unsichtbare Religion, Frankfurt a. M. ²1993

Johann Baptist Metz, Kleine Apologie des Erzählens, in: concilium 9/1973, S. 329-333

Iris Poßegger/Sven Bretfeld, Von Thangka bis Manga. Bilderzählungen aus Asien, Leipzig 2012

Jutta Wermke (ed.), Comics und Religion: eine interdisziplinäre Diskussion, München 1976
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course is connected to the former courses "Comics. Forms and Functions of a Text and Image Relationship" (HS 2012) as well as to "Knowledge and Emotions" (HS 2013). Their visit however is no prerequisite for the attendance.
851-0309-14LArthur Schnitzler's Novellas: Perspectives and Contexts from the History of Ideas and Knowledge Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 20
W3 credits2SJ. Reidy
AbstractThis seminar revolves around Arthur Schnitzler's novellas. We will read and discuss a selection of Schnitzler's short prose in chronological order, the main avenues of discussion being approaches from the history of knowledge and ideas.
Objective- Students get the opportunity to familiarize themselves with a selection of Arthur Schnitzler's short prose.
- Based on the primary texts, the seminar seeks to establish distinct strands of analysis and discussion, centered around the history of culture, knowledge, ideas, economics and medicine among other aspects.
851-0301-01LNietzsche's Critique of Cognition Information W3 credits2SC. Jany
AbstractNietzsche is considered a classic of epistemology. Yet his critique of knowledge is not only philosophical in kind; it also draws on the arts and sciences of his time. We will trace Nietzsche's critique in his writings, as well as the alternative models of cognition and science that he develops.
Objective- reflection upon the conditions and the practice of knowledge
- critical apprehension of Nietzsche's texts and relevant contexts
ContentNietzsche gilt als Klassiker der Erkenntniskritik -- und zwar in einem doppelten Sinn. Einerseits reflektiert Nietzsche, wie schon viele Philosophen vor ihm, auf die Strukturen und Grenzen der menschlichen Erkenntnis. Andererseits kritisiert er jene stillschweigend vorausgesetzten Werte und Ideale, die den Erkenntnisprozess organisieren und das daraus resultierende Wissen verbürgen. Das Seminar verfolgt diese doppelte Kritik in Nietzsches Schriften. Nietzsches Einsicht, dass "das Perspektivische" die Grundbedingung des Erkennens, ja des Lebens selbst sei, dient dabei als Ausgangspunkt. Zu dieser Einsicht gelangt Nietzsche allerdings nicht allein auf dem Weg philosophischer Argumentation. Ebenso wesentlich ist die Aneignung von Begriffen, Verfahren, Strategien und nicht zuletzt von Attitüden, die anderen Wissenschaften und vor allem den Künsten entstammen. Das wirft die Frage auf, inwieweit man Nietzsches Kritik und, mehr noch, die von ihm skizzierten Alternativen von eben diesen Darstellungsweisen lösen kann.
LiteratureJenseits von Gut und Böse, Geburt der Tragödie, zudem weitere Auszüge aus veröffentlichten Schriften und ausgewählte Texte aus dem Nachlass.

Zur Einführung: Alexander Nehamas, Nietzsche: Life as Literature (Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 1985) sowie Günter Figal, Nietzsche: Eine philosophische Einführung (Stuttgart: Reclam, 1999).
851-0301-03LGoethe: Literature and Natural ScienceW3 credits2SA. Kilcher
AbstractIn addition to literature, Goethe immersed himself in studies of geology, physics and botany. In combining empirical methods with speculations, he conceived a holistic concept of nature. We will analyze and contextualize this concept as to its epistemic status, but also with regard to Goethe's literary works ("Faust", "Wahlverwandschaft", "Weltallroman").
Objective- Analysis of Goethe's writings on the natural sciences
- historical contextualization of these writings around 1800
- understand epistemic connection between Goethe's literary and scientific work
- understand the relation between literature and science with the methods of the history and poetics of knowledge
LiteratureTexts:
- Goethe: Schriften zur Naturwissenschaft. Reclam UB 9866
- Goethe: Faust I. Reclam UB 1
- Goethe: Wahlverwandtschaften. Reclam UB 7835
851-0300-60LFranz Kafka. Modernism's Literary KnowledgeW3 credits2VA. Kilcher
AbstractThe course offers an overview of Kafka's texts while revealing a twofold perspective. On the one hand, the text as a literary composition occupies central stage; at the same time, however, the aim is to understand the interrelatedness of these texts with cultural, political, economical and literary discourse of Kafka's time.
Objective1) Students are acquainted with Kafka's texts; 2) students are familiar with the historical, cultural and political contexts of Kafka's work; 3) students gain insight in Kafka's process of writing; 4) students gain insight into the nature of knowledge of Kafka's texts.
851-0315-01LWriting: Precision of Language as a Field of Research for Literature Restricted registration - show details W1 credit1GF. Kretzen
AbstractWhen we write a literary text we enter into a set-up for experiments and explore the possibilities ensuing from the specific structure and consistency of such a text. Literary writing allows us to go over to another kind of knowledge. Thus, the question: what is it that I want to write about? is replaced by: what do I write?
ObjectiveIn this course we shall analyze and apply conditions and criteria for literary writing on the basis of our own texts.
The course is intended for persons who are interested in literary approaches to exactitude.
Any attempt to write literature is confronted with an unforeseeable linguistic dynamism whose feasibility is determined by laws and rules quite different from those of science and technology. For the science-oriented writer, experiencing the self-evidence produced by literary approaches in his or her own writing project opens up a field of language with new content and new methods.
ContentIn the natural sciences as well as in engineering we set up experiments, analyze equation systems, and formulate theories. In order to complement these practices, the course «Writing» shall pursue precision in literary writing, its choice of word and its self-evidence.

When we write a literary text we also enter into a set-up for experiments and explore the possibilities ensuing from the specific structure and overall consistency of such a text. This form of writing takes us from the question: what is it that I want to write about? to the question: what do I write?
How do such literary approaches differ from the ways in which the natural sciences use language?
In this course we shall analyze and apply conditions and criteria for literary writing on the basis of our own texts.
The course is intended for persons who are interested in literary approaches to exactitude.
Any attempt to write literature is confronted with an unforeseeable linguistic dynamism whose feasibility is determined by laws and rules quite different from those of science and technology. For the science-oriented writer, experiencing the self-evidence produced by literary approaches in his or her own writing project opens up a field of language with new content and new methods.
Prerequisites / NoticeZur Anmeldung für den Kurs soll ein selbstverfasster zwei- bis dreiseitiger Text eingereicht werden, der in der Veranstaltung diskutiert werden wird. Dabei kann es sich um einen bereits vorhandenen Text handeln, etwa einen Essay aus der Schulzeit oder einen Beitrag für eine Studierendenzeitschrift. Anschliessend werden die Teilnehmenden einen Text nach gegebenem Thema schreiben, der uns erlauben wird, die Vielfalt der Durchführungen einer gegebenen Aufgabe zu diskutieren.
851-0365-02LIntroduction to English Literature: Science and Fiction Part IIW2 credits2SA. Brand-Kilcher
AbstractWho are we? Why are we here? Both science and literature alike are often motivated by a deep desire to answer life's big questions. We will look at differences and similarities in approach, methods and output in search for answers.
ObjectiveFind out more about shared ground between sciences and humanities and how that relationship changed over the last three centuries.
Develop a critical awareness about concepts such as a neat distinction between dry objectivity and emotional subjectivity which breaks down when the human identity of scientists is considered.
ContentWhat will save us in the end: surgery or poetry? That is one of the questions posed in Ian McEwan's novel "Saturday". Mc Ewan's novel and other texts and essays will be read and discussed.
Today there is not one scientific style anymore but rather a multiplicity of scientific genres. You can bring your own scientific text to class in order to analyze, discuss and possibly improve it.
LiteratureRecommended reading: Ian Mc Ewan: Saturday (2005);
Charlotte Sleigh: Literature and Science (2011).
851-0346-05LThe Book Trade in Renaissance ItalyW3 credits2VA. Nuovo Filippini
AbstractThe invention of printing set in motion a series of profound changes in Europe, especially over the long term. In Italy the arrival of the new technology coincided with the golden age of the Renaissance and led to a vast number of publications.
ObjectiveThe success of printing throughout Italy and above all in Venice was the result of continual cultural innovation, as the great humanist publishing enterprise of Aldus Manutius demonstrates so well. Another fundamental factor in this success, however, was the support which the merchants who transformed themselves into publishers gave to this new sphere of productive activity. The great dynasties of sixteenth-century publishers, such as the Giunti, the Gabiano and the Giolito, developed new techniques of distributing and selling books. Among the most significant innovations introduced by these merchant-publishers we find the invention of the publisher's device or logo and of a network of branch bookshops located in the most important cities. The constant application of marketing techniques led to the creation of an organised book trade from which in turn emerged the figure of the reader as consumer and as book collector.
ContentThe success of printing throughout Italy and above all in Venice was the result of continual cultural innovation, as the great humanist publishing enterprise of Aldus Manutius demonstrates so well. Another fundamental factor in this success, however, was the support which the merchants who transformed themselves into publishers gave to this new sphere of productive activity. The great dynasties of sixteenth-century publishers, such as the Giunti, the Gabiano and the Giolito, developed new techniques of distributing and selling books. Among the most significant innovations introduced by these merchant-publishers we find the invention of the publisher's device or logo and of a network of branch bookshops located in the most important cities. The constant application of marketing techniques led to the creation of an organised book trade from which in turn emerged the figure of the reader as consumer and as book collector.
Lecture notesI materiali di lettura sono messi a disposizione dell'insegnante nella Dokumentablage del corso. Link diretto: https://ilias-app2.let.ethz.ch/goto.php?target=crs_106898&client_id=ilias_lda
Prego notare che solo i partecipanti al corso hanno accesso ai materiali.
  •  Page  1  of  13 Next page Last page