Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2016

Certificate of Advanced Studies in Computer Science Information
Seminars
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
252-3002-00LAlgorithms for Database Systems Information
Limited number of participants.
W2 credits2SP. Widmayer
AbstractQuery processing, optimization, stream-based systems, distributed and parallel databases, non-standard databases.
ObjectiveDevelop an understanding of selected problems of current interest in the area of algorithms for database systems.
252-3100-00LComputer Supported Cooperative Work Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 18.
W2 credits2SM. Norrie
AbstractComputer-Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) is the study of how people work together using computer technology. It is a multi-disciplinary research field dealing with the social, theoretical, practical and technical aspects of collaboration and how the use of technology can affect groups, organisations and communities. The diversity of the CSCW field is reflected in the range of topics covered.
ObjectiveComputer-Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) is the study of how people work together using computer technology. It is a multi-disciplinary research field dealing with the social, theoretical, practical and technical aspects of collaboration and how the use of technology can affect groups, organisations, communities and societies. The CSCW community is interested in how people use everyday tools such as email, the web and chat systems as well as specialist groupware applications that support groups of people engaged in shared tasks such as software development or product design. A better understanding of how people communicate and work together can in turn lead to a better understanding of the problems of current technologies and systems and influence the design of new technologies and tools.
263-3200-00LAdvanced Topics in Information Retrieval and Natural Language Processing Information W2 credits2ST. Hofmann, C. Eickhoff
AbstractThe seminar will explore advanced topics in the areas of information retrieval and natural language processing.
ObjectiveStudents will select one or more papers and prepare a 30-45 min presentation in the seminar followed by discussions. Students will learn to read and critically evaluate current research papers. It is expected that all students regularly participate in the seminar and the discussions.
LiteratureTopics and papers will be presented in the first meeting of the semester.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe first meeting will deal with paper assignments and scheduling.
252-3600-02LUbiquitous Computing Seminar Information
Does not take place this semester.
W2 credits2SO. Hilliges
AbstractSeminar on various topics from the broader areas of Pervasive Computing, Ubiquitous Computing, Human Computer Interaction, and Distributed Systems.
ObjectiveLearn about various current topics from the broader areas of Pervasive Computing, Ubiquitous Computing, Human Computer Interaction, and Distributed Systems.
Prerequisites / NoticeThere will be an orientation event several weeks before the start of the semester (possibly at the end of the preceding semester) where also first topics will be assigned to students. Please check http://www.vs.inf.ethz.ch/edu for further information.
252-4102-00LSeminar on Randomized Algorithms and Probabilistic MethodsW2 credits2SA. Steger
AbstractThe aim of the seminar is to study papers which bring the students to the forefront of today's research topics. This semester we will study selected papers of the conference Symposium on Discrete Algorithms (SODA16).
ObjectiveRead papers from the forefront of today's research; learn how to give a scientific talk.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe seminar is open for both students from mathematics and students from computer science. As prerequisite we require that you passed the course Randomized Algorithms and Probabilistic Methods (or equivalent, if you come from abroad).
252-4202-00LSeminar in Theoretical Computer Science Information W2 credits2SE. Welzl, B. Gärtner, M. Hoffmann, J. Lengler, A. Steger, B. Sudakov
AbstractPresentation of recent publications in theoretical computer science, including results by diploma, masters and doctoral candidates.
ObjectiveTo get an overview of current research in the areas covered by the involved research groups. To present results from the literature.
252-4302-00LSeminar Algorithmic Game Theory Information
Limited number of participants.
W2 credits2SP. Widmayer, P. Dütting
AbstractIn the seminar we will get familiar with the current original research in the area of algorithmic game theory by reading and presenting selected research papers in that area.
ObjectiveDevelop an understanding of selected problems of current interest in the area of algorithmic game theory, and a practice of a scientific presentation.
ContentStudy and understanding of selected topics of current interest in algorithmic game theory such as: Complexity Results (class PPAD, PLS, NP), Sponsored Search, Approximation Algorithms via Algorithmic Game Theory, Price of Anarchy, New paradigms of computation (e.g., envy-fee, truthful), Mechanism Design.
LiteratureSelected research articles.
Prerequisites / NoticeYou must have passed our "Algorithmic Game Theory" class (or have acquired equivalent knowledge, in exceptional cases).
252-4800-00LQuantum Information and Cryptography Information W2 credits3SS. Wolf
AbstractIn this advanced seminar, various topics are treated in the intersection of quantum physics, information theory, and cryptography.
Objectivesee above
252-5251-00LComputational ScienceW2 credits2SP. Arbenz, T. Hoefler, P. Koumoutsakos
AbstractClass participants study and make a 40 minute presentation (in English) on fundamental papers of Computational Science. A preliminary discussion of the talk (structure, content, methodology) with the responsible professor is required. The talk has to be given in a way that the other seminar participants can understand it and learn from it. Participation throughout the semester is mandatory.
ObjectiveStudying and presenting fundamental works of Computational Science. Learning how to make a scientific presentation.
ContentClass participants study and make a 40 minute presentation (in English) on fundamental papers of Computational Science. A preliminary discussion of the talk (structure, content, methodology) with the responsible professor is required. The talk has to be given in a way that the other seminar participants can understand it and learn from it. Participation throughout the semester is mandatory.
Lecture notesnone
LiteraturePapers will be distributed in the first seminar in the first week of the semester
252-5704-00LAdvanced Methods in Computer Graphics Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 24.
W2 credits2SM. Gross
AbstractThis seminar covers advanced topics in computer graphics with a focus on the latest research results. Topics include modeling, rendering,
animation, physical simulation, computational photography, and others.
ObjectiveThe goal is to obtain an in-depth understanding of actual problems and
research topics in the field of computer graphics as well as improve
presentation and critical analysis skills.
263-2100-00LResearch Topics in Software Engineering Information W2 credits2SM. Vechev
AbstractThis seminar introduces students to the latest research trends in programming languages and systems:

- automated program analysis and synthesis techniques (e.g., new algorithms, combinations with machine learning)

- applications of these techniques to challenges in systems, security, and others.

More information: http://www.srl.inf.ethz.ch/rse2016.php
ObjectiveAt the end of the course, the students should be:

- familiar with a broad range of key research results in the area as well as their applications.

- know how to read and assess high quality research papers

- be able to highlight practical examples/applications, limitations of existing work, and outline potential improvements.
ContentThe course will be structured as a sequence of presentations of high-quality research papers, spanning both theory and practice. These papers will have typically appeared in top conferences spanning several areas such as POPL, PLDI, OOPSLA, OSDI, ASPLOS, SOSP, AAAI, ICML and others.
LiteratureThe publications to be presented will be announced on the seminar home page at least one week before the first session.
Prerequisites / NoticePapers will be distributed during the first lecture.
263-3830-00LSoftware Defined Networking: The Data Centre Perspective Information W2 credits2ST. Roscoe
AbstractSoftware Defined Networks (SDN) is a change supported not only by research but also industry and redifens how traditional network management and configuration is been done.
ObjectiveThrough review and discussion of literature on an exciting new trend in networking, the students get the opportunity to get familiar with one of the most promising new developments in data centre connectivity, while at the same time they can develop soft skills related to the evaluation and presentation of professional content.
ContentSoftware Defined Networks (SDN) is a change supported not only by research but also industry and redifens how traditional network management and configuration is been done. Although much has been already investigated and there are already functional SDN-enabled switches there are many open questions ahead of the adoption of SDN inside and outside the data centre (traditional or cloud-based). With a series of seminars we will reflect on the challenges, adoption strategies and future trends of SDN to create an understanding how SDN is affecting the network operators' industry.
LiteratureThe seminar is based on recent publications by academia and industry. Links to the publications are placed on the Seminar page and can be downloaded from any location with access to the ETH campus network.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe seminar bases on active and interactive participation of the students.
263-4203-00LGeometry: Combinatorics and Algorithms Information W2 credits2SB. Gärtner, M. Hoffmann, E. Welzl
AbstractThis seminar is held once a year and complements the course Geometry: Combinatorics & Algorithms. Students of the seminar will present original research papers, some classic and some of them very recent. The seminar is a good preparation for a master, diploma, or semester thesis in the area.
ObjectiveEach student is expected to read, understand, and elaborate on a selected research paper. To this end, (s)he should give a 45-min. presentation about the paper. The process includes

* getting an overview of the related literature;
* understanding and working out the background/motivation:
why and where are the questions addressed relevant?
* understanding the contents of the paper in all details;
* selecting parts suitable for the presentation;
* presenting the selected parts in such a way that an audience
with some basic background in geometry and graph theory can easily understand and appreciate it.
Prerequisites / NoticeTo attend the seminar, some knowledge in (discrete and computational) geometry and graphs and algorithms is required. Thus, previous participation in the course "Geometry: Combinatorics & Algorithms" or a comparable course is strongly encouraged.
227-0126-00LAdvanced Topics in Networked Embedded Systems Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 12.
W2 credits1SO. Saukh, J. Beutel, L. Thiele
AbstractThe seminar will cover advanced topics in networked embedded systems. A particular focus are cyber-physical systems and sensor networks in various application domains.
ObjectiveThe goal is to get a deeper understanding on leading edge technologies in the discipline, on classes of applications, and on current as well as future research directions.
ContentThe seminar enables Master students, PhDs and Postdocs to learn about latest breakthroughs in wireless sensor networks, networked embedded systems and devices, and energy-harvesting in several application domains, including environmental monitoring, tracking, smart buildings and control. Participants are requested to actively participate in the organization and preparation of the seminar.
227-0559-00LSeminar in Distributed Computing Information
Does not take place this semester.
The seminar will be offered in autumn semester from now on.
W2 credits2SR. Wattenhofer
AbstractIn this seminar participating students present and discuss recent research papers in the area of distributed computing. The seminar consists of algorithmic as well as systems papers in distributed computing theory, peer-to-peer computing, ad hoc and sensor networking, or multi-core computing.
ObjectiveIn the last two decades, we have experienced an unprecedented growth in the area of distributed systems and networks; distributed computing now encompasses many of the activities occurring in today's computer and communications world. This course introduces the basics of distributed computing, highlighting common themes and techniques. We study the fundamental issues underlying the design of distributed systems: communication, coordination, synchronization, uncertainty. We explore essential algorithmic ideas and lower bound techniques.

In this seminar, students present the latest work in this domain.

Seminar language: English
ContentDifferent each year. For details see: www.disco.ethz.ch/courses.html
Lecture notesSlides of presentations will be made available.
LiteraturePapers.
The actual paper selection can be found on www.disco.ethz.ch/courses.html.
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