The spring semester 2021 will take place online until further notice. Exceptions: Courses that can only be carried out with on-site presence. Please note the information provided by the lecturers.

Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2016

MAS in Sustainable Water Resources Information
The Master of Advanced Studies in Sustainable Water Resources is a 12 month full time postgraduate diploma programme. The focus of the programme is on issues of sustainability and water resources in Latin America, with special attention given to the impacts of development and climate change on water resources. The programme combines multidisciplinary coursework with high level research. Sample research topics include: water quality, water quantity, water for agriculture, water for the environment, adaptation to climate change, and integrated water resource management. Language: English. Credit hours: 66 ECTS.
For further information please visit: http://www.ifu.ethz.ch/MAS_SWR
Electives
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0278-00LFlood Protection Information W3 credits2GH. P. Willi
AbstractConcepts and structural measures to prevent or mitigate flood damage, planning methods to implement projects in practice
ObjectiveTo get to know processes leading to flood damage, the different concepts and structural measures allowing to prevent or mitigate flood damage, as well as promising practical planning methods to implement flood protection measures in practice.
ContentExplanation of relevant processes: flooding, aggradation, sedimentations, erosion, debris flows.
Concept of different objectives of protection for various land uses (from rural areas to industrial regions).
General possibilities of flood protection / control.
Land use planning on the basis of hazard zones.
Classical procedures against flood damage with the use of examples such as increase of flow capacity, release structures, flood detention basins, polder.
Property protection as continuative measure.
Maintenance.
Considering of overload case, Emergency procedures.
Damage determination and risk analysis.
Management of residual risk.
Conflict of objective during implementation of procedures.
Situatively adjusted approach.
Case studies (group work).
Field trip.
Lecture notes(no script is available for this lecture)
LiteratureGuidelines of Swiss federal administration (especially Federal Office for the Environment, FOEN)
651-1504-00LSnowcover: Physics and ModellingW4 credits3GM.  Schneebeli, H. Löwe
AbstractSnow is a fascinating high-temperature material and relevant for applications in glaciology, hydrology, atmospheric sciences, polar climatology, remote sensing and natural hazards. This course introduces key concepts and underlying physical principles of snow, ranging from individual crystals to polar ice sheets.
ObjectiveThe course aims at a cross-disciplinary overview about the phenomenology of relevant processes in the snow cover, traditional and advanced experimental methods for snow measurements and theoretical foundations with key equations required for snow modeling. Tutorials and short presentations will also consider the bigger picture of snow physics with respect to climatology, hydrology and earth science.
ContentThe lectures will treat snow formation, crystal growth, snow microstructure, metamorphism, ice physics, snow mechanics, heat and mass transport in the snowcover, surface energy balance, snow models, wind transport, snow chemistry, electromagnetic properties, experimental techniques.

The tutorials include a demonstration/exercise part and a presentation part. The demonstration/exercise part consolidates key subjects of the lecture by means of small data sets, mathematical toy models, order of magnitude estimates, image analysis and visualization, small simulation examples, etc. The presentation part comprises short presentations (about 15 min) based on selected papers in the subject.

A short presentation by the student in one of the tutorials is a pre-requisite to pass the course. Topics for the presentations will be offered in the first week of the semester. A good performance in the presentations will be counted as a bonus on the grade for the written exam.

First practical experience with modern methods measuring snow properties can be acquired in a voluntary field excursion.
Lecture notesLecture notes and selected publications.
Prerequisites / NoticeWe offer a voluntary field excursion to Davos on Saturday, April 2, 2016, in Davos. We will demonstrate traditional and modern field-techniques (snow profile, Near-infrared photography, SnowMicroPen) and you will have the chance to use the instruments yourself. The excursion includes a visit of the SLF cold laboratories with the micro-tomography setup and the snowmaker.
651-1506-00LThe High-Mountain Cryosphere: Processes and Risks (University of Zurich)
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at UZH.
UZH Module Code: GEO856

Mind the enrolment deadlines at UZH:
http://www.uzh.ch/studies/application/mobilitaet_en.html
W3 credits2GUniversity lecturers
AbstractPart I: Hazards in glacierized high-mountain regions
Hazard assessments in cold high-mountain areas with respect to glaciers and permafrost.

Part II: Paleoglaciology
Ice-related aspects of the recent earth and climate history (Ice Age, Holocene, 20. century): reconstruction/modeling of past glaciers/ice sheets and interpretation of information from ice cores.
ObjectivePart I: Hazards in glacierized high-mountain regions
Knowledge about integrative hazard assessment techniques in high-mountain areas under conditions of climate change.

Part II: Paleoglaciology
Understanding of the role of glaciers and ice sheets in the climate system through time since the last Ice Age; knowledge of corresponding reconstruction techniques and of the glaciological basis for ice core interpretation.
ContentPart I: Natural hazards in glacierised mountain regions
- Introduction and instruction e-learning, Hazard/risk concepts
- Introduction to Part II, Paleoglaciology
- e-learning glacier floods and ice avalanches
- Comments on glacier floods, Comments on ice avalanches, climate-induced glacier changes
- Recent case studies
- Application of remote sensing, Principles and applications of numerical mass movement models
- Glacier-clad volcanoes
- Feedbacks on exercises and test

Part II: Paleoglaciology
2-day block course (Friday and Saturday)
Including written test on Paleoglaciology, Subjects include:
- Former glaciers/ice sheets: outlines and geometry
- Former glaciers/ice sheets: flow, mass turnover, temperature, etc.
- Former glaciers/ice sheets: changes in time
- Ice cores: archive (embedding) characteristics
- Ice cores: Information carriers, polar und alpine examples
- Nuclear waste disposal and ice ages, climate change and sea level
Lecture notesPaleoglaciology (about 100p.)
Hazards in glacierized high-mountain regions (about 100p.)

available at the Geography Department, University of Zurich
Literaturerich reference list in lecture notes
Prerequisites / NoticePrecondition
- Getscher und Permafrost (651-4073-00)
651-4095-01LColloquium Atmosphere and Climate 1 Information W1 credit1KE. M. Fischer, C. Schär, N. Gruber, R. Knutti, U. Lohmann, T. Peter, T. Schneider, S. I. Seneviratne, K. Steffen, H. Wernli, M. Wild
AbstractThe colloquium is a series of scientific talks by prominent invited speakers assembling interested students and researchers from around Zürich. Students take part of the scientific discussions.
ObjectiveThe colloquium is a series of scientific talks by prominent invited speakers assembling interested students and researchers from around Zürich. Students take part of the scientific discussions.
Prerequisites / NoticeTo acquire credit points for this colloquium, please visit the course's web page and sign up for one of the groups.
651-4095-02LColloquium Atmosphere and Climate 2 Information W1 credit1KE. M. Fischer, C. Schär, N. Gruber, R. Knutti, U. Lohmann, T. Peter, T. Schneider, S. I. Seneviratne, K. Steffen, H. Wernli, M. Wild
AbstractThe colloquium is a series of scientific talks by prominent invited speakers assembling interested students and researchers from around Zürich. Students take part of the scientific discussions.
ObjectiveThe colloquium is a series of scientific talks by prominent invited speakers assembling interested students and researchers from around Zürich. Students take part of the scientific discussions.
Prerequisites / NoticeTo acquire credit points for this colloquium, please visit the course's web page and sign up for one of the groups.
651-4095-03LColloquium Atmosphere and Climate 3 Information W1 credit1KE. M. Fischer, C. Schär, N. Gruber, R. Knutti, U. Lohmann, T. Peter, T. Schneider, S. I. Seneviratne, K. Steffen, H. Wernli, M. Wild
AbstractThe colloquium is a series of scientific talks by prominent invited speakers assembling interested students and researchers from around Zürich. Students take part of the scientific discussions.
ObjectiveThe colloquium is a series of scientific talks by prominent invited speakers assembling interested students and researchers from around Zürich. Students take part of the scientific discussions.
Prerequisites / NoticeTo acquire credit points for this colloquium, please visit the course's web page and sign up for one of the groups.
860-0012-00LCooperation and Conflict Over International Water Resources
Note: Replacement of 701-0462-01L "The Science and Politics of International Water Management".
Students who already attended 701-0462-01L, kann not be credited again for this course.
W3 credits2SB. Wehrli, T. Bernauer, J. Mertens
AbstractThis course focuses on the technical, economic, and political challenges of dealing with water allocation and pollution problems in large international river basins. It examines ways and means through which such challenges are addressed, and when and why international efforts in this respect succeed or fail.

This is a research seminar at the Master level. PhD students are also welcome.
ObjectiveThe students get an overview of (1) causes and consequences of water scarcity and water pollution problems in large international river basins; (2) they learn concepts to assess and mitigate such water challenges, and (3) they analyze when and why international efforts in this respect succeed or fail.
ContentBased on lectures and discussion of scientific papers students acquire basic knowledge on contentious issues in managing international water resources, on the determinants of cooperation and conflict over international water issues, and on ways and means of mitigating conflict and promoting cooperation. Students will then, in teams of two and coached by Profs. Bernauer and Wehrli, do research on a case of their choice (i.e. an international river basin where riparian countries are trying to find solutions to water allocation and/or water quality problems). They will write a brief paper and present their findings during a final meeting at the end of the semester.
The first 4 and the last 2 dates are reserved for lectures and seminars. The students work on their case study from 22.03. to 17.05.
Lecture notesslides and papers will be distributed electronically
LiteratureThe UN World Water Development Report 2015 provides a broad overview of the topic
http://www.unwater.org/publications/publications-detail/en/c/281166/
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course is open to Master and PhD students from any area of ETH.
701-1226-00LInter-Annual Phenomena and Their PredictionW2 credits2GC. Appenzeller
AbstractThis course provides an overview of the current ability to understand and predict short-term climate variability in the tropical and extra-tropical region and provides insights on how operational weather and climate services are organized.
ObjectiveStudents will acquire an understanding of the key atmosphere and ocean processes involved, will gain experience in analyzing and predicting short-term climate variability and learn how operational weather and climate services are organised and how scientific developments can improve these services.
ContentThe course covers the following topics:

Part 1:
- a brief introduction into short-term climate variability and some basic concepts
- a brief review of climate data and the statistical concepts used for analysing climate variability (e.g. correlation analysis, teleconnection maps, EOF analysis)

Part 2:
- inter-annual variability in the tropical region (e.g. ENSO, MJO)
- inter-annual variability in the extra-tropical region (e.g. Blocking, NAO, PNA, regimes)

Part 3:
- prediction of short-term climate variability (seasonal forecasts, statistical methods, ensemble prediction systems)
- verification methods for probabilistic forecast systems

Part 4:
- challenges for operational weather and climate services
- weather and climate extremes
- early warning systems
- a visit to the forecasting centre of MeteoSwiss
Lecture notesA pdf version of the slides will be available at
http://www.iac.ethz.ch/edu/courses/master/modules/interannual-phenomena.html
LiteratureReferences are given during the lecture.
701-1232-00LRadiation and Climate ChangeW3 credits2GM. Wild, W. Ball
AbstractThis lecture focuses on the prominent role of radiation in the energy balance of the Earth and in the context of past and future climate change.
ObjectiveThe aim of this course is to develop a thorough understanding of the fundamental role of radiation in the context of climate change.
ContentThe course will cover the following topics:
Basic radiation laws; sun-earth relations; the sun as driver of climate change (faint sun paradox, Milankovic ice age theory, solar cycles); radiative forcings in the atmosphere: aerosol, water vapour, clouds; radiation balance of the Earth (satellite and surface observations, modeling approaches); anthropogenic perturbation of the Earth radiation balance: greenhouse gases and enhanced greenhouse effect, air pollution and global dimming; radiation-induced feedbacks in the climate system (water vapour feedback, snow albedo feedback); climate model scenarios under various radiative forcings.
Lecture notesSlides will be made available, lecture notes for part of the course
LiteratureAs announced in the course
701-1252-00LClimate Change Uncertainty and Risk: From Probabilistic Forecasts to Economics of Climate AdaptationW3 credits2V + 1UR. Knutti, D. N. Bresch
AbstractThe course introduces the concepts of predictability, probability, uncertainty and probabilistic risk modelling and their application to climate modeling and the economics of climate adaptation.
ObjectiveStudents will acquire knowledge in uncertainty and risk quantification (probabilistic modelling) and an understanding of the economics of climate adaptation. They will become able to construct their own uncertainty and risk assessment models (MATLAB), hence basic understanding of scientific programming forms a prerequisite of the course.
ContentThe first part of the course covers methods to quantify uncertainty in detecting and attributing human influence on climate change and to generate probabilistic climate change projections on global to regional scales. Model evaluation, calibration and structural error are discussed. In the second part, quantification of risks associated with local climate impacts and the economics of different baskets of climate adaptation options are assessed – leading to informed decisions to optimally allocate resources. Such pre-emptive risk management allows evaluating a mix of prevention, preparation, response, recovery, and (financial) risk transfer actions, resulting in an optimal balance of public and private contributions to risk management, aiming at a more resilient society.
The course provides an introduction to the following themes:
1) basics of probabilistic modelling and quantification of uncertainty from global climate change to local impacts of extreme events
2) methods to optimize and constrain model parameters using observations
3) risk management from identification (perception) and understanding (assessment, modelling) to actions (prevention, preparation, response, recovery, risk transfer)
4) basics of economic evaluation, economic decision making in the presence of climate risks and pre-emptive risk management to optimally allocate resources
Lecture notesPowerpoint slides will be made available
Literature-
Prerequisites / NoticeHands-on experience with probabilistic climate models and risk models will be acquired in the tutorials; hence basic understanding of scientific programming forms a prerequisite of the course. Basic understanding of the climate system, e.g. as covered in the course 'Klimasysteme' is required.

Examination: graded tutorials during the semester (benotete Semesterleistung)
701-1260-00LClimatological and Hydrological Field Work Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30.
W2.5 credits5PL. Gudmundsson, D. Michel, S. I. Seneviratne
AbstractPractical work using selected measurement techniques in meteorology and hydrology. The course consists of field work with different measuring systems to determine turbulence, radiation, soil moisture, evapotranspiration, discharge and the atmospheric state as well as of data analysis.
ObjectiveLearning of elementary concepts and practical experience with meteorological and hydrological measuring systems as well as data analysis.
ContentPractical work using selected measurement techniques in meteorology and hydrology. The course consists of field work with different measuring systems to determine turbulence, radiation, soil moisture, evapotranspiration, discharge and the atmospheric state as well as of data analysis.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course takes place in the hydrological research catchment Rietholzbach (field work) and at ETH (data analysis) as a block course.
701-1342-00LAgriculture and Water QualityW3 credits3GC. H. Stamm, E. Frossard, W. Richner, H. Singer
AbstractLinking scientific basics of different disciplines (agronomy, soil science, aquatic chemistry) with practical questions in the context of real-world problems of diffuse pollution due to agricultural production.
ObjectiveThis course discusses the application of scientific understanding in the context of real-world situations of diffuse pollution caused by agricultural production. It aims at understanding the relevant processes, analysing diffuse pollution and developing mitigation strategies starting from legal requirements regarding water quality.
Content- Diversity of diffuse agrochemical pollution
- Agronomic background on the use of agrochemicals
- Transport of agrochemicals from soils to water bodies
- Development of legal requirements for water quality
- Monitoring strategies in water bodies
- Mitigation strategies

- Exercises including all major topics
- 1 field excursion
Lecture notesHandouts will be provided including reference list for each topic.
Prerequisites / NoticeSome exercises require R (http://www.r-project.org/) and a laptop during the class.
701-1420-00LSystems Ecology: Principles and Modelling Information
Does not take place this semester.
W3 credits3GA. Fischlin, H. Lischke
AbstractFundamentals of systems ecology: Principles, approaches, and modeling of ecological systems illustrated by case studies based on a general systems-theoretical foundation with emphasis on structured ecological modeling. Examples are not only drawn from ecology, but also from biology, agronomy, and forestry.
ObjectiveMain teaching goal: Introduction to the modeling and simulation of complex environmental systems from ecology, biology, agronomy, and forestry.
ContentFundamentals, concepts, and methods of systems ecology, covering population systems as well as ecosystems and introducing students to systems approaches and the associated concepts such as systems analysis, systems thinking, non-linear responses of ecosystems to external forcings, stability and resilience, plus tipping points etc.

In a first part principles and approaches are taught by discussing in detail three case studies. The case studies allow students to familiarize themselves with some of the more important techniques such as systems analysis, modeling, system and parameter identification, stability analysis, and model evaluation.

In the second part of the course students get a comprehensive overview over the diverse modeling approaches (dynamic, linear, non-linear, deterministic, and stochastic systems). The techniques of structured mathematical modeling, simulation, equilibrium and stability analysis, numerical simulation, model validation, and interpretation of model results.

In the last third part case studies from latest research are presented, such as impacts of climate change on forest ecosystems, host-pathogen-vector systems, or population dynamics of pests.

For further details please visit the course portal: http://www.sysecol.ethz.ch/education/course-portal/VSysEcol
Lecture notesHandouts and other course material will be made available during the course.
LiteraturePlease visit the web portal Link
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course expects students to participate actively in discussions and notably also in solving a set of problems. Some of these activities include working with computers. Therefore students should either bring their own laptops along or use one of the laptops provided.
701-1653-00LPolicy and Economics of Ecosystem ServicesW3 credits2GS. Andrade de Sa
AbstractThe course introduces the concept of ecosystem services (ES), their value for society, the causes of their degradation and potential policies to reduce degradation, from an environmental economics perspective. The main focus is thus on policy options for addressing ecosystems' degradation. The strengths and weaknesses of alternative policies are analyzed and illustrated with examples.
ObjectiveThe objective is to draw on insights from environmental economics for explaining human-induced ecosystem change and for assessing the potential of policies and economic incentives as strategies to reduce ecosystem services degradation. Students understand the relevance of environmental economics in application to the sustainable provision of ecosystem services (ES). They can define different categories of ecosystem services and understand underlying sources of market failure that lead to suboptimal human decisions regarding ES provision. They understand the importance of policy choice and policy design. This incorporates both established and newer policy approaches that can be used to address market failure and move towards better outcomes from a societal point of view. They can assess strengths and weaknesses of alternative policy approaches and instruments and understand the basis for selecting among alternative instruments to address ecosystems' degradation. Students have an improved understanding of the political economy underlying the making of environmental policy. They know a variety of real-world applications of different policy approaches related to land use choices and ES in developing and developed countries. Finally, they understand approaches for assessing policy impacts.
ContentThe Millennium Ecosystem Assessment found that 60% of the world's ecosystem services (ES) are being degraded or used unsustainably. The UN report on 'The Economics of Ecosystems Services and Biodiversity' highlighted the impacts on human well-being and the role of policy in addressing ecosystems' degradation. Evaluating changes in ES from a societal perspective first requires an assessment of the societal value of different ES and the tradeoffs between them. Second, we need to understand the drivers of human decision-making affecting ES. Examples will be provided on resource use choices in developed and developing countries. Third, an assessment of the causes of excessive ES degradation is needed. Potential causes include the presence of externalities, improperly designed property rights systems, divergence of private and social discount rates, and lack of information and knowledge. Understanding the causes helps to design policies for more sustainable outcomes. Policies include command-and-control, economic incentives (for example, eco-taxes, tradable permits, government payments for ecosystem services), and decentralized approaches (for example, voluntary agreements, eco-labeling, participatory management). Choosing an appropriate policy instrument (or a combination thereof) requires an understanding of the relative strengths and weaknesses of alternative instruments, their preconditions for success and the political economy of their implementation. Finally, assessing the actual impacts of policy once implemented requires a careful assessment of appropriate baselines.
Lecture notesLecture notes, homework exercises and readings for each class will be made available on OLAT.
LiteratureThere is no single textbook for this class. Instead, a number of articles and book chapters will be suggested for each of the topics addressed during the lecture.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course consists of a combination of lectures, homework assignments on real world case studies, a computer exercise, and an exam.
A prerequisite for this course is a bachelor-level course in Environmental Economics (e.g. 751-1551-00). In particular, students are expected to be familiar with basic environmental economics' concepts such as externality, public good, market failure, opportunity cost, social optimum and market equilibrium, among others. Students with no background in environmental economics can be provided with readings but will be expected to come up to the required standards on their own, prior to starting the class. Please contact Dr. Andrade de Sá (saraly.andrade@env.ethz.ch) for these.
701-1522-00LMulti-Criteria Decision Analysis Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 25.
W3 credits2GJ. Lienert
AbstractThis introduction to "Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis" (MCDA) combines prescriptive Decision Theory (MAVT, MAUT) with practical application and computer-based decision support systems. Participants apply the theory to an environmental decision problem (group work). Methods from philosophical analysis (argumentation analysis) are introduced to help systematize decisions under great uncertainty.
ObjectiveThe main objective is to learn the theory of "Multi-Attribute Value Theory" (MAVT) and "Multi-Attribute Utility Theory" (MAUT) and apply it step-by-step using an environmental decision problem. The participants learn how to structure complex decision problems and break them down into manageable parts. An important aim is to integrate the goals and preferences of different decision makers. The participants will practice how to elicit subjective (personal) preferences from decision makers with structured interviews. They should have an understanding of people's limitations to decision making, based on insights from descriptive Decision Theory. They will use formal computer-based tools to integrate "objective / scientific" data with "subjective / personal" preferences to find consensus solutions that are acceptable to different decision makers. They should also understand the limitations of conventional decision analysis, and how philosophical approaches help to deal with policy decisions under great uncertainty.
ContentGENERAL DESCRIPTION
Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis is an umbrella term for a set of methods to structure, formalize, and analyze complex decision problems involving multiple objectives (aims, criteria), many different alternatives (options, choices), and different actors which may have conflicting preferences. Uncertainty (e.g., of the future or of environmental data) adds to the complexity of environmental decisions. MCDA helps to make decision problems more transparent and guides decision makers into making rational choices. Today, MCDA-methods are being applied in many complex decision situations. This class is designed for participants interested in transdisciplinary approaches that help to better understand real-world decision problems and that contribute to finding sustainable solutions. The course focuses on "Multi-Attribute Value Theory" (MAVT) and "Multi-Attribute Utility Theory" (MAUT). It also gives a short introduction to behavioral Decision Theory, the psychological field of decision making. A lecture (by Gertrude Hirsch Hadorn) focusses on philosophical approaches to systematize decisions. Hereby, framing the decision, timing strategies, and setting goals are discussed, and reasoning about uncertainty is introduced.

STRUCTURE
The course consists of a combination of lectures, exercises in the class, exercises in small groups, reading, and one mandatory exam. Some exercises are computer assisted, applying MCDA software. The participants will choose an environmental case study to work on in small groups throughout the semester. Additional reading from the textbook Eisenführ et al. (2010) is required.

GRADING
There will be one written examination at the end of the course that covers the important theory (50 % of final grade). The group work consists of two to three written reports (50 %).
Lecture notesNo script (see below)
LiteratureThe course is based on: Eisenführ, Franz; Weber, Martin; and Langer, Thomas (2010) Rational Decision Making. 1st edition, 447 p., Springer Verlag, ISBN 978-3-642-02850-2.

Additional reading material will be recommended during the course. Lecture slides will be made available for download.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course requires some understanding of (basic) mathematics. The "formal" parts are not too complicated and we will guide students through the mathematical applications and use of software.

Please note:
The number of participants is limited to 25. Registration is based on a first come first serve basis; registration period ends by 23.02.2016.
751-3402-00LPlant Nutrition II - Integrated Nutrient Management Information W2 credits2VE. Frossard, A. Oberson Dräyer
AbstractTeaching knowledge on nutrient fluxes in agroecosystems so as to maximize nutrient use efficiency by crops and minimize losses to the environment while providing optimal nutrient supply to crops. Methods to establish nutrient budgets are presented. Nutrient input and output variables (e.g. losses by various pathways) are treated and their optimal management presented.
ObjectiveAt the end of the lecture the students can establish nutrient budgets, can critically evaluate agricultural systems as source of elements for the environment and can propose agricultural practices that limit these losses while maximizing nutrient use efficiency and optimizing nutrient supply to crops.
ContentThis course provides understanding of nutrient fluxes in agro-ecosystems so as to maximize nutrient use efficiency by crops while minimizing nutrient losses to the environment at optimal nutrient supply to the crop. First, different approaches to calculate nutrient budgets at various levels of the agro-ecosystem will be studied. Then the characteristics of input and output variables will be treated. These variables encompass organic (e.g. animal manure, plant residues, recycled organic wastes) and mineral fertilizers (e.g. minerals and products from recycling), symbiotic nitrogen fixation, nutrient deposition and pathways of nutrient losses. Measures to mitigate nutrient losses to the environment will be presented. Using case studies on nutrient rich and nutrient poor agro-ecosystems, strategies for an optimal nutrient management will be discussed that integrate attributes of soils, plants and fertilizers.
401-6624-11LApplied Time Series AnalysisW5 credits2V + 1UM. Dettling
AbstractThe course starts with an introduction to time series analysis (examples, goal, mathematical notation). In the following, descriptive techniques, modeling and prediction as well as advanced topics will be covered.
ObjectiveGetting to know the mathematical properties of time series, as well as the requirements, descriptive techniques, models, advanced methods and software that are necessary such that the student can independently run an applied time series analysis.
ContentThe course starts with an introduction to time series analysis that comprises of examples and goals. We continue with notation and descriptive analysis of time series. A major part of the course will be dedicated to modeling and forecasting of time series using the flexible class of ARMA models. More advanced topics that will be covered in the following are time series regression, state space models and spectral analysis.
Lecture notesA script will be available.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course starts with an introduction to time series analysis that comprises of examples and goals. We continue with notation and descriptive analysis of time series. A major part of the course will be dedicated to modeling and forecasting of time series using the flexible class of ARMA models. More advanced topics that will be covered in the following are time series regression, state space models and spectral analysis.
101-0259-00LRiver Revitalization Information
Titel LE bis FS15: Flussmorphologie und naturnaher Wasserbau.
W3 credits2GV. Weitbrecht, M. Detert, M. Koksch, C. Weber
AbstractChannel formation of alluvial rivers (regime width, planforms) is presented. Fluvial hydraulics and sediment transport theory are summarized. Principles of environmentally friendly hydraulic engineering are derived from river morphology. Special attention is given to the application to flood protection and river revitalization projects.
ObjectiveThe main processes of alluvial river channel formation are presented. Fluvial hydraulics and sediment transport theories are summarized. From these elements basic principles of environmentally friendly hydraulic engineering are derived.
Lecture notesno lecture notes
Prerequisites / NoticeRiver Engineering (Lecture 101-0258-00L)
102-0617-01LMethodologies for Image Processing of Remote Sensing DataW3 credits2GI. Hajnsek, O. Frey, M. A. Siddique
AbstractThe aim of this course is to get an overview of several methodologies/algorithms for analysis of different sensor specific information products. It is focused at students that like to deepen their knowledge and understanding of remote sensing for environmental applications.
ObjectiveThe course is divided into two main parts, starting with the brief introduction to remote sensing imaging (4 lectures) and is followed by the introduction into different methodologies (9 lectures) for the quantitative estimation of bio-/geo-physical parameters. The main idea is to deepen the knowledge in remote sensing tools in order to be able to understand the information products, with respect to quality and accuracy.
ContentEach lecture will be composed of two parts:
Theory: During the first hour, we go trough the main concepts needed to understand the specific algorithm.
Practice: During the second hour, the student will test/develop the actual algorithm over some real datasets using Matlab. The student will not be asked to write all the code from scratch (especially during the first lectures), but we will provide some script with missing parts or pseudo-code. However, in the latest lectures the student is supposed to build up some working libraries.
Lecture notesHandouts for each topic will be provided.
LiteratureSuggested readings:
T. M. Lillesand, R.W. Kiefer, J.W. Chipman, Remote Sensing and Image Interpretation, John Wiley & Sons Verlag, 2008
J. R. Jensen, Remote Sensing of the Environment: An Earth Resource Perspective, Prentice Hall Series in Geograpic Information Science, 2000
363-0514-00LEnergy Economics and Policy
It is recommended for students to have taken a course in introductory microeconomics. If not, they should be familiar with microeconomics as in, for example,"Microeconomics" by Mankiw & Taylor and the appendices 4 and 7 of the book "Microeconomics" by Pindyck & Rubinfeld.
W3 credits2GM. Filippini
AbstractAn introduction to principles of energy economics and applications using energy policies: demand analysis, economic analysis of energy investments and cost analysis, economics of fossil fuels, economics of electricity, economics of renewable energy, market failures and energy policy, market-based and non-market based instruments, demand side management and regulation of energy industries.
ObjectiveThe students will develop the understanding of economic principles and tools necessary to analyze energy issues and to formulate energy policy instruments. Emphasis will be put on empirical analysis of energy demand and supply, market failures, energy policy instruments, investments in power plants and in energy efficiency technologies and the reform of the electric power sector.
ContentThe course provides an introduction to energy economics principles and policy applications. The core topics are
-Demand analysis
-Economic analysis of energy investments and cost analysis
-Economics of fossil fuels
-Economics of electricity
-Economics of renewable energies
-Market failures and energy policy
-Market oriented and non-market oriented instruments
-Demand side management
-Regulation of energy industries
Literature- International Handbook on the Economics of Energy
by Joanne Evans (Editor), Lester C. Hunt (Editor)

- Energy Economics
Concepts, Issues, Markets and Governance
Bhattacharyya, Subhes C.
1st Edition, 2011, XXVI, 721 p. 267 illus, 83 in color.
Prerequisites / NoticeIt is recommended for students to have taken a course in introductory microeconomics. If not, they should be familiar with microeconomics as in, for example, "Microeconomics" by Mankiw & Taylor and the appendices 4 and 7 of the book "Microeconomics" by Pindyck & Rubinfeld.
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