Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2016

Agroecosystem Sciences Master Information
Master Studies (Programme Regulations 2016)
Major in Animal Sciences
Disciplinary Competences
LivestockSystems
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
751-6501-00LRuminant Science (HS)W+4 credits4GM. Kreuzer, M. C. Härdi-Landerer, E. Hillmann, U. Witschi
AbstractThe course provides the scientific basis of the central aspects of reproduction, husbandry and nutrition physiology of ruminants, and of the implications for animal welfare, product quality, breeding programs, and organic livestock systems. Means of knowledge transfer include interdisciplinary approaches, disciplinary parts, web-based learning and self-study.
ObjectiveAt the end of the course the students are able to apply, by a comprehensive understanding of the underlying mechanisms, their knowledge in various fields of ruminant science. They will be able to develop and recommend best strategies for breeding programs, feed formulation, improving forage quality, increasing animal health and welfare etc. They will be trained to carry out interdisciplinary and disciplinary research at the highest level. The course Ruminant Science (FS) offered in spring has a similar structure but is complementary to this course.
ContentFields (contact hours)
- Introduction: 2 h
- Special topics: 12 h
- Lameness
- Fertility in Cows
- Food Intake of Ruminants
- Disciplinary topics: 36 h
- Ruminant Husbandry: 16 h
- Ruminant Nutrition Physiology: 10 h
- Reproduction in Ruminants: 8 h
- Lectures held by the students: 4 h

In summary
- Contact hours: 52 h
- Self-study within semester: 30 h (especially preparation for the interdisciplinary courses and the own lecture)
- Self-study in semester break: 38 h
Total: 120 h
Lecture notesDocumentations, links and other materials will be provided at the start of the course
LiteratureInformation on books and other references will be communicated during the course
Prerequisites / NoticeThe specialty of this course is that for the first time the animal science disciplines are unified. This is realised with a particular emphasis on interdisciplinary special topics and new forms of teaching. At the same time the essential basics in the central fields are communicated.

The field of Ruminant Science will also be a part of the spring semester (special topics: Organic Ruminant Systems, Tropical Ruminant Systems, Mastitis; disciplinary courses: Cattle, Sheep and Goat Breeding, Ruminant Diseases and Prophylaxis, Ruminant Nutrition and the Environment). However both courses are organized independently.

Conditions for successful participation: Background on animal science from the Bachelor is desired. In order to attend the Minor in Ruminant Science without any animal science background, a realistic self-assessment concerning the need for additional self-study is recommended (e.g. by choosing an appropriate bachelor course which then may be counted as 'optional courses' in the master). These efforts depend on the extent to which animal science courses have already been attended in the bachelor.

The control of performance will consist of:
- an own lecture
- a final oral examination with focus on comprehension of the fundamental linkages rather than of specific details
751-6601-00LPig Science (HS)W+3 credits3VE. Hillmann, M. C. Härdi-Landerer
AbstractThe overall goal of the course is to provide the essential scientific knowledge of the genetic, physiological and special nutritional aspects of pigs metabolism, animal health and behaviour, and of the implications for environment, product quality, housing and animal welfare, and breeding programs.
ObjectiveStudents will
- understand the complex interactions of nutrition, quality traits of products, breeding and reproduction, health management, behaviour and husbandry.
- be trained to understand interdisciplinary and disciplinary research.
- be able to critically analyze published research data.
- be able to present precise scientific reports in oral and written form.
ContentFour main topics in Pig Science:
HS
- Behaviour and Husbandry of pigs: behavioral needs, husbandry related behavioral disorders, design and construction of housing systems in accordance with welfare requirements and legal regulations.
- Planning of reproductive cycle in practice
- welfare monitoring in practice
- pigs in organic farming
- Animal Health and Diseases: animal hygiene, immunology/vaccinations, metabolic diseaeses, diarrhoe, legisalation, thermoregulation, important infections, prophylaxis.
- poster, exam and evaluation

FS
- Special Physiology of Pig Nutrition: food intake; growth;
metabolism and digestion at different growth stages; energy and specific nutritional requirements; feeding systems; environmental aspects, efeed.
- Genetics: Breeding systems, reproductive techniques, performance tests and recording, etc.
- oral presentation, exam, evaluation
Lecture notesHandouts/scripts are distributed by the the lecturers.
LiteratureSpecific literature is indicated by the lecturers.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture corresponds with the lecture "Ruminant Science" and knowledge in animal health, nutrition and breedin as wellas applied ethology and animal welfare are recommended.
The lecture usually is in German, but there is alsways the possibility to change to English.
751-6901-00LNiches in Animal Production Restricted registration - show details W+1 credit1GM. Kreuzer, M. Buchmann
AbstractThis course deals with unconventional animals or production forms and specific aspects of for keeping them in Europe or, more specifically, in Switzerland. This includes e.g. rare breeds, wild cattle, deer, camelids, ostrich and fish. Particular emphasis will be given to the regulations and the problems occurring with import, housing and marketing of the products.
ObjectiveAt the end of the course the students are able to describe the conditions of keeping unconventional livestock and to develop recommendations for farmers intending to include niche production into the farm enterprise.
ContentThe contact hour part of the course (16 h) is conceptually a block course which is subdivided into one day of lecture and one day of excursion.

The non-contact hour part (14 h) is to comprehend the information given and to prepare for the examination
Lecture notesA documentation will be provided at the start of the course.
LiteratureWill be communicated at the start of the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeLecture and excursion have the same weight with respect to time allocation
Livestock Biology
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
751-7211-00LRuminal DigestionW+1 credit1GA. Schwarm
AbstractThis course broadens the knowledge in one of the most important aspects of ruminant nutrition: the microbial digestion in the rumen (and in the hindgut). For a comprehensive understanding of the rumen microbial ecosystem, the mechanisms of nutrient fermentation and the synthesis of microbial protein, thorough basics are provided. Apart from lectures, group and laboratory exercises are included.
ObjectiveThe course enables students to understand in detail how ruminal digestion works and how this knowledge can be applied to design optimal feeding diets using highly fibrous forages and a variety of other feeds. The students also are able to show how to modify the most important rumen microbes beneficially by nutritional means.
ContentStructure of the contact hour part of the course (14 h):

2 h Introduction and blackboard exercise

8 h Basic topics in ruminal digestion, lectures and group exercises:
- Systematics of the microbes involved in microbial digestion
- Measurement of microbial digestion
- Interactions of microbes and epithelium of the digestive tract
- Differences between ruminal and hindgut microbial digestion
- Microbial nutrient degradation and its modification
- Efficiency of microbial protein synthesis
- Manipulation of the ruminal digestion

2 h Laboratory exercise with a rumen fistulated cow and the Rumen Simulation Technique

2 h Final seminar


The non-contact hour part is to comprehend the information given and to prepare either the written report or the oral presentation (cf. "Besonderes")
Lecture notesLecture notes are provided via Moodle.
LiteratureWill be communicated at the start of the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course is a balanced mixture of blackboard exercise, laboratory exercise, group exercise, lecture and student seminar presentation.

Credit point associated with grade of either a written report or an oral presentation in the final seminar (both on a self-chosen related topic)
751-7703-00LTropical Animal NutritionW1 credit1GS. Marquardt
AbstractFarm animals play an important role in most agro/eco - systems, but conditions for a successful management and nutrition in the tropics are diverse. In this course a wide range of aspects are examined.
ObjectiveThe aim of this course is to know and understand animal production systems in the different zones of the tropics taking into consideration the local and social structure of the population. We will deal with different aspects of animal nutrition in the tropics.
Content- Introduction to the tropics
- Special problems and challenges in tropical regions
- Importance of livestock in the tropics
- Animal production and livestock production systems in the tropics
- Special challenges for livestock in the tropics
- Feeds available in the tropics
- Tropical pasture systems and their characteristics
- Quality of feeds in the tropics
- Problems and challenges of animal nutrition in the tropics
751-6113-00LEndocrinology and Biology of ReproductionW+3 credits2VS. E. Ulbrich
AbstractEndokrinologie und Reproduktionsbiologie der Säugetiere und des Menschen (Anatomie, Morphologie, Physiologie, Regelmechanismen)
Die Systematik der Reproduktionshormone und der Hormonrezeptoren wird erläutert, die Wirkungsmechanismen (Bildung; orale Bioverfügbarkeit; Elimination) erklärt. Mit diesen Grundlagen wird das Verständnis der Regulation der Fortpflanzung umfassend erörtert.
ObjectiveDie Studierenden erlangen das grundlegende theoretische Verständnis und Fachwissen zur Endokrinologie der Reproduktion und zur weiblichen und männlichen Reproduktionsbiologie. Sie können darüber hinaus pathologische Situationen (Fortpflanzungsstörungen) und deren vielfältige Ursachen in den physiologischen Kontext einordnen.
Livestock Genetics
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
751-6243-00LConservation of Animal Genetic ResourcesW+1 credit1VH. Signer-Hasler, C. Flury
Abstract“Conservation of Animal Genetic Resources” overviews the distribution, endangerment and conservation of farm animal genetic resources in Switzerland and abroad. The theory is illustrated with numerous examples and the knowledge is deepened in exercises.
ObjectiveThe students

- overview the distribution and endangerment of animal genetic resources on national and international level and they know, where to find the relevant information.

- can explain, what value can be assigned to biodiversity and name reasons, why biodiversity should be conserved.

- know the national and international efforts of the present and the past to conserve biodiversity in the livestock sector.

- can explain what is important concerning the management of small populations.

- can explain differences between species and breeds concerning biodiversity conservation.

- can describe different conservation activities, in particular in situ and ex situ conservation

- can describe current national and international conservation programmes for species and breeds.
751-6305-00LLivestock Breeding and GenomicsW3 credits3GP. von Rohr
AbstractMethods for analysing livestock data, in particular for the estimation of breeding values: principles of selection index, introduction to BLUP, application of common models used, relationship matrix, methods for the estimation of variance components, basics of breeding programs. The material will be illustrated via exercises and assignments.
ObjectiveThe students are able to set up design matrices, the relationship matrix and its inverse as well as the Mixed Model equations to estimate BLUP breeding values for smaller examples.
Content- Selection index (various sources of information, one trait, multiple traits)
- Relationship matrix and its inverse
- BLUP: one trait, repeated observations, multiple traits, economic indices
- Introduction to methods for the estimation of variance components
- Assignments
Lecture notesCopies of the slides are available on the net.
LiteratureTo be announced in the lectures.
Methodology Competences
Methods for Scientific Research
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
751-6241-00LLaboratory Practical in Molecular Animal Genetics and Inherited DiseasesW+3 credits3PS. Neuenschwander, A. Bratus-Neuenschwander, C. Schelling
AbstractTechnologies of molecular animal-, immuno- and biochemical genetics will be shown and applied to selected domestic and farm animals. The students will perform laboratory tests for genome analysis (identification of gene loci, gene mapping), gene expression (mRNA, proteins), diagnostics (analysis of hereditary diseases) and verification of animals and animal products (parentage control, forensics).
ObjectiveGet to know and apply the basic laboratory methods to systematically identify loci controlling important performance and disease traits and analysis of the molecular nature of variation at the loci. At the end of the course the students are able to understand the underlying mechanisms influencing genetic variations and to analyze gene variants in the laboratory. The students know the importance of the technologies for animal breeding, animal health and quality of animal products in Switzerland and internationally.
The matter is illustrated on practical examples.
Content- Introduction to the course (aims, program, written examination)
- Porcine E.coli test. Determination of the mutation in FUT1
- Sequencing of DNA
- Marker-/microsatellite analyses
- Forensics
- Cytogenetics
- Cell cultures
- Inheritance of coat colour
- Gene expression and animal biotechnology

Contact hours: 42 h
Self-study (preparation for courses and examination): additionally
Lecture notesHandouts/scripts will be distributed by the lecturers.
LiteratureHermann Geldermann. Tierbiotechnologie (2005). Verlag Eugen Ulmer, Stuttgart (Hohenheim)

Specific literature will be indicated individually by the lecturers.
751-3801-00LExperimental Design and Applied Statistics in Agroecosystem ScienceW3 credits2GA. Hund, W. Eugster, C. Grieder, R. Kölliker
AbstractIn this course, different experimental designs will be discussed and various statistical tools will be applied to research questions in agroecosystem sciences. Both manipulative (field and laboratory) experiments and surveys are addressed and students work with a selection of basic techniques and methods to analyse data using a hands-on approach. Methods range from simple t-tests to multi-factoria
ObjectiveStudents will know various statistical analyses and their application to science problems in their study area as well as a wide range of experimental design options used in environmental and agricultural sciences. They will practice to use statistical software packages (R), understand pros and cons of various designs and statistics, and be able to statistically evaluate their own results as well as those of published studies.
ContentThe course program uses a learning-by-doing approach ("hands-on minds-on"). New topics are introduced in the lecture hall, but most of the work is done in the computer lab to allow for the different speeds of progress of the student while working with data and analyzing results. In addition to contact hours exercises must be finalized and handed in for grading. The credit points will be given based on successful assessments of selected exercises.

The tentative schedule containst the following topics:

Introduction To Experimental Design and Applied Statistics
Introduction to 'R' / Revival of 'R' Skills
Designs of Field and Growth Chamber Experiments
Nonlinear Regression Fits
Multivariate Techniques: Principle Component Analysis, Canonical Correpondence Analysis (CCA), Cluster Analysis
ANOVA using linear and mixed effect models
Error Analysis, Error Propagation and Error Estimation
Introduction to autoregression and autocorrelations in temporal and spatial data and how to consider them in ANOVA-type analysis

This course does not provide the mathematical background that students are expected to bring along when signing up to this course. Alternatively, students can consider some aspects of this course as a first exposure to solutions in experimental design and applied statistics and then deepen their understanding in follow-up statistical courses.
Lecture notesHandouts will be available (in English)
LiteratureA selection of suggested additional literature, especially for German speaking students will be presented in the introductory lecture.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course is based on the course Mathematik IV: Statistik, passed in the 2nd year and the Bachelor's course "Wissenschaftliche Datenauswertung und Datenpräsentation" (751-0441-00L)
751-6125-00LPractical Course in Molecular PhysiologyW+3 credits3PS. Bauersachs, S. E. Ulbrich
AbstractThis course is intended to intensify and broaden the knowledge of molecular biology gained during the bachelor lab practical course. It directly allows students to commence a master thesis with a detailed knowledge of pitfalls in experimental setup. It will also sensitize for the awareness of biological and technical variance in experimental research.
ObjectiveThe course will be divided in two parts:
Experimental part:
- Isolation of leukocytes from blood and milk (cattle)
- Culture of isolated cells and stimulation, e.g., with LPS
- Extraction of RNA
- Quantification and quality control of RNA (Nanodrop, Fluorometer, Bioanalyzer)
- Analysis of gene expression by the use of quantitative real-time RT-PCR
Theoretical part:
- Principles of primary cell culture and transcriptional regulation, methods for analytical detection
- Bioinformatics (scientific databases, sequence analysis, biostatistics)
- Presentations by the students (e.g. techniques for analysis of physiological regulatory processes, application examples)
ContentIn this practical course the students will achieve a comprehensive understanding of molecular physiology in livestock research. A cell culture experiment using blood and milk leucocytes under pathogen-associated treatment will be performed and the analysis of differential gene expression undertaken. The primary cell culture study will give insights into the laboratory work undertaken in animal physiology research. It will include the general discussion of strategies for an appropriate experimental setup in livestock research and possible methods and tools for the analysis. Hands-on cell culture and harvesting, preanalytical sample preparation and measurement implementation as well as the analysis of differential gene expression, data analysis and statistical evaluation using bioinformatics will be performed. In addition, the students will present talks based on state-of-the-art primary literature about related topics to prepare for the course and to complement the provided information. The course will enable the students to design, perform and evaluate laboratory in vitro investigations of physiological regulatory processes on a cellular level.
751-6127-00LPractical course in Microscopy of Functional HistologyW+3 credits6PS. E. Ulbrich
Abstract
Objective
751-6129-00LPractical course EpigeneticsW+3 credits6PS. E. Ulbrich
Abstract
Objective
Project Management for Scientific Research
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
751-6001-00LForum: Livestock in the World Food SystemW+2 credits1SM. Kreuzer, S. Bauersachs, E. Hillmann, S. Neuenschwander
AbstractThis forum is a platform for the critical reflection of highly relevant topics of livestock in the frame of the world food system comprising issues from basic knowledge to acceptance in society. The exchange is operated by scientific writing and presentation.
ObjectiveIn the Forum "Livestock in the World Food System", a topic of significance for livestock agriculture is selected by the students and subsequently dealt with from various angles (from scientific basis to production systems, environmental aspects and to the acceptance by society). The students learn to present a scientific subject in writing and orally to an audience and to defend the presentation in a discussion.
ContentThe Forum "Livestock in the World Food System" will take place in blocks of 2 hours each. Once the general topic has been selected, it comprises two elements:

Element 1. Oral Presentation: The students form small groups and are lecturers. There are chair persons (moderators) from outside of these small groups and they also head the discussion. The remaining students and lecturers are the audience.

Element 2. Scientific writing: Option 1: preparation of a short scientific type of paper from a result table offered by the lecturers; Option 2: preparation of an abstract with limited word count from a scientific paper; Option 3: writing of a critical review of a paper. The students have to select 2 of the three options each. There will be a discussion be a discussion in small groups at two dates.

Introductions to both forms of presentation will be offered by lecturers.
The preparation of the oral and written presentations takes place to a small part during the 2-h blocks and mainly outside of this time.
Lecture notesno scriptum
Prerequisites / NoticeRequirements for allocation of the two credit points:
- Theatre presentation (with handout) at the forum
- Delivery of written documents of sufficient quality
- Active participation during the presentations by the other participants
751-6003-00LTraining Course in Research Groups (Large) Restricted registration - show details W+6 credits13PM. Kreuzer, E. Hillmann, S. Neuenschwander, S. E. Ulbrich
AbstractThe students will learn the conceptual and methodological background of research in the animal science groups of the Institute of Plant, Animal and Agroecosystem Science. In addition to teaching the theoretical background, the major aim of the course is to integrate the students into the research groups (on job training) and, hence, to focus on the practical application of the knowledge.
Objective- Introduction into the conceptual and methodological basis of research
- Integration of the students into the research groups (on job training)
- Application of the gained knowledge
ContentThe students will be integrated into the research groups’ day-to-day work and will thus deal with all aspects of scientific work. This comprises the planning (conceptually and logistically), execution (data collection, laboratory analyses) and evaluation (statistics, data presentation) of experiments as well as the basics of scientific writing (aim: later publication, Master thesis). The research topics and the range of methodologies vary between the animal science research groups in the Institute of Plant, Animal and Agroecosystem Sciences.
Lecture notesNone
LiteratureSpecific readings after enlisting in a particular research group.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe number of training slots in the various groups is limited. It is therefore highly recommended to contact the group leaders early enough (first come first serve).
The full integration in a research group often means to work on weekends.
The total time budget is equivalent to about 180 hours. Active participation in group meetings (discussion, presentation) and short written reports about the work conducted are required for the 6 credit points. There are no grades, it is only pass or fail.
751-6003-01LTraining Course in Research Groups (Small) Restricted registration - show details W+3 credits6PM. Kreuzer, E. Hillmann, S. Neuenschwander, S. E. Ulbrich
AbstractThe students will learn the conceptual and methodological background of research in the animal science groups of the Institute of Plant, Animal and Agroecosystem Science. In addition to teaching the theoretical background, the major aim of the course is to integrate the students into the research groups (on job training) and, hence, to focus on the practical application of the knowledge.
Objective- Introduction into the conceptual and methodological basis of research
- Integration of the students into the research groups (on job training)
- Application of the gained knowledge
ContentThe students will be integrated into the research groups’ day-to-day work and will thus deal with all aspects of scientific work. This comprises the planning (conceptually and logistically), execution (data collection, laboratory analyses) and evaluation (statistics, data presentation) of experiments as well as the basics of scientific writing (aim: later publication, Master thesis). The research topics and the range of methodologies vary between the animal science research groups in the Institute of Plant, Animal and Agroecosystem Sciences.
Lecture notesNone
LiteratureSpecific readings after enlisting in a particular research group.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe number of training slots in the various groups is limited. It is therefore highly recommended to contact the group leaders early enough (first come first serve).
The full integration in a research group often means to work on weekends.
The total time budget is equivalent to about 90 hours. Active participation in group meetings (discussion, presentation) and short written reports about the work conducted are required for the 3 credit points. There are no grades, it is only pass or fail.
Major in Plant Sciences
Disciplinary Competences
Agronomy and Plant Breeding
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
751-4104-00LAlternative CropsW+2 credits2VA. Walter, B. Büter, E. A. Pérez Torres
AbstractFew crops dominate the crop rotations worldwide. Following the goal of an increased agricultural biodiversity, species such as buckwheat but also medicinal plants might become more important in future. The biology, physiology, stress tolerance and central aspects of the value-added chain of the above-mentioned and of other alternative crops will be depicted.
ObjectiveDuring this course, students learn to assess the potential of different minor or alternative crops compared to the dominant major crops based on their biological and agronomical features. Each student will assess and present a specific alternative crop of his or her choice based on information from scientific articles and Wikipedia. Wikipedia-entries will be generated.
751-4203-00LHorticultural Science: Case Studies (HS) Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 24.
W+2 credits2GL. Bertschinger, J. Rösti, V. J. U. Zufferey
AbstractLectures address 2 horticultural cropping systems and value chains, each one in 4 2h-lecture blocks. Afterwards, the students split in 2 groups for addressing a case study focusing on one of the cropping systems treated before. An excursion to a research site might be included. In a final colloquium, each group presents a report on their case study and their conclusions.
ObjectiveAchieve a deepened understanding of horticultural value chain challenges relating to ecological intensification, resource efficiency, climate change and healthy and safe food, and the problem solution strategies and scientific principles behind.
Deliver in a team effort a report and a presentation providing a comprehensive insight into a problem of the horticultural value chain and its science-based solution strategy.
ContentIn the autumn semester, the two addressed cropping systems and value chains are fruit-production and viticulture.
In the spring semester, the two addressed cropping systems and value chains are vegetable-production- and berry-production or glasshouse-horticulture.
The selected topics address challenges with regard to ecological intensification, resource efficiency or climate change and branch into on-going research and development projects.
Lecture notesDocuments handed out during the case studies.
LiteratureAs provided by the case study leaders.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course builds on basic knowledge delivered in 'Horticultural Crops I' and 'Horticultural Crops II'. If these courses have not been followed by interested participants, equivalent knowledge and experience will greatly support a successful and productive participation of the participating student.
Language: spoken E, G or F, Documents: Preferably English, G/F possible.
751-3603-00LCurrent Challenges in Plant Breeding Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 15.
W+2 credits2GB. Studer, A. Hund, University lecturers
AbstractThe seminar 'Current challenges in plant breeding' aims to bring together national and international experts in plant breeding to discuss current activities, latest achievements and future prospective of a selected topic/area in plant breeding.
The topic this year will be: 'Genome editing: potential and challenges for plant breeding'.
ObjectiveThe educational objectives cover both thematic competences and soft skills:
Thematic competences:
- Deepening of scientific knowledge in plant breeding
- Critical evaluation of current challenges and new concepts in plant breeding
- Promotion of collaboration and Master thesis projects with practical plant breeders
Soft skills:
- Independent literature research to get familiar with the selected topic
- Critical evaluation and consolidation of the acquired knowledge in an interdisciplinary team
- Establishment of a scientific presentation in an interdisciplinary team
- Presentation and discussion of the teamwork outcome
- Establishing contacts and strengthening the network to national and international plant breeders and scientist
ContentInteresting topics related to plant breeding will be selected in close collaboration with the working group for plant breeding of the Swiss Society of Agronomy (SSA). For this year, the topic 'Genome editing: potential and challenges for plant breeding' was selected.

In the fall semester (November 29, 2016), the enrolled students will meet with the lecturers as well as four to six tutors, selected according to their expertise in the selected topic (one afternoon, for about three hours). After an input talk by the lecturers, four to six specific questions/aspects will be identified and phrased. The tutors and the enrolled students will be assigned to four to six different groups, to critically evaluate one question/aspect of the selected topic. The students, guided by tutors, will prepare a presentation of 15 minutes (plus 5 minutes discussion) covering their specific question/aspect. Participation on that afternoon will be mandatory.

End of January (January 31, 2017), a one-day seminar on the selected topic will be organized. After one to two keynote speakers (international experts), four invited talks will link the selected topic to practical plant breeding. In the afternoon, the four to six students groups will present and discuss with the experts their specific questions on the selected topic/area. These presentations will be evaluated by the lecturers. The seminar will be public and serve as annual meeting of the SSA working group for plant breeding, bringing together the experts in plant breeding.

The course is designed for a maximum of 15 Master students and 10 PhD students (advertised and recruited via the Zurich-Basel Plant Science Center). For full and active participation, a total of 2 credit/ECTS points will be provided.
Lecture notesSeminar abstracts
LiteraturePeer-reviewed research articles, selected according to the selected topic/area.
Prerequisites / NoticeParticipation in the BSc course 'Pflanzenzüchtung' is strongly recommended, a completed course in 'Molecular Plant Breeding' is highly advantageous.
Crop Health
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
751-5121-00LInsect EcologyW+2 credits2VR. R. Kariyat Ramachandran, C. De Moraes, M. Mescher
AbstractThis is an introductory course in insect ecology. Students will learn about the ways in which insects interact with and adapt to their abiotic & biotic environments and their roles in diverse ecosystems. The course will entail lectures, outside readings, and critical analysis of contemporary literature.
ObjectiveStudents completing this course should become familiar with the application of ecological principles to the study of insects, as well as major areas of inquiry in this field. Highlighted topics will include insect behavior, chemical and sensory ecology, physiological responses to biotic and abiotic stressors, plant-insect interactions, community and food-web dynamics, and disease ecology. The course will emphasize insect evolution and adaptation in the context of specific interactions with other organisms and the abiotic environment. Examples from the literature incorporated into lectures will highlight the methods used to study insect ecology.
Lecture notesProvided to students through ILIAS
LiteratureSelected required readings (peer reviewed literature, selected book chapters). Optional recommended readings with additional information.
  •  Page  1  of  11 Next page Last page