Autumn Semester 2020 takes place in a mixed form of online and classroom teaching.
Please read the published information on the individual courses carefully.

Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2016

Spatial Development and Infrastructure Systems Master Information
1. Semester
Compulsory Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0467-01LTransport Systems
Only for master students, otherwise a special permisson by the lecturers is required.
O6 credits4GU. A. Weidmann, K. W. Axhausen, M. Menendez, M. Sinner
AbstractHistory, impact and principles of the design and operation of
transport systems
ObjectiveIntroduction of the basic principles of the design and operation of
transport systems (road, rail, air) and of the essential pathways of their
impacts (investment, generalised costs, accessibilities, external effects)
ContentTransport systems and land use; network design; fundamental model of mobility behaviour; costs and benefits of mobility; transport history

Classification of public transport systems; Characteristics of rail systems, bus systems, cable cars and funiculars, unconventional systems; introduction to logistics; fundamentals of rail freight transports; freight transport systems; intermodal transportation

Network layout and its impact on road traffic. Traffic control systems for urban and inter-urban areas. Fundamentals of road safety and infrastructure maintenance.
Lecture notesLecturer notes and slides as well as hints to further literature will be given during the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeObligatory lecture for students of the first semester of MSc Spatial development and Infrastructure Systems.
Remark: parts of the lecture will be given in German.
103-0317-00LSustainable Spatial Development I
Only for master students, otherwise a special permisson by the lecturer is required.
O3 credits2GB. Scholl
AbstractThe lectures imparts important knowledge for solving spatial relevant conflicts and problems. Case studies will be used to demonstrate the implementation in practice.
ObjectiveSpatial development deals with the development and the design of our living space. To meet the expectations, the interests and the plans of the different actors, it is needed a planning approach considering the overview of both the actual and future situation.
The concept of sustainable development in spatial planning leads necessarily to an efficient management of the resources, especially regarding the resource land. The basics of this important discipline will be the subject of this lecture, which is therefore organised in three parts:
- Inner development
- Integrated spatial and infrastructure development
- Cross-border issues in spatial development
ContentContents

Tasks of Spatial Planning and development
Issues of local and supra-local interest
Recurring spatial changes, impacts and key figures
Formal and informal instruments and procedures in spatial planning
Spatial Design - Ideas about the future
Reasoning and assessing the situation in spatial planning
Spatial planning as a sequence of decisions and interventions
Process and procedures management
Focus issues - Inner development before external development
Focus issues - Cross-border tasks
Focus Issues - Integrated spatial and infrastructure development
Lecture notesFuther information and the documents for the lecture can be found on the homepage of the Chair of Spatial Development.
103-0347-00LLandscape Planning and Environmental Systems Restricted registration - show details
Only for master students, otherwise a special permisson by the lecturers is required.
O3 credits2VA. Grêt-Regamey
AbstractIn the course, methods for the identification and measurement of landscape characteristics, as well as measures and implementation of landscape planning are taught. Landscape planning is put into the context of the environmental systems (soil, water, air, climate, flora and fauna) and discussed with regard to socio-political questions of the future.
ObjectiveThe aims of this course are:
1) To illustrate the concept of landscape planning, the economic relevance of landscape and nature in the context of the environmental systems (soil, water, air, climate, flora and fauna).
2) To show landscape planning as an integral information system for the coordination of different instruments by illustrating the aims, methods, instruments and their functions in landscape planning.
3) To show the importance of ecosystem services.
4) To point out basic information about nature and landscape: Analysis and assessment of the complex interactions between landscape elements, effects of existing and foreseeable utilization of space (nature goods and services and landscape functions).
5) To identify and measure the characteristics of landscape.
6) Learn how to use the instrument of GIS appropriately in landscape planning.
ContentIn this course, the following topics are discussed:
- Definition of the concept of landscape
- Landscape change
- Landscape planning
- Methods, instruments and aims of landscape planning (politics)
- Socio-political questions of the future
- Environmental systems, IUCN Red List, ecological connectivity
- Urban landscape services
- Practice of landscape planning
- Use of GIS in landscape planning
Lecture notesNo script. The documentation, consisting of presentation slides are partly handed out and are provided for download on the PLUS website.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe contents of the course will be illustrated in the associated lecture 103-0347-01 U (Landscape Planning and Environmental Systems (GIS Exercises)). An combination of courses is recommended.
Major Courses
Major in Spatial Development
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
103-0337-00LSite and Project DevelopementW3 credits2GG. Nussbaumer
AbstractThe main focus of the lecture is on site and project development questions in relation to recycling of industrial wasteland. A semester exercise covers a specific major project and serves as the semester grade (project report and presentation).
ObjectiveObjectives of the lecture are:
1) Get knowledge of comprehensive and multifunctional large-scale projects and their problem areas
2) Get deepened knowledge in selected fields (site analysis, market analysis, project development, cooperative planning, participation processes)
3) Practical orientation, insight into occupational fields
4) Independent acquirement and acquisition of theoretical knowledge
ContentThe lecture consists of several modules. The main focus is on site and project development questions in relation to recycling of industrial wasteland. Technical presentations, lectured by scientific staff of the division of Planning of Landscape and Urban Systems PLUS as well as well guest referees treat different subjects.

The subjects are:
-Site and market analysis
-Real estate development
-Project development from the perspective of project developers and investors
-Parking and transportation models
-Cooperative planning, participation processes, mediation

The theory is discussed and illustrated at case studies and exercises. Specific large-scale projects that are currently in the development phase will be discussed, for example the area Sihl- Manegg in Zurich (GreenCity) or the area Alter Pilatusmarkt (Niedfeld) Luzern. For one specific industrial wasteland area the students will develop a vision for a possible redevelopment and a new land-use concept, which will be discussed with experts.
Lecture notes-Handouts of the lectures
-Extracts from relevant scientific articles and theory literature
-Exercise material

Download: http://www.irl.ethz.ch/plus/education
103-0417-02LTheory and Methodology of Spatial Planning
Only for master students, otherwise a special permisson by the lecturer is required.
W3 credits2GM. Nollert
AbstractIn order to solve problems in spatial planning it is necessary to explore actions and to judge them; finally, one has to argue why a certain option should be preferred to others. Assessments of the situation are the basis for the problems to treat. Specific knowledge, represented in an adequate manner, is required.
ObjectiveThe participants know the interdependencies between the assessment of a situation, decision making, knowlegde and language. They know the nature of a decision dilemma und maximes, how to deal with it. Especially they learn that the requirement of information for a decision depends upon the preferences of the deciding acteur. They are also familiar with difficulties and pitfalls within these contexts and know what can be done against it.
ContentAssessment of the situation, deciding, language and knowledge are the main parts.
051-0363-00LHistory of Urban Design I Information W2 credits2GV. Magnago Lampugnani
AbstractThe lecture covers the time from the beginning of urban culture until the mid 19th century. With selected examples it emphasizes on the historical plannings and methods of European cities. Each specific urban development will be presented within a broader context.
ObjectiveThis course analyzes the history of urban architecture primarily in its existing three dimensional form as a complex human artefact. It also explores the inspirations that prompted the creation of this artefact: philosophical and religious concepts, social conditions, property relationships and the mechanisms that exploit the economics of real estate and the influence of building technology. Intellectual, literary or artistic modes of thought will also be assessed with regard to their impact on urban development. Urbanism has its own distinctive approach as a discipline, but it is also clearly responsive to the influence of related disciplines. Study is made of actual cities and urban expansion plans which are in the process of implementation, as well as unrealized projects and visions of the future. These projects sometimes illustrate ways of thinking that are equal to, or clearer than, actual urban situations.
ContentIn the first semester an introduction to the discipline and the methods are given along the thematic issues from the beginning of urban culture until the mid-19th century.

01. Introduction to the discipline and method: The history of urban design as a historical project

02. Athens and Rome in the ancient world: Myth, selfportrayal and speculation

03. From the spirit of equality to the colonial module: Greek and Roman City foundings

04. From the urban ideal to new cities in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance

05. Baroque strategies: The new organisation of Rome under Sixtus V, the production of Versailles under Louis XIV and the invention of St. Petersburg

06. The city between Absolutism and Enlightment: baroque defence-designs, the European colonization of the American continent and the reconstruction of Lisbon

07. Ideology and speculation after the Glorious Revolution: landscapegardens and urban figurations in England from 1650-1850

08. Between modernization, Grandeur and repression: Embellishment in Paris from 1750-1830

09. The construction of the bourgeois city: Georges-Eugène Haussmann transforms Paris into the capital of the 19th century

10. Architectural insertion and plan for the expansion of the city: From the Berlin of Karl Friedrich Schinkel to James Hobrecht

11. Neoabsolute power, bourgeois self-confidence and Marxian Idealism: The Viennese Ringstrasse and Ildefonso Cerdas Ensanche for Barcelona
Lecture notesThe lectures are accompagnied by a script (two semesters of the bachelor studies), that can be purchased at the chair for the history of urban design (HIL D 75.2) at the price of CHF 30,-. The script serves as an auxiliary means to the attended lecture compiling the most important illustrations showed and the names and dates of the buildings and its builders along with a short introductory note.
LiteratureFurther recommended literature to consult is listet within the script.
Prerequisites / NoticeHistory of Urban Design from antiquity to the 19th century
851-0707-00LSpace Planning Law and Environment
Particularly suitable for students of D-ARCH, D-BAUG, D-USYS
W2 credits2GO. Bucher
AbstractSystem of swiss planning law,
Constitutional and statutory provisions,
Space planning and fundamental rights,
Instruments,
Application, legal protection, enforcement,
Practical training.
ObjectiveBasic unterstanding of nature and function of space planning from a legal point of view. Basic knowledge of space planning instruments, relationship between space planning and constitutional law (especially property rights), solving of practical cases.
ContentDie Vorlesung basiert wesentlich auf der Mitwirkung der Studenten. Es finden 3 Sitzungen im Hörsaal statt, in welchen sich in der Praxis stellende Probleme erörtert werden. Die Vorbereitung auf die jeweiligen Sitzungen erfolgt an Hand von Fallbearbeitungen und einem Selbststudium an Hand des Lehrbuchs zum Raumplanungs- und Baurecht. Lösen von drei Aufgaben (praktischen Fällen) mit je genügender Leistung für die Erlangung der KP. Als Lernhilfe werden Anleitungen und insbesondere ein Musterfall mit Musterlösung zur Verfügung gestellt.
Lecture notesHaller, Walter/Karlen, Peter, Raumplanung-, Bau- und Umweltrecht, 3.A., Zürich 1999

Hänni, Peter, Planungs-, Bau- und besonderes Umweltschutzrecht, 6.A., Bern 2016
103-0327-00LHistory of Spatial PlanningW1 credit1VM. Koll-Schretzenmayr
AbstractThe course examines the patterns of cleavage, conflict, convergence of interest, and consensus that have structured spatial planning.
ObjectiveThis course aims to provide students with knowledge of the historical background to understand the current spatial structure and to face the current challanges in spatial planning.
Social, cultural, and economic forces will be analyzed for the roles they have played in shaping the landscapes and cityscapes and the answers spatiall planning had to spatial development. The course focuses on the history of planning ideas, paradigms and approaches. A link is made to current challanges in spatial planning.
ContentDie Veranstaltung gibt einen Überblick über die Geschichte der Raumplanung. Sie möchte das Verständnis für die Ideengeschichte wecken und den historischen Kontext für die gegenwärtige Raumplanung und Raumstruktur vermitteln.
LiteratureMartina Koll-Schretzenmayr (2008): gelungen-misslungen? Die Geschichte der Raumplanung Schweiz. NZZ Libro.

Leendertz, Ariane: Ordnung schaffen. Deutsche Raumplanung im 20. Jahrhundert. Wallstein Verlag, Göttingen 2010

Kleine Geschichte der Schweiz: Der Bundesstaat und seine Traditionen (edition suhrkamp)

Michael Koch, Städtebau in der Schweiz 1800-1990, Zürich 1992.

Angelus Eisinger: Städte bauen: gta Verlag 2004.

Daniel Kurz: Die Disziplinierung der Stadt - Moderner Städtebau in Zürich 1900 bis 1940. gta Verlag 2008
103-0569-00LEuropean Aspects of Spatial DevelopmentW3 credits2GA. Peric Momcilovic
AbstractFollowing the insight into historical perspective and contemporary models of governance and planning, the course focuses on the international dimension of spatial planning in Europe. This includes a discussion of how European spatial policy is made and by whom, how planners can participate in such process and how they can address transnational challenges of spatial development cooperatively.
ObjectiveKeeping the general aim of exploring the European dimension of spatial planning in mind, the specific course learning objectives are as follows:
- to interpret the history of spatial planning at the transnational scale
- to understand and explain the content of the European spatial policy agenda
- to describe and analyse the role of territorial cooperation in making European spatial development patterns and planning procedures
- to discuss the changing role of planners and evaluate the ways of their engagement in European spatial policy-making
Content- European spatial policy agenda: introduction and basic directives
- governance models
- planning models; collaborative planning model (main concepts & critics)
- post-positivist approach to spatial planning
- transnational spatial planning in Europe; questioning the European spatial planning; spatial development trends in Europe
- EU as a political system: EU institutions & non-EU actors
- planning families in Europe; the European spatial planning agenda
- spatial planning strategies and programmes on territorial cooperation
- the notion of planning culture and planning system; planning cultures in Europe
- basic characteristics of planning systems in Europe
- the relevance of European transnational cooperation for spatial planning
- European transnational initiatives: CODE 24 (Rotterdam-Genoa), Orient/east-Med corridor (Hamburg-Athens), Danube region
Lecture notesThe documents for the lecture will be provided at the moodle, https://moodle-app2.let.ethz.ch/course/view.php?id=2298.
LiteratureObligatory literature:
- Dühr, S., Colomb, C. & Nadin, V. (2010). European Spatial Planning and Territorial Cooperation. London: Routledge.

Recommended literature:
Governance models:
- Martens, K. (2007). Actors in a Fuzzy Governance Environment. In G. de Roo & G. Porter (Eds.), Fuzzy Planning: The Role of Actors in a Fuzzy Governance Environment (pp. 43-65). Abingdon, Oxon, GBR: Ashgate Publishing Group.

Planning models:
- Davoudi, S. & Strange, I. (2009). Conceptions of Space and Place in Strategic Spatial Planning. Abingdon, Oxon, GBR: Routledge.
- Allmendinger, P. (2002). The Post-Positivist Landscape of Planning Theory. In P. Allmendinger & M. Tewdwr-Jones (Eds.), Planning Futures: New Directions for Planning Theory (pp. 3-17). London: Routledge.
- Healey, P. (1997). Collaborative Planning - Shaping places in fragmented societies. London: MacMillan Press.

EU as a political context:
- Williams, R. H. (1996). European Union Spatial Policy and Planning. London: Sage.

Territorial cooperation in Europe:
- Dühr, S., Stead, D. & Zonneveld, W. (2007). The Europeanization of spatial planning through territorial cooperation. Planning Practice & Research, 22(3), 291-307.
- Dühr, S. & Nadin, V. (2007). Europeanization through transnational territorial cooperation? The case of INTERREG IIIB North-West Europe. Planning Practice and Research, 22(3), 373-394.
- Faludi, A. (Ed.) (2002). European Spatial Planning. Cambridge, Mass.: Lincoln institute of land policy.
- Faludi, A. (2010). Cohesion, Coherence, Cooperation: European Spatial Planning Coming of Age? London: Routledge.
- Faludi, A. (2014). EUropeanisation or Europeanisation of spatial planning? Planning Theory & Practice, 15(2), 155-169.
- Kunzmann, K. R. (2006). The Europeanisation of spatial planning. In N. Adams, J. Alden & N. Harris (Eds.), Regional Development and Spatial Planning in an Enlarged European Union. Aldershot: Ashgate.

Planning families and cultures:
- Newman, P. & Thornley, A. (1996). Urban Plannning in Europe: international competition, national systems and planning projects. London: Routledge.
- Knieling, J. & Othengrafen, F. (Eds.). (2009). Planning Cultures in Europe: Decoding Cultural Phenomena in Urban and Regional Planning. Aldershot: Ashgate.
- Stead, D., de Vries, J. & Tasan-Kok, T. (2015). Planning Cultures and Histories: Influences on the Evolution of Planning Systems and Spatial Development Patterns. European Planning Studies, 23(11), 2127-2132.
- Scholl, B. (Eds.) (2012). Spaces and Places of National Importance. Zurich: ETH vdf Hochschulverlag.

Planning systems in Europe:
- Nadin, V. & Stead, D. (2008). European Spatial Planning Systems, Social Models and Learning. disP - The Planning Review, 44(172), 35-47.
- Commission of the European Communities. (1997). The EU compendium of spatial planning systems and policies. Luxembourg: Office for Official Publications of the European Communities.
Prerequisites / NoticeOnly for master students, otherwise a special permission by the lecturer is required.
Major in Landscape and Environmental Planning
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
103-0307-00LMulti-Criteria Decision Analysis Information W3 credits2GA. Grêt-Regamey
AbstractPlanners need to make decisions about the best possible mix of land uses. With increasing availability of spatial databases and the analytical capabilities of GIS, more effective decision support systems can be developed. The goal of the course is to provide the basics of spatial analysis and to teach the integration of spatial data into multicriteria decision-making systems.
ObjectiveThis course will:
1) introduce students to techniques and issues associated with spatial modeling and decision support systems, including analytical techniques that are unique to spatial analysis
2) provide hands-on training in the use of these spatial tools in R while addressing real planning problems.

The emphasis is on concepts, resources, and analysis tools that students can use in science, private companies and government careers.
Lecture notes- Handouts of the lectures
- Script
- Exercise material

Download: http://www.irl.ethz.ch/plus/education
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course will be held in German and English. It is highly recommended to attend the lecture "Introduction to the data analysis software R" ("Einführung in die R Umgebung für Datenanalysen"), providing the basic principles of using the R-Software.
103-0347-01LLandscape Planning and Environmental Systems (GIS Exercises) Restricted registration - show details W3 credits2UA. Grêt-Regamey, S. Huber, S.‑E. Rabe, A. Stritih
AbstractThe course content of the lecture Landscape Planning and Environmental Systems (103-0347-00 V) will be illustrated.
ObjectiveTo show the importance of ecosystem services.
Analysis and assessment of the complex interactions between landscape elements.
To identify and measure the characteristics of landscape.
Learn how to use the instrument of GIS appropriately in landscape planning.
Content- Environmental systems, IUCN Red List, ecological connectivity
- Calculating urban landscape services
- Practice of landscape planning
- Use of GIS in landscape planning
- Modelling
- Landscape analysis
- Landscape metrics
Lecture notesNo script. The documentation, consisting of presentation slides are partly handed out and are provided for download on the PLUS website.
LiteratureWill be named in the lecture.
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic GIS skills are recommended. A brief introduction to GIS will be given in the first exercise.
851-0707-00LSpace Planning Law and Environment
Particularly suitable for students of D-ARCH, D-BAUG, D-USYS
W2 credits2GO. Bucher
AbstractSystem of swiss planning law,
Constitutional and statutory provisions,
Space planning and fundamental rights,
Instruments,
Application, legal protection, enforcement,
Practical training.
ObjectiveBasic unterstanding of nature and function of space planning from a legal point of view. Basic knowledge of space planning instruments, relationship between space planning and constitutional law (especially property rights), solving of practical cases.
ContentDie Vorlesung basiert wesentlich auf der Mitwirkung der Studenten. Es finden 3 Sitzungen im Hörsaal statt, in welchen sich in der Praxis stellende Probleme erörtert werden. Die Vorbereitung auf die jeweiligen Sitzungen erfolgt an Hand von Fallbearbeitungen und einem Selbststudium an Hand des Lehrbuchs zum Raumplanungs- und Baurecht. Lösen von drei Aufgaben (praktischen Fällen) mit je genügender Leistung für die Erlangung der KP. Als Lernhilfe werden Anleitungen und insbesondere ein Musterfall mit Musterlösung zur Verfügung gestellt.
Lecture notesHaller, Walter/Karlen, Peter, Raumplanung-, Bau- und Umweltrecht, 3.A., Zürich 1999

Hänni, Peter, Planungs-, Bau- und besonderes Umweltschutzrecht, 6.A., Bern 2016
051-0161-00LLandscape Architecture I Information W1 credit2VC. Girot
AbstractIntroduction to the history and theory of garden design and landscape architecture. Analysis of the design of historical gardens and landscapes within the cultural background.
ObjectiveThe course covers the basic history and theory of garden design and landscape architecture from its beginnings to the 21th century. The course aims to raise awareness of a changing perception of nature and landscape.
ContentThe lecture series on “History and Theory of Garden Design and Landscape Architecture” deals with the historical development of designed nature, from the beginnings of cultural landscapes and gardens to 21th century landscape architecture. In the analysis of each era, the focus is on the spatial and cultural relationship between the garden, the city and the landscape, as well as the changing perceptions of nature and its representation.
Lecture notesHandouts and a reading list will be provided.
LiteratureA reading list will be provided for the exams.
Prerequisites / NoticeGeneral Information for the final exam:
Bachelor students: The content of the lectures as well as texts and exam-relevant literature provided by the Chair make up the basis for preparing for the exam. The lecture series is conceived as a yearlong course. Since the written session examination will test knowledge from both semesters, it is necessary to fully attend the lectures of both courses "Landscape Architecture I" and "Landscape Architecture II".
The themes of the examination will be announced at the end of the semester. The Chair will provide literature and texts available for download as pdfs. These allow a more in-depth understanding of the lecture material.

Exchange students or students from other departments: Students, who are attending only one semester, may pass the oral end-of-semester examination. Test-relevant literature will also be made available for download for this purpose.
The students are requested to get in touch by email with the Chair.
701-1631-00LFoundations of Ecosystem Management Information W5 credits3GJ. Ghazoul, C. Garcia
AbstractThis course introduces the broad variety of conflicts that arise in projects focusing on sustainable management of natural resources. It explores case studies of ecosystem management approaches and considers their practicability, their achievements and possible barriers to their uptake.
ObjectiveStudents should be able to
a) propose appropriate and realistic solutions to ecosystem management problems that integrate ecological, economic and social dimensions across relevant temporal and spatial scales.
b) identify important stakeholders, their needs and interests, and the main conflicts that exist among them in the context of land and resource management.
ContentTraditional management systems focus on extraction of natural resources, and their manipulation and governance. However, traditional management has frequently resulted in catastrophic failures such as, for example, the collapse of fish stocks and biodiversity loss. These failures have stimulated the development of alternative ‘ecosystem management’ approaches that emphasise the functionality of human-dominated systems. Inherent to such approaches are system-wide perspectives and a focus on ecological processes and services, multiple spatial and temporal scales, as well as the need to incorporate diverse stakeholder interests in decision making. Thus, ecosystem management is the science and practice of managing natural resources, biodiversity and ecological processes, to meet multiple demands of society. It can be local, regional or global in scope, and addresses critical issues in developed and developing countries relating to economic and environmental security and sustainability.

This course provides an introduction to ecosystem management, and in particular the importance of integrating ecology into management systems to meet multiple societal demands. The course explores the extent to which human-managed terrestrial systems depend on underlying ecological processes, and the consequences of degradation of these processes for human welfare and environmental well-being. Building upon a theoretical foundation, the course will tackle issues in resource ecology and management, notably forests, agriculture and wild resources within the broader context of sustainability, biodiversity conservation and poverty alleviation or economic development. Case studies from tropical and temperate regions will be used to explore these issues. Dealing with ecological and economic uncertainty, and how this affects decision making, will be discussed. Strategies for conservation and management of terrestrial ecosystems will give consideration to landscape ecology, protected area systems, and community management, paying particular attention to alternative livelihood options and marketing strategies of common pool resources.
Lecture notesNo Script
LiteratureChichilnisky, G. and Heal, G. (1998) Economic returns from the biosphere. Nature, 391: 629-630.
Daily, G.C. (1997) Nature’s Services: Societal dependence on natural ecosystems. Island Press. Washington DC.
Hindmarch, C. and Pienkowski, M. (2000) Land Management: The Hidden Costs. Blackwell Science.
Millenium Ecosystem Assessment (2005) Ecosystems and Human Well-being: Synthesis. Island Press, Washington DC.
Milner-Gulland, E.J. and Mace, R. (1998) Conservation of Biological Resources. Blackwell Science.
Gunderson, L.H. and Holling, C.S. (2002) Panarchy: understanding transformations in human and natural systems. Island Press.
701-0565-00LFundamentals of Natural Hazards ManagementW3 credits3GH. R. Heinimann, B. Krummenacher, S. Löw
AbstractRisks to life and human assets result when settlement areas and infrastructure overlap regions where natural hazard processes occur. This course utilizes case studies to teach how a future natural hazards-specialist should analyze, assess and manage risks.
ObjectiveConcepts will be explained step-by-step through a set of case studies, and applied in lab by the students. The following principal steps are used when coping with natural hazard-risks. At each step, students will learn and apply the following skills:
Risk analysis - What can happen?
-Characterize the processes and environmental measures that lead to a natural hazard and integrate modeling results of these processes.
- Identify threats to human life and assets exposed to natural hazards and estimate possible drawbacks or damages.
Risk assessment - What are the acceptable levels of risk?
- Apply principles to determine acceptable risks to human life and assets in order to identify locations which should receive added protection.
- Explain causes for conflicts between risk perception and risk analysis.
Risk management - What steps should be taken to manage risks?
- Explain how various hazard mitigation approaches reduce risk.
- Describe hazard scenarios as a base for adequate dimensioning of control measures.
- Identify the best alternative from a set of thinkable measures based on an evaluation scheme.
- Explain the principles of risk-governance.
ContentDie Vorlesung besteht aus folgenden Blöcken:
1) Einführung ins Vorgehenskonzept (1W)
2) Risikoanalyse (6W + Exkursion) mit:
- Systemabgrenzung
- Gefahrenbeurteilung
- Expositions- und Folgenanalyse
3) Risikobewertung (2W)
4) Risikomanagement (2W + Exkursion)
5) Abschlussbesprechung (1W)
701-1453-00LEcological Assessment and Evaluation Information W3 credits3GF. Knaus, U. Bollens Hunziker
AbstractThe course provides methods and tools for ecological evaluations dealing with nature conservation or landscape planning. It covers census methods, ecological criteria, indicators, indices and critically appraises objectivity and accuracy of the available methods, tools and procedures. Birds and plants are used as main example guiding through different case studies.
ObjectiveStudents will be able to:
1) critically consider biological data books and local, regional, and national inventories;
2) evaluate the validity of ecological criteria used in decision making processes;
3) critically appraise the handling of ecological data and criteria used in the process of evaluation
4) perform an ecological evaluation project from the field survey up to the descision making and planning.
Lecture notesPowerpoint slides are available on the webpage. Additional documents are handed out as copies.
LiteratureBasic literature and references are listed on the webpage.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course structure changes between lecture parts, seminars and discussions. The didactic atmosphere is intended as working group.

Prerequisites for attending this course are skills and knowledge equivalent to those taught in the following ETH courses:
- Pflanzen- und Vegetationsökologie
- Systematische Botanik
- Raum- und Regionalentwicklung
- Naturschutz und Stadtbioökologie
Major in Transport Planning
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
401-0647-00LIntroduction to Mathematical Optimization Information W5 credits2V + 1UD. Adjiashvili
AbstractIntroduction to basic techniques and problems in mathematical optimization, and their applications to problems in engineering.
ObjectiveThe goal of the course is to obtain a good understanding of some of the most fundamental mathematical optimization techniques used to solve linear programs and basic combinatorial optimization problems. The students will also practice applying the learned models to problems in engineering.
ContentTopics covered in this course include:
- Linear programming (simplex method, duality theory, shadow prices, ...).
- Basic combinatorial optimization problems (spanning trees, network flows, knapsack problem, ...).
- Modelling with mathematical optimization: applications of mathematical programming in engineering.
LiteratureInformation about relevant literature will be given in the lecture.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course is meant for students who did not already attend the course "Mathematical Optimization", which is a more advance lecture covering similar topics and more.
101-0417-00LTransport Planning MethodsW6 credits4GK. W. Axhausen
AbstractThe course provides the necessary knowledge to develop models supporting the solution of given planning problems. This is done by dividing the forecasting problem into sub-problems.
The course is composed of a lecture part, providing the theoretical knowledge, and a applied part, in which students develop their own models.
Objective- Knowledge of methods and algorithms commonly used in transport planning
- Ability to independently develop a transport model able to solve / answer the given problem / questions
- Understanding of algorithms and their implementations commonly used in transport planning
ContentThe course provides the necessary knowledge to develop models supporting the solution of given planning problems. Examples of such planning problems are the estimation of traffic volumes, prediction of estimated utilization of new public transport lines, and evaluation of effects (e.g. change in emissions of a city) triggered by building new infrastructure and changes to operational regulations.

To cope with the forecasting problem it is first divided into sub-problems. Then, these are solved using various algorithms like iterative proportional fitting, shortest path algorithms and the method of successive averages.

The course is composed of a lecture part, providing the theoretical knowledge, and a applied part, in which students create their own models. This part takes place in form of a tutorial and consists in the development of a computer program. The programming part is closely guided and particularly suitable for students with little programming experience.
Lecture notesThe slides of the lecture are provided electronically.
LiteratureWillumsen, P. and J. de D. Ortuzar (2003) Modelling Transport, Wiley, Chichester.

Cascetta, E. (2001) Transportation Systems Engineering: Theory and Methods, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht.

Sheffi, Y. (1985) Urban Transportation Networks: Equilibrium Analysis with Mathematical Programming Methods, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs.
363-1047-00LEconomics of Urban TransportationW3 credits2GA. Russo
AbstractThe first part of the course will present some basic principles of transportation economics, applied to the main issues in urban transport policy (e.g. road pricing, public transport tariffs, investment in infrastructure etc.). The second part of the course will consider some case studies where we will apply the tools acquired in the first part to actual policy issues.
ObjectiveThe main objective of this course is to provide students with some basic tools to analyze transport policy decisions from an economic perspective. Can economics help us reduce road congestion problems? Should drivers be asked to pay for using urban roads? Should public transport tariffs depend on how roads are priced? How should the investment in transport infrastructure be financed? These are some of the questions that students should be able to tackle after completing the course.
ContentCOURSE OUTLINE (preliminary):

1. Introduction
2. Travel demand :
a. travel cost and value of time
b. mode choice
3. Road congestion and first-best pricing
a. Static congestion model
b. Dynamic congestion models
c. Examples: London Congestion Charge, Stockholm Congestion Charge
4. Second-best pricing
a. Pricing roads with unpriced alternatives. Examples: tolled and toll-free highways
b. Public transport: pricing with road congestion and with (or without) road tolls
5. Investment in infrastructure: public transport and roads
a. Roads: Investment with and without pricing
b. induced demand
c. Economies of scale/density in public transport
6. Topics:
a. Political economy of road pricing: why do we see road pricing in so few cities (London, Stockholm...) and not in many other cities (NYC, Manchester, Paris...)?
b. What are the alternatives to road pricing to reduce congestion? Parking tariffs, traffic regulation (speed bumps, low emission zones), road space reduction. Examples: Zurich, San Francisco (SFPark), Paris.
c. Transport and land use: value of housing and transport services. Road congestion, transport subsidies and urban sprawl.
Lecture notesCourse slides will be made available to students prior to each class.
LiteratureSYLLABUS (preliminary):

course slides will be made available to students.

Additional material:

Part 1 to 5: textbook: Small and Verhoef (The economics of urban transportation, 2007).

Part 6: Topics to be covered on research papers/case studies.
Major in Transport Systems
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0427-01LSystem and Network PlanningW6 credits4GU. A. Weidmann
AbstractPublic transports in the context of the transport systems; customer needs in the transport market; service planning processes for regular public transport services; long distance, regional and urban public transport service strategies; access to public transport and the last mile
ObjectiveStudents will develop a basic knowledge of all stages of the public transport planning process from market demand to service planning; they will understand the most relevant planning methods and will be able to use them
Content(1) Fundamentals of system and network planning: Mobility and transport systems; public transport systems; customer needs versus supply characteristics of regular services. (2) System and network planning in public passenger services: Goals of the system and network planning; generic planning process; demarcation, analysis of the situation, setting of targets; design of public transport services; evaluation and optimization; system planning. (3) Public transport services: long distance service offers; suburban and urban service offers; regional and local service offers; access to public transport and the last mile.
Lecture notesA script in German will be provided for the course. The slides are made available.
LiteratureReferences to technical literature will be included in the course script. An additional list of literature will be given during the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeNo remarks.
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