Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2016

Physics Bachelor Information
Selection of Higher Semester Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
402-0811-00LProgramming Techniques for Scientific Simulations IW5 credits4GM. Troyer
AbstractThis lecture provides an overview of programming techniques for scientific simulations. The focus is on advances C++ programming techniques and scientific software libraries. Based on an overview over the hardware components of PCs and supercomputer, optimization methods for scientific simulation codes are explained.
Objective
402-0713-00LAstro-Particle Physics I Information W6 credits2V + 1UA. Biland
AbstractThis lecture gives an overview of the present research in the field of Astro-Particle Physics, including the different experimental techniques. In the first semester, main topics are the charged cosmic rays including the antimatter problem. The second semester focuses on the neutral components of the cosmic rays as well as on some aspects of Dark Matter.
ObjectiveSuccessful students know:
- experimental methods to measure cosmic ray particles over full energy range
- current knowledge about the composition of cosmic ray
- possible cosmic acceleration mechanisms
- correlation between astronomical object classes and cosmic accelerators
- information about our galaxy and cosmology gained from observations of cosmic ray
ContentFirst semester (Astro-Particle Physics I):
- definition of 'Astro-Particle Physics'
- important historical experiments
- chemical composition of the cosmic rays
- direct observations of cosmic rays
- indirect observations of cosmic rays
- 'extended air showers' and 'cosmic muons'
- 'knee' and 'ankle' in the energy spectrum
- the 'anti-matter problem' and the Big Bang
- 'cosmic accelerators'
Lecture notesSee lecture home page: http://ihp-lx2.ethz.ch/AstroTeilchen/
LiteratureSee lecture home page: http://ihp-lx2.ethz.ch/AstroTeilchen/
402-0737-00LEnergy and Environment in the 21st Century (Part I)W6 credits2V + 1UM. Dittmar
AbstractThe energy and related environmental problems, the physics principles of using energy and the various real and hypothetical options are discussed from a physicist point of view. The lecture is intended for students of all ages with an interest in a rational approach to the energy problem of the 21st century.
ObjectiveScientists and espially physicists are often confronted with questions
related to the problems of energy and the environment.
The lecture tries to address the physical principles of todays and tomorrow
energy use and the resulting global consequences for the world climate.

The lecture is for students which are interested
participate in a rational and responsible debatte about the
energyproblem of the 21. century.
ContentIntroduction: energy types, energy carriers, energy density
and energy usage. How much energy does a human needs/uses?

Energy conservation and the first and second law of thermodynamics

Fossile fuels (our stored energy resources) and their use.

Burning fossile fuels and the physics of the greenhouse effect.

physics basics of nuclear fission and fusion energy

controlled nuclear fission energy today, the different types of
nuclear power plants, uranium requirements and resources,
natural and artificial radioactivity and the related waste problems
from the nuclear fuel cycle.

Nuclear reactor accidents and the consequences,
a comparison with risks from other energy using methods.

The problems with nuclear fusion and the ITER project.

Nuclear fusion and fission: ``exotic'' ideas.

Hydrogen as an energy carrier: ideas and limits of a
hydrogen economy.

new clean renewable energy sources and their physical limits
(wind, solar, geothermal etc)

Energy perspectives for the next 100 years and some
final remarks
Lecture notesmany more details (in english and german) here:

http://ihp-lx2.ethz.ch/energy21/
LiteratureDie Energiefrage - Bedarf und Potentiale, Nutzung, Risiken und Kosten:
Klaus Heinloth, 2003, VIEWEG ISBN: 3528131063;

Environmental Physics: Boeker and Egbert New York Wiley 1999
Prerequisites / NoticeScience promised us truth, or at least a knowledge
of such relations as our intelligence can seize:
it never promised us peace or happiness
Gustave Le Bon

Physicists learned to realize that whether they like a theory or
they don't like a theory is not the essential question.
Rather, it's whether or not the theory gives predictions that agree with experiment.
Richard Feynman, 1985
402-0461-00LQuantum Information Theory Information W8 credits3V + 1UR. Renner
AbstractThe goal of this course is to introduce the foundations of quantum information theory. It starts with a brief introduction to the mathematical theory of information and then discusses the basic information-theoretic aspects of quantum mechanics. Further topics include applications such as quantum cryptography and quantum computing.
ObjectiveThe course gives an insight into the notion of information and its relevance to physics and, in particular, quantum mechanics. It also serves as a preparation for further courses in the area of quantum information sciences.
402-0580-00LSuperconductivityW6 credits2V + 1UM. Sigrist
AbstractSuperconductivity: thermodynamics, London and Pippard theory; Ginzburg-Landau theory: spontaneous symmetry breaking, flux quantization, type I and II superconductors; microscopic BCS theory: electron-phonon mechanism, Cooper pairing, quasiparticle spectrum and tunneling, Josephson effect, superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUID), brief introduction to unconventional superconductivity.
ObjectiveIntroduction to the most important concepts of superconductivity both on phenomenological and microscopic level, including experimental and theoretical aspects.
ContentThis lecture course provides an introduction to superconductivity, covering both experimental as well as theoretical aspects. The following topics are covered:
Basic phenomena of superconductivity: thermodynamics, electrodynamics, London and Pippard theory; Ginzburg-Landau theory: spontaneous symmetry braking, flux quantization, properties of type I and II superconductors; microscopic BCS theory: electron-phonon mechanism, Cooper pairing, coherent state, quasiparticle spectrum, quasiparticle tunnel, Josephson effects, superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUID), brief extension to unconventional superconductivity.
Lecture notesLecture notes and additional materials are available.
LiteratureM. Tinkham "Introduction to Superconductivity"
H. Stolz: "Supraleitung"
W. Buckel & R. Kleiner "Superconductivity"
P. G. de Gennes "Superconductivity Of Metals And Alloys"
A. A. Abrikosov "Fundamentals of the Theory of Metals"
Prerequisites / NoticeThe preceding attendance of the scheduled lecture courses "Introduction to Solid State Physics" and "Quantum Mechanics I" are mandatory. The courses "Quantum Mechanics II" and "Solid State Theory" provide the most optimal conditions to follow the course.
402-0674-00LPhysics in Medical Research: From Atoms to Cells Information W6 credits2V + 1UB. K. R. Müller
AbstractScanning probe and diffraction techniques allow studying activated atomic processes during early stages of epitaxial growth. For quantitative description, rate equation analysis, mean-field nucleation and scaling theories are applied on systems ranging from simple metallic to complex organic materials. The knowledge is expanded to optical and electronic properties as well as to proteins and cells.
ObjectiveThe lecture series is motivated by an overview covering the skin of the crystals, roughness analysis, contact angle measurements, protein absorption/activity and monocyte behaviour.

As the first step, real structures on clean surfaces including surface reconstructions and surface relaxations, defects in crystals are presented, before the preparation of clean metallic, semiconducting, oxidic and organic surfaces are introduced.

The atomic processes on surfaces are activated by the increase of the substrate temperature. They can be studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The combination with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) allows determining the sizes of the critical nuclei and the other activated processes in a hierarchical fashion. The evolution of the surface morphology is characterized by the density and size distribution of the nanostructures that could be quantified by means of the rate equation analysis, the mean-field nucleation theory, as well as the scaling theory. The surface morphology is further characterized by defects and nanostructure's shapes, which are based on the strain relieving mechanisms and kinetic growth processes.

High-resolution electron diffraction is complementary to scanning probe techniques and provides exact mean values. Some phenomena are quantitatively described by the kinematic theory and perfectly understood by means of the Ewald construction. Other phenomena need to be described by the more complex dynamical theory. Electron diffraction is not only associated with elastic scattering but also inelastic excitation mechanisms that reflect the electronic structure of the surfaces studied. Low-energy electrons lead to phonon and high-energy electrons to plasmon excitations. Both effects are perfectly described by dipole and impact scattering.

Thin-films of rather complex organic materials are often quantitatively characterized by photons with a broad range of wavelengths from ultra-violet to infra-red light. Asymmetries and preferential orientations of the (anisotropic) molecules are verified using the optical dichroism and second harmonic generation measurements. These characterization techniques are vital for optimizing the preparation of medical implants and the determination of tissue's anisotropies within the human body.

Cell-surface interactions are related to the cell adhesion and the contractile cellular forces. Physical means have been developed to quantify these interactions. Other physical techniques are introduced in cell biology, namely to count and sort cells, to study cell proliferation and metabolism and to determine the relation between cell morphology and function.

3D scaffolds are important for tissue augmentation and engineering. Design, preparation methods, and characterization of these highly porous 3D microstructures are also presented.

Visiting clinical research in a leading university hospital will show the usefulness of the lecture series.
227-1037-00LIntroduction to Neuroinformatics Information W6 credits2V + 1UK. A. Martin, M. Cook, V. Mante, M. Pfeiffer
AbstractThe course provides an introduction to the functional properties of neurons. Particularly the description of membrane electrical properties (action potentials, channels), neuronal anatomy, synaptic structures, and neuronal networks. Simple models of computation, learning, and behavior will be explained. Some artificial systems (robot, chip) are presented.
ObjectiveUnderstanding computation by neurons and neuronal circuits is one of the great challenges of science. Many different disciplines can contribute their tools and concepts to solving mysteries of neural computation. The goal of this introductory course is to introduce the monocultures of physics, maths, computer science, engineering, biology, psychology, and even philosophy and history, to discover the enchantments and challenges that we all face in taking on this major 21st century problem and how each discipline can contribute to discovering solutions.
ContentThis course considers the structure and function of biological neural networks at different levels. The function of neural networks lies fundamentally in their wiring and in the electro-chemical properties of nerve cell membranes. Thus, the biological structure of the nerve cell needs to be understood if biologically-realistic models are to be constructed. These simpler models are used to estimate the electrical current flow through dendritic cables and explore how a more complex geometry of neurons influences this current flow. The active properties of nerves are studied to understand both sensory transduction and the generation and transmission of nerve impulses along axons. The concept of local neuronal circuits arises in the context of the rules governing the formation of nerve connections and topographic projections within the nervous system. Communication between neurons in the network can be thought of as information flow across synapses, which can be modified by experience. We need an understanding of the action of inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmitters and neuromodulators, so that the dynamics and logic of synapses can be interpreted. Finally, the neural architectures of feedforward and recurrent networks will be discussed in the context of co-ordination, control, and integration of sensory and motor information in neural networks.
401-3531-00LDifferential Geometry I
This course counts as a core course in the Bachelor's degree programme in Mathematics. Holders of an ETH Zurich Bachelor's degree in Mathematics who didn't use credits from neither 401-3531-00L Differential Geometry I nor 401-3532-00L Differential Geometry II for their Bachelor's degree still can have recognised this course for the Master's degree.
Furthermore, at most one of the three course units
401-3461-00L Functional Analysis I
401-3531-00L Differential Geometry I
401-3601-00L Probability Theory
can be recognised for the Master's degree in Mathematics or Applied Mathematics.
W10 credits4V + 1UU. Lang
AbstractCurves in R^n, inner geometry of hypersurfaces in R^n, curvature, Theorema Egregium, special classes of surfaces, Theorem of Gauss-Bonnet. Hyperbolic space. Differentiable manifolds, tangent bundle, immersions and embeddings, Sard's Theorem, mapping degree and intersection number, vector bundles, vector fields and flows, differential forms, Stokes' Theorem.
ObjectiveIntroduction to elementary differential geometry and differential topology.
Content- Differential geometry in R^n: theory of curves, submanifolds and immersions, inner geometry of hypersurfaces, Gauss map and curvature, Theorema Egregium, special classes of surfaces, Theorem of Gauss-Bonnet, Poincaré Index Theorem.
- The hyperbolic space.
- Differential topology: differentiable manifolds, tangent bundle, immersions and embeddings in R^n, Sard's Theorem, transversality, mapping degree and intersection number, vector bundles, vector fields and flows, differential forms, Stokes' Theorem.
LiteratureDifferential Geometry in R^n:
- Manfredo P. do Carmo: Differential geometry of curves and surfaces
- Wolfgang Kühnel: Differentialgeometrie. Curves-surfaces-manifolds
- Christian Bär: Elementary differential geometry
Differential Topology:
- Dennis Barden & Charles Thomas: An Introduction to Differential Manifolds
- Victor Guillemin & Alan Pollack: Differential Topology
- Morris W. Hirsch: Differential Topology
401-3461-00LFunctional Analysis I
This course counts as a core course in the Bachelor's degree programme in Mathematics. Holders of an ETH Zurich Bachelor's degree in Mathematics who didn't use credits from neither 401-3461-00L Functional Analysis I nor 401-3462-00L Functional Analysis II for their Bachelor's degree still can have recognised this course for the Master's degree.
Furthermore, at most one of the three course units
401-3461-00L Functional Analysis I
401-3531-00L Differential Geometry I
401-3601-00L Probability Theory
can be recognised for the Master's degree in Mathematics or Applied Mathematics.
W10 credits4V + 1UM. Struwe
AbstractBaire category; Banach and Hilbert spaces, bounded linear operators; three fundamental principles: Uniform boundedness, open mapping/closed graph theorem, Hahn-Banach; convexity; dual spaces; weak and weak* topologies; Banach-Alaoglu; reflexive spaces; compact operators and Fredholm theory; closed range theorem; spectral theory of self-adjoint operators in Hilbert spaces.
Objective
Lecture notesLecture Notes on "Funktionalanalysis I" by Michael Struwe
401-3601-00LProbability Theory
This course counts as a core course in the Bachelor's degree programme in Mathematics. Holders of an ETH Zurich Bachelor's degree in Mathematics who didn't use credits from none of the three course units 401-3601-00L Probability Theory, 401-3642-00L Brownian Motion and Stochastic Calculus resp. 401-3602-00L Applied Stochastic Processes for their Bachelor's degree still can have recognised this course for the Master's degree.
Furthermore, at most one of the three course units
401-3461-00L Functional Analysis I
401-3531-00L Differential Geometry I
401-3601-00L Probability Theory
can be recognised for the Master's degree in Mathematics or Applied Mathematics.
W10 credits4V + 1UA.‑S. Sznitman
AbstractBasics of probability theory and the theory of stochastic processes in discrete time
ObjectiveThis course presents the basics of probability theory and the theory of stochastic processes in discrete time. The following topics are planned:
Basics in measure theory, random series, law of large numbers, weak convergence, characteristic functions, central limit theorem, conditional expectation, martingales, convergence theorems for martingales, Galton Watson chain, transition probability, Theorem of Ionescu Tulcea, Markov chains.
ContentThis course presents the basics of probability theory and the theory of stochastic processes in discrete time. The following topics are planned:
Basics in measure theory, random series, law of large numbers, weak convergence, characteristic functions, central limit theorem, conditional expectation, martingales, convergence theorems for martingales, Galton Watson chain, transition probability, Theorem of Ionescu Tulcea, Markov chains.
Lecture notesavailable, will be sold in the course
LiteratureR. Durrett, Probability: Theory and examples, Duxbury Press 1996
H. Bauer, Probability Theory, de Gruyter 1996
J. Jacod and P. Protter, Probability essentials, Springer 2004
A. Klenke, Wahrscheinlichkeitstheorie, Springer 2006
D. Williams, Probability with martingales, Cambridge University Press 1991
401-3621-00LFundamentals of Mathematical StatisticsW10 credits4V + 1UF. Balabdaoui
AbstractThe course covers the basics of inferential statistics.
Objective
» Electives (Physics Master)
  •  Page  1  of  1