Autumn Semester 2020 takes place in a mixed form of online and classroom teaching.
Please read the published information on the individual courses carefully.

Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2016

Robotics, Systems and Control Master Information
Core Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0104-00LUncertainty Quantification for Engineering & Life Sciences Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
Number of participants limited to 60.
W4 credits3GP. Koumoutsakos
AbstractQuantification of uncertainties in computational models pertaining to applications in engineering and life sciences. Exploitation of massively available data to develop computational models with quantifiable predictive capabilities. Applications of Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation to problems in mechanics, control, systems and cell biology.
ObjectiveThe course will teach fundamental concept of Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation (UQ+P) for computational models of systems in Engineering and Life Sciences. Emphasis will be placed on practical and computational aspects of UQ+P including the implementation of relevant algorithms in multicore architectures.
ContentTopics that will be covered include: Uncertainty quantification under
parametric and non-parametric modelling uncertainty, Bayesian inference with model class assessment, Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation, prior and posterior reliability analysis.
Lecture notesThe class will be largely based on the book: Data Analysis: A Bayesian Tutorial by Devinderjit Sivia as well as on class notes and related literature that will be distributed in class.
Literature1. Data Analysis: A Bayesian Tutorial by Devinderjit Sivia
2. Probability Theory: The Logic of Science by E. T. Jaynes
3. Class Notes
Prerequisites / NoticeFundamentals of Probability, Fundamentals of Computational Modeling
151-0107-20LHigh Performance Computing for Science and Engineering (HPCSE) IW4 credits4GM. Troyer, P. Chatzidoukas
AbstractThis course gives an introduction into algorithms and numerical methods for parallel computing for multi and many-core architectures and for applications from problems in science and engineering.
ObjectiveIntroduction to HPC for scientists and engineers
Fundamental of:
1. Parallel Computing Architectures
2. MultiCores
3. ManyCores
ContentProgramming models and languages:
1. C++ threading (2 weeks)
2. OpenMP (4 weeks)
3. MPI (5 weeks)

Computers and methods:
1. Hardware and architectures
2. Libraries
3. Particles: N-body solvers
4. Fields: PDEs
5. Stochastics: Monte Carlo
Lecture noteshttp://www.cse-lab.ethz.ch/index.php/teaching/42-teaching/classes/615-hpcse1
Class notes, handouts
151-0509-00LMicroscale Acoustofluidics Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30.
W4 credits3GJ. Dual
AbstractIn this lecture the basics as well as practical aspects (from modelling to design and fabrication ) are described from a solid and fluid mechanics perspective with applications to microsystems and lab on a chip devices.
ObjectiveUnderstanding acoustophoresis, the design of devices and potential applications
ContentLinear and nonlinear acoustics, foundations of fluid and solid mechanics and piezoelectricity, Gorkov potential, numerical modelling, acoustic streaming, applications from ultrasonic microrobotics to surface acoustic wave devices
Lecture notesYes, incl. Chapters from the Tutorial: Microscale Acoustofluidics, T. Laurell and A. Lenshof, Ed., Royal Society of Chemistry, 2015
LiteratureMicroscale Acoustofluidics, T. Laurell and A. Lenshof, Ed., Royal Society of Chemistry, 2015
Prerequisites / NoticeSolid and fluid continuum mechanics. Notice: The exercise part is a mixture of presentation, lab session and hand in homework.
151-0563-01LDynamic Programming and Optimal Control Information W4 credits2V + 1UR. D'Andrea
AbstractIntroduction to Dynamic Programming and Optimal Control.
ObjectiveCovers the fundamental concepts of Dynamic Programming & Optimal Control.
ContentDynamic Programming Algorithm; Deterministic Systems and Shortest Path Problems; Infinite Horizon Problems, Bellman Equation; Deterministic Continuous-Time Optimal Control.
LiteratureDynamic Programming and Optimal Control by Dimitri P. Bertsekas, Vol. I, 3rd edition, 2005, 558 pages, hardcover.
Prerequisites / NoticeRequirements: Knowledge of advanced calculus, introductory probability theory, and matrix-vector algebra.
151-0593-00LEmbedded Control SystemsW4 credits6GJ. S. Freudenberg, M. Schmid Daners, C. Onder
AbstractThis course provides a comprehensive overview of embedded control systems. The concepts introduced are implemented and verified on a microprocessor-controlled haptic device.
ObjectiveFamiliarize students with main architectural principles and concepts of embedded control systems.
ContentAn embedded system is a microprocessor used as a component in another piece of technology, such as cell phones or automobiles. In this intensive two-week block course the students are presented the principles of embedded digital control systems using a haptic device as an example for a mechatronic system. A haptic interface allows for a human to interact with a computer through the sense of touch.

Subjects covered in lectures and practical lab exercises include:
- The application of C-programming on a microprocessor
- Digital I/O and serial communication
- Quadrature decoding for wheel position sensing
- Queued analog-to-digital conversion to interface with the analog world
- Pulse width modulation
- Timer interrupts to create sampling time intervals
- System dynamics and virtual worlds with haptic feedback
- Introduction to rapid prototyping
Lecture notesLecture notes, lab instructions, supplemental material
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite courses are Control Systems I and Informatics I.

This course is restricted to 33 students due to limited lab infrastructure. Interested students please contact Marianne Schmid (E-Mail: marischm@ethz.ch)
After your reservation has been confirmed please register online at www.mystudies.ethz.ch.

Detailed information can be found on the course website
http://www.idsc.ethz.ch/education/lectures/embedded-control-systems.html
151-0601-00LTheory of Robotics and Mechatronics Information W4 credits3GP. Korba, S. Stoeter, B. Nelson
AbstractThis course provides an introduction and covers the fundamentals of the field, including rigid motions, homogeneous transformations, forward and inverse kinematics of multiple degree of freedom manipulators, velocity kinematics, motion planning, trajectory generation, sensing, vision, and control. It’s a requirement for the Robotics Vertiefung and for the Masters in Mechatronics and Microsystems.
ObjectiveRobotics is often viewed from three perspectives: perception (sensing), manipulation (affecting changes in the world), and cognition (intelligence). Robotic systems integrate aspects of all three of these areas. This course provides an introduction to the theory of robotics, and covers the fundamentals of the field, including rigid motions, homogeneous transformations, forward and inverse kinematics of multiple degree of freedom manipulators, velocity kinematics, motion planning, trajectory generation, sensing, vision, and control. This course is a requirement for the Robotics Vertiefung and for the Masters in Mechatronics and Microsystems.
ContentAn introduction to the theory of robotics, and covers the fundamentals of the field, including rigid motions, homogeneous transformations, forward and inverse kinematics of multiple degree of freedom manipulators, velocity kinematics, motion planning, trajectory generation, sensing, vision, and control.
Lecture notesavailable.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course will be taught in English.
151-0604-00LMicrorobotics Information
Does not take place this semester.
W4 credits3GB. Nelson
AbstractMicrorobotics is an interdisciplinary field that combines aspects of robotics, micro and nanotechnology, biomedical engineering, and materials science. The aim of this course is to expose students to the fundamentals of this emerging field. Throughout the course students are expected to submit assignments. The course concludes with an end-of-semester examination.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to expose students to the fundamental aspects of the emerging field of microrobotics. This includes a focus on physical laws that predominate at the microscale, technologies for fabricating small devices, bio-inspired design, and applications of the field.
ContentMain topics of the course include:
- Scaling laws at micro/nano scales
- Electrostatics
- Electromagnetism
- Low Reynolds number flows
- Observation tools
- Materials and fabrication methods
- Applications of biomedical microrobots
Lecture notesThe powerpoint slides presented in the lectures will be made available in hardcopy and as pdf files. Several readings will also be made available electronically.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture will be taught in English.
151-0623-00LETH Zurich Distinguished Seminar in Robotics, Systems and Controls Information
Students for other Master's programmes in Department Mechanical and Process Engineering cannot use the credit in the category Core Courses
W1 credit1SB. Nelson, J. Buchli, M. Chli, R. Gassert, M. Hutter, W. Karlen, R. Riener, R. Siegwart
AbstractThis course consists of a series of seven lectures given by researchers who have distinguished themselves in the area of Robotics, Systems, and Controls.
ObjectiveObtain an overview of various topics in Robotics, Systems, and Controls from leaders in the field. Please see Link for a list of upcoming lectures.
ContentThis course consists of a series of seven lectures given by researchers who have distinguished themselves in the area of Robotics, Systems, and Controls. MSc students in Robotics, Systems, and Controls are required to attend every lecture. Attendance will be monitored. If for some reason a student cannot attend one of the lectures, the student must select another ETH or University of Zurich seminar related to the field and submit a one page description of the seminar topic. Please see Link for a suggestion of other lectures.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents are required to attend all seven lectures to obtain credit. If a student must miss a lecture then attendance at a related special lecture will be accepted that is reported in a one page summary of the attended lecture. No exceptions to this rule are allowed.
151-0632-00LVision Algorithms for Mobile Robotics Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 50
W4 credits2V + 2UD. Scaramuzza
AbstractFor a robot to be autonomous, it has to perceive and understand the world around it. This course introduces you to the fundamental computer vision algorithms used in mobile robotics, in particular: feature extraction, multiple view geometry, dense reconstruction, object tracking, image retrieval, event-based vision, and visual-inertial odometry (the algorithm behind Google Tango).
ObjectiveLearn the fundamental computer vision algorithms used in mobile robotics, in particular: feature extraction, multiple view geometry, dense reconstruction, object tracking, image retrieval, event-based vision, and visual-inertial odometry (the algorithm behind Google Tango).
ContentFor a robot to be autonomous, it has to perceive and understand the world around it. This course introduces you to the fundamental computer vision algorithms used in mobile robotics, in particular: feature extraction, multiple view geometry, dense reconstruction, object tracking, image retrieval, event-based vision, and visual-inertial odometry (the algorithm behind Google Tango).
Lecture notesLecture slides will be available after each lecture on the course official website: http://rpg.ifi.uzh.ch/teaching.html
Literature[1] Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications, by Richard Szeliski, Springer, 2010.
[2] Robotics Vision and Control: Fundamental Algorithms, by Peter Corke 2011.
Prerequisites / NoticeBasics of algebra and geomertry, matrix calculus.
151-0851-00LRobot Dynamics Information Restricted registration - show details W4 credits2V + 1UM. Hutter, R. Siegwart, T. Stastny
AbstractWe will provide an overview on how to kinematically and dynamically model typical robotic systems such as robot arms, legged robots, rotary wing systems, or fixed wing.
ObjectiveThe primary objective of this course is that the student deepens an applied understanding of how to model the most common robotic systems. The student receives a solid background in kinematics, dynamics, and rotations of multi-body systems. On the basis of state of the art applications, he/she will learn all necessary tools to work in the field of design or control of robotic systems.
ContentThe course consists of three parts: First, we will refresh and deepen the student's knowledge in kinematics, dynamics, and rotations of multi-body systems. In this context, the learning material will build upon the courses for mechanics and dynamics available at ETH, with the particular focus on their application to robotic systems. The goal is to foster the conceptual understanding of similarities and differences among the various types of robots. In the second part, we will apply the learned material to classical robotic arms as well as legged systems and discuss kinematic constraints and interaction forces. In the third part, focus is put on modeling fixed wing aircraft, along with related design and control concepts. In this context, we also touch aerodynamics and flight mechanics to an extent typically required in robotics. The last part finally covers different helicopter types, with a focus on quadrotors and the coaxial configuration which we see today in many UAV applications. Case studies on all main topics provide the link to real applications and to the state of the art in robotics.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe contents of the following ETH Bachelor lectures or equivalent are assumed to be known: Mechanics and Dynamics, Control, Basics in Fluid Dynamics.
151-1116-00LIntroduction to Aircraft and Car AerodynamicsW4 credits3GJ. Wildi
AbstractAircraft aerodynamics: Atmosphere; aerodynamic forces (lift, drag); thrust.
Vehicle aerodynamics: Aerodynamic and mass forces, drag, lift, car aerodynamics and performence. Passenger cars, trucks, racing cars.
ObjectiveAn introduction to the basic principles and interrelationships of aircraft and automotive aerodynamics.
To understand the basic relations of the origin of aerodynamic forces (ie lift, drag). To quantify the aerodynamic forces for basic configurations of aercraft and car components.
Illustration of the intrinsic problems and results using examples.
Using experimental and theoretical methods to illustrate possibilities and limits.
ContentAircraft aerodynamics: atmosphere, aerodynamic forces (ascending force: profile, wings. Resistance, residual resistance, induced resistance); thrust (overview of the propulsion system, aerodynamics of the propellers), introduction to static longitudinal stability.

Automobile aerodynamics: Basic principles: aerodynamic force and the force of inertia, resistance, drive, aerodynamic and driving performance. Cars commercial vehicles, racing cars.
Lecture notes1.) Grundlagen der Flugtechnik (Basics of flight science, script in german language)
2.) Einführung in die Fahrzeugaerodynamik (Introduction in car aerodynamics, script in german language)
LiteratureEnglish literature covering the content of the course:
- Anderson Jr, John D: Introduction to Flight, Mc Graw Hill, Ed 06, 2007; ISBN: 9780073529394
- Mc Cormick, B.W.: Aerodynamics, Aeronautics and Flight Mechanics, John Wiley and Sons, 1979
- Hucho, Wolf-Heinrich: Aerodynamics of Road Vehicles, SAE International, 1998
151-0532-00LNonlinear Dynamics and Chaos I Information W4 credits2V + 2UG. Haller, F. Kogelbauer
AbstractBasic facts about nonlinear systems; stability and near-equilibrium dynamics; bifurcations; dynamical systems on the plane; non-autonomous dynamical systems; chaotic dynamics.
ObjectiveThis course is intended for Masters and Ph.D. students in engineering sciences, physics and applied mathematics who are interested in the behavior of nonlinear dynamical systems. It offers an introduction to the qualitative study of nonlinear physical phenomena modeled by differential equations or discrete maps. We discuss applications in classical mechanics, electrical engineering, fluid mechanics, and biology. A more advanced Part II of this class is offered every other year.
Content(1) Basic facts about nonlinear systems: Existence, uniqueness, and dependence on initial data.

(2) Near equilibrium dynamics: Linear and Lyapunov stability

(3) Bifurcations of equilibria: Center manifolds, normal forms, and elementary bifurcations

(4) Nonlinear dynamical systems on the plane: Phase plane techniques, limit sets, and limit cycles.

(5) Time-dependent dynamical systems: Floquet theory, Poincare maps, averaging methods, resonance
Lecture notesThe class lecture notes will be posted electronically after each lecture. Students should not rely on these but prepare their own notes during the lecture.
Prerequisites / Notice- Prerequisites: Analysis, linear algebra and a basic course in differential equations.

- Exam: two-hour written exam in English.

- Homework: A homework assignment will be due roughly every other week. Hints to solutions will be posted after the homework due dates.
227-0102-00LDiscrete Event Systems Information W6 credits4GL. Thiele, L. Vanbever, R. Wattenhofer
AbstractIntroduction to discrete event systems. We start out by studying popular models of discrete event systems. In the second part of the course we analyze discrete event systems from an average-case and from a worst-case perspective. Topics include: Automata and Languages, Specification Models, Stochastic Discrete Event Systems, Worst-Case Event Systems, Verification, Network Calculus.
ObjectiveOver the past few decades the rapid evolution of computing, communication, and information technologies has brought about the proliferation of new dynamic systems. A significant part of activity in these systems is governed by operational rules designed by humans. The dynamics of these systems are characterized by asynchronous occurrences of discrete events, some controlled (e.g. hitting a keyboard key, sending a message), some not (e.g. spontaneous failure, packet loss).

The mathematical arsenal centered around differential equations that has been employed in systems engineering to model and study processes governed by the laws of nature is often inadequate or inappropriate for discrete event systems. The challenge is to develop new modeling frameworks, analysis techniques, design tools, testing methods, and optimization processes for this new generation of systems.

In this lecture we give an introduction to discrete event systems. We start out the course by studying popular models of discrete event systems, such as automata and Petri nets. In the second part of the course we analyze discrete event systems. We first examine discrete event systems from an average-case perspective: we model discrete events as stochastic processes, and then apply Markov chains and queuing theory for an understanding of the typical behavior of a system. In the last part of the course we analyze discrete event systems from a worst-case perspective using the theory of online algorithms and adversarial queuing.
Content1. Introduction
2. Automata and Languages
3. Smarter Automata
4. Specification Models
5. Stochastic Discrete Event Systems
6. Worst-Case Event Systems
7. Network Calculus
Lecture notesAvailable
Literature[bertsekas] Data Networks
Dimitri Bersekas, Robert Gallager
Prentice Hall, 1991, ISBN: 0132009161

[borodin] Online Computation and Competitive Analysis
Allan Borodin, Ran El-Yaniv.
Cambridge University Press, 1998

[boudec] Network Calculus
J.-Y. Le Boudec, P. Thiran
Springer, 2001

[cassandras] Introduction to Discrete Event Systems
Christos Cassandras, Stéphane Lafortune.
Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1999, ISBN 0-7923-8609-4

[fiat] Online Algorithms: The State of the Art
A. Fiat and G. Woeginger

[hochbaum] Approximation Algorithms for NP-hard Problems (Chapter 13 by S. Irani, A. Karlin)
D. Hochbaum

[schickinger] Diskrete Strukturen (Band 2: Wahrscheinlichkeitstheorie und Statistik)
T. Schickinger, A. Steger
Springer, Berlin, 2001

[sipser] Introduction to the Theory of Computation
Michael Sipser.
PWS Publishing Company, 1996, ISBN 053494728X
227-0103-00LControl Systems Information W6 credits2V + 2UF. Dörfler
AbstractStudy of concepts and methods for the mathematical description and analysis of dynamical systems. The concept of feedback. Design of control systems for single input - single output and multivariable systems.
ObjectiveStudy of concepts and methods for the mathematical description and analysis of dynamical systems. The concept of feedback. Design of control systems for single input - single output and multivariable systems.
ContentProcess automation, concept of control. Modelling of dynamical systems - examples, state space description, linearisation, analytical/numerical solution. Laplace transform, system response for first and second order systems - effect of additional poles and zeros. Closed-loop control - idea of feedback. PID control, Ziegler - Nichols tuning. Stability, Routh-Hurwitz criterion, root locus, frequency response, Bode diagram, Bode gain/phase relationship, controller design via "loop shaping", Nyquist criterion. Feedforward compensation, cascade control. Multivariable systems (transfer matrix, state space representation), multi-loop control, problem of coupling, Relative Gain Array, decoupling, sensitivity to model uncertainty. State space representation (modal description, controllability, control canonical form, observer canonical form), state feedback, pole placement - choice of poles. Observer, observability, duality, separation principle. LQ Regulator, optimal state estimation.
LiteratureK. J. Aström & R. Murray. Feedback Systems: An Introduction for Scientists and Engineers. Princeton University Press, 2010.
R. C. Dorf and R. H. Bishop. Modern Control Systems. Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 2007.
G. F. Franklin, J. D. Powell, and A. Emami-Naeini. Feedback Control of Dynamic Systems. Addison-Wesley, 2010.
J. Lunze. Regelungstechnik 1. Springer, Berlin, 2014.
J. Lunze. Regelungstechnik 2. Springer, Berlin, 2014.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Signal and Systems Theory II.

MATLAB is used for system analysis and simulation.
227-0225-00LLinear System TheoryW6 credits5GM. Kamgarpour
AbstractThe class is intended to provide a comprehensive overview of the theory of linear dynamical systems, their use in control, filtering, and estimation and their applications to areas ranging from avionics to systems biology.
ObjectiveBy the end of the class students should be comfortable with the fundamental results in linear system theory and the mathematical tools used to derive them.
Content- Rings, fields and linear spaces, normed linear spaces and inner product spaces.
- Ordinary differential equations, existence and uniqueness of solutions.
- Continuous and discrete time, time varying linear systems. Time domain solutions. Time invariant systems treated as a special case.
- Controllability and observability, canonical forms, Kalman decomposition. Time invariant systems treated as a special case.
- Stability and stabilization, observers, state and output feedback, separation principle.
- Realization theory.
Lecture notesF.M. Callier and C.A. Desoer, "Linear System Theory", Springer-Verlag, 1991.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Control Systems I (227-0103-00) or equivalent and sufficient mathematical maturity.
227-0247-00LPower Electronic Systems I Information W6 credits4GJ. W. Kolar
AbstractBasics of the switching behavior, gate drive and snubber circuits of power semiconductors are discussed. Soft-switching and resonant DC/DC converters are analyzed in detail and high frequency loss mechanisms of magnetic components are explained. Space vector modulation of three-phase inverters is introduced and the main power components are designed for typical industry applications.
ObjectiveDetailed understanding of the principle of operation and modulation of advanced power electronics converter systems, especially of zero voltage switching and zero current switching non-isolated and isolated DC/DC converter systems and three-phase voltage DC link inverter systems. Furthermore, the course should convey knowledge on the switching frequency related losses of power semiconductors and inductive power components and introduce the concept of space vector calculus which provides a basis for the comprehensive discussion of three-phase PWM converters systems in the lecture Power Electronic Systems II.
ContentBasics of the switching behavior and gate drive circuits of power semiconductor devices and auxiliary circuits for minimizing the switching losses are explained. Furthermore, zero voltage switching, zero current switching, and resonant DC/DC converters are discussed in detail; the operating behavior of isolated full-bridge DC/DC converters is detailed for different secondary side rectifier topologies; high frequency loss mechanisms of magnetic components of converter circuits are explained and approximate calculation methods are presented; the concept of space vector calculus for analyzing three-phase systems is introduced; finally, phase-oriented and space vector modulation of three-phase inverter systems are discussed related to voltage DC link inverter systems and the design of the main power components based on analytical calculations is explained.
Lecture notesLecture notes and associated exercises including correct answers, simulation program for interactive self-learning including visualization/animation features.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Introductory course on power electronics.
227-0447-00LImage Analysis and Computer Vision Information W6 credits3V + 1UL. Van Gool, O. Göksel, E. Konukoglu
AbstractLight and perception. Digital image formation. Image enhancement and feature extraction. Unitary transformations. Color and texture. Image segmentation and deformable shape matching. Motion extraction and tracking. 3D data extraction. Invariant features. Specific object recognition and object class recognition.
ObjectiveOverview of the most important concepts of image formation, perception and analysis, and Computer Vision. Gaining own experience through practical computer and programming exercises.
ContentThe first part of the course starts off from an overview of existing and emerging applications that need computer vision. It shows that the realm of image processing is no longer restricted to the factory floor, but is entering several fields of our daily life. First it is investigated how the parameters of the electromagnetic waves are related to our perception. Also the interaction of light with matter is considered. The most important hardware components of technical vision systems, such as cameras, optical devices and illumination sources are discussed. The course then turns to the steps that are necessary to arrive at the discrete images that serve as input to algorithms. The next part describes necessary preprocessing steps of image analysis, that enhance image quality and/or detect specific features. Linear and non-linear filters are introduced for that purpose. The course will continue by analyzing procedures allowing to extract additional types of basic information from multiple images, with motion and depth as two important examples. The estimation of image velocities (optical flow) will get due attention and methods for object tracking will be presented. Several techniques are discussed to extract three-dimensional information about objects and scenes. Finally, approaches for the recognition of specific objects as well as object classes will be discussed and analyzed.
Lecture notesCourse material Script, computer demonstrations, exercises and problem solutions
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
Basic concepts of mathematical analysis and linear algebra. The computer exercises are based on Linux and C.
The course language is English.
227-0526-00LPower System Analysis Information W6 credits4GG. Hug
AbstractThe goal of this course is understanding the stationary and dynamic problems in electrical power systems. The course includes the development of stationary models of the electrical network, their mathematical representation and special characteristics and solution methods of large linear and non-linear systems of equations related to electrical power networks.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is understanding the stationary and dynamic problems in electrical power systems. The course includes the development of stationary models of the electrical network, their mathematical representation and special characteristics and solution methods of large linear and non-linear systems of equations related to electrical power networks.
ContentThe electrical power transmission system, the energy management system, requirements of the electrical power transmission (demand oriented, operationally, economically), network planning and network operation, models of N-port network components (line, cables, shunts, transformers), the p.u. computation, computer oriented network models, linear networks (solution methods - direct, iterative), algorithms for the solution of non-linear sets of equations, derived from the electrical power system (Newton-Raphson), power flow computation (problem definition, solution methods), three phase short-circuit computation, application of power flow algorithms. Introduction to power system stability.
Lecture notesLecture notes. Course is supported by WWW-teaching system.
227-0689-00LSystem IdentificationW4 credits2V + 1UR. Smith
AbstractTheory and techniques for the identification of dynamic models from experimentally obtained system input-output data.
ObjectiveTo provide a series of practical techniques for the development of dynamical models from experimental data, with the emphasis being on the development of models suitable for feedback control design purposes. To provide sufficient theory to enable the practitioner to understand the trade-offs between model accuracy, data quality and data quantity.
ContentIntroduction to modeling: Black-box and grey-box models; Parametric and non-parametric models; ARX, ARMAX (etc.) models.

Predictive, open-loop, black-box identification methods. Time and frequency domain methods. Subspace identification methods.

Optimal experimental design, Cramer-Rao bounds, input signal design.

Parametric identification methods. On-line and batch approaches.

Closed-loop identification strategies. Trade-off between controller performance and information available for identification.
Literature"System Identification; Theory for the User" Lennart Ljung, Prentice Hall (2nd Ed), 1999.

"Dynamic system identification: Experimental design and data analysis", GC Goodwin and RL Payne, Academic Press, 1977.
Prerequisites / NoticeControl systems (227-0216-00L) or equivalent.
227-0697-00LIndustrial Process ControlW4 credits3GG. Maier, A. Horch
AbstractIntroduction to process automation and its application in process industry and power generation
ObjectiveKnowledge of process automation and its application in industry and power generation
ContentIntroduction to process automation: system architecture, data handling, communication (fieldbusses), process visualization, engineering, etc.
Analysis and design of open loop control problems: discrete automata, decision tables, petri-nets, drive control and object oriented function group automation philosophy, RT-UML.
Engineering: Application programming in IEC61131-3 (function blocks, sequence control, structured text); process visualization and operation; engineering integration from sensor, cabling, topology design, function, visualization, diagnosis, to documentation; Industry standards (e.g. OPC, Profibus); Ergonomic design, safety (IEC61508) and availability, supervision and diagnosis.
Practical examples from process industry, power generation and newspaper production.
Lecture notesSlides will be available as .PDF documents, see "Learning materials" (for registered students only)
Prerequisites / NoticeExercises: Tuesday 15-16

Practical exercises will illustrate some topics, e.g. some control software coding using industry standard programming tools based on IEC61131-3.
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