Autumn Semester 2020 takes place in a mixed form of online and classroom teaching.
Please read the published information on the individual courses carefully.

Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2016

Environmental Sciences Master Information
Course Units for Additional Admission Requirements
The courses below are only available for Master students with additional admission requirements.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
406-0062-AALPhysics I
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-5 credits11RA. Vaterlaus
AbstractIntroduction to the concepts and tools in physics: mechanics of point-like and rigid bodies, elasticity theory, elements of hydrostatics and hydrodynamics, periodic motion and mechanical waves.
ObjectiveIntroduction to the scientific methodology. The student should develop his/her capability to turn physical observations into mathematical models, and to solve the latter.
The student should acquire an overview over the basic concepts in mechanics.
ContentBook:
Physics for Scientists and Engineers, Douglas C. Giancoli, Pearson Education (2009), ISBN: 978-0-13-157849-4

Chapters:
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 (without: 6-5, 6-6, 6-8), 7, 8 (without 8-9), 9, 10 (without 10-10), 11 (without 11-7), 13 (without 13-13, 13-14), 14 (without 14-6), 15 (without 15-3, 15-5)
Literaturesee "Content"

Friedhelm Kuypers
Physik für Ingenieure und Naturwissenschaftler
Band 1: Mechanik und Thermodynamik
Wiley-VCH Verlag, 2002, 544 S, ca.: Fr. 68.-
406-0063-AALPhysics II
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-5 credits11RA. Vaterlaus
AbstractIntroduction to the "way of thinking" and the methodology in Physics. The Chapters treated are Magnetism, Refraction and Diffraction of Waves, Elements of Quantum Mechanics with applications to Spectroscopy, Thermodynamics, Phase Transitions, Transport Phenomena.
ObjectiveIntroduction to the scientific methodology. The student should develop his/her capability to turn physical observations into mathematical models, and to solve the latter.
The student should acquire an overview over the basic concepts used in the theory of heat and electricity.
ContentBook:
Physics for Scientists and Engineers, Douglas C. Giancoli, Pearson Education (2009), ISBN: 978-0-13-157849-4

Chapters:
17 (without 17-5, 17-10), 18 (without 18-5, 18-6, 18-7), 19, 20 (without 20-7, 20-8, 20-9, 20-10, 20-11), 21 (without 21-12), 23, 25 (without 25-9, 25-10), 26 (without 26-4, 26-5, 26-7), 27, 28 (without 28-4, 28-5, 28-8. 28-9, 28-10), 29 (without 29-5, 29-8), 32 (without 32-8), 33 (without 33-4, 33-5, 33-9, 33-10), 34 (without 34-4, 34-6, 34-7), 35 (without 35-2, 35-3, 35-9, 35-11, 35-12, 35-13).
Literaturesee "Content"

Friedhelm Kuypers
Physik für Ingenieure und Naturwissenschaftler
Band 2 Elektrizität, Optik, Wellen
Verlag Wiley-VCH, 2003, Fr. 77.-
406-0251-AALMathematics I Information
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-6 credits13RA. Cannas da Silva
AbstractThis course covers mathematical concepts and techniques necessary to model, solve and discuss scientific problems - notably through ordinary differential equations.
ObjectiveMathematics is of ever increasing importance to the Natural Sciences and Engineering. The key is the so-called mathematical modelling cycle, i.e. the translation of problems from outside of mathematics into mathematics, the study of the mathematical problems (often with the help of high level mathematical software packages) and the interpretation of the results in the original environment.

The goal of Mathematics I and II is to provide the mathematical foundations relevant for this paradigm. Differential equations are by far the most important tool for modelling and are therefore a main focus of both of these courses.
Content1. Linear Algebra and Complex Numbers:
systems of linear equations, Gauss-Jordan elimination, matrices, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, cartesian and polar forms for complex numbers, complex powers, complex roots, fundamental theorem of algebra.

2. Single-Variable Calculus:
review of differentiation, linearisation, Taylor polynomials, maxima and minima, antiderivative, fundamental theorem of calculus, integration methods, improper integrals.

3. Ordinary Differential Equations:
separable ordinary differential equations (ODEs), integration by substitution, 1st and 2nd order linear ODEs, homogeneous systems of linear ODEs with constant coefficients, introduction to 2-dimensional dynamical systems.
Literature- Bretscher, O.: Linear Algebra with Applications (Pearson Prentice Hall).
- Thomas, G. B.: Thomas' Calculus, Part 1 - Early Transcendentals (Pearson Addison-Wesley).
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: familiarity with the basic notions from Calculus, in particular those of function and derivative.

Assistance:
Tuesdays and Wednesdays 17-19h, in Room HG E 41.
406-0252-AALMathematics II Information
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-7 credits15RA. Cannas da Silva
AbstractContinuation of the topics of Mathematics I. Main focus: multivariable calculus and partial differential equations.
ObjectiveMathematics is of ever increasing importance to the Natural Sciences and Engineering. The key is the so-called mathematical modelling cycle, i.e. the translation of problems from outside of mathematics into mathematics, the study of the mathematical problems (often with the help of high level mathematical software packages) and the interpretation of the results in the original environment.

The goal of Mathematics I and II is to provide the mathematical foundations relevant for this paradigm. Differential equations are by far the most important tool for modelling and are therefore a main focus of both of these courses.
Content- Multivariable Differential Calculus:
functions of several variables, partial differentiation, curves and surfaces in space, scalar and vector fields, gradient, curl and divergence.

- Multivariable Integral Calculus:
multiple integrals, line and surface integrals, work and flux, Green, Gauss and Stokes theorems, applications.

- Partial Differential Equations:
separation of variables, Fourier series, heat equation, wave equation, Laplace equation, Fourier transform.
Literature- Thomas, G. B.: Thomas' Calculus, Parts 2 (Pearson Addison-Wesley).
- Kreyszig, E.: Advanced Engineering Mathematics (John Wiley & Sons).
406-0253-AALMathematics I & II Information
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-13 credits28RA. Cannas da Silva
AbstractMathematics I covers mathematical concepts and techniques necessary to model, solve and discuss scientific problems - notably through ordinary differential equations.
Main focus of Mathematics II: multivariable calculus and partial differential equations.
ObjectiveMathematics is of ever increasing importance to the Natural Sciences and Engineering. The key is the so-called mathematical modelling cycle, i.e. the translation of problems from outside of mathematics into mathematics, the study of the mathematical problems (often with the help of high level mathematical software packages) and the interpretation of the results in the original environment.

The goal of Mathematics I and II is to provide the mathematical foundations relevant for this paradigm. Differential equations are by far the most important tool for modelling and are therefore a main focus of both of these courses.
Content1. Linear Algebra and Complex Numbers:
systems of linear equations, Gauss-Jordan elimination, matrices, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, cartesian and polar forms for complex numbers, complex powers, complex roots, fundamental theorem of algebra.

2. Single-Variable Calculus:
review of differentiation, linearisation, Taylor polynomials, maxima and minima, antiderivative, fundamental theorem of calculus, integration methods, improper integrals.

3. Ordinary Differential Equations:
separable ordinary differential equations (ODEs), integration by substitution, 1st and 2nd order linear ODEs, homogeneous systems of linear ODEs with constant coefficients, introduction to 2-dimensional dynamical systems.

4. Multivariable Differential Calculus:
functions of several variables, partial differentiation, curves and surfaces in space, scalar and vector fields, gradient, curl and divergence.

5. Multivariable Integral Calculus:
multiple integrals, line and surface integrals, work and flow, Green, Gauss and Stokes theorems, applications.

6. Partial Differential Equations:
separation of variables, Fourier series, heat equation, wave equation, Laplace equation, Fourier transform.
Literature- Bretscher, O.: Linear Algebra with Applications (Pearson Prentice Hall).
- Thomas, G. B.: Thomas' Calculus, Part 1 - Early Transcendentals (Pearson Addison-Wesley).
- Thomas, G. B.: Thomas' Calculus, Parts 2 (Pearson Addison-Wesley).
- Kreyszig, E.: Advanced Engineering Mathematics (John Wiley & Sons).
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: familiarity with the basic notions from Calculus, in particular those of function and derivative.

Assistance:
Tuesdays and Wednesdays 17-19h, in Room HG E 41.
406-0603-AALStochastics (Probability and Statistics)
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-4 credits9RM. Kalisch
AbstractIntroduction to basic methods and fundamental concepts of statistics and probability theory for non-mathematicians. The concepts are presented on the basis of some descriptive examples. Learning the statistical program R for applying the acquired concepts will be a central theme.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to build a solid fundament in probability and statistics. The student should understand some fundamental concepts and be able to apply these concepts to applications in the real world. Furthermore, the student should have a basic knowledge of the statistical programming language "R".
ContentFrom "Statistics for research" (online)
Ch 1: The Role of Statistics
Ch 2: Populations, Samples, and Probability Distributions
Ch 3: Binomial Distributions
Ch 6: Sampling Distribution of Averages
Ch 7: Normal Distributions
Ch 8: Student's t Distribution
Ch 9: Distributions of Two Variables

From "Introductory Statistics with R (online)"
Ch 1: Basics
Ch 2: The R Environment
Ch 3: Probability and distributions
Ch 4: Descriptive statistics and tables
Ch 5: One- and two-sample tests
Ch 6: Regression and correlation
Literature- "Statistics for research" by S. Dowdy et. al. (3rd
edition); Print ISBN: 9780471267355; Online ISBN: 9780471477433; DOI:
10.1002/0471477435
From within the ETH, this book is freely available online under:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/book/10.1002/0471477435

- "Introductory Statistics with R" by Peter Dalgaard; ISBN
978-0-387-79053-4; DOI: 10.1007/978-0-387-79054-1
From within the ETH, this book is freely available online under:
http://www.springerlink.com/content/m17578/
529-2001-AALChemistry I and II Information
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-9 credits19RH. Grützmacher, W. Uhlig
AbstractGeneral Chemistry I and II: Chemical bond and molecular structure, chemical thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, kinetics, acids and bases, electrochemistry
ObjectiveIntroduction to general and inorganic chemistry. Basics of the composition and the change of the material world. Introduction to the thermodynamically controlled physico-chemical processes. Macroscopic phenomena and their explanation through atomic and molecular properties. Using the theories to solve qualitatively and quantitatively chemical and ecologically relevant problems.
Content1. Stoichiometry

2. Atoms and Elements (Quantenmechanical Model of the Atom)

3. Chemical Bonding

4. Thermodynamics

5. Chemical Kinetics

6. Chemical Equilibrium (Acids and Bases, Solubility Equilibria)

7. Electrochemistry
Lecture notesNivaldo J. Tro
Chemistry - A molecular Approach (Pearson), Chapter 1-18
LiteratureHousecroft and Constable, CHEMISTRY
Oxtoby, Gillis, Nachtrieb, MODERN CHEMISTRY
551-0001-AALGeneral Biology I
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-3 credits6RU. Sauer, O. Y. Martin, A. Widmer
AbstractOrganismic biology to teach the basic principles of classical and molecular genetics, evolutionary biology and phylogeny.

This is a virtual self-study lecture for non-German speakers of the "Allgemeine Biology I (551-0001-00L) lecture. The exam will be written jointly with the participants of this lecture.
ObjectiveThe understanding of basic principles of biology (inheritance, evolution and phylogeny) and an overview of the diversity of life.
ContentThe first semester focuses on the organismal biology aspects of genetics, evolution and diversity of life in the Campbell chapters 12-34.

Week 1-7 by Alex Widmer, Chapters 12-25
12 Cell biology Mitosis
13 Genetics Sexual life cycles and meiosis
14 Genetics Mendelian genetics
15 Genetics Linkage and chromosomes
20 Genetics Evolution of genomes
21 Evolution How evolution works
22 Evolution Phylogentic reconstructions
23 Evolution Microevolution
24 Evolution Species and speciation
25 Evolution Macroevolution

Week 8-14 by Oliver Martin, Chapters 26-34
26 Diversity of Life Introdution to viruses
27 Diversity of Life Prokaryotes
28 Diversity of Life Origin & evolution of eukaryotes
29 Diversity of Life Nonvascular&seedless vascular plants
30 Diversity of Life Seed plants
31 Diversity of Life Introduction to fungi
32 Diversity of Life Overview of animal diversity
33 Diversity of Life Introduction to invertebrates
34 Diversity of Life Origin & evolution of vertebrates
Lecture notesNo script
LiteratureCampbell et al. (2015) Biology - A Global Approach. 10th Edition (Global Edition)
Prerequisites / NoticeThis is a virtual self-study lecture for non-german speakers of the "Allgemeine Biology I (551-0001-00L) lecture. The exam will be written jointly with the participants of this lecture.

Example exam questions will be discussed during the lectures, and old exam questions are kept by the various student organisations. If necessary, please contact Prof. Uwe Sauer (sauer@ethz.ch) for details regarding the exam.
551-0002-AALGeneral Biology II
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-4 credits6RU. Sauer, R. Aebersold, H.‑M. Fischer, W. Gruissem
AbstractMolecular biology approach to teach the basic principles of biochemistry, cell biology, cgenetics, evolutionary biology and form and function of vacular plants.

This is a virtual self-study lecture for non-German speakers of the "Allgemeine Biology II (551-0002-00L) lecture. The exam will be written jointly with the participants of this lecture.
ObjectiveThe understanding basic concepts of biology: the hierarchy of the structural levels of biological organisation, with particular emphasis on the cell and its molecular functions, the fundamentals of metabolism and molecular genetics, as well as form and function of vascular plants.
ContentThe structure and function of biomacromolecules; basics of metabolism; tour of the cell; membrane structure and function; basic energetics of cellular processes; respiration, photosynthesis; cell cycle, from gene to protein; structure and growth of vascular plants, resource acquisition and transport, soil and plant nutrition.

Specifically the following Campbell chapters will be covered:
3 Biochemistry Chemistry of water
4 Biochemistry Carbon: the basis of molecular diversity
5 Biochemistry Biological macromolecules and lipids
7 Cell biology Cell structure and function
8 Cell biology Cell membranes
10 Cell biology Respiration: introduction to metabolism
10 Cell biology Cell respiration
11 Cell biology Photosynthetic processes
16 Genetics Nucleic acids and inheritance
17 Genetics Expression of genes
18 Genetics Control of gene expression
19 Genetics DNA Technology
35 Plant structure&function Plant Structure and Growth
36 Plant structure&function Transport in vascular plants
37 Plant structure&function Plant nutrition
38 Plant structure&function Reproduction of flowering plants
39 Plant structure&function Plants signal and behavior
Lecture notesNo script
LiteratureCampbell et al. (2015) Biology - A Global Approach. 10th Edition (Global Edition)
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic general and organic chemistry

PLEASE NOTE This lecture is newly conceived and will be held for the first time in the spring semester 2017.
701-0023-AALAtmosphere Information
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-3 credits6RH. Wernli, T. Peter
AbstractBasic principles of the atmosphere, physical structure and chemical composition, trace gases, atmospheric cycles, circulation, stability, radiation, condensation, clouds, oxidation capacity and ozone layer.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of basic physical and chemical processes in the atmosphere. Understanding of mechanisms of and interactions between: weather - climate, atmosphere - ocean - continents, troposhere - stratosphere. Understanding of environmentally relevant structures and processes on vastly differing scales. Basis for the modelling of complex interrelations in the atmospehre.
ContentBasic principles of the atmosphere, physical structure and chemical composition, trace gases, atmospheric cycles, circulation, stability, radiation, condensation, clouds, oxidation capacity and ozone layer.
Lecture notesWritten information will be supplied.
Literature- John H. Seinfeld and Spyros N. Pandis, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics: From Air Pollution to Climate Change, Wiley, New York, 1998.
- Gösta H. Liljequist, Allgemeine Meteorologie, Vieweg, Braunschweig, 1974.
701-0243-AALBiology III: Essentials of Ecology
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-3 credits6RJ. Levine
AbstractThis course assigns reading for students needing further background for understanding ecological processes. Central problems in ecology, including population growth and regulation, the dynamics of species interactions, the influence of spatial structure, the controls over species invasions, and community responses to environmental change will be explored from basic and applied perspectives.
ObjectiveOriginal language Students will understand how ecological processes operate in natural communities. They will appreciate how mathematical theory, field experimentation, and observational studies combine to generate a predictive science of ecological processes.

Upon completing the course, students will be able to:

Understand the factors determining the outcome of species interactions in communities, and how this information informs management.

Apply theoretical knowledge on species interactions to predict the potential outcomes of novel species introductions.

Understanding the role of spatial structure in mediating population dynamics and persistence, species interactions, and patterns of species diversity.

Use population and community models to predict the stability of interactions between predators and prey and between different competitors.

Understand the conceptual basis of predictions concerning how ecological communities will respond to climate change.
ContentReadings from a text book will focus on understanding central processes in community ecology. Topics will include demographic and spatial structure, consumer resource interactions, food webs, competition, invasion, and the maintenance of species diversity. Each of these more conceptual topics will be discussed in concert with their applications to the conservation and management of species and communities in a changing world.
701-0401-AALHydrosphere Information
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-3 credits6RR. Kipfer, C. Roques
AbstractQualitative and quantitative understanding of the physical processes that control the terrestrial water cycle. Energy and mass exchange, mixing and transport processes are described and the coupling of the hydrosphere with the atmosphere and the solid Earth are discussed.
ObjectiveQualitative and quantitative understanding of the physical processes that control the terrestrial water cycle. Energy and mass exchange, mixing and transport processes are described and the coupling of the hydrosphere with the atmosphere and the solid Earth are discussed.
ContentTopics of the course.
Physical properties of water (i.e. density and equation of state)
- global water resources
Exchange at boundaries
- energy (thermal & kinetic), gas exchange
Mixing and transport processes in open waters
- vertical stratification, large scale transport
- turbulence and mixing
- mixing and exchange processes in rivers
Groundwater and its dynamics
- ground water as part of the terrestrial water cycle
- ground water hydraulics, Darcy's law
- aquifers and their properties
- hydrochemistry and tracer
- ground water use
Case studies
- 1. Water as resource, 2. Water and climate
Lecture notesIn addition to the self-learning literature handouts are distributed.
LiteratureTextbooks for self-studying.
Surface water.
'Physics and Chemistry in Lakes', ed: Lerman, A., Imboden, D.M., and Gat, J., Springer Verlag, 1995:
Chapter 4: Imboden, D.M., and Wüest, A. 'Mixing Mechanisms in Lakes'
'Environmental Organic Chemistry', ed: Schwarzenbach, R., Imboden, D. M., and Gschwend, Ph., Willey, 2002:
Chapter 6.4: Air-Water Partitioning
Chapter 19.2: Bottleneck Boundaries

Ground water:
Fetter, C.W. 'Applied Hydrogeology', Prentice Hall, 2002 (4th edition):
Chapters 1 - 6, 8, 10, 11.

Optional additional readers.
Park, Ch., 2001, The Environment, Routledge, 2001
Price, M., 1996. Introducing groundwater. Chapman & Hall, London u.a.


a) Park, Ch., 2001, The Environment, Routledge, 2001
b) Price, M., 1996. Introducing groundwater. Chapman & Hall, London u.a.
701-0501-AALPedosphere
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-3 credits6RR. Kretzschmar
AbstractIntroduction to the formation and properties of soils as a function of parent rock, landscape position, climate, and soil organisms. Complex relationships between soil forming processes, physical and chemical soil properties, soil biota, and ecological soil properties.
ObjectiveIntroduction to the formation and properties of soils as a function of parent rock, landscape position, climate, and soil organisms. Complex relationships between soil forming processes, physical and chemical soil properties, soil biota, and ecological soil properties.
ContentDefinition of the pedosphere, soil functions, rocks as parent materials, minerals and weathering, soil organisms, soil organic matter, physical soil properties and functions, chemical soil properties and functions, soil formation, principles of soil classification, global soil regions, soil fertility, land use and soil degradation.
Literature- Scheffer/Schachtschabel - Soil Science, Springer, Heidelberg, 2016.

- Brady N.C. and Weil, R.R. The Nature and Properties of Soils. 14th ed. Prentice Hall, 2007.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Basic knowledge in chemistry, biology and geology.
701-0721-AALPsychology Information
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-3 credits6RM. Siegrist
AbstractThis is an introductory course in psychology. This course will emphasize cognitive psychology and the psychological experiment.
ObjectiveKnowledge of key concepts and exemplary theories of psychology and their relation to "daily" psychology. Comprehension of relation between theory and experiment in psychology.

Goals: Learning how psychologists are thinking, a side change from the ETH natural science perspective to psychological thinking.

Domains of psychology:
- Psychology fields
- Concept definitions of psychology
- Theories of psychology
- Methods of psychology
- Results of psychology

Capability:
Be able to define a psychological research question
Basics understanding of role of psychology

Comprehension:
Psychology as a science of experience and behavior of the human
ContentEinführung in die psychologische Forschung und Modellbildung unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der kognitiven Psychologie und des psychologischen Experiments. Themen sind u.a.: Wahrnehmung; Lernen und Entwicklung; Denken und Problemlösen; Kognitive Sozialpsychologie; Risiko und Entscheidung.
LiteratureEnglish book of Zimbardo (Link)

Scholz, R. W. (2011). Environmental Literacy in Science and Society: From Knowledge to Decisions. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Prerequisites / NoticeDetermine with Prof. Dr. Michael Siegrist the chapters in "Zimbardo" which are compulsory reading

Read the two Psychology chapters (6 + 7) from the book of Prof. Roland W. Scholz
701-0757-AALPrinciples of Economics Information
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-3 credits6RR. Schubert
AbstractStudents understand basic microeconomics and macroeconomics problems and theories. They are able to argue along economic principles and to judge policy measures.
ObjectiveStudents should be enabled to understand basic microeconomics and macroeconomics problems and theories. They should be able to argue along economic principles and to judge policy measures.
ContentSupply and demand behaviour of firm and households; market equilibrium and taxation; national income and indicators; inflation ; unemployment; growth; macroeconomics policies
Lecture notesavailable on electronic platform
LiteratureMankiw, N.G.: "Principles of Economics", fourth edition, South-Western College/West, Mason 2006.

German translation: Mankiw, N.G. : Grundzüge der Volkswirtschaftslehre, 3rd. edition, Stuttgart 2004.
Prerequisites / Noticeelectronic plattform
701-1901-AALSystems Analysis
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-4 credits6RN. Gruber
AbstractSelf study course in Systems Analysis to fulfill requirements for enrollment into the master program. Topics covered include linear box models with one and several variables; non-linear box models with one or several variables; discrete-time models; and continuous models in space and time.
ObjectiveThe aim of this course is to develop an understanding of the dynamical behavior of environmental systems and how this behavior can be captured and understood using mathematical concepts.
Lecture notesFor English Speaking students:
R.P. Schwarzenbach, P.M.Gschwend, D.M.Imboden, Environmental Organic Chemistry, Wiley-Interscience, Second Edition, 2003
Chapters 12.3, 12.4, 18.2, 21, 22.1 and 22.2

Für Deutschsprachige: D.M. Imboden und S. Koch, Systemanalyse, Springer-Verlag 2003
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