Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2016

Micro- and Nanosystems Master Information
Core Courses
Elective Core Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0525-00LWave Propagation in SolidsW4 credits2V + 1UJ. Dual, D. Mohr
AbstractPlane Waves, harmonic waves, Fourier analysis and synthesis, dispersion, distorsion, damping, group and phase velocity, transmission and reflection, impact, waves in linear elastic continua, elastic plastic waves, experimental and numerical methods in wave propagation.
ObjectiveStudents learn, which technical problems must be approached using the methods used in wave propagation in solids. Furthermore, they learn to use these methods and develop an intuitive feeling for phenomena that can be expected in various situations.
ContentWave Propagation in solids including applications.
Content: Phenomenology of wave propagation ( plane waves, harmonic waves, harmonic analysis and synthesis, dispersion, attenuation, group and phase velocity), transmission and reflection, impact problems, waves in linear elastic media ( P- Waves, S-Waves, Rayleigh waves, guided waves), elastic plastic waves, experimental and numerical methods.
Lecture notesHandouts
LiteratureVarious books will be recommended pertaining to the topics covered.
Prerequisites / NoticeLanguage according to the wishes of students.
151-0255-00LEnergy Conversion and Transport in BiosystemsW4 credits2V + 1UD. Poulikakos, A. Ferrari
AbstractTheory and application of thermodynamics and energy conversion in biological systems with focus on the cellular level.
ObjectiveTheory and application of energy conversion at the cellular level. Understanding of the basic features governing solutes transport in the principal systems of the human cell. Connection of characteristics and patterns from other fields of engineering to biofluidics. Heat and mass transport processes in the cell, generation of forces, work and relation to biomedical technologies.
ContentMass transfer models for the transport of chemical species in the human cell. Organization and function of the cell membrane and of the cell cytoskeleton. The role of molecular motors in cellular force generation and their function in cell migration. Description of the functionality of these systems and of analytical experimental and computational techniques for understanding of their operation. Introduction to cell metabolism, cellular energy transport and cellular thermodynamics.
Lecture notesMaterial in the form of hand-outs will be distributed.
LiteratureLecture notes and references therein.
402-0572-00LAerosols I: Physical and Chemical PrinciplesW4 credits2V + 1UM. Gysel Beer, U. Baltensperger, H. Burtscher
AbstractAerosols I deals with basic physical and chemical properties of aerosol particles. The importance of aerosols in the atmosphere and in other fields is discussed.
ObjectiveKnowledge of basic physical and chemical properties of aerosol particles and their importance in the atmosphere and in other fields
Contentphysical and chemical properties of aerosols, aerosol dynamics (diffusion, coagulation...), optical properties (light scattering, -absorption, -extinction), aerosol production, physical and chemical characterization.
Lecture notesmateriel is distributed during the lecture
Literature- Kulkarni, P., Baron, P. A., and Willeke, K.: Aerosol Measurement - Principles, Techniques, and Applications. Wiley, Hoboken, New Jersey, 2011.
- Hinds, W. C.: Aerosol Technology: Properties, Behavior, and Measurement of Airborne Particles. John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 1999.
- Colbeck I. (ed.) Physical and Chemical Properties of Aerosols, Blackie Academic & Professional, London, 1998.
- Seinfeld, J. H. and Pandis, S. N.: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics: From Air Pollution to Climate Change. Hoboken, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2006
151-0605-00LNanosystemsW4 credits4GA. Stemmer, J.‑N. Tisserant
AbstractFrom atoms to molecules to condensed matter: characteristic properties of simple nanosystems and how they evolve when moving towards complex ensembles.
Intermolecular forces, their macroscopic manifestations, and ways to control such interactions.
Self-assembly and directed assembly of 2D and 3D structures.
Special emphasis on the emerging field of molecular electronic devices.
ObjectiveFamiliarize students with basic science and engineering principles governing the nano domain.
ContentThe course addresses basic science and engineering principles ruling the nano domain. We particularly work out the links between topics that are traditionally taught separately.

Special emphasis is placed on the emerging field of molecular electronic devices, their working principles, applications, and how they may be assembled.

Topics are treated in 2 blocks:

(I) From Quantum to Continuum
From atoms to molecules to condensed matter: characteristic properties of simple nanosystems and how they evolve when moving towards complex ensembles.

(II) Interaction Forces on the Micro and Nano Scale
Intermolecular forces, their macroscopic manifestations, and ways to control such interactions.
Self-assembly and directed assembly of 2D and 3D structures.
Literature- Kuhn, Hans; Försterling, H.D.: Principles of Physical Chemistry. Understanding Molecules, Molecular Assemblies, Supramolecular Machines. 1999, Wiley, ISBN: 0-471-95902-2
- Chen, Gang: Nanoscale Energy Transport and Conversion. 2005, Oxford University Press, ISBN: 978-0-19-515942-4
- Ouisse, Thierry: Electron Transport in Nanostructures and Mesoscopic Devices. 2008, Wiley, ISBN: 978-1-84821-050-9
- Wolf, Edward L.: Nanophysics and Nanotechnology. 2004, Wiley-VCH, ISBN: 3-527-40407-4

- Israelachvili, Jacob N.: Intermolecular and Surface Forces. 2nd ed., 1992, Academic Press,ISBN: 0-12-375181-0
- Evans, D.F.; Wennerstrom, H.: The Colloidal Domain. Where Physics, Chemistry, Biology, and Technology Meet. Advances in Interfacial Engineering Series. 2nd ed., 1999, Wiley, ISBN: 0-471-24247-0
- Hunter, Robert J.: Foundations of Colloid Science. 2nd ed., 2001, Oxford, ISBN: 0-19-850502-7
Prerequisites / NoticeCourse format:

Lectures and Mini-Review presentations: Thursday 10-13, ML F 36

Homework: Mini-Reviews
Students select a paper (list distributed in class) and expand the topic into a Mini-Review that illuminates the particular field beyond the immediate results reported in the paper.
529-0611-00LCharacterization of Catalysts and SurfacesW7 credits3GJ. A. van Bokhoven, D. Ferri
AbstractBasic elements of surface science important for materials and catalysis research. Physical and chemical methods important for research in surface science, material science and catalysis are considered and their application is demonstrated on practical examples.
ObjectiveBasic aspects of surface science. Understanding of principles of most important experimental methods used in research concerned with surface science, material science and catalysis.
ContentMethods which are covered embrace: Gas adsorption and surface area analysis, IR-Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray absorption, solid state NMR, Electron Microscopy and others.
529-0643-00LProcess Design and Development Information W7 credits3GG. Storti
AbstractThe course is focused on the design of Chemical Processes, with emphasis on the preliminary stage of the design approach, where process creation and quick selection among many alternatives are important. The main concepts behind more detailed process design and process simulation are also examined in the last part of the course.
ObjectiveThe course is focused on the design of Chemical Processes, with emphasis on the preliminary stage of the design approach, where process creation and quick selection among many alternatives are important. The main concepts behind more detailed process design and process simulation are also examined in the last part of the course.
ContentProcess creation: decomposition strategies (reduction of differences - vinyl chloride production and hierarchical decomposition - ethanol production). Identification of the "base case design". Heuristics for process synthesis.
Preliminary process evaluation: simplified material and energy balances (linear balances), degrees of freedom, short-cut models, flowsheet solution algorithm).
Process Integration: sequencing of distillation columns, synthesis of heat exchanger networks.
Process economic evaluation: equipment sizing and costing, time value of money, cash flow calculations.
Batch Processes: scheduling, sizing and inventories.
Detailed Process Design: unit operation models, flash solution algorithms (different iterative methods, inside-out method), sequencing of nonideal distillation columns, networks of chemical reactors.
Lecture notesno script
LiteratureL.T.Biegler et al., Systematic Methods of Chemical Process Design, Prentice Hall, 1997.
W.D.Seider et al., Process Design Principles, J. Wiley & Sons, 1998.
J.M.Douglas, Conceptual Design of Chemical Processes, McGraw-Hill, 1988.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite: Thermal Unit Operations
752-3103-00LFood Rheology IW3 credits2VP. A. Fischer
AbstractRheology is the science of flow and deformation of matter such as polymers, dispersions (emulsions, foams, suspensions), and colloidal systems. The fluid dynamical basis, measuring techniques (rheometry), and the flow properties of different fluids (Newtonian, non-Newtonian, viscoelastic) are introduced and discussed.
ObjectiveThe course provides an introduction on the link between flow and structural properties of flowing material. Rheometrical techniques and appropriate measuring protocols for the characterization of complex fluids will be discussed. The concept of rheological constitutive equations and the application to different material classes are established.
ContentLectures will be given on general introduction (4h), fluid dynamics (2h), complex flow behavior (4h), influence of temperature (2h), rheometers (4h), rheological tests (6h) and structure and rheology of complex fluids (4h).
Lecture notesNotes will be handed out during the lectures.
LiteratureProvided in the lecture notes.
227-0157-00LSemiconductor Devices: Physical Bases and SimulationW4 credits3GA. Schenk
AbstractThe course addresses the physical principles of modern semiconductor devices and the foundations of their modeling and numerical simulation. Necessary basic knowledge on quantum-mechanics, semiconductor physics and device physics is provided. Computer simulations of the most important devices and of interesting physical effects supplement the lectures.
ObjectiveThe course aims at the understanding of the principle physics of modern semiconductor devices, of the foundations in the physical modeling of transport and its numerical simulation. During the course also basic knowledge on quantum-mechanics, semiconductor physics and device physics is provided.
ContentThe main topics are: transport models for semiconductor devices (quantum transport, Boltzmann equation, drift-diffusion model, hydrodynamic model), physical characterization of silicon (intrinsic properties, scattering processes), mobility of cold and hot carriers, recombination (Shockley-Read-Hall statistics, Auger recombination), impact ionization, metal-semiconductor contact, metal-insulator-semiconductor structure, and heterojunctions.
The exercises are focussed on the theory and the basic understanding of the operation of special devices, as single-electron transistor, resonant tunneling diode, pn-diode, bipolar transistor, MOSFET, and laser. Numerical simulations of such devices are performed with an advanced simulation package (Sentaurus-Synopsys). This enables to understand the physical effects by means of computer experiments.
Lecture notesThe script (in book style) can be downloaded from: http://www.iis.ee.ethz.ch/˜schenk/vorlesung.
LiteratureThe script (in book style) is sufficient. Further reading will be recommended in the lecture.
Prerequisites / NoticeQualifications: Physics I+II, Semiconductor devices (4. semester).
227-0225-00LLinear System TheoryW6 credits5GM. Kamgarpour
AbstractThe class is intended to provide a comprehensive overview of the theory of linear dynamical systems, their use in control, filtering, and estimation and their applications to areas ranging from avionics to systems biology.
ObjectiveBy the end of the class students should be comfortable with the fundamental results in linear system theory and the mathematical tools used to derive them.
Content- Rings, fields and linear spaces, normed linear spaces and inner product spaces.
- Ordinary differential equations, existence and uniqueness of solutions.
- Continuous and discrete time, time varying linear systems. Time domain solutions. Time invariant systems treated as a special case.
- Controllability and observability, canonical forms, Kalman decomposition. Time invariant systems treated as a special case.
- Stability and stabilization, observers, state and output feedback, separation principle.
- Realization theory.
Lecture notesF.M. Callier and C.A. Desoer, "Linear System Theory", Springer-Verlag, 1991.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Control Systems I (227-0103-00) or equivalent and sufficient mathematical maturity.
227-0377-00LPhysics of Failure and Failure Analysis of Electronic Devices and EquipmentW3 credits2VU. Sennhauser
AbstractFailures have to be avoided by proper design, material selection and manufacturing. Properties, degradation mechanisms, and expected lifetime of materials are introduced and the basics of failure analysis and analysis equipment are presented. Failures will be demonstrated experimentally and the opportunity is offered to perform a failure analysis with advanced equipment in the laboratory.
ObjectiveIntroduction to the degradation and failure mechanisms and causes of electronic components, devices and systems as well as to methods and tools of reliability testing, characterization and failure analysis.
ContentSummary of reliability and failure analysis terminology; physics of failure: materials properties, physical processes and failure mechanisms; failure analysis of ICs, PCBs, opto-electronics, discrete and other components and devices; basics and properties of instruments; application in circuit design and reliability analysis
Lecture notesComprehensive copy of transparencies
151-0593-00LEmbedded Control SystemsW4 credits6GJ. S. Freudenberg, M. Schmid Daners, C. Onder
AbstractThis course provides a comprehensive overview of embedded control systems. The concepts introduced are implemented and verified on a microprocessor-controlled haptic device.
ObjectiveFamiliarize students with main architectural principles and concepts of embedded control systems.
ContentAn embedded system is a microprocessor used as a component in another piece of technology, such as cell phones or automobiles. In this intensive two-week block course the students are presented the principles of embedded digital control systems using a haptic device as an example for a mechatronic system. A haptic interface allows for a human to interact with a computer through the sense of touch.

Subjects covered in lectures and practical lab exercises include:
- The application of C-programming on a microprocessor
- Digital I/O and serial communication
- Quadrature decoding for wheel position sensing
- Queued analog-to-digital conversion to interface with the analog world
- Pulse width modulation
- Timer interrupts to create sampling time intervals
- System dynamics and virtual worlds with haptic feedback
- Introduction to rapid prototyping
Lecture notesLecture notes, lab instructions, supplemental material
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite courses are Control Systems I and Informatics I.

This course is restricted to 33 students due to limited lab infrastructure. Interested students please contact Marianne Schmid (E-Mail: marischm@ethz.ch)
After your reservation has been confirmed please register online at www.mystudies.ethz.ch.

Detailed information can be found on the course website
http://www.idsc.ethz.ch/education/lectures/embedded-control-systems.html
151-0235-00LThermodynamics of Novel Energy Conversion TechnologiesW4 credits3GC. S. Sharma, D. Poulikakos, G. Sansavini
AbstractIn the framework of this course we will look at a current electronic thermal and energy management strategies and novel energy conversion processes. The course will focus on component level fundamentals of these process and system level analysis of interactions among various energy conversion components.
ObjectiveThis course deals with liquid cooling based thermal management of electronics, reuse of waste heat and novel energy conversion and storage systems such as batteries, fuel cells and micro-fuel cells. The focus of the course is on the physics and basic understanding of those systems as well as their real-world applications. The course will also look at analysis of system level interactions between a range of energy conversion components.
ContentPart 1: Fundamentals:
- Overview of exergy analysis, Single phase liquid cooling and micro-mixing;
- Thermodynamics of multi-component-systems (mixtures) and phase equilibrium;
- Electrochemistry;

Part 2: Applications:
- Basic principles of battery;
- Introduction to fuel cells;
- Reuse of waste heat from supercomputers
- Hotspot targeted cooling of microprocessors
- Microfluidic fuel cells

Part3: System- level analysis
- Integration of the components into the system: a case study
- Analysis of the coupled operations, identification of critical states
- Support to system-oriented design
Lecture notesLecture slides will be made available. Lecture notes will be available for some topics (in English).
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course will be given in English:

1- Mid-term examination: Mid-term exam grade counts as 20% of the final grade.
2- Final exam: Written exam during the regular examination session. It counts as 80% of the final grade.
227-0145-00LSolid State Electronics and Optics Information W6 credits4GV. Wood
Abstract"Solid State Electronics" is an introductory condensed matter physics course covering crystal structure, electron models, classification of metals, semiconductors, and insulators, band structure engineering, thermal and electronic transport in solids, magnetoresistance, and optical properties of solids.
ObjectiveUnderstand the fundamental physics behind the mechanical, thermal, electric, magnetic, and optical properties of materials.
Prerequisites / NoticeRecommended background:
Undergraduate physics, mathematics, semiconductor devices
151-0621-00LMicrosystems Technology Information W6 credits4GC. Hierold, M. Haluska
AbstractStudents are introduced to the basics of micromachining and silicon process technology and will learn about the fabrication of microsystems and -devices by a sequence of defined processing steps (process flow).
ObjectiveStudents are introduced to the basics of micromachining and silicon process technology and will understand the fabrication of microsystem devices by the combination of unit process steps ( = process flow).
Content- Introduction to microsystems technology (MST) and micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS)
- Basic silicon technologies: Thermal oxidation, photolithography and etching, diffusion and ion implantation, thin film deposition.
- Specific microsystems technologies: Bulk and surface micromachining, dry and wet etching, isotropic and anisotropic etching, beam and membrane formation, wafer bonding, thin film mechanical and thermal properties, piezoelectric and piezoresitive materials.
- Selected microsystems: Mechanical sensors and actuators, microresonators, thermal sensors and actuators, system integration and encapsulation.
Lecture notesHandouts (available online)
Literature- S.M. Sze: Semiconductor Devices, Physics and Technology
- W. Menz, J. Mohr, O.Paul: Microsystem Technology
- G. Kovacs: Micromachined Transducer Sourcebook
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Physics I and II
402-0811-00LProgramming Techniques for Scientific Simulations IW5 credits4GM. Troyer
AbstractThis lecture provides an overview of programming techniques for scientific simulations. The focus is on advances C++ programming techniques and scientific software libraries. Based on an overview over the hardware components of PCs and supercomputer, optimization methods for scientific simulation codes are explained.
Objective
151-0911-00LIntroduction to PlasmonicsW4 credits2V + 1UD. J. Norris
AbstractThis course provides fundamental knowledge of surface plasmon polaritons and discusses their applications in plasmonics.
ObjectiveElectromagnetic oscillations known as surface plasmon polaritons have many unique properties that are useful across a broad set of applications in biology, chemistry, physics, and optics. The field of plasmonics has arisen to understand the behavior of surface plasmon polaritons and to develop applications in areas such as catalysis, imaging, photovoltaics, and sensing. In particular, metallic nanoparticles and patterned metallic interfaces have been developed to utilize plasmonic resonances. The aim of this course is to provide the basic knowledge to understand and apply the principles of plasmonics. The course will strive to be approachable to students from a diverse set of science and engineering backgrounds.
ContentFundamentals of Plasmonics
- Basic electromagnetic theory
- Optical properties of metals
- Surface plasmon polaritons on surfaces
- Surface plasmon polariton propagation
- Localized surface plasmons

Applications of Plasmonics
- Waveguides
- Extraordinary optical transmission
- Enhanced spectroscopy
- Sensing
- Metamaterials
Lecture notesClass notes and handouts
LiteratureS. A. Maier, Plasmonics: Fundamentals and Applications, 2007, Springer
Prerequisites / NoticePhysics I, Physics II
151-0642-00LSeminar on Micro and Nanosystems Information Z0 credits1SC. Hierold
AbstractScientific presentations from the field of Micro- and Nanosystems
ObjectiveIn particular, the seminar addresses students, who are interested in scientific work in the field of Micro- and Nanosystem technologies, or who have started already with it. Respectively, current examples in the research will be discussed.
ContentCurrent themes in the field of Micro- and Nanosystem technologies using the examples of intern and extern research groups, as well as ongoing themes of study-, diplom- and doctoral thesis will be introduced and discussed. The scope of the seminar is broadened by occasional guest speakers.
Lecture notes-
Literature-
Prerequisites / NoticeMaster of MNS, MAVT, ITET, Physics
227-0663-00LNano-Optics Information W6 credits2V + 2UL. Novotny
AbstractNano-Optics is the study of optical phenomena and techniques on the nanometer scale. It is an emerging field of study motivated by the rapid advance of nanoscience and technology. It embraces topics such as plasmonics, optical antennas, optical trapping and manipulation, and high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy.
ObjectiveUnderstanding concepts of light localization and light-matter interactions on the nanoscale.
ContentStarting with an angular spectrum representation of optical fields the role of inhomogeneous evanescent fields is discussed. Among the topics are: theory of strongly focused light, point spread functions, resolution criteria, confocal microscopy, and near-field optical microscopy. Further topics are: optical interactions between nanoparticles, atomic decay rates in inhomogeneous environments, single molecule spectroscopy, light forces and optical trapping, photonic bandgap materials, and theoretical methods in nano-optics.
Prerequisites / Notice- Electrodynamics (or equivalent)
- Physics I+II
151-0104-00LUncertainty Quantification for Engineering & Life Sciences Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
Number of participants limited to 60.
W4 credits3GP. Koumoutsakos
AbstractQuantification of uncertainties in computational models pertaining to applications in engineering and life sciences. Exploitation of massively available data to develop computational models with quantifiable predictive capabilities. Applications of Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation to problems in mechanics, control, systems and cell biology.
ObjectiveThe course will teach fundamental concept of Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation (UQ+P) for computational models of systems in Engineering and Life Sciences. Emphasis will be placed on practical and computational aspects of UQ+P including the implementation of relevant algorithms in multicore architectures.
ContentTopics that will be covered include: Uncertainty quantification under
parametric and non-parametric modelling uncertainty, Bayesian inference with model class assessment, Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation, prior and posterior reliability analysis.
Lecture notesThe class will be largely based on the book: Data Analysis: A Bayesian Tutorial by Devinderjit Sivia as well as on class notes and related literature that will be distributed in class.
Literature1. Data Analysis: A Bayesian Tutorial by Devinderjit Sivia
2. Probability Theory: The Logic of Science by E. T. Jaynes
3. Class Notes
Prerequisites / NoticeFundamentals of Probability, Fundamentals of Computational Modeling
227-0468-00LAnalog Signal Processing and Filtering Information
Suitable for Master Students as well as Doctoral Students.
W6 credits2V + 2UH. Schmid
AbstractThis lecture provides a wide overview over analog filters (continuous-time and discrete-time), signal-processing systems, and sigma-delta conversion, and gives examples with sensor interfaces and class-D audio drivers. All systems and circuits are treated using a signal-flow view. The lecture is suitable for both analog and digital designers.
ObjectiveThis lecture provides a wide overview over analog filters (continuous-time and discrete-time), signal-processing systems, and sigma-delta conversion, and gives examples with sensor interfaces and class-D audio drivers. All systems and circuits are treated using a signal-flow view. The lecture is suitable for both analog and digital designers. The way the exam is done allows for the different interests of the two groups.

The learning goal is that the students can apply signal-flow graphs and can understand the signal flow in such circuits and systems (including non-ideal effects) well enough to gain an understanding of further circuits and systems by themselves.
ContentAt the beginning, signal-flow graphs in general and driving-point signal-flow graphs in particular are introduced. We will use them during the whole term to analyze circuits and understand how signals propagate through them. The theory and CMOS implementation of active Filters is then discussed in detail using the example of Gm-C filters and active-RC filters. The ideal and nonideal behaviour of opamps, current conveyors, and inductor simulators follows. The link to the practical design of circuits and systems is done with an overview over different quality measures and figures of merit used in scientific literature and datasheets. Finally, an introduction to discrete-time and mixed-domain filters and circuits is given, including sensor read-out amplifiers, correlated double sampling, and chopping, and an introduction to sigma-delta A/D and D/A conversion on a system level.
Lecture notesThe base for these lectures are lecture notes and two or three published scientific papers. From these papers we will together develop the technical content.

Details: https://people.ee.ethz.ch/~haschmid/asfwiki/

Some material is protected by password; students from ETHZ who are interested can write to haschmid@ethz.ch to ask for the password even if they do not attend the lecture.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Recommended (but not required): Stochastic models and signal processing, Communication Electronics, Analog Integrated Circuits, Transmission Lines and Filters.

Knowledge of the Laplace transform and z transform and their interpretation (transfer functions, poles and zeros, bode diagrams, stability criteria ...) and of the main properties of linear systems is necessary.
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