From 2 November 2020, the autumn semester 2020 will take place online. Exceptions: Courses that can only be carried out with on-site presence.
Please note the information provided by the lecturers via e-mail.

Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2016

Environmental Sciences Master Information
Major in Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics
Applications
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-1341-00LWater Resources and Drinking WaterW3 credits2GS. Hug, M. Berg, F. Hammes, U. von Gunten
AbstractThe course covers qualitative (chemistry and microbiology) and quantitative aspects of drinking water from the resource to the tap. Natural processes, anthropogenic pollution, legislation of groundwater and surface water and of drinking water as well as water treatment will be discussed for industrialized and developing countries.
ObjectiveThe goal of this lecture is to give an overview over the whole path of drinking water from the source to the tap and understand the involved physical, chemical and biological processes which determine the drinking water quality.
ContentThe course covers qualitative (chemistry and microbiology) and quantitative aspects of drinking water from the resource to the tap. The various water resources, particularly groundwater and surface water, are discussed as part of the natural water cycle influenced by anthropogenic activities such as agriculture, industry, urban water systems. Furthermore legislation related to water resources and drinking water will be discussed. The lecture is focused on industrialized countries, but also addresses global water issues and problems in the developing world. Finally unit processes for drinking water treatment (filtration, adsorption, oxidation, disinfection etc.) will be presented and discussed.
Lecture notesHandouts will be distributed
LiteratureWill be mentioned in handouts
701-1346-00LCarbon Mitigation Information W3 credits2GN. Gruber
AbstractFuture climate change can only kept within reasonable bounds when CO2 emissions are drastically reduced. In this course, we will discuss a portfolio of options involving the alteration of natural carbon sinks and carbon sequestration. The course includes introductory lectures, presentations from guest speakers from industry and the public sector, and final presentations by the students.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is to investigate, as a group, a particular set of carbon mitigation/sequestration options and to evaluate their potential, their cost, and their consequences.
ContentFrom the large number of carbon sequestration/mitigation options, a few options will be selected and then investigated in detail by the students. The results of this research will then be presented to the other students, the involved faculty, and discussed in detail by the whole group.
Lecture notesNone
LiteratureWill be identified based on the chosen topic.
Prerequisites / NoticeExam: No final exam. Pass/No-Pass is assigned based on the quality of the presentation and ensuing discussion.
701-1351-00LNanomaterials in the EnvironmentW3 credits2GB. Nowack, T. Bucheli
AbstractThe lecture provides an overview on the behavior and effects of engineered nanomaterials in the environment as far as they are currently understood. The course will cover definitions, analysis, fate in technical and natural systems, effects (nano-ecotoxicology) and environmental risk assessment of nanomaterials.
Objective- Successful application of knowledge gained in the traditional disciplines of environmental sciences (e.g. biogeochemistry, environmental chemistry) to elucidate nanomaterial fate and behavior in the environment
- Identify key parameters of nanomaterials that potentially influence their environmental fate and behavior
- Get acquainted with the most common analytical tools for the quantification of nanomaterials in the environment
- Critical assessment of current state of research in this juvenile field, including the sometimes controversial literature data
ContentTopics

- Definitions; nano-effects; engineered, natural and incidental nanoparticles
- Sources and release; Material flow modeling
- Analysis in environmental samples
- Fate in technical systems: water treatment, waste incineration
- Fate in the environment: water and soil
- Effects: nano-ecotoxicology
- Environmental risk assessment


Group work

Case studies about specific nanomaterials in environmental systems, topics will be provided
Written report submitted and presentation at the end of the lecture
Lecture notesHandouts will be provided
Literaturewill be provided during lecture
102-0337-00LLandfilling, Contaminated Sites and Radioactive Waste Repositories Restricted registration - show details W3 credits2GW. Hummel, M. Plötze
AbstractPractices of landfilling and remediation of contaminated sites and disposal of radioactive waste are based on the same concepts that aim to protect the environment. The assessment of contaminants that may leach into the environment as a function of time and how to reduce the rate of their release is key to the design of chemical, technical and geological barriers.
ObjectiveUpon successful completion of this course students are able to:
- assess the risk posed to the environment of landfills, contaminated sites and radioactive waste repositories in terms of fate and transport of contaminants
- describe technologies available to minimize environmental contamination
- describe the principles in handling of contaminated sites and to propose and evaluate suitable remediation techniques
- explain the concepts that underlie radioactive waste disposal practices
ContentThis lecture course comprises of lectures with exercises and guided case studies.
- A short overview of the principles of environmental protection in waste management and how this is applied in legislation.
- A overview of the chemistry underlying the release and transport of contaminants from the landfilled/contaminated material/radioactive waste repository focusing on processes that control redox state and pH buffer capacity; mobility of heavy metals and organic compounds
- Technical barrier design and function. Clay as a barrier.
- Contaminated site remediation: Site evaluation, remediation technologies
- Concepts and safety in radioactive waste management
- Role of the geological and engineered barriers and radionuclide transport in geological media.
Lecture notesShort script plus copies of overheads
LiteratureLiterature will be made available.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis is an interdisciplinary course aimed at environmental scientists and environmental engineers.
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