Autumn Semester 2020 takes place in a mixed form of online and classroom teaching.
Please read the published information on the individual courses carefully.

Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2016

Environmental Sciences Master Information
Major in Atmosphere and Climate
Hydrology and Water Cycle
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-1251-00LLand-Climate Dynamics Information W3 credits2GS. I. Seneviratne, E. L. Davin
AbstractThe purpose of this course is to provide fundamental background on the role of land surface processes (vegetation, soil moisture dynamics, land energy and water balances) for the climate system. The course consists of 2 contact hours per week, including 2 computer exercises.
ObjectiveThe students can understand the role of land processes and associated feedbacks for the climate system.
Lecture notesPowerpoint slides will be made available
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Introductory lectures in atmospheric and climate science
Atmospheric physics -> Link
and/or
Climate systems -> Link
701-1253-00LAnalysis of Climate and Weather Data Information W3 credits2GC. Frei
AbstractObservation networks and numerical climate and forcasting models deliver large primary datasets. The use of this data in practice and in research requires specific techniques of statistical data analysis. This lecture introduces a range of frequently used techniques, and enables students to apply them and to properly interpret their results.
ObjectiveObservation networks and numerical climate and forcasting models deliver large primary datasets. The use of this data in practice and in research requires specific techniques of statistical data analysis. This lecture introduces a range of frequently used techniques, and enables students to apply them and to properly interpret their results.
ContentIntroduction into the theoretical background and the practical application of methods of data analysis in meteorology and climatology.

Topics: exploratory methods, hypothesis tests, analysis of climate trends, measuring the skill of climate and forecasting models, analysis of extreme events, principal component analysis and maximum covariance analysis.

The lecture also provides an introduction into R, a programming language and graphics tool frequently used for data analysis in meteorology and climatology. During hands-on computer exercises the student will become familiar with the practical application of the methods.
Lecture notesDocumentation and supporting material include:
- documented view graphs used during the lecture
- excercise sets and solutions
- R-packages with software and example datasets for exercise sessions

All material is made available via the lecture web-page.
LiteratureSuggested literature:
- Wilks D.S., 2005: Statistical Methods in the Atmospheric Science. (2nd edition). International Geophysical Series, Academic Press Inc. (London)
- Coles S., 2001: An introduction to statistical modeling of extreme values. Springer, London. 208 pp.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Atmosphäre, Mathematik IV: Statistik, Anwendungsnahes Programmieren.
102-0237-00LHydrology IIW3 credits2GP. Burlando, S. Fatichi
AbstractThe course presents advanced hydrological analyses of rainfall-runoff processes. The course is given in English.
ObjectiveTools for hydrological modelling are discussed at the event and continuous scale. The focus is on the description of physical processes and their modelisation with practical examples.
ContentMonitoring of hydrological systems (point and space monitoring, remote sensing). The use of GIS in hydrology (practical applications). General concepts of watershed modelling. Infiltration. IUH models. Event based rainfall-runoff modelling. Continuous rainfall-runoff models (components and prrocesses). Example of modelling with the PRMS model. Calibration and validation of models. Flood routing (unsteady flow, hydrologic routing, examples). The course contains an extensive semester project.
Lecture notesParts of the script for "Hydrology I" are used. Also available are the overhead transparencies used in the lectures. The semester project consists of a two part instruction manual.
LiteratureAdditional literature is presented during the course.
651-4053-05LBoundary Layer MeteorologyZ4 credits3GM. Rotach, P. Calanca
AbstractThe Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) constitutes the interface between the atmosphere and the Earth's surface. Theory on transport processes in the PBL and their dynamics is provided. This course treats theoretical background and idealized concepts. These are contrasted to real world applications and current research issues.
ObjectiveOverall goals of this course are given below. Focus is on the theoretical background and idealised concepts.
Students have basic knowledge on atmospheric turbulence and theoretical as well as practical approaches to treat Planetary Boundary Layer flows. They are familiar with the relevant processes (turbulent transport, forcing) within, and typical states of the Planetary Boundary Layer. Idealized concepts are known as well as their adaptations under real surface conditions (as for example over complex topography).
Content- Introduction
- Turbulence
- Statistical tratment of turbulence, turbulent transport
- Conservation equations in a turbulent flow
- Closure problem and closure assumptions
- Scaling and similarity theory
- Spectral characteristics
- Concepts for non-ideal boundary layer conditions
Lecture notesavailable (i.e. in English)
Literature- Stull, R.B.: 1988, "An Introduction to Boundary Layer Meteorology", (Kluwer), 666 pp.
- Panofsky, H. A. and Dutton, J.A.: 1984, "Atmospheric Turbulence, Models and Methods for Engineering Applications", (J. Wiley), 397 pp.
- Kaimal JC and Finningan JJ: 1994, Atmospheric Boundary Layer Flows, Oxford University Press, 289 pp.
- Wyngaard JC: 2010, Turbulence in the Atmosphere, Cambridge University Press, 393pp.
Prerequisites / NoticeUmwelt-Fluiddynamik (701-0479-00L) (environment fluid dynamics) or equivalent and basic knowledge in atmospheric science
  •  Page  1  of  1