Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2016

Mechanical Engineering Master Information
Core Courses
Energy, Flows and Processes
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0104-00LUncertainty Quantification for Engineering & Life Sciences Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
Number of participants limited to 60.
W4 credits3GP. Koumoutsakos
AbstractQuantification of uncertainties in computational models pertaining to applications in engineering and life sciences. Exploitation of massively available data to develop computational models with quantifiable predictive capabilities. Applications of Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation to problems in mechanics, control, systems and cell biology.
ObjectiveThe course will teach fundamental concept of Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation (UQ+P) for computational models of systems in Engineering and Life Sciences. Emphasis will be placed on practical and computational aspects of UQ+P including the implementation of relevant algorithms in multicore architectures.
ContentTopics that will be covered include: Uncertainty quantification under
parametric and non-parametric modelling uncertainty, Bayesian inference with model class assessment, Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation, prior and posterior reliability analysis.
Lecture notesThe class will be largely based on the book: Data Analysis: A Bayesian Tutorial by Devinderjit Sivia as well as on class notes and related literature that will be distributed in class.
Literature1. Data Analysis: A Bayesian Tutorial by Devinderjit Sivia
2. Probability Theory: The Logic of Science by E. T. Jaynes
3. Class Notes
Prerequisites / NoticeFundamentals of Probability, Fundamentals of Computational Modeling
151-0105-00LQuantitative Flow VisualizationW4 credits2V + 1UT. Rösgen
AbstractThe course provides an introduction to digital image analysis in modern flow diagnostics. Different techniques which are discussed include image velocimetry, laser induced fluorescence, liquid crystal thermography and interferometry. The physical foundations and measurement configurations are explained. Image analysis algorithms are presented in detail and programmed during the exercises.
ObjectiveIntroduction to modern imaging techniques and post processing algorithms with special emphasis on flow analysis and visualization.
Understanding of hardware and software requirements and solutions.
Development of basic programming skills for (generic) imaging applications.
ContentFundamentals of optics, flow visualization and electronic image acquisition.
Frequently used mage processing techniques (filtering, correlation processing, FFTs, color space transforms).
Image Velocimetry (tracking, pattern matching, Doppler imaging).
Surface pressure and temperature measurements (fluorescent paints, liquid crystal imaging, infrared thermography).
Laser induced fluorescence.
(Digital) Schlieren techniques, phase contrast imaging, interferometry, phase unwrapping.
Wall shear and heat transfer measurements.
Pattern recognition and feature extraction, proper orthogonal decomposition.
Lecture notesavailable
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Fluiddynamics I, Numerical Mathematics, programming skills.
Language: German on request.
151-0107-20LHigh Performance Computing for Science and Engineering (HPCSE) IW4 credits4GM. Troyer, P. Chatzidoukas
AbstractThis course gives an introduction into algorithms and numerical methods for parallel computing for multi and many-core architectures and for applications from problems in science and engineering.
ObjectiveIntroduction to HPC for scientists and engineers
Fundamental of:
1. Parallel Computing Architectures
2. MultiCores
3. ManyCores
ContentProgramming models and languages:
1. C++ threading (2 weeks)
2. OpenMP (4 weeks)
3. MPI (5 weeks)

Computers and methods:
1. Hardware and architectures
2. Libraries
3. Particles: N-body solvers
4. Fields: PDEs
5. Stochastics: Monte Carlo
Lecture noteshttp://www.cse-lab.ethz.ch/index.php/teaching/42-teaching/classes/615-hpcse1
Class notes, handouts
151-0109-00LTurbulent FlowsW4 credits2V + 1UP. Jenny
AbstractContents
- Laminar and turbulent flows, instability and origin of turbulence - Statistical description: averaging, turbulent energy, dissipation, closure problem - Scalings. Homogeneous isotropic turbulence, correlations, Fourier representation, energy spectrum - Free turbulence: wake, jet, mixing layer - Wall turbulence: Channel and boundary layer - Computation and modelling of turbulent flows
ObjectiveBasic physical phenomena of turbulent flows, quantitative and statistical description, basic and averaged equations, principles of turbulent flow computation and elements of turbulence modelling
Content- Properties of laminar, transitional and turbulent flows.
- Origin and control of turbulence. Instability and transition.
- Statistical description, averaging, equations for mean and fluctuating quantities, closure problem.
- Scalings, homogeneous isotropic turbulence, energy spectrum.
- Turbulent free shear flows. Jet, wake, mixing layer.
- Wall-bounded turbulent flows.
- Turbulent flow computation and modeling.
Lecture notesLecture notes are available
LiteratureS.B. Pope, Turbulent Flows, Cambridge University Press, 2000
151-0113-00LApplied Fluid DynamicsW4 credits2V + 1UJ.‑P. Kunsch
AbstractApplied Fluid Dynamics
The methods of fluid dynamics play an important role in the description of a chain of events, involving the release, spreading and dilution of dangerous fluids in the environment.
Tunnel ventilation systems and strategies are studied, which must meet severe requirements during normal operation and in emergency situations (tunnel fires etc.).
ObjectiveGenerally applicable methods in fluid dynamics and gas dynamics are illustrated and practiced using selected current examples.
ContentOften experts fall back on the methodology of fluid dynamics when involved in the construction of environmentally friendly processing and incineration facilities, as well as when choosing safe transport and storage options for dangerous materials. As a result of accidents, but also in normal operations, dangerous gases and liquids may escape and be transported further by wind or flowing water.
There are many possible forms that the resulting damage may take, including fire and explosion when flammable substances are mixed. The topics covered include: Emissions of liquids and gases from containers and pipelines, evaporation from pools and vaporization of gases kept under pressure, the spread and dilution of waste gas plumes in the wind, deflagration and detonation of inflammable gases, fireballs in gases held under pressure, pollution and exhaust gases in tunnels (tunnel fires etc.)
Lecture notesnot available
Prerequisites / NoticeRequirements: successful attendance at lectures "Fluiddynamik I und II", "Thermodynamik I und II"
151-0163-00LNuclear Energy ConversionW4 credits2V + 1UH.‑M. Prasser
AbstractPhyiscal fundamentals of the fission reaction and the sustainable chain reaction, thermal design, construction, function and operation of nuclear reactors and power plants, light water reactors and other reactor types, converion and breeding
ObjectiveStudents get an overview on energy conversion in nuclear power plants, on construction and function of the most important types of nuclear reactors with special emphasis to light water reactors. They obtain the mathematical/physical basis for quantitative assessments concerning most relevant aspects of design, dynamic behaviour as well as material and energy flows.
ContentNuclear physics of fission and chain reaction. Themodynamics of nuclear reactors. Design of the rector core. Introduction into the dynamic behaviour of nuclear reactors. Overview on types of nuclear reactors, difference between thermal reactors and fast breaders. Construction and operation of nuclear power plants with pressurized and boiling water reactors, role and function of the most important safety systems, special features of the energy conversion. Development tendencies of rector technology.
Lecture notesHand-outs will be distributed. Additional literature and information on the website of the lab: Link
LiteratureS. Glasston & A. Sesonke: Nuclear Reactor Engineering, Reactor System Engineering, Ed. 4, Vol. 2., Springer-Science+Business Media, B.V.

R. L. Murray: Nuclear Energy (Sixth Edition), An Introduction to the Concepts, Systems, and Applications of Nuclear Processes, Elsevier
151-0182-00LFundamentals of CFD MethodsW4 credits3GA. Haselbacher
AbstractThis course is focused on providing students with the knowledge and understanding required to develop simple computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes to solve the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and to critically assess the results produced by CFD codes. As part of the course, students will write their own codes and verify and validate them systematically.
Objective1. Students know and understand basic numerical methods used in CFD in terms of accuracy and stability.
2. Students have a basic understanding of a typical simple CFD code.
3. Students understand how to assess the numerical and physical accuracy of CFD results.
Content1. Governing and model equations. Brief review of equations and properties
2. Overview of basic concepts: Overview of discretization process and its consequences
3. Overview of numerical methods: Finite-difference and finite-volume methods
4. Analysis of spatially discrete equations: Consistency, accuracy, stability, convergence of semi-discrete methods
5. Time-integration methods: LMS and RK methods, consistency, accuracy, stability, convergence
6. Analysis of fully discrete equations: Consistency, accuracy, stability, convergence of fully discrete methods
7. Solution of one-dimensional advection equation: Motivation for and consequences of upwinding, Godunov's theorem, TVD methods, DRP methods
8. Solution of two-dimensional advection equation: Dimension-by-dimension methods, dimensional splitting, multidimensional methods
9. Solution of one- and two-dimensional diffusion equations: Implicit methods, ADI methods
10. Solution of one-dimensional advection-diffusion equation: Numerical vs physical viscosity, boundary layers, non-uniform grids
11. Solution of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations: Incompressibility constraint and consequences, fractional-step and pressure-correction methods
12. Solution of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured grids
Lecture notesThe course is based mostly on notes developed by the instructor.
LiteratureLiterature: There is no required textbook. Suggested references are:
1. H.K. Versteeg and W. Malalasekera, An Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics, 2nd ed., Pearson Prentice Hall, 2007
2. R.H. Pletcher, J.C. Tannehill, and D. Anderson, Computational Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer, 3rd ed., Taylor & Francis, 2011
Prerequisites / NoticePrior knowledge of fluid dynamics, applied mathematics, basic numerical methods, and programming in Fortran and/or C++ (knowledge of MATLAB is *not* sufficient).
151-0185-00LRadiation Heat Transfer Information W4 credits2V + 1UA. Steinfeld, A. Z'Graggen
AbstractAdvanced course in radiation heat transfer
ObjectiveFundamentals of radiative heat transfer and its applications. Examples are combustion and solar thermal/thermochemical processes, and other applications in the field of energy conversion and material processing.
Content1. Introduction to thermal radiation. Definitions. Spectral and directional properties. Electromagnetic spectrum. Blackbody and gray surfaces. Absorptivity, emissivity, reflectivity. Planck's Law, Wien's Displacement Law, Kirchhoff's Law.

2. Surface radiation exchange. Diffuse and specular surfaces. Gray and selective surfaces. Configuration factors. Radiation xxchange. Enclosure theory- radiosity method. Monte Carlo.

3.Absorbing, emitting and scattering media. Extinction, absorption, and scattering coefficients. Scattering phase function. Optical thickness. Equation of radiative transfer. Solution methods: discrete ordinate; zone; Monte-Carlo.

4. Applications. Cavities. Selective surfaces and media. Semi-transparent windows. Combined radiation-conduction-convection heat transfer.
Lecture notesCopy of the slides presented.
LiteratureR. Siegel, J.R. Howell, Thermal Radiation Heat Transfer, 3rd. ed., Taylor & Francis, New York, 2002.

M. Modest, Radiative Heat Transfer, Academic Press, San Diego, 2003.
151-0203-00LTurbomachinery Design Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 20.
W4 credits2V + 1UR. S. Abhari, N. Chokani, B. Ribi
AbstractIntroduction to the understanding of a broad range of turbomachinery devices.
Learn the steps of turbomachinery design.
ObjectiveUnderstand the principles, and learn the design procedures and the behaviour of turbomachines.
ContentDiese Vorlesung beschreibt die Grundlagen des Designs von Turbomaschinen (Turbinen und Verdichtern). Dazu werden zunächst die theoretischen Grundlagen vertieft erarbeitet. Ausgehend von den thermodynamischen Grundlagen werden Verlustkorrelationen und -Mechanismen behandelt. Diese Grundlagen führen zu einem Verständnis des 3D Design der Turbomaschinen.
Im zweiten Teil der Vorlesung wird das Verhalten der Turbomaschinen bei veränderten Betriebsbedingungen dargestellt. Ebenfalls behandelt werden mechanische Fragestellungen des Turbomaschinenbaus wie z.B. Vibrationen, Lagerbelastungen und auftretende Spannungen in den Bauteilen.
Lecture notesLecture notes
151-0207-00LTheory and Modeling of Reactive FlowsW4 credits3GC. E. Frouzakis, I. Mantzaras
AbstractThe course first reviews the governing equations and combustion chemistry, setting the ground for the analysis of homogeneous gas-phase mixtures, laminar diffusion and premixed flames. Catalytic combustion and its coupling with homogeneous combustion are dealt in detail, and turbulent combustion modeling approaches are presented. Available numerical codes will be used for modeling.
ObjectiveTheory of combustion with numerical applications
ContentThe analysis of realistic reactive flow systems necessitates the use of detailed computer models that can be constructed starting from first principles i.e. thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, chemical kinetics, and heat
and mass transport. In this course, the focus will be on combustion theory and modeling. The reacting flow governing equations and the combustion chemistry are firstly reviewed, setting the ground for the analysis of
homogeneous gas-phase mixtures, laminar diffusion and premixed flames. Heterogeneous (catalytic) combustion, an area of increased importance in the last years, will be dealt in detail along with its coupling with homogeneous
combustion. Finally, approaches for the modeling of turbulent combustion will be presented. Available numerical codes will be used to compute the above described phenomena. Familiarity with numerical methods for the solution of partial differential equations is expected.
Lecture notesHandouts
Prerequisites / NoticeNEW course
151-0213-00LFluid Dynamics with the Lattice Boltzmann MethodW4 credits3GI. Karlin
AbstractThe course provides an introduction to theoretical foundations and practical usage of the Lattice Boltzmann Method for fluid dynamics simulations.
ObjectiveMethods like molecular dynamics, DSMC, lattice Boltzmann etc are being increasingly used by engineers all over and these methods require knowledge of kinetic theory and statistical mechanics which are traditionally not taught at engineering departments. The goal of this course is to give an introduction to ideas of kinetic theory and non-equilibrium thermodynamics with a focus on developing simulation algorithms and their realizations.

During the course, students will be able to develop a lattice Boltzmann code on their own. Practical issues about implementation and performance on parallel machines will be demonstrated hands on.

Central element of the course is the completion of a lattice Boltzmann code (using the framework specifically designed for this course).

The course will also include a review of topics of current interest in various fields of fluid dynamics, such as multiphase flows, reactive flows, microflows among others.

Optionally, we offer an opportunity to complete a project of student's choice as an alternative to the oral exam. Samples of projects completed by previous students will be made available.
ContentThe course builds upon three parts:
I Elementary kinetic theory and lattice Boltzmann simulations introduced on simple examples.
II Theoretical basis of statistical mechanics and kinetic equations.
III Lattice Boltzmann method for real-world applications.

The content of the course includes:

1. Background: Elements of statistical mechanics and kinetic theory:
Particle's distribution function, Liouville equation, entropy, ensembles; Kinetic theory: Boltzmann equation for rarefied gas, H-theorem, hydrodynamic limit and derivation of Navier-Stokes equations, Chapman-Enskog method, Grad method, boundary conditions; mean-field interactions, Vlasov equation;
Kinetic models: BGK model, generalized BGK model for mixtures, chemical reactions and other fluids.

2. Basics of the Lattice Boltzmann Method and Simulations:
Minimal kinetic models: lattice Boltzmann method for single-component fluid, discretization of velocity space, time-space discretization, boundary conditions, forcing, thermal models, mixtures.

3. Hands on:
Development of the basic lattice Boltzmann code and its validation on standard benchmarks (Taylor-Green vortex, lid-driven cavity flow etc).

4. Practical issues of LBM for fluid dynamics simulations:
Lattice Boltzmann simulations of turbulent flows;
numerical stability and accuracy.

5. Microflow:
Rarefaction effects in moderately dilute gases; Boundary conditions, exact solutions to Couette and Poiseuille flows; micro-channel simulations.

6. Advanced lattice Boltzmann methods:
Entropic lattice Boltzmann scheme, subgrid simulations at high Reynolds numbers; Boundary conditions for complex geometries.

7. Introduction to LB models beyond hydrodynamics:
Relativistic fluid dynamics; flows with phase transitions.
Lecture notesLecture notes on the theoretical parts of the course will be made available.
Selected original and review papers are provided for some of the lectures on advanced topics.
Handouts and basic code framework for implementation of the lattice Boltzmann models will be provided.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course addresses mainly graduate students (MSc/Ph D) but BSc students can also attend.
151-0216-00LWind EnergyW4 credits2V + 1UN. Chokani
AbstractThe objective of this course is to introduce the students to the fundamentals, technologies, modern day application, and economics of wind energy. These subjects are introduced through a discussion of the basic principles of wind energy generation and conversion, and a detailed description of the broad range of relevant technical, economic and environmental topics.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to introduce the students to the fundamentals, technologies, modern day application, and economics of wind energy.
ContentThis mechanical engineering course focuses on the technical aspects of wind turbines; non-technical issues are not within the scope of this technically oriented course. On completion of this course, the student shall be able to conduct the preliminary aerodynamic and structural design of the wind turbine blades. The student shall also be more aware of the broad context of drivetrains, dynamics and control, electrical systems, and meteorology, relevant to all types of wind turbines.
151-0235-00LThermodynamics of Novel Energy Conversion TechnologiesW4 credits3GC. S. Sharma, D. Poulikakos, G. Sansavini
AbstractIn the framework of this course we will look at a current electronic thermal and energy management strategies and novel energy conversion processes. The course will focus on component level fundamentals of these process and system level analysis of interactions among various energy conversion components.
ObjectiveThis course deals with liquid cooling based thermal management of electronics, reuse of waste heat and novel energy conversion and storage systems such as batteries, fuel cells and micro-fuel cells. The focus of the course is on the physics and basic understanding of those systems as well as their real-world applications. The course will also look at analysis of system level interactions between a range of energy conversion components.
ContentPart 1: Fundamentals:
- Overview of exergy analysis, Single phase liquid cooling and micro-mixing;
- Thermodynamics of multi-component-systems (mixtures) and phase equilibrium;
- Electrochemistry;

Part 2: Applications:
- Basic principles of battery;
- Introduction to fuel cells;
- Reuse of waste heat from supercomputers
- Hotspot targeted cooling of microprocessors
- Microfluidic fuel cells

Part3: System- level analysis
- Integration of the components into the system: a case study
- Analysis of the coupled operations, identification of critical states
- Support to system-oriented design
Lecture notesLecture slides will be made available. Lecture notes will be available for some topics (in English).
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course will be given in English:

1- Mid-term examination: Mid-term exam grade counts as 20% of the final grade.
2- Final exam: Written exam during the regular examination session. It counts as 80% of the final grade.
151-0243-00LNew Enterprises for Engineers Information
Does not take place this semester.
W4 credits3GR. S. Abhari
AbstractTransforming Needs to opportunities for new technology enterprises.
- Links between entrepreneurship and product development/engineering.
- Sales, marketing, financing, and growth. Detailed Plans and execution.
- Survival through cash flow management.
- Human issues in new enterprise
- Alignment of interests.
- Transition of enterprises along growth path
- http://www.NEFE.ethz.ch
ObjectiveTransforming Needs to Business Enterprises

Goals of the course:
- Propose the role of Needs-Driven Opportunities for new technology enterprises
- Explore links between entrepreneurship and engineering; such as problem solving, planning, system analysis, can-do attitude!
- Making it happen- through sales, marketing, planning, staffing, implementation, financing, and growth. Detailed Plans and execution
- Survival (and success) through cash flow management
- Explore the human issues in any new enterprise
- Alignment of interests between providers of value (founders and staff, VC’s) and the providers of capital (Angels, VC’s, Corporation)
- Transformations of enterprises along growth path
ContentApproach:
Weekly lectures including discussions of international case studies
Exercises to develop and present modules of new plans
Extensive class interactions capped with presentation by each (group) student of new enterprise plan

Please see http://www.NEFE.ethz.ch
Lecture notesCourse material will be communicated to the students prior to the start of each class for download.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course is primarily for engineering and natural science students at all levels who are interested in participating in the initiation or growth of a new enterprise. The new enterprise could be stand -alone start up or a new business unit for an existing enterprise.

The class is practical in nature but emphasizes the basic understanding of the parameters that significantly contribute to the success of a new enterprise. It will be highly interactive with special selected guests from Selected guests from; companies founder, venture capital and business angel, and large corporation executive. Class attendance and active participation is required.
151-0251-00LIC-Engines and Propulsion Systems I Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 60.
W4 credits2V + 1UK. Boulouchos, G. Georges, P. Kyrtatos
AbstractIntroduction to basic concepts, operating maps and work processes of internal combustion engines. Thermodynamic analysis and design, scavenging methods, heat transfer mechanisms, turbulent flow field in combustion chambers, turbocharging. Energy systemic role of IC engines: conventional and electrified vehicle propulsion systems and decentralized power generation.
ObjectiveThe students learn the basic concepts of an internal combustion engine by means of the topics mentioned in the abstract. This knowledge is applied in several calculation exercises and two lab exercises at the engine test bench. The students get an insight in alternative power train systems.
Lecture notesin English
LiteratureJ. Heywood, Internal Combustion Engine Fundamentals, McGraw-Hill
151-0368-00LAeroelasticityW4 credits2V + 1UF. Campanile
AbstractIntroduction to the basics and methods of Aeroelasticity. An overview of the main static and dynamic phenomena arising from the interaction between structural and aerodynamic loads.
ObjectiveThe course will give you a physical basic overview of current-structure phenomena. Furtermore you will get to know the most important phenomena in the statistical and dynamical aeroelastic as well as an introduction to the methods for mathematical descriptions and for the wording of quantitative forecasts.
ContentElemente der Profilaerodynamik. Aeroelastische Divergenz am starren Streifenmodell. Aeroelastische Divergenz eines kontinuierlichen Flügels. Allgemeines über statische Aeroelastik.
Ruderwirksamkeit und -umkehr. Auswirkung der Flügelpfeilung auf statische aeroelastische Phänomene.
Grundelemente der instationären Aerodynamik.
Kinematik des Biegetorsionsflatterns. Dynamik des starren Flügelstreifenmodells. Dynamik des Biegetorsionsflatterns.
Einführung in die Modalanalyse
Einfühung in weitere Phänomene der dynamischen Aeroelastik.
LiteratureY. C. Fung, An Introduction to the Theory of Aeroelasticity, Dover Phoenix Editions.
151-0709-00LStochastic Methods for Engineers and Natural ScientistsW4 credits3GD. W. Meyer-Massetti, N. Noiray
AbstractThe course provides an introduction into stochastic methods that are applicable for example for the description and modeling of turbulent and subsurface flows. Moreover, mathematical techniques are presented that are used to quantify uncertainty in various engineering applications.
ObjectiveBy the end of the course you should be able to mathematically describe random quantities and their effect on physical systems. Moreover, you should be able to develop basic stochastic models of such systems.
Content- Probability theory, single and multiple random variables, mappings of random variables
- Stochastic differential equations, Ito calculus, PDF evolution equations
- Polynomial chaos and other expansion methods
All topics are illustrated with application examples from engineering.
Lecture notesDetailed lecture notes will be provided.
LiteratureSome textbooks related to the material covered in the course:
Stochastic Methods: A Handbook for the Natural and Social Sciences, Crispin Gardiner, Springer, 2010
The Fokker-Planck Equation: Methods of Solutions and Applications, Hannes Risken, Springer, 1996
Turbulent Flows, S.B. Pope, Cambridge University Press, 2000
Spectral Methods for Uncertainty Quantification, O.P. Le Maitre and O.M. Knio, Springer, 2010
151-0851-00LRobot Dynamics Information Restricted registration - show details W4 credits2V + 1UM. Hutter, R. Siegwart, T. Stastny
AbstractWe will provide an overview on how to kinematically and dynamically model typical robotic systems such as robot arms, legged robots, rotary wing systems, or fixed wing.
ObjectiveThe primary objective of this course is that the student deepens an applied understanding of how to model the most common robotic systems. The student receives a solid background in kinematics, dynamics, and rotations of multi-body systems. On the basis of state of the art applications, he/she will learn all necessary tools to work in the field of design or control of robotic systems.
ContentThe course consists of three parts: First, we will refresh and deepen the student's knowledge in kinematics, dynamics, and rotations of multi-body systems. In this context, the learning material will build upon the courses for mechanics and dynamics available at ETH, with the particular focus on their application to robotic systems. The goal is to foster the conceptual understanding of similarities and differences among the various types of robots. In the second part, we will apply the learned material to classical robotic arms as well as legged systems and discuss kinematic constraints and interaction forces. In the third part, focus is put on modeling fixed wing aircraft, along with related design and control concepts. In this context, we also touch aerodynamics and flight mechanics to an extent typically required in robotics. The last part finally covers different helicopter types, with a focus on quadrotors and the coaxial configuration which we see today in many UAV applications. Case studies on all main topics provide the link to real applications and to the state of the art in robotics.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe contents of the following ETH Bachelor lectures or equivalent are assumed to be known: Mechanics and Dynamics, Control, Basics in Fluid Dynamics.
151-0911-00LIntroduction to PlasmonicsW4 credits2V + 1UD. J. Norris
AbstractThis course provides fundamental knowledge of surface plasmon polaritons and discusses their applications in plasmonics.
ObjectiveElectromagnetic oscillations known as surface plasmon polaritons have many unique properties that are useful across a broad set of applications in biology, chemistry, physics, and optics. The field of plasmonics has arisen to understand the behavior of surface plasmon polaritons and to develop applications in areas such as catalysis, imaging, photovoltaics, and sensing. In particular, metallic nanoparticles and patterned metallic interfaces have been developed to utilize plasmonic resonances. The aim of this course is to provide the basic knowledge to understand and apply the principles of plasmonics. The course will strive to be approachable to students from a diverse set of science and engineering backgrounds.
ContentFundamentals of Plasmonics
- Basic electromagnetic theory
- Optical properties of metals
- Surface plasmon polaritons on surfaces
- Surface plasmon polariton propagation
- Localized surface plasmons

Applications of Plasmonics
- Waveguides
- Extraordinary optical transmission
- Enhanced spectroscopy
- Sensing
- Metamaterials
Lecture notesClass notes and handouts
LiteratureS. A. Maier, Plasmonics: Fundamentals and Applications, 2007, Springer
Prerequisites / NoticePhysics I, Physics II
151-0917-00LMass TransferW4 credits2V + 2UR. Büchel, S. E. Pratsinis
AbstractThis course presents the fundamentals of transport phenomena with emphasis on mass transfer. The physical significance of basic principles is elucidated and quantitatively described. Furthermore the application of these principles to important engineering problems is demonstrated.
ObjectiveThis course presents the fundamentals of transport phenomena with emphasis on mass transfer. The physical significance of basic principles is elucidated and quantitatively described. Furthermore the application of these principles to important engineering problems is demonstrated.
ContentFick's laws; application and significance of mass transfer; comparison of Fick's laws with Newton's and Fourier's laws; derivation of Fick's 2nd law; diffusion in dilute and concentrated solutions; rotating disk; dispersion; diffusion coefficients, viscosity and heat conduction (Pr and Sc numbers); Brownian motion; Stokes-Einstein equation; mass transfer coefficients (Nu and Sh numbers); mass transfer across interfaces; Reynolds- and Chilton-Colburn analogies for mass-, heat-, and momentum transfer in turbulent flows; film-, penetration-, and surface renewal theories; simultaneous mass, heat and momentum transfer (boundary layers); homogenous and heterogenous reversible and irreversible reactions; diffusion-controlled reactions; mass transfer and first order heterogenous reaction. Applications.
LiteratureCussler, E.L.: "Diffusion", 2nd edition, Cambridge University Press, 1997.
Prerequisites / NoticeTwo tests are offered for practicing the course material. Participation is mandatory.
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