Autumn Semester 2020 takes place in a mixed form of online and classroom teaching.
Please read the published information on the individual courses carefully.

Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2016

Mechanical Engineering Master Information
Core Courses
Bioengineering
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0104-00LUncertainty Quantification for Engineering & Life Sciences Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
Number of participants limited to 60.
W4 credits3GP. Koumoutsakos
AbstractQuantification of uncertainties in computational models pertaining to applications in engineering and life sciences. Exploitation of massively available data to develop computational models with quantifiable predictive capabilities. Applications of Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation to problems in mechanics, control, systems and cell biology.
ObjectiveThe course will teach fundamental concept of Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation (UQ+P) for computational models of systems in Engineering and Life Sciences. Emphasis will be placed on practical and computational aspects of UQ+P including the implementation of relevant algorithms in multicore architectures.
ContentTopics that will be covered include: Uncertainty quantification under
parametric and non-parametric modelling uncertainty, Bayesian inference with model class assessment, Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation, prior and posterior reliability analysis.
Lecture notesThe class will be largely based on the book: Data Analysis: A Bayesian Tutorial by Devinderjit Sivia as well as on class notes and related literature that will be distributed in class.
Literature1. Data Analysis: A Bayesian Tutorial by Devinderjit Sivia
2. Probability Theory: The Logic of Science by E. T. Jaynes
3. Class Notes
Prerequisites / NoticeFundamentals of Probability, Fundamentals of Computational Modeling
151-0107-20LHigh Performance Computing for Science and Engineering (HPCSE) IW4 credits4GM. Troyer, P. Chatzidoukas
AbstractThis course gives an introduction into algorithms and numerical methods for parallel computing for multi and many-core architectures and for applications from problems in science and engineering.
ObjectiveIntroduction to HPC for scientists and engineers
Fundamental of:
1. Parallel Computing Architectures
2. MultiCores
3. ManyCores
ContentProgramming models and languages:
1. C++ threading (2 weeks)
2. OpenMP (4 weeks)
3. MPI (5 weeks)

Computers and methods:
1. Hardware and architectures
2. Libraries
3. Particles: N-body solvers
4. Fields: PDEs
5. Stochastics: Monte Carlo
Lecture noteshttp://www.cse-lab.ethz.ch/index.php/teaching/42-teaching/classes/615-hpcse1
Class notes, handouts
151-0255-00LEnergy Conversion and Transport in BiosystemsW4 credits2V + 1UD. Poulikakos, A. Ferrari
AbstractTheory and application of thermodynamics and energy conversion in biological systems with focus on the cellular level.
ObjectiveTheory and application of energy conversion at the cellular level. Understanding of the basic features governing solutes transport in the principal systems of the human cell. Connection of characteristics and patterns from other fields of engineering to biofluidics. Heat and mass transport processes in the cell, generation of forces, work and relation to biomedical technologies.
ContentMass transfer models for the transport of chemical species in the human cell. Organization and function of the cell membrane and of the cell cytoskeleton. The role of molecular motors in cellular force generation and their function in cell migration. Description of the functionality of these systems and of analytical experimental and computational techniques for understanding of their operation. Introduction to cell metabolism, cellular energy transport and cellular thermodynamics.
Lecture notesMaterial in the form of hand-outs will be distributed.
LiteratureLecture notes and references therein.
151-0317-00LVisualization, Simulation and Interaction - Virtual Reality IIW4 credits3GA. Kunz
AbstractThis lecture provides deeper knowledge on the possible applications of virtual reality, its basic technolgy, and future research fields. The goal is to provide a strong knowledge on Virtual Reality for a possible future use in business processes.
ObjectiveVirtual Reality can not only be used for the visualization of 3D objects, but also offers a wide application field for small and medium enterprises (SME). This could be for instance an enabling technolgy for net-based collaboration, the transmission of images and other data, the interaction of the human user with the digital environment, or the use of augmented reality systems.
The goal of the lecture is to provide a deeper knowledge of today's VR environments that are used in business processes. The technical background, the algorithms, and the applied methods are explained more in detail. Finally, future tasks of VR will be discussed and an outlook on ongoing international research is given.
ContentIntroduction into Virtual Reality; basisc of augmented reality; interaction with digital data, tangible user interfaces (TUI); basics of simulation; compression procedures of image-, audio-, and video signals; new materials for force feedback devices; intorduction into data security; cryptography; definition of free-form surfaces; digital factory; new research fields of virtual reality
Lecture notesThe handout is available in German and English.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
"Visualization, Simulation and Interaction - Virtual Reality I" is recommended.

Didactical concept:
The course consists of lectures and exercises.
151-0917-00LMass TransferW4 credits2V + 2UR. Büchel, S. E. Pratsinis
AbstractThis course presents the fundamentals of transport phenomena with emphasis on mass transfer. The physical significance of basic principles is elucidated and quantitatively described. Furthermore the application of these principles to important engineering problems is demonstrated.
ObjectiveThis course presents the fundamentals of transport phenomena with emphasis on mass transfer. The physical significance of basic principles is elucidated and quantitatively described. Furthermore the application of these principles to important engineering problems is demonstrated.
ContentFick's laws; application and significance of mass transfer; comparison of Fick's laws with Newton's and Fourier's laws; derivation of Fick's 2nd law; diffusion in dilute and concentrated solutions; rotating disk; dispersion; diffusion coefficients, viscosity and heat conduction (Pr and Sc numbers); Brownian motion; Stokes-Einstein equation; mass transfer coefficients (Nu and Sh numbers); mass transfer across interfaces; Reynolds- and Chilton-Colburn analogies for mass-, heat-, and momentum transfer in turbulent flows; film-, penetration-, and surface renewal theories; simultaneous mass, heat and momentum transfer (boundary layers); homogenous and heterogenous reversible and irreversible reactions; diffusion-controlled reactions; mass transfer and first order heterogenous reaction. Applications.
LiteratureCussler, E.L.: "Diffusion", 2nd edition, Cambridge University Press, 1997.
Prerequisites / NoticeTwo tests are offered for practicing the course material. Participation is mandatory.
151-3205-00LExperimental Ergonomics Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 15.
W4 credits2V + 2AJ. Held
AbstractYou will learn how to apply the scientific discipline of ergonomics for system analysis and product development "in order to optimise human well-being and overall system performance" (www.iea.cc). The course offers the framework of models, concepts, methods and tools of applied ergonomics. Teaching is combined with learning-by-doing and research-based learning.
ObjectiveKnowledge of:
- Principles and rules of applied ergonomic system and product design.
- Methods and tools of ergonomic analysis and evaluation.
Practical experiences and hands-on skills in:
- Conducting a study in system and task analysis.
- Analysing human-product interactions.
- Applying ergonomic knowledge for product and system improvements.
Content- Definition and role of applied ergonomics in engineering and design.
- Framework of ergonomic analysis and design.
- Design principles and rules.
- Methods and tools for system and task analysis.
Hands-on experience in team work:
- Experimental study of human-product interaction and usability through eye-tracking
- Field study of system and task analysis, including on-site visits of complex work stations (Hospital OR/ICU or Air traffic/Railway Control Rooms).
Lecture notesHandout at the start of the course.
LiteratureAhlstrom, V. and Longo, V. (2003). Human Factors Design Standard (HFDS). http://hf.tc.faa.gov/hfds/default.htm
Wiklund M.E., Wilcox, S.B. (2005). Designing Usability into Medical Products. Taylor & Francis.
Rubin, J. and Chisnell, D. (2008). Handbook of Usability Testing: How to Plan, Design and Conduct Effective Tests. Wiley.
Hölscher, U., Laurig, W. & Müller-Arnecke, H.W. (2008). Prinziplösungen zur ergonomischen Gestaltung von Medizingeräten. BAUA Forschung Projekt F1902.
http://www.baua.de/de/Publikationen/Fachbeitraege/F1902.pdf
Niku, S.B. (2009). Creative Design of Products and Systems (Chapter 8). Wiley.
Prerequisites / NoticeMax. number of participants is 15.
Experiments and field studies in teams of 2-3 students are obligatory.
227-0385-10LBiomedical ImagingW6 credits5GS. Kozerke, K. P. Prüssmann, M. Rudin
AbstractIntroduction and analysis of medical imaging technology including X-ray procedures, computed tomography, nuclear imaging techniques using single photon and positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound imaging techniques.
ObjectiveTo understand the physical and technical principles underlying X-ray imaging, computed tomography, single photon and positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound and Doppler imaging techniques. The mathematical framework is developed to describe image encoding/decoding, point-spread function/modular transfer function, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast behavior for each of the methods. Matlab exercises are used to implement and study basic concepts.
Content- X-ray imaging
- Computed tomography
- Single photon emission tomography
- Positron emission tomography
- Magnetic resonance imaging
- Ultrasound/Doppler imaging
Lecture notesLecture notes and handouts
LiteratureWebb A, Smith N.B. Introduction to Medical Imaging: Physics, Engineering and Clinical Applications; Cambridge University Press 2011
Prerequisites / NoticeAnalysis, Linear Algebra, Physics, Basics of Signal Theory, Basic skills in Matlab programming
227-0386-00LBiomedical Engineering Information W4 credits3GJ. Vörös, S. J. Ferguson, S. Kozerke, U. Moser, M. Rudin, M. P. Wolf, M. Zenobi-Wong
AbstractIntroduction into selected topics of biomedical engineering as well as their relationship with physics and physiology. The focus is on learning the concepts that govern common medical instruments and the most important organs from an engineering point of view. In addition, the most recent achievements and trends of the field of biomedical engineering are also outlined.
ObjectiveIntroduction into selected topics of biomedical engineering as well as their relationship with physics and physiology. The course provides an overview of the various topics of the different tracks of the biomedical engineering master course and helps orienting the students in selecting their specialized classes and project locations.
ContentIntroduction into neuro- and electrophysiology. Functional analysis of peripheral nerves, muscles, sensory organs and the central nervous system. Electrograms, evoked potentials. Audiometry, optometry. Functional electrostimulation: Cardiac pacemakers. Function of the heart and the circulatory system, transport and exchange of substances in the human body, pharmacokinetics. Endoscopy, medical television technology. Lithotripsy. Electrical Safety. Orthopaedic biomechanics. Lung function. Bioinformatics and Bioelectronics. Biomaterials. Biosensors. Microcirculation.Metabolism.
Practical and theoretical exercises in small groups in the laboratory.
Lecture notesIntroduction to Biomedical Engineering
by Enderle, Banchard, and Bronzino

AND

https://www1.ethz.ch/lbb/Education/BME
227-0393-10LBioelectronics and Biosensors
New course. Not to be confounded with 227-0393-00L last offered in the Spring Semester 2015.
W6 credits2V + 2UJ. Vörös, M. F. Yanik, T. Zambelli
AbstractThe course introduces the concepts of bioelectricity and biosensing. The sources and use of electrical fields and currents in the context of biological systems and problems are discussed. The fundamental challenges of measuring biological signals are introduced. The most important biosensing techniques and their physical concepts are introduced in a quantitative fashion.
ObjectiveDuring this course the students will:
- learn the basic concepts in biosensing and bioelectronics
- be able to solve typical problems in biosensing and bioelectronics
- learn about the remaining challenges in this field
ContentL1. Bioelectronics history, its applications and overview of the field
- Volta and Galvani dispute
- BMI, pacemaker, cochlear implant, retinal implant, limb replacement devices
- Fundamentals of biosensing
- Glucometer and ELISA

L2. Fundamentals of quantum and classical noise in measuring biological signals

L3. Biomeasurement techniques with photons

L4. Acoustics sensors
- Differential equation for quartz crystal resonance
- Acoustic sensors and their applications

L5. Engineering principles of optical probes for measuring and manipulating molecular and cellular processes

L6. Optical biosensors
- Differential equation for optical waveguides
- Optical sensors and their applications
- Plasmonic sensing

L7. Basic notions of molecular adsorption and electron transfer
- Quantum mechanics: Schrödinger equation energy levels from H atom to crystals, energy bands
- Electron transfer: Marcus theory, Gerischer theory

L8. Potentiometric sensors
- Fundamentals of the electrochemical cell at equilibrium (Nernst equation)
- Principles of operation of ion-selective electrodes

L9. Amperometric sensors and bioelectric potentials
- Fundamentals of the electrochemical cell with an applied overpotential to generate a faraday current
- Principles of operation of amperometric sensors
- Ion flow through a membrane (Fick equation, Nernst equation, Donnan equilibrium, Goldman equation)

L10. Channels, amplification, signal gating, and patch clamp Y4

L11. Action potentials and impulse propagation

L12. Functional electric stimulation and recording
- MEA and CMOS based recording
- Applying potential in liquid - simulation of fields and relevance to electric stimulation

L13. Neural networks memory and learning
LiteraturePlonsey and Barr, Bioelectricity: A Quantitative Approach (Third edition)
Prerequisites / NoticeSupervised exercises solving real-world problems. Some Matlab based exercises in groups.
227-0447-00LImage Analysis and Computer Vision Information W6 credits3V + 1UL. Van Gool, O. Göksel, E. Konukoglu
AbstractLight and perception. Digital image formation. Image enhancement and feature extraction. Unitary transformations. Color and texture. Image segmentation and deformable shape matching. Motion extraction and tracking. 3D data extraction. Invariant features. Specific object recognition and object class recognition.
ObjectiveOverview of the most important concepts of image formation, perception and analysis, and Computer Vision. Gaining own experience through practical computer and programming exercises.
ContentThe first part of the course starts off from an overview of existing and emerging applications that need computer vision. It shows that the realm of image processing is no longer restricted to the factory floor, but is entering several fields of our daily life. First it is investigated how the parameters of the electromagnetic waves are related to our perception. Also the interaction of light with matter is considered. The most important hardware components of technical vision systems, such as cameras, optical devices and illumination sources are discussed. The course then turns to the steps that are necessary to arrive at the discrete images that serve as input to algorithms. The next part describes necessary preprocessing steps of image analysis, that enhance image quality and/or detect specific features. Linear and non-linear filters are introduced for that purpose. The course will continue by analyzing procedures allowing to extract additional types of basic information from multiple images, with motion and depth as two important examples. The estimation of image velocities (optical flow) will get due attention and methods for object tracking will be presented. Several techniques are discussed to extract three-dimensional information about objects and scenes. Finally, approaches for the recognition of specific objects as well as object classes will be discussed and analyzed.
Lecture notesCourse material Script, computer demonstrations, exercises and problem solutions
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
Basic concepts of mathematical analysis and linear algebra. The computer exercises are based on Linux and C.
The course language is English.
227-0455-00LTerahertz: Technology & ApplicationsW3 credits2VK. Sankaran
AbstractThis course will provide a solid foundation for understanding physical principles of THz applications. We will discuss various building blocks of THz technology - components dealing with generation, manipulation, and detection of THz electromagnetic radiation. We will introduce THz applications in the domain of imaging, communications, and energy harvesting.
ObjectiveThis is an introductory course on Terahertz (THz) technology and applications. Devices operating in THz frequency range (0.1 to 10 THz) have been increasingly studied in the recent years. Progress in nonlinear optical materials, ultrafast optical and electronic techniques has strengthened research in THz application developments. Due to unique interaction of THz waves with materials, applications with new capabilities can be developed. In theory, they can penetrate somewhat like X-rays, but are not considered harmful radiation, because THz energy level is low. They should be able to provide resolution as good or better than magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), possibly with simpler equipment. Imaging, very-high bandwidth communication, and energy harvesting are the most widely explored THz application areas. We will study the basics of THz generation, manipulation, and detection. Our emphasis will be on the physical principles and applications of THz in the domain of imaging, communication and energy harvesting.
ContentINTRODUCTION
Chapter 1: Introduction to THz Physics
Chapter 2: Components of THz Technology

THz TECHNOLOGY MODULES
Chapter 3: THz Generation
Chapter 4: THz Detection
Chapter 5: THz Manipulation

APPLICATIONS
Chapter 6: THz Imaging
Chapter 7: THz Communication
Chapter 8: THz Energy Harvesting
Literature- Yun-Shik Lee, Principles of Terahertz Science and Technology, Springer 2009
- Ali Rostami, Hassan Rasooli, and Hamed Baghban, Terahertz Technology: Fundamentals and Applications, Springer 2010

Whenever we deviate from the main material discussed in these books, softcopy of lectures notes will be provided.
Prerequisites / NoticeGood foundation in electromagnetics & knowledge of microwave or optical communication is helpful.
227-0945-00LCell and Molecular Biology for Engineers I
This course is part I of a two-semester course.
W3 credits3GC. Frei
AbstractThe course gives an introduction into cellular and molecular biology, specifically for students with a background in engineering. The focus will be on the basic organization of eukaryotic cells, molecular mechanisms and cellular functions. Textbook knowledge will be combined with results from recent research and technological innovations in biology.
ObjectiveAfter completing this course, engineering students will be able to apply their previous training in the quantitative and physical sciences to modern biology. Students will also learn the principles how biological models are established, and how these models can be tested.
ContentLectures will include the following topics: DNA, chromosomes, RNA, protein, genetics, gene expression, membrane structure and function, vesicular traffic, cellular communication, energy conversion, cytoskeleton, cell cycle, cellular growth, apoptosis, autophagy, cancer, development and stem cells.

In addition, three journal clubs will be held, where one/two publictions will be discussed (part I: 1 Journal club, part II: 2 Journal Clubs). For each journal club, students (alone or in groups of up to three students) have to write a summary and discussion of the publication. These written documents will be graded and count as 25% for the final grade.
Lecture notesScripts of all lectures will be available.
Literature"Molecular Biology of the Cell" (6th edition) by Alberts, Johnson, Lewis, Raff, Roberts, and Walter.
227-0965-00LMicro and Nano-Tomography of Biological TissuesW4 credits3GM. Stampanoni, P. A. Kaestner
AbstractThe lecture introduces the physical and technical know-how of X-ray tomographic microscopy. Several X-ray imaging techniques (absorption-, phase- and darkfield contrast) will be discussed and their use in daily research, in particular biology, is presented. The course discusses the aspects of quantitative evaluation of tomographic data sets like segmentation, morphometry and statistics.
ObjectiveIntroduction to the basic concepts of X-ray tomographic imaging, image analysis and data quantification at the micro and nano scale with particular emphasis on biological applications
ContentSynchrotron-based X-ray micro- and nano-tomography is today a powerful technique for non-destructive, high-resolution investigations of a broad range of materials. The high-brilliance and high-coherence of third generation synchrotron radiation facilities allow quantitative, three-dimensional imaging at the micro and nanometer scale and extend the traditional absorption imaging technique to edge-enhanced and phase-sensitive measurements, which are particularly suited for investigating biological samples.

The lecture includes a general introduction to the principles of tomographic imaging from image formation to image reconstruction. It provides the physical and engineering basics to understand how imaging beamlines at synchrotron facilities work, looks into the recently developed phase contrast methods, and explores the first applications of X-ray nano-tomographic experiments.

The course finally provides the necessary background to understand the quantitative evaluation of tomographic data, from basic image analysis to complex morphometrical computations and 3D visualization, keeping the focus on biomedical applications.
Lecture notesAvailable online
LiteratureWill be indicated during the lecture.
227-0981-00LCross-Disciplinary Research and Development in Medicine and Engineering Restricted registration - show details
A maximum of 12 medical degree students and 12 (biomedical) engineering degree students can be admitted, their number should be equal.
W4 credits2V + 2AV. Kurtcuoglu, D. de Julien de Zelicourt, M. Meboldt, M. Schmid Daners, O. Ullrich
AbstractCross-disciplinary collaboration between engineers and medical doctors is indispensable for innovation in health care. This course will bring together engineering students from ETH Zurich and medical students from the University of Zurich to experience the rewards and challenges of such interdisciplinary work in a project based learning environment.
ObjectiveThe main goal of this course is to demonstrate the differences in communication between the fields of medicine and engineering. Since such differences become the most evident during actual collaborative work, the course is based on a current project in physiology research that combines medicine and engineering. For the engineering students, the specific aims of the course are to:

- Acquire a working understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the investigated system;
- Identify the engineering challenges in the project and communicate them to the medical students;
- Develop and implement, together with the medical students, solution strategies for the identified challenges;
- Present the found solutions to a cross-disciplinary audience.
ContentAfter a general introduction to interdisciplinary communication and detailed background on the collaborative project, the engineering students will receive tailored lectures on the anatomy and physiology of the relevant system. They will then team up with medical students who have received a basic introduction to engineering methodology to collaborate on said project. In the process, they will be coached both by lecturers from ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich, receiving lectures customized to the project. The course will end with each team presenting their solution to a cross-disciplinary audience.
Lecture notesHandouts and relevant literature will be provided.
376-1177-00LHuman Factors IW2 credits2VM. Menozzi Jäckli, R. Huang, M. Siegrist
AbstractEvery day humans interact with various systems. Strategies of interaction, individual needs, physical & mental abilities, and system properties are important factors in controlling the quality and performance in interaction processes. In the lecture, factors are investigated by basic scientific approaches. Discussed topics are important for optimizing people's satisfaction & overall performance.
ObjectiveThe goal of the lecture is to empower students in better understanding the applied theories, principles, and methods in various applications. Students are expected to learn about how to enable an efficient and qualitatively high standing interaction between human and the environment, considering costs, benefits, health, and safety as well. Thus, an ergonomic design and evaluation process of products, tasks, and environments may be promoted in different disciplines. The goal is achieved in addressing a broad variety of topics and embedding the discussion in macroscopic factors such as the behavior of consumers and objectives of economy.
Content- Physiological, physical, and cognitive factors in sensation and perception
- Body spaces and functional anthropometry, Digital Human Models
- Experimental techniques in assessing human performance and well-being
- Human factors and ergonomics in system designs, product development and innovation
- Human information processing and biological cybernetics
- Interaction among consumers, environments, behavior, and tasks
Literature- Gavriel Salvendy, Handbook of Human Factors and Ergonomics, 4th edition (2012), is available on NEBIS as electronic version and for free to ETH students
- Further textbooks are introduced in the lecture
- Brouchures, checklists, key articles etc. are uploaded in ILIAS
376-1219-00LRehabilitation Engineering II: Rehabilitation of Sensory and Vegetative FunctionsW3 credits2VR. Riener, R. Gassert, L. Marchal Crespo
AbstractRehabilitation Engng is the application of science and technology to ameliorate the handicaps of individuals with disabilities to reintegrate them into society.The goal is to present classical and new rehabilitation engineering principles applied to compensate or enhance motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits. Focus is on the restoration and treatment of the human sensory and vegetative system.
ObjectiveProvide knowledge on the anatomy and physiology of the human sensory system, related dysfunctions and pathologies, and how rehabilitation engineering can provide sensory restoration and substitution.

This lecture is independent from Rehabilitation Engineering I. Thus, both lectures can be visited in arbitrary order.
ContentIntroduction, problem definition, overview
Rehabilitation of visual function
- Anatomy and physiology of the visual sense
- Technical aids (glasses, sensor substitution)
- Retina and cortex implants
Rehabilitation of hearing function
- Anatomy and physiology of the auditory sense
- Hearing aids
- Cochlea Implants
Rehabilitation and use of kinesthetic and tactile function
- Anatomy and physiology of the kinesthetic and tactile sense
- Tactile/haptic displays for motion therapy (incl. electrical stimulation)
- Role of displays in motor learning
Rehabilitation of vestibular function
- Anatomy and physiology of the vestibular sense
- Rehabilitation strategies and devices (e.g. BrainPort)
Rehabilitation of vegetative Functions
- Cardiac Pacemaker
- Phrenic stimulation, artificial breathing aids
- Bladder stimulation, artificial sphincter
Brain stimulation and recording
- Deep brain stimulation for patients with Parkinson, epilepsy, depression
- Brain-Computer Interfaces
LiteratureIntroductory Books:

An Introduction to Rehabilitation Engineering. R. A. Cooper, H. Ohnabe, D. A. Hobson (Eds.). Taylor & Francis, 2007.

Principles of Neural Science. E. R. Kandel, J. H. Schwartz, T. M Jessell (Eds.). Mc Graw Hill, New York, 2000.

Force and Touch Feedback for Virtual Reality. G. C. Burdea (Ed.). Wiley, New York, 1996 (available on NEBIS).

Human Haptic Perception, Basics and Applications. M. Grunwald (Ed.). Birkhäuser, Basel, 2008.

The Sense of Touch and Its Rendering, Springer Tracts in Advanced Robotics 45, A. Bicchi et al.(Eds). Springer-Verlag Berlin, 2008.

Interaktive und autonome Systeme der Medizintechnik - Funktionswiederherstellung und Organersatz. Herausgeber: J. Werner, Oldenbourg Wissenschaftsverlag 2005.

Neural prostheses - replacing motor function after desease or disability. Eds.: R. Stein, H. Peckham, D. Popovic. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Advances in Rehabilitation Robotics - Human-Friendly Technologies on Movement Assistance and Restoration for People with Disabilities. Eds: Z.Z. Bien, D. Stefanov (Lecture Notes in Control and Information Science, No. 306). Springer Verlag Berlin 2004.

Intelligent Systems and Technologies in Rehabilitation Engineering. Eds: H.N.L. Teodorescu, L.C. Jain (International Series on Computational Intelligence). CRC Press Boca Raton, 2001.


Selected Journal Articles and Web Links:

Abbas, J., Riener, R. (2001) Using mathematical models and advanced control systems techniques to enhance neuroprosthesis function. Neuromodulation 4, pp. 187-195.

Bach-y-Rita P., Tyler M., and Kaczmarek K (2003). Seeing with the brain. International journal of human-computer-interaction, 15(2):285-295.

Burdea, G., Popescu, V., Hentz, V., and Colbert, K. (2000): Virtual reality-based orthopedic telerehabilitation, IEEE Trans. Rehab. Eng., 8, pp. 430-432
Colombo, G., Jörg, M., Schreier, R., Dietz, V. (2000) Treadmill training of paraplegic patients using a robotic orthosis. Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development, vol. 37, pp. 693-700.

Hayward, V. (2008): A Brief Taxonomy of Tactile Illusions and
Demonstrations That Can Be Done In a Hardware Store. Brain Research Bulletin, Vol 75, No 6, pp 742-752

Krebs, H.I., Hogan, N., Aisen, M.L., Volpe, B.T. (1998): Robot-aided neurorehabilitation, IEEE Trans. Rehab. Eng., 6, pp. 75-87

Levesque. V. (2005). Blindness, technology and haptics. Technical report, McGill University. Available at: http://www.cim.mcgill.ca/~vleves/docs/VL-CIM-TR-05.08.pdf

Quintern, J. (1998) Application of functional electrical stimulation in paraplegic patients. NeuroRehabilitation 10, pp. 205-250.

Riener, R., Nef, T., Colombo, G. (2005) Robot-aided neurorehabilitation for the upper extremities. Medical & Biological Engineering & Computing 43(1), pp. 2-10.

Riener, R. (1999) Model-based development of neuroprostheses for paraplegic patients. Royal Philosophical Transactions: Biological Sciences 354, pp. 877-894.

The vOICe. http://www.seeingwithsound.com.

VideoTact, ForeThought Development, LLC. http://my.execpc.com/?dwysocki/videotac.html
Prerequisites / NoticeTarget Group:
Students of higher semesters and PhD students of
- D-MAVT, D-ITET, D-INFK, D-HEST
- Biomedical Engineering, Robotics, Systems and Control
- Medical Faculty, University of Zurich
Students of other departments, faculties, courses are also welcome
This lecture is independent from Rehabilitation Engineering I. Thus, both lectures can be visited in arbitrary order.
376-1279-00LVirtual Reality in Medicine Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
W3 credits2VR. Riener
AbstractVirtual Reality has the potential to support medical training and therapy. This lecture will derive the technical principles of multi-modal (audiovisual, haptic, tactile etc.) input devices, displays and rendering techniques. Examples are presented in the fields of surgical training, intra-operative augmentation, and rehabilitation. The lecture is accompanied by practical courses and excursions.
ObjectiveProvide theoretical and practical knowledge of new principles and applications of multi-modal simulation and interface technologies in medical education, therapy, and rehabilitation.
ContentVirtual Reality has the potential to provide descriptive and practical information for medical training and therapy while relieving the patient and/or the physician. Multi-modal interactions between the user and the virtual environment facilitate the generation of high-fidelity sensory impressions, by using not only visual and auditory modalities, but also kinesthetic, tactile, and even olfactory feedback. On the basis of the existing physiological constraints, this lecture will derive the technical requirements and principles of multi-modal input devices, displays, and rendering techniques. Several examples are presented that are currently being developed or already applied for surgical training, intra-operative augmentation, and rehabilitation. The lecture will be accompanied by several practical courses on graphical and haptic display devices as well as excursions to facilities equipped with large-scale VR equipment.

Target Group:
Students of higher semesters and PhD students of
- D-HEST, D-MAVT, D-ITET, D-INFK, D-PHYS
- Robotics, Systems and Control Master
- Biomedical Engineering/Movement Science and Sport
- Medical Faculty, University of Zurich
Students of other departments, faculties, courses are also welcome!
LiteratureBook: Virtual Reality in Medicine. Riener, Robert; Harders, Matthias; 2012 Springer.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course language is English.
Basic experience in Information Technology and Computer Science will be of advantage
More details will be announced in the lecture.
376-1504-00LPhysical Human Robot Interaction (pHRI) Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 26.
W4 credits2V + 2UR. Gassert, O. Lambercy
AbstractThis course focuses on the emerging, interdisciplinary field of physical human-robot interaction, bringing together themes from robotics, real-time control, human factors, haptics, virtual environments, interaction design and other fields to enable the development of human-oriented robotic systems.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to give an introduction to the fundamentals of physical human robot interaction, through lectures on the underlying theoretical/mechatronics aspects and application fields, in combination with a hands-on lab tutorial. The course will guide students through the design and evaluation process of such systems.

By the end of this course, you should understand the critical elements in human-robot interactions - both in terms of engineering and human factors - and use these to evaluate and de- sign safe and efficient assistive and rehabilitative robotic systems. Specifically, you should be able to:

1) identify critical human factors in physical human-robot interaction and use these to derive design requirements;
2) compare and select mechatronic components that optimally fulfill the defined design requirements;
3) derive a model of the device dynamics to guide and optimize the selection and integration of selected components
into a functional system;
4) design control hardware and software and implement and
test human-interactive control strategies on the physical
setup;
5) characterize and optimize such systems using both engineering and psychophysical evaluation metrics;
6) investigate and optimize one aspect of the physical setup and convey and defend the gained insights in a technical presentation.
ContentThis course provides an introduction to fundamental aspects of physical human-robot interaction. After an overview of human haptic, visual and auditory sensing, neurophysiology and psychophysics, principles of human-robot interaction systems (kinematics, mechanical transmissions, robot sensors and actuators used in these systems) will be introduced. Throughout the course, students will gain knowledge of interaction control strategies including impedance/admittance and force control, haptic rendering basics and issues in device design for humans such as transparency and stability analysis, safety hardware and procedures. The course is organized into lectures that aim to bring students up to speed with the basics of these systems, readings on classical and current topics in physical human-robot interaction, laboratory sessions and lab visits.
Students will attend periodic laboratory sessions where they will implement the theoretical aspects learned during the lectures. Here the salient features of haptic device design will be identified and theoretical aspects will be implemented in a haptic system based on the haptic paddle (Link), by creating simple dynamic haptic virtual environments and understanding the performance limitations and causes of instabilities (direct/virtual coupling, friction, damping, time delays, sampling rate, sensor quantization, etc.) during rendering of different mechanical properties.
Lecture notesWill be distributed through the document repository before the lectures.
http://www.relab.ethz.ch/education/courses/phri.html
LiteratureAbbott, J. and Okamura, A. (2005). Effects of position quantization and sampling rate on virtual-wall passivity. Robotics, IEEE Transactions on, 21(5):952 - 964.
Adams, R. and Hannaford, B. (1999). Stable haptic interaction with virtual environments. Robotics and Automation, IEEE Transactions on, 15(3):465 -474.
Buerger, S. and Hogan, N. (2007). Complementary stability and loop shaping for improved human ndash;robot interaction. Robotics, IEEE Transactions on, 23(2):232 -244.
Burdea, G. and Brooks, F. (1996). Force and touch feedback for virtual reality. John Wiley & Sons New York NY.
Colgate, J. and Brown, J. (1994). Factors affecting the z-width of a haptic display. In Robotics and Automation, 1994. Proceedings., 1994 IEEE International Conference on, pages 3205 -3210 vol.4.
Diolaiti, N., Niemeyer, G., Barbagli, F., and Salisbury, J. (2006). Stability of haptic rendering: Discretization, quantization, time delay, and coulomb effects. Robotics, IEEE Transactions on, 22(2):256 -268.
Gillespie, R. and Cutkosky, M. (1996). Stable user-specific haptic rendering of the virtual wall. In Proceedings of the ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exhibition, volume 58, pages 397-406.
Hannaford, B. and Ryu, J.-H. (2002). Time-domain passivity control of haptic interfaces. Robotics and Automation, IEEE Transactions on, 18(1):1 -10.
Hashtrudi-Zaad, K. and Salcudean, S. (2001). Analysis of control architectures for teleoperation systems with impedance/admittance master and slave manipulators. The International Journal of Robotics Research, 20(6):419.
Hayward, V. and Astley, O. (1996). Performance measures for haptic interfaces. In ROBOTICS RESEARCH-INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM-, volume 7, pages 195-206. Citeseer.
Hayward, V. and Maclean, K. (2007). Do it yourself haptics: part i. Robotics Automation Magazine, IEEE, 14(4):88 -104.
Leskovsky, P., Harders, M., and Szeekely, G. (2006). Assessing the fidelity of haptically rendered deformable objects. In Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems, 2006 14th Symposium on, pages 19 - 25.
MacLean, K. and Hayward, V. (2008). Do it yourself haptics: Part ii [tutorial]. Robotics Automation Magazine, IEEE, 15(1):104 -119.
Mahvash, M. and Hayward, V. (2003). Passivity-based high-fidelity haptic rendering of contact. In Robotics and Automation, 2003. Proceedings. ICRA '03. IEEE International Conference on, volume 3, pages 3722 - 3728 vol.3.
Mehling, J., Colgate, J., and Peshkin, M. (2005). Increasing the impedance range of a haptic display by adding electrical damping. In Eurohaptics Conference, 2005 and Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems, 2005. World Haptics 2005. First Joint, pages 257 - 262.
Okamura, A., Richard, C., and Cutkosky, M. (2002). Feeling is believing: Using a force-feedback joystick to teach dynamic systems. JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING EDUCATION-WASHINGTON-, 91(3):345-350.
O'Malley, M. and Goldfarb, M. (2004). The effect of virtual surface stiffness on the haptic perception of detail. Mechatronics, IEEE/ASME Transactions on, 9(2):448 -454.
Richard, C. and Cutkosky, M. (2000). The effects of real and computer generated friction on human performance in a targeting task. In Proceedings of the ASME Dynamic Systems and Control Division, volume 69, page 2.
Salisbury, K., Conti, F., and Barbagli, F. (2004). Haptic rendering: Introductory concepts. Computer Graphics and Applications, IEEE, 24(2):24-32.
Weir, D., Colgate, J., and Peshkin, M. (2008). Measuring and increasing z-width with active electrical damping. In Haptic interfaces for virtual environment and teleoperator systems, 2008. haptics 2008. symposium on, pages 169 -175.
Yasrebi, N. and Constantinescu, D. (2008). Extending the z-width of a haptic device using acceleration feedback. Haptics: Perception, Devices and Scenarios, pages 157-162.
Prerequisites / NoticeNotice:
The registration is limited to 26 students
There are 4 credit points for this lecture.
The lecture will be held in English.
The students are expected to have basic control knowledge from previous classes.
http://www.relab.ethz.ch/education/courses/phri.html
376-1651-00LClinical and Movement BiomechanicsW4 credits3GS.  Lorenzetti, R. List, N. Singh
AbstractMeasurement and modeling of the human movement during daily activities and in a clinical environment.
ObjectiveThe students are able to analyse the human movement from a technical point of view, to process the data and perform modeling with a focus towards clinical application.
ContentThis course includes study design, measurement techniques, clinical testing, accessing movement data and anysis as well as modeling with regards to human movement.
376-1714-00LBiocompatible MaterialsW4 credits3GK. Maniura, J. Möller, M. Zenobi-Wong
AbstractIntroduction to molecules used for biomaterials, molecular interactions between different materials and biological systems (molecules, cells, tissues). The concept of biocompatibility is discussed and important techniques from biomaterials research and development are introduced.
ObjectiveThe class consists of three parts:
1. Introdcution into molecular characteristics of molecules involved in the materials-to-biology interface. Molecular design of biomaterials.
2. The concept of biocompatibility.
3. Introduction into methodology used in biomaterials research and application.
ContentIntroduction into native and polymeric biomaterials used for medical applications. The concepts of biocompatibility, biodegradation and the consequences of degradation products are discussed on the molecular level. Different classes of materials with respect to potential applications in tissue engineering and drug delivery are introduced. Strong focus lies on the molecular interactions between materials having very different bulk and/or surface chemistry with living cells, tissues and organs. In particular the interface between the materials surfaces and the eukaryotic cell surface and possible reactions of the cells with an implant material are elucidated. Techniques to design, produce and characterize materials in vitro as well as in vivo analysis of implanted and explanted materials are discussed.
In addition, a link between academic research and industrial entrepreneurship is established by external guest speakers.
Lecture notesHandouts can be accessed online.
LiteratureLiteratur
Biomaterials Science: An Introduction to Materials in Medicine, Ratner B.D. et al, 3rd Edition, 2013
Comprehensive Biomaterials, Ducheyne P. et al., 1st Edition, 2011

(available online via ETH library)

Handouts provided during the classes and references therin.
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