From 2 November 2020, the autumn semester 2020 will take place online. Exceptions: Courses that can only be carried out with on-site presence.
Please note the information provided by the lecturers via e-mail.

Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2016

Integrated Building Systems Master Information
Main Courses
Specialised Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0235-00LThermodynamics of Novel Energy Conversion TechnologiesW4 credits3GC. S. Sharma, D. Poulikakos, G. Sansavini
AbstractIn the framework of this course we will look at a current electronic thermal and energy management strategies and novel energy conversion processes. The course will focus on component level fundamentals of these process and system level analysis of interactions among various energy conversion components.
ObjectiveThis course deals with liquid cooling based thermal management of electronics, reuse of waste heat and novel energy conversion and storage systems such as batteries, fuel cells and micro-fuel cells. The focus of the course is on the physics and basic understanding of those systems as well as their real-world applications. The course will also look at analysis of system level interactions between a range of energy conversion components.
ContentPart 1: Fundamentals:
- Overview of exergy analysis, Single phase liquid cooling and micro-mixing;
- Thermodynamics of multi-component-systems (mixtures) and phase equilibrium;
- Electrochemistry;

Part 2: Applications:
- Basic principles of battery;
- Introduction to fuel cells;
- Reuse of waste heat from supercomputers
- Hotspot targeted cooling of microprocessors
- Microfluidic fuel cells

Part3: System- level analysis
- Integration of the components into the system: a case study
- Analysis of the coupled operations, identification of critical states
- Support to system-oriented design
Lecture notesLecture slides will be made available. Lecture notes will be available for some topics (in English).
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course will be given in English:

1- Mid-term examination: Mid-term exam grade counts as 20% of the final grade.
2- Final exam: Written exam during the regular examination session. It counts as 80% of the final grade.
151-0113-00LApplied Fluid DynamicsW4 credits2V + 1UJ.‑P. Kunsch
AbstractApplied Fluid Dynamics
The methods of fluid dynamics play an important role in the description of a chain of events, involving the release, spreading and dilution of dangerous fluids in the environment.
Tunnel ventilation systems and strategies are studied, which must meet severe requirements during normal operation and in emergency situations (tunnel fires etc.).
ObjectiveGenerally applicable methods in fluid dynamics and gas dynamics are illustrated and practiced using selected current examples.
ContentOften experts fall back on the methodology of fluid dynamics when involved in the construction of environmentally friendly processing and incineration facilities, as well as when choosing safe transport and storage options for dangerous materials. As a result of accidents, but also in normal operations, dangerous gases and liquids may escape and be transported further by wind or flowing water.
There are many possible forms that the resulting damage may take, including fire and explosion when flammable substances are mixed. The topics covered include: Emissions of liquids and gases from containers and pipelines, evaporation from pools and vaporization of gases kept under pressure, the spread and dilution of waste gas plumes in the wind, deflagration and detonation of inflammable gases, fireballs in gases held under pressure, pollution and exhaust gases in tunnels (tunnel fires etc.)
Lecture notesnot available
Prerequisites / NoticeRequirements: successful attendance at lectures "Fluiddynamik I und II", "Thermodynamik I und II"
151-0185-00LRadiation Heat Transfer Information W4 credits2V + 1UA. Steinfeld, A. Z'Graggen
AbstractAdvanced course in radiation heat transfer
ObjectiveFundamentals of radiative heat transfer and its applications. Examples are combustion and solar thermal/thermochemical processes, and other applications in the field of energy conversion and material processing.
Content1. Introduction to thermal radiation. Definitions. Spectral and directional properties. Electromagnetic spectrum. Blackbody and gray surfaces. Absorptivity, emissivity, reflectivity. Planck's Law, Wien's Displacement Law, Kirchhoff's Law.

2. Surface radiation exchange. Diffuse and specular surfaces. Gray and selective surfaces. Configuration factors. Radiation xxchange. Enclosure theory- radiosity method. Monte Carlo.

3.Absorbing, emitting and scattering media. Extinction, absorption, and scattering coefficients. Scattering phase function. Optical thickness. Equation of radiative transfer. Solution methods: discrete ordinate; zone; Monte-Carlo.

4. Applications. Cavities. Selective surfaces and media. Semi-transparent windows. Combined radiation-conduction-convection heat transfer.
Lecture notesCopy of the slides presented.
LiteratureR. Siegel, J.R. Howell, Thermal Radiation Heat Transfer, 3rd. ed., Taylor & Francis, New York, 2002.

M. Modest, Radiative Heat Transfer, Academic Press, San Diego, 2003.
151-0103-00LFluid Dynamics IIW3 credits2V + 1UP. Jenny
AbstractTwo-dimensional irrotational (potential) flows: stream function and potential, singularity method, unsteady flow, aerodynamic concepts.
Vorticity dynamics: vorticity and circulation, vorticity equation, vortex theorems of Helmholtz and Kelvin.
Compressible flows: isentropic flow along stream tube, normal and oblique shocks, Laval nozzle, Prandtl-Meyer expansion, viscous effects.
ObjectiveExpand basic knowledge of fluid dynamics.
Concepts, phenomena and quantitative description of irrotational (potential), rotational, and one-dimensional compressible flows.
ContentTwo-dimensional irrotational (potential) flows: stream function and potential, complex notation, singularity method, unsteady flow, aerodynamic concepts.
Vorticity dynamics: vorticity and circulation, vorticity equation, vortex theorems of Helmholtz and Kelvin.
Compressible flows: isentropic flow along stream tube, normal and oblique shocks, Laval nozzle, Prandtl-Meyer expansion, viscous effects.
Lecture notesLecture notes are available (in German).
(See also info on literature below.)
LiteratureRelevant chapters (corresponding to lecture notes) from the textbook

P.K. Kundu, I.M. Cohen, D.R. Dowling: Fluid Mechanics, Academic Press, 5th ed., 2011 (includes a free copy of the DVD "Multimedia Fluid Mechanics")

P.K. Kundu, I.M. Cohen, D.R. Dowling: Fluid Mechanics, Academic Press, 6th ed., 2015 (does NOT include a free copy of the DVD "Multimedia Fluid Mechanics")
Prerequisites / NoticeAnalysis I/II, Knowledge of Fluid Dynamics I, thermodynamics of ideal gas
401-0647-00LIntroduction to Mathematical Optimization Information W5 credits2V + 1UD. Adjiashvili
AbstractIntroduction to basic techniques and problems in mathematical optimization, and their applications to problems in engineering.
ObjectiveThe goal of the course is to obtain a good understanding of some of the most fundamental mathematical optimization techniques used to solve linear programs and basic combinatorial optimization problems. The students will also practice applying the learned models to problems in engineering.
ContentTopics covered in this course include:
- Linear programming (simplex method, duality theory, shadow prices, ...).
- Basic combinatorial optimization problems (spanning trees, network flows, knapsack problem, ...).
- Modelling with mathematical optimization: applications of mathematical programming in engineering.
LiteratureInformation about relevant literature will be given in the lecture.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course is meant for students who did not already attend the course "Mathematical Optimization", which is a more advance lecture covering similar topics and more.
227-0477-00LAcoustics IW6 credits4GK. Heutschi
AbstractIntroduction to the fundamentals of acoustics in the area of sound field calculations, measurement of acoustical events, outdoor sound propagation and room acoustics of large and small enclosures.
ObjectiveIntroduction to acoustics. Understanding of basic acoustical mechanisms. Survey of the technical literature. Illustration of measurement techniques in the laboratory.
ContentFundamentals of acoustics, measuring and analyzing of acoustical events, anatomy and properties of the ear. Outdoor sound propagation, absorption and transmission of sound, room acoustics of large and small enclosures, architectural acoustics, noise and noise control, calculation of sound fields.
Lecture notesyes
101-0579-00LInfrastructure Maintenance Processes
Does not take place this semester.
101-0579-00L "Infrastructure Maintenance Processes" will be offered from FS17 on with new title 101-0579-00L "Infrastructure Management 2: Evaluation Tools".
W3 credits2GB. T. Adey
AbstractThis course provides an introduction to the tools that can be used to evaluate infrastructure. In particular tools:
- to measure the level of service being obtained from infrastructure,
- to predict slow changes in infrastructure over time, and
- to predict fast changes in infrastructure over time,fits of monitoring.
Objectiveto equip students with tools to be used to evaluate infrastructure and the level of service being provided from infrastructure
ContentIntroduction
Levels of service
Reliability of infrastructure
Availability and maintainability of infrastructure
Mechanistic-empirical models
Regression analysis
Event trees
Fault trees
Markov chains
Neural networks
Bayesian networks
Conclusion
Lecture notesAll necessary materials (e.g. transparencies and hand-outs) will be distributed before class.
LiteratureAppropriate reading material will be assigned when necessary.
101-0577-00LAn Introduction to Sustainable Development in the Built EnvironmentW3 credits2GG. Habert
AbstractThis year the UN Conference in Paris will shape future world objectives to tackle climate change.
This course provides an introduction to the notion of sustainable development when applied to our built environment
ObjectiveAt the end of the semester, the students have an understanding of the term of sustainable development, its history, the current political and scientific discourses and its relevance for our built environment.

In order to address current challenges of climate change mitigation and resource depletion, students will learn a holistic approach of sustainable development. Ecological, economical and social constraints will be presented and students will learn about methods for argumentation and tools for assessment (i.e. life cycle assessment).

For this purpose an overview of sustainable development is presented with an introduction to the history of sustainability and its today definition as well as the role of cities, urbanisation and material resources (i.e. energy, construction material) in social economic and environmetal aspects.

The course aims to promote an integral view and understanding of sustainability and describing different spheres (social/cultural, ecological, economical, and institutional) that influence our built environment.

Students will acquire critical knowledge and understand the role of involved stakeholders, their motivations and constraints, learn how to evaluate challenges, identify deficits and define strategies to promote a more sustainable construction.

After the course students should be able to define the relevance of specific local, regional or territorial aspects to achieve coherent and applicable solutions toward sustainable development.

The course offers an environmental, socio-economic and socio-technical perspective focussing on buildings, cities and their transition to resilience with sustainable development. Students will learn on theory and application of current scientific pathways towards sustainable development.
ContentThe following topics give an overview of the themes that are to be worked on during the lecture.

- Overview on the history and emergence of sustainable development
- Overview on the current understanding and definition of sustainable development

- Case Study 1: Sustainable construction, the role of construction industry (national/international)
- Case Study 2: Cities, forms of settlements
- Case Study 3: Material resources, scenarios, energy, construction materials, urban metabolism
- Case Study 4: Buildings, heating/cooling, consumers, prosumers and other stakeholder, cooperations

- Method 1: Life cycle assessment (planning, construction, operation/use, deconstruction)
- Method 2: Economics for sustainable construction
- Method 3: Construction, flexibility, modularity

- Synthesis 1: Climate Change mitigation and adaptation in cities
- Synthesis 2: Transition to sustainable development
Lecture notesAll relevant information will be online available before the lectures. For each lecture slides of the lecture will be provided.
LiteratureA list of the basic literature will be offered on a specific online platform, that could be used by all students attending the lectures.
101-0417-00LTransport Planning MethodsW6 credits4GK. W. Axhausen
AbstractThe course provides the necessary knowledge to develop models supporting the solution of given planning problems. This is done by dividing the forecasting problem into sub-problems.
The course is composed of a lecture part, providing the theoretical knowledge, and a applied part, in which students develop their own models.
Objective- Knowledge of methods and algorithms commonly used in transport planning
- Ability to independently develop a transport model able to solve / answer the given problem / questions
- Understanding of algorithms and their implementations commonly used in transport planning
ContentThe course provides the necessary knowledge to develop models supporting the solution of given planning problems. Examples of such planning problems are the estimation of traffic volumes, prediction of estimated utilization of new public transport lines, and evaluation of effects (e.g. change in emissions of a city) triggered by building new infrastructure and changes to operational regulations.

To cope with the forecasting problem it is first divided into sub-problems. Then, these are solved using various algorithms like iterative proportional fitting, shortest path algorithms and the method of successive averages.

The course is composed of a lecture part, providing the theoretical knowledge, and a applied part, in which students create their own models. This part takes place in form of a tutorial and consists in the development of a computer program. The programming part is closely guided and particularly suitable for students with little programming experience.
Lecture notesThe slides of the lecture are provided electronically.
LiteratureWillumsen, P. and J. de D. Ortuzar (2003) Modelling Transport, Wiley, Chichester.

Cascetta, E. (2001) Transportation Systems Engineering: Theory and Methods, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht.

Sheffi, Y. (1985) Urban Transportation Networks: Equilibrium Analysis with Mathematical Programming Methods, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs.
363-0387-00LCorporate SustainabilityW3 credits2GV. Hoffmann
AbstractThe lectures addresses the assessment of corporate sustainability and its links to strategy, technology, and finance. Students learn why sustainability matters for managers and how businesses can act towards it. E-modules allow students to train critical thinking skills. In the 2nd half of the semester, sustainability challenges on water, energy, mobility, and food are explored in group projects.
ObjectiveUnderstand the limits and the potential of corporate sustainability for sustainable development

Develop critical thinking skills (argumentation, communication, evaluative judgment) that are useful in the context of corporate sustainability using an innovative writing and peer review method.

Be able to recognize and realize opportunities for corporate sustainability in a business environment
ContentOverview of the key concepts of corporate sustainability and topics related to Water, Energy, Mobility, and Food

Business implications of sustainable development, in particular for the assessment of sustainability performance, strategic change towards sustainability, technological innovations and sustainability, and finance and corporate sustainability.
Critical thinking skills for corporate sustainability.
In-depth case studies of corporate sustainability challenges in the track phase: How to deal with environmental pressure groups? How to use the strengths of business to solve pressing sustainability problems? How to catalyze technological innovations for sustainability? How to invest money in a sustainable way?
Lecture notesPresentation slides will be made available on moodle prior to lectures.
LiteratureLiterature recommendations will be distributed during the lecture
402-0809-01LIntroduction to Computational Physics (for Civil Engineers)W4 credits2V + 1UH. J. Herrmann
AbstractThis course offers an introduction to computer simulation methods for physics problems and their implementation on PCs and super computers: classical equations of motion, partial differential equations (wave equation, diffusion equation, Maxwell's equation), Monte Carlo simulations, percolation, phase transitions
Objective
ContentEinführung in die rechnergestützte Simulation physikalischer Probleme. Anhand einfacher Modelle aus der klassischen Mechanik, Elektrodynamik und statistischen Mechanik sowie interdisziplinären Anwendungen werden die wichtigsten objektorientierten Programmiermethoden für numerische Simulationen (überwiegend in C++) erläutert. Daneben wird eine Einführung in die Programmierung von Vektorsupercomputern und parallelen Rechnern, sowie ein Überblick über vorhandene Softwarebibliotheken für numerische Simulationen geboten.
Prerequisites / NoticeLecture and exercse lessons in english
402-0809-00LIntroduction to Computational PhysicsW8 credits2V + 2UH. J. Herrmann
AbstractThis course offers an introduction to computer simulation methods for physics problems and their implementation on PCs and super computers: classical equations of motion, partial differential equations (wave equation, diffusion equation, Maxwell's equation), Monte Carlo simulations, percolation, phase transitions
Objective
ContentEinführung in die rechnergestützte Simulation physikalischer Probleme. Anhand einfacher Modelle aus der klassischen Mechanik, Elektrodynamik und statistischen Mechanik sowie interdisziplinären Anwendungen werden die wichtigsten objektorientierten Programmiermethoden für numerische Simulationen (überwiegend in C++) erläutert. Daneben wird eine Einführung in die Programmierung von Vektorsupercomputern und parallelen Rechnern, sowie ein Überblick über vorhandene Softwarebibliotheken für numerische Simulationen geboten.
Prerequisites / NoticeLecture and exercise lessons in english, exams in German or in English
101-0187-00LStructural Reliability and Risk Analysis Information W3 credits2GB. Sudret
AbstractStructural reliability aims at quantifying the probability of failure of systems due to uncertainties in their design, manufacturing and environmental conditions. Risk analysis combines this information with the consequences of failure in view of optimal decision making. The course presents the underlying probabilistic modelling and computational methods for reliability and risk assessment.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is to provide the students with a thorough understanding of the key concepts behind structural reliability and risk analysis. After this course the students will have refreshed their knowledge of probability theory and statistics to model uncertainties in view of engineering applications. They will be able to analyze the reliability of a structure and to use risk assessment methods for decision making under uncertain conditions. They will be aware of the state-of-the-art computational methods and software in this field.
ContentEngineers are confronted every day to decision making under limited amount of information and uncertain conditions. When designing new structures and systems, the design codes such as SIA or Euro- codes usually provide a framework that guarantees safety and reliability. However the level of safety is not quantified explicitly, which does not allow the analyst to properly choose between design variants and evaluate a total cost in case of failure. In contrast, the framework of risk analysis allows one to incorporate the uncertainty in decision making.

The first part of the course is a reminder on probability theory that is used as a main tool for reliability and risk analysis. Classical concepts such as random variables and vectors, dependence and correlation are recalled. Basic statistical inference methods used for building a probabilistic model from the available data, e.g. the maximum likelihood method, are presented.

The second part is related to structural reliability analysis, i.e. methods that allow one to compute probabilities of failure of a given system with respect to prescribed criteria. The framework of reliability analysis is first set up. Reliability indices are introduced together with the first order-second moment method (FOSM) and the first order reliability method (FORM). Methods based on Monte Carlo simulation are then reviewed and illustrated through various examples. By-products of reliability analysis such as sensitivity measures and partial safety coefficients are derived and their links to structural design codes is shown. The reliability of structural systems is also introduced as well as the methods used to reassess existing structures based on new information.

The third part of the course addresses risk assessment methods. Techniques for the identification of hazard scenarios and their representation by fault trees and event trees are described. Risk is defined with respect to the concept of expected utility in the framework of decision making. Elements of Bayesian decision making, i.e. pre-, post and pre-post risk assessment methods are presented.

The course also includes a tutorial using the UQLab software dedicated to real world structural reliability analysis.
Lecture notesSlides of the lectures are available online every week. A printed version of the full set of slides is proposed to the students at the beginning of the semester.
LiteratureAng, A. and Tang, W.H, Probability Concepts in Engineering - Emphasis on Applications to Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2nd Edition, John Wiley & Sons, 2007.

S. Marelli, R. Schöbi, B. Sudret, UQLab user manual - Structural reliability (rare events estimation), Report UQLab-V0.92-107.
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic course on probability theory and statistics
701-1346-00LCarbon Mitigation Information W3 credits2GN. Gruber
AbstractFuture climate change can only kept within reasonable bounds when CO2 emissions are drastically reduced. In this course, we will discuss a portfolio of options involving the alteration of natural carbon sinks and carbon sequestration. The course includes introductory lectures, presentations from guest speakers from industry and the public sector, and final presentations by the students.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is to investigate, as a group, a particular set of carbon mitigation/sequestration options and to evaluate their potential, their cost, and their consequences.
ContentFrom the large number of carbon sequestration/mitigation options, a few options will be selected and then investigated in detail by the students. The results of this research will then be presented to the other students, the involved faculty, and discussed in detail by the whole group.
Lecture notesNone
LiteratureWill be identified based on the chosen topic.
Prerequisites / NoticeExam: No final exam. Pass/No-Pass is assigned based on the quality of the presentation and ensuing discussion.
051-0723-16LInformation Architecture and Future Cities: Smart Cities Information W2 credits1VG. Schmitt
AbstractWhat are SMART CITIES and how do they emerge? What is the role of architects and urban designers in this process? How do data turn into information as a building material for the future city? The course covers concepts, methods and techniques in design, simulation and communication of cities. The goal is to learn principles and preconditions for the design of sustainable and smart cities.
ObjectiveStudents gain insight into the next generation of design processes for architects and urban designers, and into concepts of the Information Architecture of SMART CITIES, including the influence of Big Data. They learn about the expanded roles of information and of architecture: information and simulation in architecture as means to make the invisible visible, and architecture as a metaphor and ordering system to structure the immense amounts of data of the Information Society. The seminar is highly interactive and discusses visionary case studies in Europe and Asia and new techniques in Big Data informed smart urban design. Apart from learning about and experiencing Information Architecture and SMART CITIES, the course also introduces research and management skills that will distinguish the future ETH architect. An iBook and the edX Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) Future Cities support the course.
ContentSMART CITIES - What will happen when cities change from static configurations into responsive and dynamic structures? What does it mean for buildings that undergo the same changes? What is the impact on architectural and urban design education? How can citizens influence this development? The SMART CITIES course will answer these questions and supply you with the necessary skills and knowledge to understand and design such dynamic structures. The intelligent use of data and information are at the core of this course. Data and information are new building materials of future cities. Citizens produce increasing amounts of data in their daily life, with stationary sensors and mobile smartphones. Using those data, citizens begin to influence the design of future cities and the re-design of existing ones. The course will be a first step towards the emerging citizen design science and cognitive design computing. Those will be the next generation of participatory design and design computing.
Lecture notesiBook INFORMATION CITIES
LiteratureThe necessary texts will be found on the Chair's website at: http://www.ia.arch.ethz.ch. We specifically recommend the consultation of the Future Cities Website at: http://www.futurecities.ethz.ch during the entire course. The iBook INFORMATION CITIES is available in the iBooks Store for free.
Prerequisites / NoticeInteractive seminar including 3 exercises
051-0725-16LDigital Urban Visualization: People as Flows Information W2 credits2UG. Schmitt
AbstractWe examine patterns of crowd-flows in an extraordinary urbanisation phenomena: festivals.
ObjectiveThe course participants will learn how to program simulations using Processing/Java. Previous programming knowledge is not necessary. Furthermore they will gain insights into other analysis methods and learn about their significance, strengths and weaknesses.
ContentWe will look at those patterns from two sides. One being the view of a planer asking to find bottle necks or the ideal place for amenities such as booths, toilets etc. Another being the view of visitors. We will program different behaviours that should compete against each other in order to compare their different strategies. As a case study we will use the Caliente Festival in Zurich.

For deepening the learnt in a semester thesis we offer to optimise the created simulations to make them available in interactive planning workshops. Additionally they could be converted into interactive web apps.
Literaturehttp://www.ia.arch.ethz.ch
Prerequisites / NoticeNo programming skills are required.
063-1357-16LDigital Urban Simulation Information W4 credits4GE. Tapias Pedraza
AbstractIn this teaching unit architectural and urban design are analyzed by current computational methods. Based on these analyses the effects of plannings can be simulated and understood. An important focus of this course is the interpretation of the analysis and simulation results and the application of these correspondent methods in early planning phases.
ObjectiveThe students learn how the design and planning of cities can be evidence based by using scientific methods. The teaching unit convey knowledge in state-of-the-art and emerging spatial analysis and simulation methods and equip students with skills in modern software systems. The course consists of lectures, associated exercises and workshops, as well as of one integral project work.
ContentIn a series of theory lectures we explore how the design and planning of cities can be evidence based by using scientific methods. By various exercises the students are equipped with skills in modern software systems. In an integral project work knowledge in state-of-the-art and emerging spatial analysis and simulation methods is deepened. Based on the imparted methods the effects of planning and design interventions can be simulated and understood. An important focus of this course is the interpretation of the analysis and simulation results and the application of the correspondent computational methods in early planning phases.
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