Autumn Semester 2020 takes place in a mixed form of online and classroom teaching.
Please read the published information on the individual courses carefully.

Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2016

Earth Sciences Master Information
Major in Geology
Restricted Choice Modules Geology
A minimum of two restricted choice modules must be completed for the major Geology.
Sedimentology
Sedimentology: Compulsory Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
651-4041-00LSedimentology I: Physical Processes and Sedimentary SystemsW+3 credits2GV. Picotti
AbstractSediments preserved a record of past landscapes. This courses focuses on understanding the processes that modify sedimentary landscapes with time and how we can read this changes in the sedimentary record.
ObjectiveThe students learn basic concepts of modern sedimentology and stratigraphy in the context of sequence stratigraphy and sea level change. They discuss the advantages and pitfalls of the method and look beyond. In particular we pay attention to introducing the importance of considering entire sediment routing systems and understanding their functionning.
ContentDetails on the program will be handed out during the first lecture.

We will attribute the papers for presentation on the 26th, so please be here on that day!
LiteratureThe sedimentary record of sea-level change
Angela Coe, the Open University.
Cambridge University Press
Prerequisites / NoticeThe grading of students is based on in-class exercises and end-semester examination.
651-4043-00LSedimentology II: Biological and Chemical Processes in Lacustrine and Marine Systems
Prerequisite: Successful completion of the MSc-course "Sedimentology I" (651-4041-00L).
W+3 credits2GV. Picotti, A. Gilli
AbstractThe course will focus on biological amd chemical aspects of sedimentation in marine environments. Marine sedimentation will be traced from coast to deep-sea. The use of stable isotopes palaeoceanography will be discussed. Neritic, hemipelagic and pelagic sediments will be used as proxies for environmental change during times of major perturbations of climate and oceanography.
Objective-You will understand chemistry and biology of the marine carbonate system
-You will be able to relate carbonate mineralogy with facies and environmental conditions
-You will be familiar with cool-water and warm-water carbonates
-You will see carbonate and organic-carbon rich sediments as part of the global carbon cycle
-You will be able to recognize links between climate and marine carbonate systems (e.g. acidification of oceans and reef growth)
-You will be able to use geological archives as source of information on global change
-You will have an overview of marine sedimentation through time
Content-carbonates,: chemistry, mineralogy, biology
-carbonate sedimentation from the shelf to the deep sea
-carbonate facies
-cool-water and warm-water carbonates
-organic-carbon and black shales
-C-cycle, carbonates, Corg : CO2 sources and sink
-Carbonates: their geochemical proxies for environmental change: stable isotopes, Mg/Ca, Sr
-marine sediments thorugh geological time
-carbonates and evaporites
-lacustrine carbonates
-economic aspects of limestone
Lecture notesno script. scientific articles will be distributed during the course
LiteratureWe will read and critically discuss scientific articles relevant for "biological and chemical processes in marine and lacustrine systems"
Prerequisites / NoticeThe grading of students is based on in-class exercises and end-semester examination.
Sedimentology: Courses of Choice
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
651-4901-00LQuaternary Dating Methods Information W3 credits2GI. Hajdas, S. Ivy Ochs
AbstractReconstruction of time scales is critical for all Quaternary studies in both Geology and Archeology. Various methods are applied depending on the time range of interest and the archive studied. In this lecture we focus on the six methods that are most frequently used for dating Quaternary sediments and landforms.
ObjectiveStudents will be made familiar with the details of the six dating methods through lectures on basic principles, analysis of case studies, solving of problem sets for age calculation and visits to dating laboratories.

At the end of the course students will:
1. understand the fundamental principles of the most frequently used dating methods for Quaternary studies.
2. be able to calculate an age based on data of the six methods studied.
3. choose which dating method (or combination of methods) is suitable for a certain field problem.
4. critically read and evaluate the application of dating methods in scientific publications.
Content1. Introduction: Time scales for the Quaternary, Isotopes and decay
2. Radiocarbon dating: principles and applications
3. Cosmogenic nuclides: 3He,10Be, 14C, 21Ne, 26Cl, 36Cl
4. U-series disequilibrium dating
5. Luminescence dating
5. K/Ar and Ar/Ar dating of lava flows and ash layers
6. Cs-137 and Pb-210 (soil, sediments, ice core)
7. Summary and comparison of results from several dating methods at specific sites
Prerequisites / NoticeVisit to radiocarbon lab, cosmogenic nuclide lab, noble gas lab, accelerator (AMS) facility.

Required attending the lecture, visiting laboratories, handing back solutions for problem sets (Excercises)
651-4063-00LX-ray Powder Diffraction Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 12.
W3 credits2GM. Plötze
AbstractIn the course the students learn to measure X-ray diffraction patterns of minerals and to evaluate these using different software for qualitative and quantitative mineral composition as well as crystallographic parameters.
ObjectiveUpon successful completion of this course students are able to:
- describe the principle of X-ray diffraction analysis
- carry out a qualitative and quantitative mineralogical analysis independently,
- critically assess the data,
- communicate the results in a scientific report.
ContentFundamental principles of X-ray diffraction
Setup and operation of X-ray diffractometers
Interpretation of powder diffraction data
Qualitative and quantitative phase analysis of crystalline powders (e.g. with Rietveld analysis)
Lecture notesSelected handouts will be made available in the lecture
LiteratureALLMANN, R.: Röntgen-Pulverdiffraktometrie : Rechnergestützte Auswertung, Phasenanalyse und Strukturbestimmung Berlin : Springer, 2003.
DINNEBIER, R.E. et al.: Powder Diffraction. Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, 2008. (http://pubs.rsc.org/en/Content/eBook/978-0-85404-231-9)
PECHARSKY, V.K. and ZAVALIJ, P.Y: Fundamentals of Powder Diffraction and Structural Characterization of Materials. Springer, 2009.
(http://www.springerlink.com/content/k100xr/#section=126257&page=1)
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course includes a high portion of practical exercises in sample preparation as well as measurement and evaluation of X-ray powder diffraction data.
Own sample will be analysed qualitatively and quantitatively. Knowledge in mineralogy of this system is essential.
The lecture course is limited to 12 participants.
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