Autumn Semester 2020 takes place in a mixed form of online and classroom teaching.
Please read the published information on the individual courses carefully.

Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2017

Electrical Engineering and Information Technology Bachelor Information
Bachelor Studies (Programme Regulations 2016)
2. Semester
First Year Examinations
First Year Examination Block B
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
401-0232-10LAnalysis IIO8 credits4V + 2UD. A. Salamon
AbstractIntroduction to differential calculus and integration in several variables.
Objective
ContentDifferentiation in several variables, maxima and minima,
the implicit function theorem, integration in several variables,
integration over submanifolds, the theorems of Gauss and Stokes.
Lecture notesKonrad Koenigsberger, Analysis II.
Christian Blatter: Ingenieur-Analysis (Kapitel 4-6).
252-0836-00LComputer Science II Information O4 credits2V + 1UF. Mattern
AbstractIntroduction to basic problem solving methods, algorithms, and data structures. Topics: divide and conquer, recursion, sorting algorithms, backtracking, game tree search, data structures (lists, stacks, queues, binary trees), discrete simulation, concurrency. In the assignments and exercises, the programming language Java is used.
ObjectiveIntroduction to the general methods of computer science for electrical engineers. Also provides basic skills for advanced exercises and projects later in the electrical engineering program.
ContentPart II of the lecture concentrates on the most common problem solving skills, algorithms, and data structures. It also teaches fundamental concepts and mechanisms of structured programming. Furthermore, working with formal systems, the necessity of abstraction, and the importance of modeling in computer science will be motivated. The emphasis of the lecture is on practical concepts of computer science. Specific topics are: complexity of algorithms, divide and conquer, recursion, algorithms for sorting, backtracking, game tree search, data structures (lists, stacks, queues, binary trees), discrete simulation, and concurrency. For the assignments and exercises, the programming language Java is used. Here, also modularization, abstraction, encapsulation, and object orientation will be considered. Occasionally, short remarks on the historical context of relevant concepts are given. In the practice groups, students program an automatic player for the game "Reversi"; at the end of the semester a tournament will take place.
Lecture notesCopies of slides, extended with bonus slides that give hints to advanced concepts and present the historical context of selected concepts.
LiteratureTextbook: Mark Allan Weiss: Data Structures and Problem Solving Using Java, Addison Wesley.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite: Part 1 of the course.
401-0302-10LComplex Analysis Information O4 credits3V + 1UT. H. Willwacher
AbstractBasics of complex analysis in theory and applications, in particular the global properties of analytic functions. Introduction to the integral transforms and description of some applications
ObjectiveErwerb von einigen grundlegenden Werkzeuge der komplexen Analysis.
ContentExamples of analytic functions, Cauchy‘s theorem, Taylor and Laurent series, singularities of analytic functions, residues. Fourier series and Fourier integral, Laplace transform.
LiteratureM. Ablowitz, A. Fokas: "Complex variables: introduction and applications", Cambridge Text in Applied Mathematics, Cambridge University Press 1997

E. Kreyszig: "Advanced Engineering Analysis", Wiley 1999

J. Brown, R. Churchill: "Complex Analysis and Applications", McGraw-Hill 1995

J. Marsden, M. Hoffman: "Basic complex analysis", W. H. Freeman 1999

P. P. G. Dyke: "An Introduction to Laplace Transforms and Fourier Series", Springer 2004

Ch. Blatter: "Komplexe Analysis, Fourier- und Laplace-Transformation", Autographie

A. Oppenheim, A. Willsky: "Signals & Systems", Prentice Hall 1997

M. Spiegel: "Laplace Transforms", Schaum's Outlines, Mc Graw Hill
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Analysis I and II
227-0002-00LNetworks and Circuits II Information O8 credits4V + 2UJ. W. Kolar
AbstractIntroduction to AC circuits analysis, Fourier analysis, frequency and time domain, step response of electric circuits, Fourier and Laplace transform, frequency response of electric networks, two-port systems, bipolar and field-effect transistor, basic transistor circuits, push-pull emitter follower and differential amplifier, operational amplifier, basic and advanced operational amplifier circuits
ObjectiveThe lecture is aiming to make students familiar with basis methods of AC circuits analysis, the Fourier analysis of non-sinusoidal periodic signals, i.e. the relations of frequency and time domain, the calculation of the step response and transfer function of linear networks using Fourier- and Laplace transform and the analysis and design of transistor and operational amplifier circuits.
ContentIntroduction to AC circuits analysis, Fourier analysis, frequency and time domain, step response of electric circuits, Fourier and Laplace transform, frequency response of electric networks, two-port systems, bipolar and field-effect transistor, basic transistor circuits, push-pull emitter follower and differential amplifier, operational amplifier, basic and advanced operational amplifier circuits
Lecture notesSpecified literature and lectures slides
LiteratureGrundlagen der Elektrotechnik

Bd. 2 - Periodische und nicht periodische Signalformen
M. Albach
Pearson Studium
Ausgabe 2005 (ISBN 9783827371089) oder
Ausgabe 2011 (ISBN 9783868940800)

Bd. 3 - Netzwerke
L.-P. Schmidt et al.
Pearson Studium
Ausgabe 2006 (ISBN 9783827371072)

Microelectronic Circuits
Adel S. Sedra, Kenneth C. Smith
5th or 6th Edition (Vorlesung entsprechend 5th Edition)
ISBN 0-19-514252-7
Oxford University Press, 2004
402-0052-00LPhysics I: Waves and ThermodynamicsO4 credits2V + 2UA. Imamoglu
AbstractPhysics I is an introduction to continuum mechanics, wave phenomena, and fundamental concepts of thermodynamics.
ObjectiveAfter completing this course, students should be able to construct and apply simple models of dynamics in non-rigid materials. Students should also be able to identify and relate basic thermodynamic quantities in equilibrium systems given realistic constraints.
ContentThe lecture will discuss the following concepts:

Waves
- One dimensional wave equation
- Plane waves, spherical waves in 2 and 3 dimensions
- Elastic waves, sound velocity
- Stationary waves, resonances
- Propagation: interference and diffraction
- Doppler effect

Thermodynamics
- Kinetic theory of gases, perfect gases
- Conservation of energy, first principle
- Second principle, thermal cycles
- Entropy, thermodynamical and statistical interpretation
- Thermal radiation and heat transfer.
Lecture notesThe lecture notes will be distributed via the Moodle platform.
LiteratureP. A. Tipler and G. Mosca, "Physics for Scientists and Engineers" (6th edition) Chapters 14-20.
Prerequisites / NoticeTechnical Mechanics, Analysis
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