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Suchergebnis: Katalogdaten im Herbstsemester 2018

Science, Technology, and Policy Master Information
Kernfächer
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
860-0003-00LCornerstone Science, Technology, and Policy Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Only for Science, Technology, and Policy MSc, MAS and PhD.
O2 KP2ST. Bernauer
KurzbeschreibungThis course introduces students to the MSc STP and MAS STP program in two ways. First, it provides a general introduction to the study of STP. Second, it exposes students to a variety of complex policy problems and ways and means of coming up with proposals for and assessments of policy options.
LernzielThis course introduces students to the MSc STP and MAS STP program in two ways. First, it provides a general introduction to the study of STP. Second, it exposes students to a variety of complex policy problems and ways and means of coming up with proposals for and assessments of policy options.
InhaltDay 1: Introduction to the study of Science, Technology and Policy / getting to know each other, social event
Day 2: Knowledge assessment in areas marked by controversy over scientific evidence
Day 3: Challenges of urban development / Energy transition and sustainable mobility
Day 4: Mitigating and adapting to climate change / Managing international water resources
Day 5: Implications of digital society / Policy planning exercise
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesReserved for the ISTP MSC and MAS students
860-0002-00LQuantitative Policy Analysis and ModelingO6 KP4GA. Patt, S. Hanger-Kopp, S. Pfenninger, T. Schmidt
KurzbeschreibungThe lectures will introduce students to the principles of quantitative policy analysis, namely the methods to predict and evaluate the social, economic, and environmental effects of alternative strategies to achieve public objectives. A series of graded assignments will give students an opportunity for students to apply those methods to a set of case studies
LernzielThe objectives of this course are to develop the following key skills necessary for policy analysts:
- Identifying the critical quantitative factors that are of importance to policy makers in a range of decision-making situations.
- Developing conceptual models of the types of processes and relationships governing these quantitative factors, including stock-flow dynamics, feedback loops, optimization, sources and effects of uncertainty, and agent coordination problems.
- Develop and program numerical models to simulate the processes and relationships, in order to identify policy problems and the effects of policy interventions.
- Communicate the findings from these simulations and associated analysis in a manner that makes transparent their theoretical foundation, the level and sources of uncertainty, and ultimately their applicability to the policy problem.
The course will proceed through a series of policy analysis and modeling exercises, involving real-world or hypothetical problems. The specific examples around which work will be done will concern the environment, energy, health, and natural hazards management.
860-0004-00LBridging Science, Technology, and Policy Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Only for Science, Technology, and Policy MSc, MAS and PhD.
O3 KP2ST. Bernauer
KurzbeschreibungThis course focuses on technological innovations from the beginning of humanity through the industrial revolution up until today. It provides students with a deeper understanding of the factors that drive technological innovations, and the roles government policies, society, science, and industry play in this regard.
LernzielThis course picks up on the ISTP Cornerstone Science, Technology and Policy course and goes into greater depth on issues covered in that course, as well as additional issues where science and technology are among the causes of societal challenges but can also help in finding solutions.
InhaltWeek 1: no class because of ISTP Cornerstone Science, Technology and Policy course
Week 2: technology & society in historical perspective - technological innovations up to the industrial revolution
Week 3: technology & society in historical perspective - technological innovations during the industrial revolution - engines & electricity
Week 4: technology & society in historical perspective - from the industrial revolution to modernity - mobility and transport (railroads, ships, cars, airplanes, space)
Week 5: food production: the green revolutions.
Week 6: microelectronics, computing & the internet
Week 7: life sciences: pharmaceuticals & diagnostic technology
Week 8: energy: primary fuels, renewables, networks
Week 9: automation: self-driving cars & trains, drones
Week 10: communication & Big Data: semiconductors and software
Week 11: military & security issues associated with technological innovation
Week 12: possible futures (1): nuclear fusion, geoengineering
Week 13: possible Future (2): information, communication, robotics, synthetic biology, nanotech, quantum computing
SkriptCourse materials will be given to the students prior to the start of each class
860-0005-00LColloquium Science, Technology, and Policy (HS) Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Only for Science, Technology, and Policy MSc and MAS.
O1 KP2KT. Bernauer
KurzbeschreibungPresentations by invited guest speakers from academia and practice/policy. Students are assigned to play a leading role in the discussion and write a report on the respective event.
LernzielPresentations by invited guest speakers from academia and practice/policy. Students are assigned to play a leading role in the discussion and write a report on the respective event.
InhaltSee program on the ISTP website: http://www.istp.ethz.ch/events/colloquium.html
Voraussetzungen / Besonderesopen to anyone from ETH
860-0007-00LPrinciples of Economics Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Only for Science, Technology, and Policy MSc and MAS.
O3 KP2VS. Sarferaz, J.‑P. Nicolai
KurzbeschreibungThis course is an introduction to the study of economics. Students will learn about the economic way of thinking, the functioning of a market economy, as well as the potentials and limitations of economic policies to govern the behavior of individuals and the economy. The course is divided into two parts, the first covering microeconomic analysis, and the second on macroeconomics.
LernzielThe first part of the course focuses on microeconomic analysis, including the behavior of individuals and firms, supply and demand analysis, and market failures. Students will also be introduced to the use of microeconomic thought to influence the behavior of individuals and firms and to address market failures.
The second part focuses on macroeconomic concepts, including national production, employment, inflation, and growth theories. Students will then learn about macroeconomic policies, such as monetary and fiscal policy, often used to stabilize short-run economic fluctuations.
SkriptLecture slides will be made available by email or via course website.
LiteraturMankiw, N. G. and Taylor, M. P. (2014), Economics, Cengage Learning, 3rd Edition.
860-0001-00LPublic Institutions and Policy-Making Processes Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to 25.

Priority for Science, Technology, and Policy MSc and MAS students.
O3 KP3GT. Bernauer, S. Bechtold, F. Schimmelfennig
KurzbeschreibungStudents acquire the contextual knowledge for analyzing public policies. They learn why and how public policies and laws are developed, designed, and implemented at national and international levels, and what challenges arise in this regard.
LernzielPublic policies result from decision-making processes that take place within formal institutions of the state (parliament, government, public administration, courts). That is, policies are shaped by the characteristics of decision-making processes and the characteristics of public institutions and related actors (e.g. interest groups). In this course, students acquire the contextual knowledge for analyzing public policies. They learn why and how public policies and laws are developed, designed, and implemented at national and international levels, and what challenges arise in this regard. The course is organized in three modules. The first module (Stefan Bechtold) examines basic concepts and the role of law, law-making, and law enforcement in modern societies. The second module (Thomas Bernauer) deals with the functioning of legislatures, governments, and interest groups. The third module (Frank Schimmelfennig) focuses on the European Union and international organisations.
InhaltPublic policies result from decision-making processes that take place within formal institutions of the state (parliament, government, public administration, courts). That is, policies are shaped by the characteristics of decision-making processes and the characteristics of public institutions and related actors (e.g. interest groups). In this course, students acquire the contextual knowledge for analyzing public policies. They learn why and how public policies and laws are developed, designed, and implemented at national and international levels, and what challenges arise in this regard. The course is organized in three modules. The first module (Stefan Bechtold) examines basic concepts and the role of law, law-making, and law enforcement in modern societies. The second module (Thomas Bernauer) deals with the functioning of legislatures, governments, and interest groups. The third module (Frank Schimmelfennig) focuses on the European Union and international organisations.
SkriptReading materials will be distributed electronically to the students when the semester starts.
LiteraturBaylis, John, Steve Smith, and Patricia Owens (2014): The Globalization of World Politics. An Introduction to International Relations. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Caramani, Daniele (ed.) (2014): Comparative Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Gilardi, Fabrizio (2012): Transnational Diffusion: Norms, Ideas, and Policies, in Carlsnaes, Walter, Thomas Risse and Beth Simmons, Handbook of International Relations, 2nd Edition, London: Sage, pp. 453-477.

Hage, Jaap and Bram Akkermans (eds.) (2nd edition 2017): Introduction to Law, Heidelberg: Springer.

Jolls, Christine (2013): Product Warnings, Debiasing, and Free Speech: The Case of Tobacco Regulation, Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics 169: 53-78.

Lelieveldt, Herman and Sebastiaan Princen (2011): The Politics of European Union. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Lessig, Lawrence (2006): Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace, Version 2.0, New York: Basic Books. Available at http://codev2.cc/download+remix/Lessig-Codev2.pdf.

Schimmelfennig, Frank and Ulrich Sedelmeier (2004): Governance by Conditionality: EU Rule Transfer to the Candidate Countries of Central and Eastern Europe, in: Journal of European Public Policy 11(4): 669-687.

Shipan, Charles V. and Craig Volden (2012): Policy Diffusion: Seven Lessons for Scholars and Practitioners. Public Administration Review 72(6): 788-796.

Sunstein, Cass R. (2014): The Limits of Quantification, California Law Review 102: 1369-1422.

Thaler, Richard H. and Cass R. Sunstein (2003): Libertarian Paternalism. American Economic Review: Papers & Proceedings 93: 175-179.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThis is a Master level course. The course is capped at 25 students, with ISTP Master students having priority.
860-0001-01LPublic Institutions and Policy-Making Processes; Research Paper Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Only for Science, Technology, and Policy MSc and MAS.

Prerequisite: you have to be enrolled in 860-0001-00L during the same semester.
O3 KP3AT. Bernauer, S. Bechtold, F. Schimmelfennig
KurzbeschreibungThis is an add-on module to the course: 860-0001-00L. It focuses on students writing an essay on an issue covered by the main course 860-0001-00L.
LernzielStudents learn how to write an essay on a policy issue they select.
InhaltPublic policies result from decision-making processes that take place within formal institutions of the state (parliament, government, public administration, courts). That is, policies are shaped by the characteristics of decision-making processes and the characteristics of public institutions and related actors (e.g. interest groups). In this course, students acquire the contextual knowledge for analyzing public policies - hence this course is complementary to the ISTP course on concepts and methods of policy analysis. Students learn why and how public policies and laws are developed, designed, and implemented at national and international levels. The course is organized in three modules. The first module (taught by Stefan Bechtold) examines basic concepts and the role of law, law-making, and law enforcement in modern societies. The second module (taught by Thomas Bernauer) deals with the functioning of legislatures, governments, and interest groups. The third module (taught by Frank Schimmelfennig) focuses on the European Union and international organizations.
SkriptSee 860-0001-00L
LiteraturBaylis, John, Steve Smith, and Patricia Owens (2014): The Globalization of World Politics. An Introduction to International Relations. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Bernauer, T., Jahn, D., Kuhn, P., Walter, S. (2009, 2012): Einführung in die Politikwissenschaft (Introduction to Political Science). Baden-Baden: Nomos / UTB.

Caramani, Daniele (ed.) (2014): Comparative Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Gilardi, Fabrizio (2012): Transnational Diffusion: Norms, Ideas, and Policies, in Carlsnaes, Walter, Thomas Risse and Beth Simmons, Handbook of International Relations, 2nd Edition, London: Sage, pp. 453-477.

Hage, Jaap and Bram Akkermans (eds.) (2nd edition 2017): Introduction to Law, Heidelberg: Springer, available as an ebook at ETH library.

Jolls, Christine (2013): Product Warnings, Debiasing, and Free Speech: The Case of Tobacco Regulation, Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics 169: 53-78.

Lelieveldt, Herman and Sebastiaan Princen (2011): The Politics of European Union. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Lessig, Lawrence (2006): Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace, Version 2.0, New York: Basic Books. Available at http://codev2.cc/download+remix/Lessig-Codev2.pdf.

Schimmelfennig, Frank and Ulrich Sedelmeier (2004): Governance by Conditionality: EU Rule Transfer to the Candidate Countries of Central and Eastern Europe, in: Journal of European Public Policy 11(4): 669-687.

Shipan, Charles V. and Craig Volden (2012): Policy Diffusion: Seven Lessons for Scholars and Practitioners. Public Administration Review 72(6): 788-796.

Sunstein, Cass R. (2014): The Limits of Quantification, California Law Review 102: 1369-1422.

Thaler, Richard H. and Cass R. Sunstein (2003): Libertarian Paternalism. American Economic Review: Papers & Proceedings 93: 175-179.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesAccess only for ISTP MSc students also enrolled in 860-0001-00L
860-0006-00LEssential Tools and Statistics for Impact and Policy Evaluation Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to 20.

Science, Technology, and Policy MSc and MAS students have priority.

This lecture had been offered until autumn semester 2017 with the title "Applied Statistics and Policy Evaluation". Students who has completed that lecture cannot take credit points for this lecture again.
O3 KP2GL. Beiser-McGrath
KurzbeschreibungThis course aims to equip students with the basic knowledge and skills to both understand and conduct the evaluation of policies. This will involve both learning about statistical models and their appropriateness for estimating causal effects, as well as developing skills using statistical software to implement these models.
LernzielStudents will:
- know strategies to test causal hypotheses using regression analysis and/or experimental methods
- be able to critically interpret results of applied statistics, in particular, regarding causal inference
- be able to critically read and assess published studies on policy evaluation
- learn to use the statistical software R
InhaltThis course aims to equip students with the basic knowledge and skills to both understand and conduct the evaluation of policies. The first part of the course offers a thorough treatment of the classical linear regression model, the workhorse model for quantitative data analysis, and the program R that will be used for statistical analysis. The second part of the course focuses on more advanced methods that aim to estimate causal effects from observational data.
Fallstudien
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
860-0011-00LModeling and Simulating Social Systems in MATLAB (or Python) - With Coding Project Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Only for Science, Technology, and Policy MSc and MAS.
W6 KP2S + 2AN. Antulov-Fantulin, D. Helbing, L. Aguilar Melgar
KurzbeschreibungThis course introduces mathematical and computational models to study social systems and the process of scientific research.

Students develop a significant project, implementing a model and communicating their results through a seminar thesis and a short oral presentation.
LernzielThe students should learn how to use a high level programming environment (MATLAB or Python) as a tool to solve various scientific problems. The use of a high level programming environment makes it possible to quickly find numerical solutions to a wide range of scientific problems. Students will learnt to take advantage of a rich set of tools to present their results numerically and graphically.

After the students have learned the basic structure of the programming language, they should be able to implement social simulation models and document their skills through a seminar thesis and finally give a short oral presentation.
InhaltThis course introduces first the basic functionalities and features of the high level programming environments (MATLAB and Python), such as the simple operations with matrices and vectors, differential equations, statistical tools, the graphical representation of data in various forms, and video animations of spatio-temporal data. With this knowledge, students are expected to implement themselves models of various social processes and systems, including agent-based models, e.g. models of interactive decision making, group dynamics, human crowds, or game-theoretical models.

Part of this course will consist of supervised programming exercises. Credit points are finally earned for the implementation of a mathematical model from the sociological literature and the documentation in a seminar thesis.
SkriptThe lecture slides will be presented on the course web page after each lecture.
LiteraturLiterature, in particular regarding computer models in the social sciences, will be provided in the course.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThe number of participants is limited to the size of the available computer teaching room. The source code related to the seminar thesis should be well enough documented for further use by others and must be handed over to the Chair of Computational Social Science (COSS) for further free and unrestricted use.
101-0417-00LTransport Planning MethodsW6 KP4GK. W. Axhausen
KurzbeschreibungThe course provides the necessary knowledge to develop models supporting and also evaluating the solution of given planning problems.
The course is composed of a lecture part, providing the theoretical knowledge, and an applied part in which students develop their own models in order to evaluate a transport project/ policy by means of cost-benefit analysis.
Lernziel- Knowledge and understanding of statistical methods and algorithms commonly used in transport planning
- Comprehend the reasoning and capabilities of transport models
- Ability to independently develop a transport model able to solve / answer planning problem
- Getting familiar with cost-benefit analysis as a decision-making supporting tool
InhaltThe course provides the necessary knowledge to develop models supporting the solution of given planning problems and also introduces cost-benefit analysis as a decision-making tool. Examples of such planning problems are the estimation of traffic volumes, prediction of estimated utilization of new public transport lines, and evaluation of effects (e.g. change in emissions of a city) triggered by building new infrastructure and changes to operational regulations.

To cope with that, the problem is divided into sub-problems, which are solved using various statistical models (e.g. regression, discrete choice analysis) and algorithms (e.g. iterative proportional fitting, shortest path algorithms, method of successive averages).

The course is composed of a lecture part, providing the theoretical knowledge, and an applied part in which students develop their own models in order to evaluate a transport project/ policy by means of cost-benefit analysis. Interim lab session take place regularly to guide and support students with the applied part of the course.
SkriptMoodle platform (enrollment needed)
LiteraturWillumsen, P. and J. de D. Ortuzar (2003) Modelling Transport, Wiley, Chichester.

Cascetta, E. (2001) Transportation Systems Engineering: Theory and Methods, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht.

Sheffi, Y. (1985) Urban Transportation Networks: Equilibrium Analysis with Mathematical Programming Methods, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs.

Schnabel, W. and D. Lohse (1997) Verkehrsplanung, 2. edn., vol. 2 of Grundlagen der Strassenverkehrstechnik und der Verkehrsplanung, Verlag für Bauwesen, Berlin.

McCarthy, P.S. (2001) Transportation Economics: A case study approach, Blackwell, Oxford.
Wahlfächer
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
351-0778-01LDiscovering Management (Exercises)
Complementary exercises for the module Discovering Managment.

Prerequisite: Participation and successful completion of the module Discovering Management (351-0778-00L) is mandatory.
W Dr1 KP1UB. Clarysse, L. De Cuyper
KurzbeschreibungThis course is offered complementary to the basis course 351-0778-00L, "Discovering Management". The course offers additional exercises and case studies.
LernzielThis course is offered to complement the course 351-0778-00L. The course offers additional exercises and case studies.
InhaltThe course offers additional exercises and case studies concering:
Strategic Management; Technology and Innovation Management; Operations and Supply Chain Management; Finance and Accounting; Marketing and Sales.

Please refer to the course website for further information on the content, credit conditions and schedule of the module: Link
351-0778-00LDiscovering Management
Entry level course in management for BSc, MSc and PHD students at all levels not belonging to D-MTEC. This course can be complemented with Discovering Management (Excercises) 351-0778-01.
W3 KP3GB. Clarysse, M. Ambühl, S. Brusoni, E. Fleisch, G. Grote, V. Hoffmann, T. Netland, G. von Krogh, F. von Wangenheim
KurzbeschreibungDiscovering Management offers an introduction to the field of business management and entrepreneurship for engineers and natural scientists. The module provides an overview of the principles of management, teaches knowledge about management that is highly complementary to the students' technical knowledge, and provides a basis for advancing the knowledge of the various subjects offered at D-MTEC.
LernzielDiscovering Management combines in an innovate format a set of lectures and an advanced business game. The learning model for Discovering Management involves 'learning by doing'. The objective is to introduce the students to the relevant topics of the management literature and give them a good introduction in entrepreneurship topics too. The course is a series of lectures on the topics of strategy, innovation, corporate finance, leadership, design thinking and corporate social responsibility. While the 14 different lectures provide the theoretical and conceptual foundations, the experiential learning outcomes result from the interactive business game. The purpose of the business game is to analyse the innovative needs of a large multinational company and develop a business case for the company to grow. This business case is as relevant to someone exploring innovation within an organisation as it is if you are planning to start your own business. By discovering the key aspects of entrepreneurial management, the purpose of the course is to advance students' understanding of factors driving innovation, entrepreneurship, and company success.
InhaltDiscovering Management aims to broaden the students' understanding of the principles of business management, emphasizing the interdependence of various topics in the development and management of a firm. The lectures introduce students not only to topics relevant for managing large corporations, but also touch upon the different aspects of starting up your own venture. The lectures will be presented by the respective area specialists at D-MTEC.
The course broadens the view and understanding of technology by linking it with its commercial applications and with society. The lectures are designed to introduce students to topics related to strategy, corporate innovation, leadership, corporate and entrepreneurial finance, value chain analysis, corporate social responsibility, and business model innovation. Practical examples from industry experts will stimulate the students to critically assess these issues. Creative skills will be trained by the business game exercise, a participant-centered learning activity, which provides students with the opportunity to place themselves in the role of Chief Innovation Officer of a large multinational company. As they learn more about the specific case and identify the challenge they are faced with, the students will have to develop an innovative business case for this multinational corporation. Doing so, this exercise will provide an insight into the context of managerial problem-solving and corporate innovation, and enhance the students' appreciation for the complex tasks companies and managers deal with. The business game presents a realistic model of a company and provides a valuable learning platform to integrate the increasingly important development of the skills and competences required to identify entrepreneurial opportunities, analyse the future business environment and successfully respond to it by taking systematic decisions, e.g. critical assessment of technological possibilities.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesDiscovering Management is designed to suit the needs and expectations of Bachelor students at all levels as well as Master and PhD students not belonging to D-MTEC. By providing an overview of Business Management, this course is an ideal enrichment of the standard curriculum at ETH Zurich.
No prior knowledge of business or economics is required to successfully complete this course.
851-0609-06LGoverning the Energy Transition Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to 25.

Primarily suited for Master and PhD level.
W3 KP2VT. Schmidt, S. Sewerin
KurzbeschreibungThis course addresses the role of policy and its underlying politics in the transformation of the energy sector. It covers historical, socio-economic, and political perspectives and applies various theoretical concepts to specific aspects of governing the energy transition.
Lernziel- To gain an overview of the history of the transition of large technical systems
- To recognize current challenges in the energy system to understand the theoretical frameworks and concepts for studying transitions
- To demonstrate knowledge on the role of policy and politics in energy transitions
InhaltClimate change, access to energy and other societal challenges are directly linked to the way we use and create energy. Both the recent United Nations Paris climate change agreement and the UN Sustainable Development Goals make a fast and extensive transition of the energy system necessary.
This course introduces the social and environmental challenges involved in the energy sector and discusses the implications of these challenges for the rate and direction of technical change in the energy sector. It compares the current situation with historical socio-technical transitions and derives the consequences for policy-making. It then introduces theoretical frameworks and concepts for studying innovation and transitions. It then focuses on the role of policy and policy change in governing the energy transition, considering the role of political actors, institutions and policy feedback.
The course has a highly interactive (seminar-like) character. Students are expected to actively engage in the weekly discussions and to give a presentation (15-20 minutes) on one of the weekly topics during that particular session. The presentation and participation in the discussions will form one part of the final grade (50%), the remaining 50% of the final grade will be formed by a final exam.
SkriptSlides and reading material will be made available via moodle.ethz.ch (only for registered students).
LiteraturA reading list will be provided via moodle.ethz.ch at the beginning of the semester.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThis course is particularly suited for students of the following programmes: MA Comparative International Studies; MSc Energy Science & Technology; MSc Environmental Sciences; MSc Management, Technology & Economics; MSc Science, Technology & Policy; ETH & UZH PhD programmes.
363-1065-00LDesign Thinking: Human-Centred Solutions to Real World Challenges Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Due to didactic reasons, the number of participants is limited to 30.

All interested students are invited to apply for this course by sending a short motivation letter to Linda Armbruster (larmbruster@ethz.ch).

Additionally please enroll via mystudies. Please note that all students are put on the waiting list and that your current position on the waiting list is irrelevant, as places will be assigned after the first lecture on the basis of your motivation letter and commitment for the class.
W5 KP5GA. Cabello Llamas, L. Armbruster, S. Brusoni
KurzbeschreibungThe goal of this course is to engage students in a multidisciplinary collaboration to tackle real world problems. Following a design thinking approach, students will work in teams to solve a set of design challenges that are organized as a one-week, a three-week, and a final six-week project in collaboration with an external project partner.

Information and application: http://sparklabs.ch/
LernzielDuring the course, students will learn about different design thinking methods and tools. This will enable them to:
- Generate deep insights through the systematic observation and interaction of key stakeholders (empathy).
- Engage in collaborative ideation with a multidisciplinary team.
- Rapidly prototype and iteratively test ideas and concepts by using various materials and techniques.
InhaltThe purpose of this course is to equip the students with methods and tools to tackle a broad range of problems. Following a Design Thinking approach, the students will learn how to observe and interact with key stakeholders in order to develop an in-depth understanding of what is truly important and emotionally meaningful to the people at the center of a problem. Based on these insights, the students ideate on possible solutions and immediately validated them through quick iterations of prototyping and testing using different tools and materials. The students will work in multidisciplinary teams on a set of challenges that are organized as a one-week, a three-week, and a final six-week project with an external project partner. In this course, the students will learn about the different Design Thinking methods and tools that are needed to generate deep insights, to engage in collaborative ideation, rapid prototyping and iterative testing.

Design Thinking is a deeply human process that taps into the creative abilities we all have, but that get often overlooked by more conventional problem solving practices. It relies on our ability to be intuitive, to recognize patterns, to construct ideas that are emotionally meaningful as well as functional, and to express ourselves through means beyond words or symbols. Design Thinking provides an integrated way by incorporating tools, processes and techniques from design, engineering, the humanities and social sciences to identify, define and address diverse challenges. This integration leads to a highly productive collaboration between different disciplines.

For more information and the application visit: http://sparklabs.ch/
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesOpen mind, ability to manage uncertainty and to work with students from various background. Class attendance and active participation is crucial as much of the learning occurs through the work in teams during class. Therefore, attendance is obligatory for every session. Please also note that the group work outside class is an essential element of this course, so that students must expect an above-average workload.

Please note that the class is designed for full-time MSc students. Interested MAS students need to send an email to Linda Armbruster to learn about the requirements of the class.
051-0159-00LUrban Design I Information W1 KP2VH. Klumpner
KurzbeschreibungThe ‘Urban Stories’ lecture series introduces a city during each lecture. The city’s urban development is described through contemporary phenomena and is critically presented as strategies and tactics. The urban phenomenon we explore in this course show urban conditions, models and operational modes.
LernzielHow can we read cities and recognise current trends and urban phenomena? The lectures series will produce a catalogue of operational urban tools as a series of critical case studies, and as basis for future practice. Urban Stories introduces a repertoire of urban design instruments to the students.
This will empower them to read cities and apply these tools in the urban environment. The course will approach the topic employing analytical cases on different scales, geographies, in diverse socio-political and economical environments. With our collection of tools compiled in a 'toolbox', we aim to tell the fundamental story of contemporary urban development. This specific analysis offers insight and knowledge that helps students to make informed design decisions. The tools are grouped in thematic clusters, compared and interpreted. This approach sensibilities the students to understand how to operate in different local but also international contexts.
InhaltUrban form cannot be reduced to the physical space. Cities are the result of social construction, under the influence of technologies, ecology, culture, the impact of experts and accidents. Urban un-concluded processes respond to political interests, economic pressure, cultural inclinations, along with the imagination of architects and urbanists and the informal powers at work in complex adaptive systems. Current urban phenomena are the result of an urban evolution. The facts stored in urban environments include contributions from its entire lifecycle. That is true for the physical environment, but also for non-physical aspects, the imaginary city that exists along with its potentials and problems and with the conflicts that have evolved over time. Knowledge and understanding along with a critical observation of the actions and policies are necessary to understand the diversity and instability present in the contemporary city and to understand how urban form evolved to its current state.

How did cities develop into the cities we live in now? Which urban plans, instruments, visions, political decisions, economic reasonings, cultural inputs and social organisation have been used to operate in urban settlements in specific moments of change? We have chosen cities that are exemplary in illustrating how these instruments have been implemented and how they have shaped urban environments. We transcribe these instruments into urban operational tools that we have recognized and collected within existing tested cases in contemporary cities across the globe.

This lecture series will introduce urban knowledge and the way it has introduced urban models and operational modes within different concrete realities, therefore shaping cities. Urban knowledge will be translated into operational tools, extracted from cities where they have been tested and become exemplary samples, most relevant for providing the understanding of how urban landscape has taken shape. The tools are clustered in twelve thematic clusters and three tool scales for better comparability and cross-reflection.

Tool case studies are compiled into a toolbox, which we use as templates to read the city and to critically reflect upon it. The presented contents are meant to serve as inspiration for positioning in future professional life as well as to provide instruments for future design decisions.
SkriptThe learning material, available via https://moodle-app2.let.ethz.ch/ is comprised of:
- Toolbox 'Reader' with introduction to the lecture course and tool summaries
- Weekly exercise tasks
- Infographics with basic information of each city
- Quiz question for each tool
- Additional reading material

The compiled learning material can be downloaded from the student-server: afp://brillembourg-klumpner-server.ethz.ch

Please check also the Chair website for more information: http://u-tt.com/teaching/

For a brief digital overview of all presented cities in the lecture series (not official learning material): http://utt-toolbox.com/
LiteraturPlease see 'Skript', (a digital reader is available)
Voraussetzungen / Besonderes"Semesterkurs" (semester course) students from other departments or students taking this lecture as GESS / Studium Generale course as well as exchange students must submit a research paper, which will be subject to the performance assessment: "Bestanden" (pass) or "Nicht bestanden" (failed) as the performance assessment type, for "Urban Design I: Urban Stories" taken as a semester course, is categorized as "unbenotete Semesterleistung" (ungraded semester performance).
869-0101-00LCommunicating with Stakeholders and Policy-Makers Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to10.

Only for MAS in Science, Technology and Policy and Science, Technology and Policy MSc.
W2 KP1GH. de Bruijn
Kurzbeschreibung
Lernziel
869-0102-00LDesign Thinking: A Human-Centered Approach to Problem-Solving Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to10.

Only for MAS in Science, Technology and Policy and Science, Technology and Policy MSc.
W1 KP1GS. Brusoni, A. Repetti
KurzbeschreibungThe purpose of this course is to equip the students with methods and tools to tackle a broad range of problems. Following a Design Thinking approach, the students will learn how to observe and interact with key stakeholders in order to develop an in-depth understanding of what is truly important and emotionally meaningful to the people at the center of a problem.
LernzielThe purpose of this course is to equip the students with methods and tools to tackle a broad range of problems. Following a Design Thinking approach, the students will learn how to observe and interact with key stakeholders in order to develop an in-depth understanding of what is truly important and emotionally meaningful to the people at the center of a problem. Based on these insights, the students will ideate on possible solutions and immediately validated them through quick iterations of prototyping and testing using different tools and materials. .
InhaltParticipants are expected to discover, explore and share valuable skills outside their expertise through agile and collaborative teamwork and hands-on exercises. During the entire process, they will be supported through team skill-building exercises, short theoretical presentations and experienced coaching.
869-0103-00LNegotiations Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to10.

Only for MAS in Science, Technology and Policy and Science, Technology and Policy MSc.
W2 KP1GC. Garcia
KurzbeschreibungFor two days, the participants will take on the role of CEOs of logging and mining companies operating in the Congo Basin, developing strategies and responding to global changes. They will shape the landscape, and reflect on the ecological, economic and social impacts of their decisions.
LernzielThe tropical forests stand at the cross-road. The combined and interacting effects of land-use change, resource extraction, defaunation and climate change are pushing these ecosystems towards critical points where transitions to altered states will happen. The future of these forests depends on our capacity to understand and anticipate these transitions.
In this module the participants will understand the drivers behind land use change in the tropics, and will explore some the pitfalls and opportunities new markets and policies can create for the local communities and the ecosystems of the region. They will negociate new pathways of collective action and learn to cope with uncertainty.
InhaltParticipants will use a game developped to explore the links between mining and logging in the Congo Basin. Each game will be followed up by a debriefing to analyse the outcomes of the strategies developped by the participants and invent possible new forms of collective action. We will link what happens in the game with highlitghts from the field. Finally, we will discuss on the use of boundary objects and particularly games to handle negociations in environmental contexts.
SkriptNone
LiteraturGeist HJ & Lambin EF (2002) Proximate Causes and Underlying Driving Forces of Tropical Deforestation. Bioscience 52(2):143-150.

Fernbach PM, Rogers T, Fox CR, & Sloman SA (2013) Political Extremism Is Supported by an Illusion of Understanding. Psychological Science 24(6):939-946.

Game ET, Meijaard E, Sheil D, & McDonald-Madden E (2014) Conservation in a Wicked Complex World; Challenges and Solutions. Conservation Letters 7(3):271-277.

Garcia C, Dray A, & Waeber P (2016) Learning Begins When the Game Is Over: Using Games to Embrace Complexity in Natural Resources Management. GAIA - Ecological Perspectives for Science and Society 25(4):289-291.

Potapov, P., Hansen, M. C., Laestadius L., Turubanova S., Yaroshenko A., Thies C., Smith W., Zhuravleva I., Komarova A., Minnemeyer S., Esipova E. 2016. The last frontiers of wilderness: Tracking loss of intact forest landscapes from 2000 to 2013. Science Advances, 2017; 3:e1600821 http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/3/1/e1600821

Potapov P., Yaroshenko A., Turubanova S., Dubinin M., Laestadius L., Thies C., Aksenov D., Egorov A., Yesipova Y., Glushkov I., Karpachevskiy M., Kostikova A., Manisha A., Tsybikova E., Zhuravleva I. 2008. Mapping the World's Intact Forest Landscapes by Remote Sensing. Ecology and Society, 13 (2) https://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol13/iss2/art51/
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesNone
860-0030-00LDigitale Nachhaltigkeit Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Maximale Teilnehmerzahl: 45

Diese LE ersetzt die LE 851-0591-00 Digitale Nachhaltigkeit in der Wissensgesellschaft. Studierende, die die Lerneinheit 851-0591 Digitale Nachhaltigkeit belegt hatten dürfen die Lerneinheit 860-0030-00L nicht besuchen und anrechnen lassen.

Besonders geeignet für Studierende D-INFK, D-ITET, D-MATL, D-MAVT, D-MTECT, D-USYS
W3 KP2VM. M. Dapp, D. Helbing
KurzbeschreibungWie beeinflussen verschiedene Interessen die Methoden der Produktion, Verteilung und Nutzung digitaler Ressourcen? Den gängigen Ansätzen mit starker Betonung Geistigen Eigentums werden offene Ansätze, zum Beispiel Open Source/Content/Access, gegenübergestellt. Der Fokus liegt auf den Auswirkungen dieser Ansätze und »digitaler Nachhaltigkeit« als möglicher Vision für die Gesellschaft.
LernzielIm Zentrum des Diskurses steht der Umgang mit digitalen Gütern und Geistigem Eigentum in unserer Gesellschaft. Digitalisierung und Internet ermöglichen einen Umgang mit Wissen, der in direktem Gegensatz zum traditionellen Verständnis von "Geistigem Eigentum" und den darauf fussenden Industrien steht. Ausgehend von ökonomischen und rechtlichen Grundlagen werden proprietäre und offene/«freie» Modelle einander gegenüber gestellt. Nachhaltige Entwicklung wird als Konzept auf digitale Güter übertragen, so dass die besondere Natur digitaler «Dinge» berücksichtigt wird.
Die Studierenden können anschliessend (hoffentlich)
- die besondere Natur digitaler Güter im Gegensatz zu physischen abgrenzen
- die Grundkonzepte von Urheberrecht und Patentrecht kritisch erläutern
- das Grundprinzip von Blockchains als jüngste offene Entwicklung erklären
- politisch-rechtliche und ökonomische Unterschiede proprietärer und offener Ansätze bei der Produktion und Nutzung digitaler Güter erklären
- an einem Beispiel erklären, was digitale Nachhaltigkeit bedeutet und worin die Relevanz des Konzepts für Wissensgesellschaften liegt
- Ansätze der Freien/Open Source Software auf andere digitale Güter übertragen (z.B. Open Content, Open Access)
InhaltTechnische Realität: In Minuten können wir perfekte Kopien hochwertigen digitalen Wissens oder Kultur (als Text, Audio, Video, Grafik oder Software) über den gesamten Globus verteilen. Und dies zu verschwindend geringen Kosten. «Digitalisierung plus Internet» ermöglichen erstmals in der Geschichte der Menschheit den (theoretisch) freien Zugang und Austausch von Wissen weltweit zu minimalen Kosten. Eine immense Chance für die Weiterentwicklung der Gesellschaften in Nord und Süd. «Cool, so what's the problem?»
Das Problem ist, dass diese Realität das heutige Geschäftsmodell der Wissens- und Kulturindustrien (vom Music Label und Hollywood über den Verlag bis zum Software-Hersteller) in seinen Grundfesten bedroht. Es sind mächtige kommerzielle Interessen im Spiel, denn die Bedeutung von «Wissen» als viertem Produktionsfaktor wird im 21. Jahrhundert weiter stark zunehmen. Dementsprechend hart ist das Vorgehen gegen «Raubkopierer», «Softwarepiraten» und «File-Sharer». Eine Kernfrage ist das Konzept des Eigentums an digitalem Wissen. Herangezogen wird ein Jahrhunderte altes Konzept von «Geistigem Eigentum», das der digitalen Realität nicht Rechnung trägt und teilweise zu absurden Situationen führt. Das ursprüngliche Ziel - die Weiterentwicklung der Gesellschaft durch eine möglichst grosse Verbreitung von Wissen - droht vergessen zu gehen.
Der Umgang mit dem PC entwickelt sich zur neuen Kulturtechnik des 21. Jahrhunderts. Neu daran ist, dass diese Kulturtechnik im Gegensatz zu «Lesen, Schreiben und Rechnen» nicht autonom existiert, sondern auf eine Soft- und Hardware-Infrastruktur angewiesen ist. Diese Bindung erzeugt eine Abhängigkeit vom Anbieter der Infrastruktur, der technisch «Spielregeln» festlegen kann, die dem Benutzer Freiheiten nehmen oder sie begrenzen können. Selbst der Fortgeschrittene kann diese (häufig verdeckt) implementierten Spielregeln technisch nur schwer erkennen und deren gesellschaftliche Bedeutung kaum bewerten. Doch gerade diese unsichtbaren Konsequenzen gilt es zu begreifen und zu hinterfragen, denn sie kontrollieren Zugriff, Verteilung und Nutzung des digitalen Wissens.
Vergleichbar mit der Öko-Bewegung in den 60/70er Jahren, existiert eine wachsende politische Bewegung für «Freie Software», dessen populärstes Symbol «GNU/Linux» ist. Sie kämpft dafür, dass Softwarecode als zentrales Kulturgut nicht als Privateigentum behandelt wird, sondern frei von Privatinteressen allen zur Verfügung steht. Mit dem Erfolg dieser Bewegung sind weitere Initiativen entstanden, die die Konzepte der Freien Software auf andere Wissensbereiche (z.B. akademisches Wissen, Musik) übertragen...
Als Vorgeschmack sei das Essay «ETH Zurich - A Pioneer in Digital Sustainability!» empfohlen. Es kann auf www.essays2030.ethz.ch heruntergeladen werden.
SkriptDie Folien und weitere Unterlagen (beides i.d.R. englischsprachig) werden wöchentlich online verfügbar sein.
LiteraturInhalte der folgenden Bücher (als freie PDFs online erhältlich) werden behandelt:
1 Volker Grassmuck, Freie Software - Zwischen Privat- und Gemeineigentum, Bundeszentrale für Politische Bildung, 2. Aufl. Bonn 2004.
2 François Lévêque & Yann Ménière, The Economics of Patents and Copyright, Berkeley Electronic Press, 2004.
3 Yochai Benkler, The Wealth of Networks, Yale University Press. New Haven 2006.
http://www.benkler.org/wealth_of_networks

Zur Vertiefung empfohlen:
1 (allgemein) Chris DiBona et al., Open Sources Voices from the Open Source Revolution, O'Reilly, 1999.
2 (Politologie) Steven Weber, The Success of Open Source, Harvard UP, 2004.
3 (Recht) James Boyle, Shamans, Software, & Spleens - Law and The Construction of the Information Society, Harvard UP, 1996.
4 (Recht) Lawrence Lessig, Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace, Basic Books, New York 1999.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesAus organisatorischen und didaktischen Gründen (hoher Grad an Interaktion und Gruppenarbeit zu aktuellen Themen als Kreditbedingung) ist die Zahl auf 45 Teilnehmende limitiert. Natürlich sind alle Interessierte eingeladen, die LV auch ohne Semesterleistung zu besuchen.
851-0739-00LFiscal Policy and InequalityW2 KP2VE. Ash
KurzbeschreibungThis course provides an introduction to the political economy of fiscal policy-making. We first analyze policy inputs, with a focus on how elections select and incentivize different types of policymakers. Second, we analyze major fiscal policy outputs: choices of taxes, public goods, tax evasion, and inequality. Methods are from economics and applied statistics.
LernzielGovernment policies on how to raise revenue and direct expenditures are critical for economic performance and for the fair distribution of income across society. Yet these policies must be designed and implemented by individuals whose interests may diverge from the people they represent. This course provides an introduction to the political and economic factors determining fiscal policies, and the resulting impacts on economic performance and income distribution.

We compare three systems for choosing policies: direct democracy (decision by voters), representative democracy (decision by politicians), and tenured bureaucracy (decision by judges). More democratic systems are likely to align policies with the preferences of the median voter, while more bureaucratic systems tend to engage technical expertise and protect minority rights. We use applied game theory models to clarify the differences across these systems.

We then ask how different institutions might lead to different fiscal policies. The major policy outputs considered are those from public finance: taxation, public goods, and redistribution. For each of these policy choices, we ask what insights are generated by economic theory and then consider how different governance systems might approach or diverge from these insights. Some reasons for divergence include lobbying and corruption, tax loopholes and evasion, and the tradeoff between efficiency and inequality.

The analytical framework is economic theory, which represents voter and policymaker decisions as optimization problems. We will see that the predictions generated by the economic models are sensitive to the assumptions made, and therefore empirical evidence is needed to choose between models. To this end, students will implement the standard methods in applied statistics and policy evaluation, including fixed effects regressions, instrumentral variables, regression discontinuity designs, and randomized control trials.
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