From 2 November 2020, the autumn semester 2020 will take place online. Exceptions: Courses that can only be carried out with on-site presence.
Please note the information provided by the lecturers via e-mail.

Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2019

GESS Science in Perspective Information
Only the topics listed in this paragraph can be chosen as "GESS Science in Perspective" course.
Further below you will find the "type B courses Reflections about subject specific methods and content" as well as the language courses.

6 ECTS need to be acquired during the BA and 2 ECTS during the MA

Students who already took a course within their main study program are NOT allowed to take the course again.

These course units are also listed under "Type A", which basically means all students can enroll
Type A: Enhancement of Reflection Competence
Suitable for all students.

Students who already took a course within their main study program are NOT allowed to take the course again.
Literature
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
851-0125-78LNon-Conceptual Thinking: Philosophy As LiteratureW3 credits2SM. Hampe, A. Kilcher
AbstractLiterature and Philosophy are usually distinguished from each other by the following difference: Philosophy supposedly uses a language of abstract concepts whereas literature tells stories and uses metaphors. Looking more closely reveals that philosophy is operating not at all purely conceptual and without metaphors. Metaphorical texts that tell stories in philosophy are subject of this course.
ObjectiveStudents should learn about the different types of argumentative and non-argumentative texts. They should learn to understand the descriptive and critical value of non-argumentative texts that operate at the boarder between philosophy and literature.
851-0300-60LFranz Kafka. Modernism's Literary KnowledgeW3 credits2VA. Kilcher
AbstractThe course offers an overview of Kafka's texts while revealing a twofold perspective. On the one hand, the text as a literary composition occupies central stage; at the same time, however, the aim is to understand the interrelatedness of these texts with cultural, political, economical and literary discourse of Kafka's time.
Objective1) Students are acquainted with Kafka's texts; 2) students are familiar with the historical, cultural and political contexts of Kafka's work; 3) students gain insight in Kafka's process of writing; 4) students gain insight into the nature of knowledge of Kafka's texts.
851-0301-17LGerman RomanticismW3 credits2VC. Jany
AbstractThis introductory course to German Romanticism explores chiefly Romantic poetics and its reflexive as well as ironic forms of communicating and knowing, which eschew rationalistic and scientific platitudes. Equally important will be the inherent contradictions of Romanticism, for it is division, not unity, speaking from its heart, the ecstatic experience of absence and failure--Sehnsucht.
Objective1) develop an understanding of "Romanticism", of Romantic poetics and its reflexive as well as ironic forms of communicating and knowing
2) read the literary texts in question very carefully so as to get to know that mode of perception and description which since Ludwig Tieck, Novalis, Friedrich Schlegel, E.T.A. Hoffmann, Joseph von Eichendorff, etc. is called "Romantic"
3) participate in class by listening carefully and also through critical questions and feedback. This third point is particularly important because the lectures will serve as the basis for a small book, "A Short Introduction to the Literature of German Romanticism."
4) Since this lecture is part of "Science in Perspective" (SiP), we will also explore the relation between Romanticism and modern science.
851-0315-01LWriting: Precision of Language as a Field of Research for Literature Restricted registration - show details W1 credit1GF. Kretzen
AbstractWhen we write a literary text we enter into a set-up for experiments and explore the possibilities ensuing from the specific structure and consistency of such a text. Literary writing allows us to go over to another kind of knowledge. Thus, the question: what is it that I want to write about? is replaced by: what do I write?
ObjectiveIn this course we shall analyze and apply conditions and criteria for literary writing on the basis of our own texts.
The course is intended for persons who are interested in literary approaches to exactitude.
Any attempt to write literature is confronted with an unforeseeable linguistic dynamism whose feasibility is determined by laws and rules quite different from those of science and technology. For the science-oriented writer, experiencing the self-evidence produced by literary approaches in his or her own writing project opens up a field of language with new content and new methods.
ContentIn the natural sciences as well as in engineering we set up experiments, analyze equation systems, and formulate theories. In order to complement these practices, the course «Writing» shall pursue precision in literary writing, its choice of word and its self-evidence.

When we write a literary text we also enter into a set-up for experiments and explore the possibilities ensuing from the specific structure and overall consistency of such a text. This form of writing takes us from the question: what is it that I want to write about? to the question: what do I write?
How do such literary approaches differ from the ways in which the natural sciences use language?
In this course we shall analyze and apply conditions and criteria for literary writing on the basis of our own texts.
The course is intended for persons who are interested in literary approaches to exactitude.
Any attempt to write literature is confronted with an unforeseeable linguistic dynamism whose feasibility is determined by laws and rules quite different from those of science and technology. For the science-oriented writer, experiencing the self-evidence produced by literary approaches in his or her own writing project opens up a field of language with new content and new methods.
Prerequisites / NoticeThose wishing to participate are required to send in between two and three pages text of their own writing that will be discussed in class. It may be an existing text , such as an essay yet from school or a post for a student magazine. The next step will be writing a text on a preset topic as a basis for discussing the various realizations of a given task.
851-0346-08LThe Body In 19th Century Italian Culture Between Poetry and Visual ArtW3 credits2VN. Lorenzini
AbstractThroughout the course, I will illustrate, in an interdisciplinary perspective, how the representation of the body interprets the relevant perceptual and expressive transformations in the artistic and poetic tradition of the 19th century.
ObjectiveThe starting point will be the beginning of the century, with the change of the scientific and philosophic horizon, which puts the absolute conception of Time and Space into crisis, opening up to the discovery of the relative, the simultaneous, and the rupture of the linear perspective, witch effects the "Me" as place of identity and integrity. These are the subjects
of 19th century perception phenomenology, by Husserl and Merleau-Ponty, followed by the
reflections on the "body" that intensify and multiply by reaching the 20th century.
851-0334-10LLiterature in the Mirror of ArtsW3 credits2VG. Macé
AbstractLiterature is nourished by other forms of art in multiple ways: as a comment, as inspiration, as a source of fiction etc. I suggest examining these different aspects by analysing some examples.
ObjectiveA preface will be dedicated to the tradition of writing itself: the fascination of hieroglyphs, the stelae of Segalen, the calligrams of Apollinaire, Michaux’s moving signs. I will also address the issue of writing from an anthropologic perspective, in particular with regard to the weak diffusion of writing in Sub-Saharan Africa. Several lessons will be dedicated to photography: reactions of Baudelaire, texts of Claudel, of Surrealists, of Barthes, among others. Then we will move on to painting: Balzac, Baudelaire and Claudel again, Apollinaire and the Cubists, etc. Architecture, dance and music will complete the program. I would like to elaborate on Proust and the pages of the Recherche dedicated to Fortuny, Elstir the painter, Vinteuil the musician, and, of cause, the « petit pan de mur jaune ».Suggested readings, if you wish, are: Le chef-d’œuvre inconnu by Balzac, Le peintre de la vie moderne by Baudelaire, “Calligrammes” by Apollinaire, L’œil écoute by Claudel, La chambre claire by Barthes, and Proust.
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