Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2021

Food Science Master Information
Major in Food Processing
Disciplinary Subjects
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
752-2402-00LFood PackagingW2 credits2GS. Yildirim
AbstractThe course gives an introduction to food packaging and provides an overview of different packaging materials, their properties and influences on the quality and safety of food. The course also contains the main processes used to produce the major packaging materials and explains the different packaging processes used for individual food groups. Additionally, food packaging trends and new packaging
ObjectiveStudents learn to:
-describe the technical and marketing functions of packaging
-list the main packaging materials used for food and know the technical properties of the materials affecting the marketing and preservation of food
-explain the major processes used to produce the plastic packaging materials and converting them into final packaging materials
-describe main packaging processes and materials for different type of food products
-aware of food and packaging interactions and possible migrations
-explain the future packaging trends and describe the new packaging technologies and materials
ContentPackaging functions
Packaging materials
Permeability of packaging materials and its effect on the quality of food
Polymer processing technologies
Packaging converting processes
Packaging processes for food
Packaging for major food groups and its influence on the shelf life
Migration and legislation
Packaging and sustainability
Active packaging
Intelligent and smart packaging
Food packaging trends
Lecture notesFood Packaging
LiteratureGordon L. Robertson (2010): Food packaging and shelf life. Boca Raton, FL: Tylor & Francis.
Han, Jung H. (Hrgb.) (2005): Innovations in food packaging. Amsterdam: Elsevier / Academic Press.
Soroka Walter (2009): Packaging technology. Illinois: Institute of Packaging Professionals
Roberson, Gordon L. (2006): Food packaging - principles and practice. Boca Raton, FL: Tylor & Francis.
Lee, Sun Dong (2008): Food packaging science and technology. Boca Raton, FL: Tylor & Francis.
Yam Kit L. 2009, The Wiley Encyclopedia of Pacakging Technology, Wiley
752-3022-00LFood Factory Planning and DesignW3 credits2GP.  Beck, S. Padar
AbstractThe focus is directed on the interaction (and interdependency) of the different crafts involved, mainly construction, building services, and installation engineering. Hygienic requirements have to be designed and finally are implemented in order to achieve international standards (GMP, IFS, BRC). Insight is given into contract and payment handling.
ObjectiveStudents learn about the tasks and responsibilities of the specialists (engineers, planners), organizations and distributors involved. Knowledge is provided on the coordination and guidance of people involved. An insight into hygienic and technical specifications as well as the regulatory framework is given. Finally, the implementation of a functional, ecological and cost efficient solution is discussed.
Lecture notesVorlesungsunterlagen (besprochene Folien) können ab Mitte Februar von der Lehrdokumentenablage MyStudies heruntergeladen werden.
752-5102-00LFood Fermentation BiotechnologyW3 credits2VC. Lacroix, F. Constancias, M. Stevens
AbstractFor this integration course, selected and current topics in bioprocess technology as applied to food will be selected to complement the teaching program in Food Biotechnology. Special emphasis will be given on downstream processing, bioprocess development, and metabolic engineering with current applications of microorganisms for producing high quality and safe food and food ingredients.
ObjectiveThe presentation and discussion of selected topics of food fermentation biotechnology:
- to present the main strategies for the downstream processing of fermented media
- to provide examples of recent process developments and future trends for production of high quality foods and food ingredients.
- to develop experience for formulation and design of research and development projects relating to food fermentation technologies

This course will integrate knowledge of bioprocess technology, as well as microbiology and microbial physiology.
ContentThis course will address selected and current topics on bioprocesses applied to foods and food ingredients. As well, this course will allow the integration of concepts in food biotechnology through literature search and presentation of topics by students. Specialists from the Laboratory of Food Biotechnology will contribute to the selected topics as follows:

• New technologies for food fermentation
• Downstream processing treatments
• Metabolic engineering

Students will be required to complete a group project on a selected aspect of bioprocesses and process evaluation. The project will involve information research and analysis followed by an oral presentation.
Lecture notesCopy of the power point slides from lectures will be provided.
LiteratureA list of references will be given at the beginning of the course for the different topics presented during this course.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course is taught in English.
752-3200-00LSustainable Food ProcessingW+3 credits2VA. Mathys
AbstractThis course gives an overview of the holistic approach in sustainable food processing via the consideration of the total value chain. Sustainability assessment as emerging tool in food process development will be introduced.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of the fundamental knowledge, the interdisciplinary connections and tools of Sustainable Food Processing to enable system oriented thinking, including their need in society and their environmental, economic and social impact. Understanding of food production concepts for biomass and energy use efficiency, significant waste reduction along the food value chain as well as healthy and high quality food production. Awareness of future trends in sustainable food processing.
ContentSustainability analysis and life cycle assessment in food research and production
Emerging combined processes based on mechanical, thermal and non-thermal techniques
Novel protein sources
Algae and insect biorefineries in urban environment
Industry projects and experience in the presented topics
LiteratureSustainable Food Processing Brijesh K. Tiwari (Editor), Tomas Norton (Editor), Nicholas M. Holden (Editor) ISBN: 978-0-470-67223-5 600 pages December 2013, Wiley-Blackwell

International Reference Life Cycle Data System ILCD handbook ,developed by the Institute for Environment and Sustainability in the European Commission Joint Research Centre (JRC). http://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/handle/JRC48157

Aganovic K., Smetana S., Grauwet T., Toepfl S., Mathys A., Van Loey A. & Heinz V. (2017).Pilot scale thermal and alternative pasteurization of tomato and watermelon juice: An energy comparison and life cycle assessment. Journal of Cleaner Production, 141, 514–525.

Chaudhary, A., Gustafson, D., & Mathys, A. (2018). Multi-indicator sustainability assessment of global food systems. Nature communications, 9(1), 848.

Chen C., Chaudhary A. & Mathys A. (2019). Swiss Food Sustainability Analysis sing Nutritional, Human Health and Environmental Indicators. Nutrients, 11(4), 856.

Margni, M., and Curran, M. (2012). “Life cycle Impact Assessment.” In Life Cycle Assessment Handbook : A Guide for Environmentally Sustainable Products, John Wiley and Sons, Hoboken, NJ.

Frischknecht, R.; Jungbluth, N.; Althaus, H.-J.; Doka, G., Dones, R.; Heck, T.; Hellweg, S.; Hischier R.; Nemecek, T.; Rebitzer, G.; Spielmann, M. (2005): The ecoinvent Database: Overview and Methodological Framework. In: The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment Volume 10, Issue 1, 2005, 3-9, doi:10.1065/lca2004.10.181.1

Smetana, S., Mathys, A., Knoch, A., and Heinz, V. (2015). Meat alternatives: life cycle assessment of most known meat substitutes. The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment 20(9), 1254-1267.

Smetana, S., Schmitt, E., & Mathys, A. (2019). Sustainable use of Hermetia illucens insect biomass for feed and food: Attributional and consequential life cycle assessment. Resources, Conservation and Recycling, 144, 285-296.

Valsasina L., Pizzol M., Smetana S., Georget E., Mathys A. & Heinz V. (2017).Life cycle assessment of emerging technologies: The case of milk ultra-high pressure homogenisation. Journal of Cleaner Production, 142 (4), 2209–2217.

Trivedi, J., Aila, M., Bangwal, D. P., Kaul, S., & Garg, M. O. (2015). Algae based biorefinery—How to make sense?. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 47, 295-307.

Enzing, C., Ploeg, M., Barbosa, M., & Sijtsma, L. (2014). Microalgae-based products for the food and feed sector: an outlook for Europe. IPTS Institute for Prospective technological Studies, JRC, Seville.

Van Huis, A., Van Itterbeeck, J., Klunder, H., Mertens, E., Halloran, A., Muir, G., & Vantomme, P. (2013). Edible insects: future prospects for food and feed security (No. 171). Food and agriculture organization of the United nations (FAO).
Methodology Subjects
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
751-1000-00LInterdisciplinary Project Restricted registration - show details
Only for Master Students in Agricultural Sciences and Food Sciences.

Prerequisite: successful completion of the bachelor programme.
W+4 credits4UB. Dorn, E. Frossard, C. Hartmann, M. Schuppler, H. Adelmann, J. Anderegg, J. Baumgartner, U. Brändle, M. Erzinger, T. Fleischmann, I. Gangnat, A. K. Gilgen, G. Kaufmann, L. Kronenberg, M. Maurhofer Bringolf, C. E. Pohl, A. Walter, M. Wiggenhauser, S. Wimmer
AbstractDie Studierenden der Agrar- und Lebensmittelwissenschaft erarbeiten in interdisziplinären Teams Lösungen für Fragestellungen, welche ihnen von Projektpartnern entlang der Nahrungsmittelwertschöpfungskette gestellt werden. Die Studierenden präsentieren und diskutieren die Lösungen an der Schlussveranstaltung und verfassen einen Projektbericht.
ObjectiveDie Studierenden
- können für Fragestellungen aus der Schweizer Nahrungsmittelwertschöpfungskette wissenschaftlich fundierte und praxistaugliche Lösungen entwickeln. Sie arbeiten dabei inter- und transdisziplinär;
- können mit Hilfe von Grundlagen des Projektmanagements die Lösungsentwicklung zielgerichtet und effizient abwickeln sowie steuern;
- können die Grundlagen der Gestaltung effektiver Teamarbeit für eine erfolgreiche Lösungsentwicklung in einem Projektteam einsetzen;
- können die entwickelten Lösungen in mündlicher und schriftlicher Form nachvollziehbar, überzeugend und adressatengerecht präsentieren;
- können den Arbeitsprozess und die Projektergebnisse individuell und in Projektteams reflektieren und daraus Konsequenzen für erfolgreiches Handeln in Projektteams ziehen.
ContentDie Studierenden der Agrar- und Lebensmittelwissenschaften bearbeiten Fragestellungen, welche ihnen von Projektpartnern aus der Praxis entlang der Schweizer Nahrungsmittelwertschöpfungskette gestellt werden. Dabei werden sie von einem Coach beider Studienrichtungen angeleitet und unterstützt. Sie lernen zudem selbstorganisiert ein praxisorientiertes Projekt in Zusammenarbeit mit dem Projektpartner und dem Coach abzuwickeln. Die Studierenden wenden ihre erworbenen fachlichen und überfachlichen Kompetenzen in ihrem Projektteam zur Erarbeitung und Entwicklung von Lösungen für die Fragestellungen des Projektpartners an. Die Studierenden präsentieren und diskutieren die Lösungen an der Schlussveranstaltung mit den Projektpartnern und verfassen einen schriftlichen Projektbericht zuhanden des Projektpartners. Die Studierenden reflektieren die geleistete Projektarbeit sowie ihre Team- und Projektmanagementkompetenzen.

Vorlesungszeit, Selbststudium, externe Projekttage
Die Lehrveranstaltung findet am Donnerstag während dem Semester von 12.30 - 16.00 statt. Am 11.03.21 findet die Projektbesprechung mit dem/den Projektpartner/n statt, dieser Anlass dauert vom 12.00 - 18.00. Während der Semesterzeit arbeiten die Studierenden zudem ausserhalb der Vorlesungszeit im Selbststudium an den Projekten. Die Projekttage werden vom Montag, 21.06.21 bis Donnerstag, 24.06.21 an der ETH Zürich und am Landwirtschaftlichen Zentrum St. Gallen in Salez statt.
Prerequisites / NoticeUnterrichtssprache: Deutsch
752-2310-00LPhysical Characterization of FoodW3 credits2VP. A. Fischer, R. Mezzenga
AbstractIn Physical Characterization of Food introductions into several measuring techniques to study complex colloidal food system are given. Lectures focus on scattering techniques, interfacial tension measurements, ellipsometry, microscopy, NMR, and thermoanalysis. The measuring principles and their application in food science and related areas will be discussed.
ObjectiveThe basic principles of several frequently used characterization methods and their application will be presented. The course is intended to spread awareness on the capability of physical measuring devices used in food science and related areas as well as provide a guidance for their usage and data interpretation.
ContentLectures will be given on light scattering techniques (4h), interfacial tension measurements (4h), microscopy (4h), small angle scattering (6h), NMR (2h), and thermoanalysis (2h).
Lecture notesNotes will be handed out during the lectures.
LiteratureProvided in the lecture notes
752-2110-00LMultivariate Statistical Analysis Restricted registration - show details W3 credits2VC. Hartmann, A. Bearth
AbstractThe course starts by introducing some basic statistical concepts and methods, e.g. data exploration, the idea behind significance testing, and the use of the statistical software SPSS. Based on these fundaments, the following analyses are discussed: regression analysis, factor analysis and variance analysis.
ObjectiveStudents will learn to use multivariate analysis methods and to interpret their results, by means of theory and practice.
ContentThis course provides an introduction into the theories and practice of multivariate analysis methods that are used in the fields of food sensory science, consumer behavior and environmental sciences. The course starts by introducing some basic statistical concepts and methods, e.g. data exploration, the idea behind significance testing, and the use of the statistical software SPSS. Based on these fundaments, the following analyses are discussed: regression analysis, factor analysis and variance analysis. During the course, theoretical lectures alternate with practical sessions in which data are analyzed and their results are interpreted using SPSS.


Agenda (for further information see Moodle course)

25.02 Introduction to the course and basic concepts of multivariate statistics

04.03. Data handling and exploration + SPSS Introduction

11.03. Exercise 1a+b

18.03. Basic Statistical Tests

25.03. Exercise 2: Basic Statistical Tests

01.04. Regression analysis

15.04. Exercise 3: Regression analysis

22.04. Variance Analysis

29.04. Exercise 4: Variance Analysis

06.05. Reliability Analysis

20.05. Principle Component Analysis

27.05. Exercise 5: PCA and Reliability Analysis

03.06. EXAM (Room will be announced)
LiteratureField, A. (2013). Discovering Statistics Using SPSS (4th edition). Sage Publications. ISBN: 1-4462-4918-2 (and any other edition)
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course will be given in English.
The course will take place online via zoom.
Optional Subjects
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
752-2123-00LRisk Awareness, Risk Acceptance and TrustW3 credits2VM. Siegrist
AbstractThe course provides an overview about risk perception and acceptance of new technologies. In addition, the most important findings of the research related to decisions under uncertainty are presented.
ObjectiveStudents know the most important theoretical approaches in the domains of risk perception and acceptance of new technologies. Furthermore, students understand the paradigms and the research results in the domain of decision making under uncertainty.
752-1202-00LFood Safety and Quality ManagementW3 credits2GT. Gude
AbstractThe course procures the general rules of a quality management system and its application in the food chain to guarantee food safety. Therefore the HACCP concept will be touched in relation to risk management and risk assessment. Furthermore the origin of limits as well as the analytical proof will be highlighted. Finally general principles of laboratory testing will be discussed.
ObjectiveComprehensive knowledge to take over the responsibility for and organisation of quality assurance in a food processing environment.
ContentThe following lists in note form the relevant topics:
Definition of (Food) Quality
TQM/quality management
Q.A in the food chain (manufacturer/retail)
Food Quality, -Safety (also give by examples)
Food Limits - origin of and how to get them
HACCP introduction, risk management, -assessment
Self control concepts
GFSI/Standards BRC, IFS, ISO
Statistical Process Control
Raw material/product control: sampling plans
Q.A. in laboratories, sampling
Sampling plans, Qs in an analytical lab
752-3024-00LHygienic DesignW2 credits2GJ. Hofmann
AbstractThe lecture course Hygienic Design covers the special requirements in the design of equipment and components used in food production. Material science and surface treatments are as important as the cleaning mechanisms of these surfaces. Explanations of basic design requirements in food production areas, as well as the relevant regulations associated, are covered in this course.
ObjectiveTo identify and evaluate hazards of food safety which can come from the equipment used in the food processing. Understanding of the most important design principles for easy cleaning of machinery and equipment.
752-3104-00LFood Rheology IIW3 credits2GP. A. Fischer
AbstractFood Rheology II addresses special topics in rheology such as suspension and emulsion rheology, extensional rheology, optical methods in rheology, and interfacial rheology.
ObjectiveThe rheology of complex materials such as solutions, emulsions, and suspension will be discussed. In addition, several advanced rheological techniques (extension, rheo-optics, interfacial rheology) will be introduced and discussed in light of material characterization of complex fluids.
ContentLectures will be given on structure and rheology of complex fluids (8h), optical methods in rheology (4h), extensional rheology (4h), and interfacial rheology (6h).
Lecture notesNotes will be handed out during the lectures.
LiteratureProvided in the lecture notes.
Prerequisites / NoticeAttending Food Rheology I is beneficial but not mandatory. A short repetition of the basic principles of rheology will be given in the beginning of Food Rheology II.
752-1300-01LFood Toxicology Information W2 credits1VS. J. Sturla
AbstractBuilds on a foundation in Toxicology fundamentals to address situations and toxins relevant to Food Science, Nutrition, and Food Safety & Quality.
ObjectiveCourse objectives are for the student to have a broad awareness of toxicant classes and toxicants relevant to food, and to know their identities (i.e. chemical structure or biological nature), origins, relevance of human exposures, general mode of biological action, and potential mitigation strategies.
ContentBuilds on a foundation in Toxicology fundamentals to address situations relevant to Food Science, Nutrition, and Food Safety & Quality. Representative topics: Toxic Phytochemicals and Mycotoxins, Industrial Contaminants and Packaging Materials, Toxicants formed During Food Processing, Alcohol and Tobacco. The class is comprised of bi-weekly lectures, independent reading, and preparation of an independent evaluation of a food-related toxin.
LiteratureReading from the primary literature will be referenced in class and posted to the course website.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course "Introduction to Toxicology" (752-1300-00V) is a prerequisite for the students who want to take this course. Equivalent course may be accepted; contact the instructor.
752-3102-00LProcess-Microstructure-Property RelationshipsW3 credits2GE. J. Windhab, P. Braun, A. M. Kratzer, M. Michel
AbstractThis course is important for students to understand the relationships between the processing techniques, microstructures, and properties to develop tailored food products based on the mechanisms.
ObjectiveFundamentals, applications and industrial developments; Process related structuring mechanisms; Structure related property functions; Different forms of foods such as emulsions, suspensions, foams, powders, solids etc.
751-5500-00LSimulations and Sensors in Agri-Food Supply Chains Restricted registration - show details W3 credits2GT. Defraeye
AbstractThis course provides students with expert knowledge and skills on how to effectively apply physics-based simulations and sensing in the supply chain of horticultural crops. The main targets are to use these technologies to better preserve food quality, extend shelf life and reduce food waste and the associated carbon footprint.
ObjectiveThe course targets the postharvest part of the supply chain, as products pass through pre-cooling facilities, refrigerated containers and trucks, and cold storage facilities, before arriving at the retailer and consumer. We target supply chains of both domestic and tropical horticultural crops, including apple, citrus, mangoes, and berries. In addition, other applications in agri-food chains are highlighted, such as preharvest sensing and monitoring for horticultural crops as well as physics-based simulations and sensing in supply chains of foods of animal origin (meat or milk).

In the course, we target innovative solutions that are enabled by the augmented insight that simulations and sensing provide with respect to the biophysical processes driving food decay in the cold chain. A key focus of the course is on digital tools for the agri-food chain, such as digital twins, food simulants, wireless and optical sensors, big data, data analytics, and blockchain technology.

A key objective is to gain specialized knowledge in order to:
- Identify which postharvest practices are most suitable for a certain produce and supply chain (e.g. dynamic controlled atmosphere, modified atmosphere packaging, ethylene scrubbing)
- Identify which heat and mass transfer processes (e.g. conduction, convection, radiation, respiration, evaporation) play a key role for a certain produce and supply chain
- Identify which state-of-the-art sensing technology is most optimal for a certain produce and supply chain (e.g. wireless communication, blockchain technology, and biophysical twins)
- Assess if a physics-based model and simulation is built up according to best practices, and if the reported results are realistic
- Understand the link of the cooling process to the evolution of food quality attributes

Another key objective is to acquire skills in order to:
- Perform hands-on multiphysics simulations of food cooling processes
- Measure hands-on a food cooling process with several types of sensors
- Calculate food shelf-life by experiments and kinetic-rate-law modeling
- Quantify the environmental impact of postharvest technology and food waste on the horticultural value chain
ContentThe course is built up of lectures, exercise sessions, and an excursion. The student will then apply this knowledge to perform an expert assessment of a postharvest problem (in a group), report the findings and present the solution strategies. Throughout the course, we also review upcoming national and international startups and companies in these fields.

The content is as follows:
1. Introduction to the postharvest value chain
2. Postharvest quality and losses
3. Bio-environmental heat and mass transfer
4. Sensors & food simulants
5. Basics & best practice of physics-based simulations
6. Current and emerging postharvest technologies
7. Group assignment on physics-based simulation and sensors
8. Food waste & environmental impact
9. Excursion

With this knowledge and skills, the student will be able to provide an expert assessment on a specific problem in postharvest engineering in the context of a group assignment:
- Apply the learned analytical approach to comprehensively understand and quantitatively analyze a simple postharvest problem.
- Identify and quantify strategies and solutions to improve quality preservation, shelf life and reduce food waste, and explain the scientific drivers behind these improvements.
- Identify challenges and prioritize solutions.
- Report and present the results.
Lecture notesHandouts of the slides will be provided
LiteratureRecommended literature (not-obligatory):
Datta (2017), Heat and Mass Transfer: A Biological Context. CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group.
Thompson (2008), Commercial cooling of fruits, vegetables and flowers, University of California. University of California, California.
Major in Food Quality and Safety
Disciplinary Subjects
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
752-1022-00LSelected Topics in Food ChemistryW3 credits2GL. Nyström, M. Erzinger
AbstractThis course is centered in cereal chemistry: main chemical components related to physicochemical, technological and nutritional properties of grain products.
ObjectiveThe main goal of the course are:
Understand the chemical composition and properties of cereal grains as raw materials for food, changes in composition during grain processing, and the effects of both on the nutritional properties of grain based products, such as breads, pasta, and breakfast cereals.
ContentThe course covers fundamental and modern aspects of cereal chemistry: composition of grains, physicochemical properties of main grain components (starch, proteins, fibres, lipids), and their effects on technological and nutritional properties of cereal grain products. Focus is put on chemical reactions and changes during common food processing (dough making, baking, extrusion, fermentation), reflecting also their effects on the nutritional and sensory properties of grain products. Furthermore, a special emphasis is put on dietary fibres and related phytochemicals in grains: Different dietary fibre compounds found in cereals and cereal products (cellulose, arabinoxylan, beta-glucan, resistant starch etc.), co-passengers of dietary fibre (phenolic acids, plant sterols, tocols, folates, alkylresorcinols, avenanthramides), factors affecting their levels in foods, and methods used for the analysis of their content and composition.
Lecture notesThe lectures are supplemented with handouts./ Es werden Beilagen zur Vorlesung abgegeben.
Prerequisites / NoticeCourse prerequisites: Food Chemistry I/II and Food Analysis I/II (or equivalent)
752-1202-00LFood Safety and Quality ManagementW3 credits2GT. Gude
AbstractThe course procures the general rules of a quality management system and its application in the food chain to guarantee food safety. Therefore the HACCP concept will be touched in relation to risk management and risk assessment. Furthermore the origin of limits as well as the analytical proof will be highlighted. Finally general principles of laboratory testing will be discussed.
ObjectiveComprehensive knowledge to take over the responsibility for and organisation of quality assurance in a food processing environment.
ContentThe following lists in note form the relevant topics:
Definition of (Food) Quality
TQM/quality management
Q.A in the food chain (manufacturer/retail)
Food Quality, -Safety (also give by examples)
Food Limits - origin of and how to get them
HACCP introduction, risk management, -assessment
Self control concepts
GFSI/Standards BRC, IFS, ISO
Statistical Process Control
Raw material/product control: sampling plans
Q.A. in laboratories, sampling
Sampling plans, Qs in an analytical lab
752-4010-00LProblems and Solutions in Food Microbiology Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 28.

Prerequisites: It is essential to have a basic knowledge in General Microbiology and Food Microbiology. If students have not taken appropriate courses, it is strongly recommended to consult with the lecturer before attending this seminar.
W3 credits1GM. Loessner, J. Klumpp, M. Schmelcher
AbstractA journal-club style seminar, in which preselected recent scientific articles are analyzed, presented and discussed by students. The relevant topics are selected from the wider area of food microbiology, including fundamental and applied disciplines. Students learn how state-of -the-art research is designed, conducted, appropriately analyzed, and presented.
ObjectiveStudents will learn how state-of -the-art research is designed, conducted, appropriately analyzed, and presented.
ContentSeveral pre-selected, recently published papers will be up for selection by the students. All papers were selected from recent literature and reflect the wider area of food microbiology, including fundamental research (molecular biology, genetics, biochemistry) and applied disciplines (diagnostics, control, epidemiology). Groups of 2 students each will pick a paper for in-depth analysis (mostly work done at home and/or library) and presentation to the other students.
Lecture notesNo script needed. Pre-selected papers will be assigned to student groups in the kick-off meeting (first lecture); PDF copies will be available to all students.
LiteratureNo specific books needed. Access to a library and web-based literature search is required.
Prerequisites / NoticeTeamwork in small groups of 2 students
752-5102-00LFood Fermentation BiotechnologyW3 credits2VC. Lacroix, F. Constancias, M. Stevens
AbstractFor this integration course, selected and current topics in bioprocess technology as applied to food will be selected to complement the teaching program in Food Biotechnology. Special emphasis will be given on downstream processing, bioprocess development, and metabolic engineering with current applications of microorganisms for producing high quality and safe food and food ingredients.
ObjectiveThe presentation and discussion of selected topics of food fermentation biotechnology:
- to present the main strategies for the downstream processing of fermented media
- to provide examples of recent process developments and future trends for production of high quality foods and food ingredients.
- to develop experience for formulation and design of research and development projects relating to food fermentation technologies

This course will integrate knowledge of bioprocess technology, as well as microbiology and microbial physiology.
ContentThis course will address selected and current topics on bioprocesses applied to foods and food ingredients. As well, this course will allow the integration of concepts in food biotechnology through literature search and presentation of topics by students. Specialists from the Laboratory of Food Biotechnology will contribute to the selected topics as follows:

• New technologies for food fermentation
• Downstream processing treatments
• Metabolic engineering

Students will be required to complete a group project on a selected aspect of bioprocesses and process evaluation. The project will involve information research and analysis followed by an oral presentation.
Lecture notesCopy of the power point slides from lectures will be provided.
LiteratureA list of references will be given at the beginning of the course for the different topics presented during this course.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course is taught in English.
752-1300-01LFood Toxicology Information W2 credits1VS. J. Sturla
AbstractBuilds on a foundation in Toxicology fundamentals to address situations and toxins relevant to Food Science, Nutrition, and Food Safety & Quality.
ObjectiveCourse objectives are for the student to have a broad awareness of toxicant classes and toxicants relevant to food, and to know their identities (i.e. chemical structure or biological nature), origins, relevance of human exposures, general mode of biological action, and potential mitigation strategies.
ContentBuilds on a foundation in Toxicology fundamentals to address situations relevant to Food Science, Nutrition, and Food Safety & Quality. Representative topics: Toxic Phytochemicals and Mycotoxins, Industrial Contaminants and Packaging Materials, Toxicants formed During Food Processing, Alcohol and Tobacco. The class is comprised of bi-weekly lectures, independent reading, and preparation of an independent evaluation of a food-related toxin.
LiteratureReading from the primary literature will be referenced in class and posted to the course website.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course "Introduction to Toxicology" (752-1300-00V) is a prerequisite for the students who want to take this course. Equivalent course may be accepted; contact the instructor.
Methodology Subjects
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
751-1000-00LInterdisciplinary Project Restricted registration - show details
Only for Master Students in Agricultural Sciences and Food Sciences.

Prerequisite: successful completion of the bachelor programme.
W+4 credits4UB. Dorn, E. Frossard, C. Hartmann, M. Schuppler, H. Adelmann, J. Anderegg, J. Baumgartner, U. Brändle, M. Erzinger, T. Fleischmann, I. Gangnat, A. K. Gilgen, G. Kaufmann, L. Kronenberg, M. Maurhofer Bringolf, C. E. Pohl, A. Walter, M. Wiggenhauser, S. Wimmer
AbstractDie Studierenden der Agrar- und Lebensmittelwissenschaft erarbeiten in interdisziplinären Teams Lösungen für Fragestellungen, welche ihnen von Projektpartnern entlang der Nahrungsmittelwertschöpfungskette gestellt werden. Die Studierenden präsentieren und diskutieren die Lösungen an der Schlussveranstaltung und verfassen einen Projektbericht.
ObjectiveDie Studierenden
- können für Fragestellungen aus der Schweizer Nahrungsmittelwertschöpfungskette wissenschaftlich fundierte und praxistaugliche Lösungen entwickeln. Sie arbeiten dabei inter- und transdisziplinär;
- können mit Hilfe von Grundlagen des Projektmanagements die Lösungsentwicklung zielgerichtet und effizient abwickeln sowie steuern;
- können die Grundlagen der Gestaltung effektiver Teamarbeit für eine erfolgreiche Lösungsentwicklung in einem Projektteam einsetzen;
- können die entwickelten Lösungen in mündlicher und schriftlicher Form nachvollziehbar, überzeugend und adressatengerecht präsentieren;
- können den Arbeitsprozess und die Projektergebnisse individuell und in Projektteams reflektieren und daraus Konsequenzen für erfolgreiches Handeln in Projektteams ziehen.
ContentDie Studierenden der Agrar- und Lebensmittelwissenschaften bearbeiten Fragestellungen, welche ihnen von Projektpartnern aus der Praxis entlang der Schweizer Nahrungsmittelwertschöpfungskette gestellt werden. Dabei werden sie von einem Coach beider Studienrichtungen angeleitet und unterstützt. Sie lernen zudem selbstorganisiert ein praxisorientiertes Projekt in Zusammenarbeit mit dem Projektpartner und dem Coach abzuwickeln. Die Studierenden wenden ihre erworbenen fachlichen und überfachlichen Kompetenzen in ihrem Projektteam zur Erarbeitung und Entwicklung von Lösungen für die Fragestellungen des Projektpartners an. Die Studierenden präsentieren und diskutieren die Lösungen an der Schlussveranstaltung mit den Projektpartnern und verfassen einen schriftlichen Projektbericht zuhanden des Projektpartners. Die Studierenden reflektieren die geleistete Projektarbeit sowie ihre Team- und Projektmanagementkompetenzen.

Vorlesungszeit, Selbststudium, externe Projekttage
Die Lehrveranstaltung findet am Donnerstag während dem Semester von 12.30 - 16.00 statt. Am 11.03.21 findet die Projektbesprechung mit dem/den Projektpartner/n statt, dieser Anlass dauert vom 12.00 - 18.00. Während der Semesterzeit arbeiten die Studierenden zudem ausserhalb der Vorlesungszeit im Selbststudium an den Projekten. Die Projekttage werden vom Montag, 21.06.21 bis Donnerstag, 24.06.21 an der ETH Zürich und am Landwirtschaftlichen Zentrum St. Gallen in Salez statt.
Prerequisites / NoticeUnterrichtssprache: Deutsch
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