Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2021

Materials Science Master Information
Elective Courses
The students are free to choose individually from the entire course offer of ETH Zürich on the Master level. Please consult the study administration in case of questions.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
327-0613-00LComputer Applications: Finite Elements in Solids and Structures Information
The course will only take place if at least 7 students are enrolled.
W4 credits2V + 2UA. Gusev
AbstractTo introduce the Finite Element Method to the students with a general interest in the topic
ObjectiveTo introduce the Finite Element Method to the students with a general interest in the topic
ContentIntroduction; Energy formulations; Displacement finite elements; Solutions to the finite element equations; Linear elements; Convergence, compatibility and completeness; Higher order elements; Beam and frame elements, Plate and shell elements; Dynamics and vibration; Generalization of the Finite Element concepts (Galerkin-weighted residual and variational approaches)
Lecture notesAutographie
Literature- Astley R.J. Finite Elements in Solids and Structures, Chapman & Hill, 1992
- Zienkiewicz O.C., Taylor R.L. The Finite Element Method, 5th ed., vol. 1, Butterworth-Heinemann, 2000
327-2104-00LInorganic Thin Films: Processing, Properties and ApplicationsW2 credits2GC. Schneider, T. Lippert
AbstractIntroduction to thin films growth and properties. The nucleation and growth of thin film theory is presented and the obtainable microstructures are illustrated. Main processing and characterization techniques will be discussed.
ObjectiveAchieve an understanding of major film growth methods, the most important growth mechanisms and characterization techniques.
To obtain a basic knowledge of specific thin film properties and selected applications.
ContentThis course gives an introduction to the topic of thin films growth with an emphasis on oxides, respectively oxide thin films. The main deposition techniques available for oxide thin film growth are physical and chemical vapor deposition techniques (PVD and CVD) as well as so called “wet techniques” (e.g. spin coating and spray pyrolysis). A special emphasis will be given to techniques which are important for industrial applications and basic research. A part of the course discusses vacuum technologies, materials selection and preparation.
The second main topic is thin film characterization which includes structural, chemical, mechanical, magnetic and electrical properties as well as the quantitative analysis of thin film composition. Finally, microfabrication and packaging are a topic of great technological importance and the basis for industrial applications.


I Table of Content

1 Introduction

2 Thin Film Fundamentals
2.1 Thin Film Formation
2.2 Thin Film Microstructure
2.3 Grain Growth
2.4 Epitaxy and Texture

3 Deposition Techniques
3.1 Non-Vacuum Deposition Techniques
3.1.1 Spray Pyrolysis
3.1.2 Sol Gel Deposition
3.2 Vacuum Deposition Techniques
3.2.1 Introduction to Vacuum
3.2.2 Thermal Evaporation and Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE)
3.2.3 Sputtering
3.2.4 Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD)
3.2.5 Chemical Vapor Deposition

4 Properties and Characterization
4.1 Surface and Mechanical Properties
4.2 Thermal Properties
4.3 Structural Properties
4.4 Compositional Analysis
4.5 Chemical Properties
4.6 Electrical and Magnetic Properties
4.7 Optical Properties

5 Industrial Applications
Lecture notesLecture notes will be provided.
LiteratureM. Ohring, “Materials science of thin films”, Academic Press
A. Elshabini-Riad, F.D. Barlow, “Thin film technology handbook”, Mc Graw Hill
Nucleation and growth of thin films, J A Venables, G D T Spiller and M Hanbucken, Rep. Prog. Phys., Vol 47, pp 399-459, 1984
327-2125-00LMicroscopy Training SEM I - Introduction to SEM Restricted registration - show details
Limited number of participants.

Master students will have priority over PhD students. PhD students may still enroll, but will be asked for a fee. (http://www.scopem.ethz.ch/education/MTP.html).

Registration form: (Link)
W2 credits3PP. Zeng, A. G. Bittermann, S. Gerstl, L. Grafulha Morales, K. Kunze, J. Reuteler
AbstractThe introductory course on Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) emphasizes hands-on learning. Using 2 SEM instruments, students have the opportunity to study their own samples, or standard test samples, as well as solving exercises provided by ScopeM scientists.
Objective- Set-up, align and operate a SEM successfully and safely.
- Accomplish imaging tasks successfully and optimize microscope performances.
- Master the operation of a low-vacuum and field-emission SEM and EDX instrument.
- Perform sample preparation with corresponding techniques and equipment for imaging and analysis
- Acquire techniques in obtaining secondary electron and backscatter electron micrographs
- Perform EDX qualitative and semi-quantitative analysis
ContentDuring the course, students learn through lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on sessions how to setup and operate SEM instruments, including low-vacuum and low-voltage applications.
This course gives basic skills for students new to SEM. At the end of the course, students with no prior experience are able to align a SEM, to obtain secondary electron (SE) and backscatter electron (BSE) micrographs and to perform energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) qualitative and semi-quantitative analysis. The procedures to better utilize SEM to solve practical problems and to optimize SEM analysis for a wide range of materials will be emphasized.

- Discussion of students' sample/interest
- Introduction and discussion on Electron Microscopy and instrumentation
- Lectures on electron sources, electron lenses and probe formation
- Lectures on beam/specimen interaction, image formation, image contrast and imaging modes.
- Lectures on sample preparation techniques for EM
- Brief description and demonstration of the SEM microscope
- Practice on beam/specimen interaction, image formation, image contrast (and image processing)
- Student participation on sample preparation techniques
- Scanning Electron Microscopy lab exercises: setup and operate the instrument under various imaging modalities
- Lecture and demonstrations on X-ray micro-analysis (theory and detection), qualitative and semi-quantitative EDX and point analysis, linescans and spectral mapping
- Practice on real-world samples and report results
Literature- Detailed course manual
- Williams, Carter: Transmission Electron Microscopy, Plenum Press, 1996
- Hawkes, Valdre: Biophysical Electron Microscopy, Academic Press, 1990
- Egerton: Physical Principles of Electron Microscopy: an introduction to TEM, SEM and AEM, Springer Verlag, 2007
Prerequisites / NoticeNo mandatory prerequisites. Please consider the prior attendance to EM Basic lectures (551- 1618-00V; 227-0390-00L; 327-0703-00L) as suggested prerequisite.
327-2126-00LMicroscopy Training TEM I - Introduction to TEM Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 6.
Master students will have priority over PhD students. PhD students may still enroll, but will be asked for a fee (http://www.scopem.ethz.ch/education/MTP.html).

TEM 1 registration form: (Link)
W2 credits3PP. Zeng, E. J. Barthazy Meier, A. G. Bittermann, F. Gramm, A. Sologubenko, M. Willinger
AbstractThe introductory course on Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) provides theoretical and hands-on learning for new operators, utilizing lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on sessions.
Objective- Overview of TEM theory, instrumentation, operation and applications.
- Alignment and operation of a TEM, as well as acquisition and interpretation of images, diffraction patterns, accomplishing basic tasks successfully.
- Knowledge of electron imaging modes (including Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy), magnification calibration, and image acquisition using CCD cameras.
- To set up the TEM to acquire diffraction patterns, perform camera length calibration, as well as measure and interpret diffraction patterns.
- Overview of techniques for specimen preparation.
ContentUsing two Transmission Electron Microscopes the students learn how to align a TEM, select parameters for acquisition of images in bright field (BF) and dark field (DF), perform scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging, phase contrast imaging, and acquire electron diffraction patterns. The participants will also learn basic and advanced use of digital cameras and digital imaging methods.

- Introduction and discussion on Electron Microscopy and instrumentation.
- Lectures on electron sources, electron lenses and probe formation.
- Lectures on beam/specimen interaction, image formation, image contrast and imaging modes.
- Lectures on sample preparation techniques for EM.
- Brief description and demonstration of the TEM microscope.
- Practice on beam/specimen interaction, image formation, Image contrast (and image processing).
- Demonstration of Transmission Electron Microscopes and imaging modes (Phase contrast, BF, DF, STEM).
- Student participation on sample preparation techniques.
- Transmission Electron Microscopy lab exercises: setup and operate the instrument under various imaging modalities.
- TEM alignment, calibration, correction to improve image contrast and quality.
- Electron diffraction.
- Practice on real-world samples and report results.
Literature- Detailed course manual
- Williams, Carter: Transmission Electron Microscopy, Plenum Press, 1996
- Hawkes, Valdre: Biophysical Electron Microscopy, Academic Press, 1990
- Egerton: Physical Principles of Electron Microscopy: an introduction to TEM, SEM and AEM, Springer Verlag, 2007
Prerequisites / NoticeNo mandatory prerequisites. Please consider the prior attendance to EM Basic lectures (551- 1618-00V; 227-0390-00L; 327-0703-00L) as suggested prerequisite.
327-2128-00LHigh Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Restricted registration - show details
Limited number of participants.
More information here: https://scopem.ethz.ch/education/MTP.html
W2 credits3GA. Sologubenko, R. Erni, R. Schäublin, M. Willinger, P. Zeng
AbstractThis advanced course on High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) provides lectures focused on HRTEM and HRSTEM imaging principles, related data analysis and simulation and phase restoration methods.
Objective- Learning how HRTEM and HRSTEM images are obtained.
- Learning about the aberrations affecting the resolution in TEM and STEM and the different methods to correct them.
- Learning about TEM and STEM images simulation software.
- Performing TEM and STEM image analysis (processing of TEM images and phase restoration after focal series acquisitions).
ContentThis course provides new skills to students with previous TEM experience. At the end of the course, students will know how to obtain HR(S)TEM images, how to analyse, process and simulate them.

Topics:
1. Introduction to HRTEM and HRSTEM
2. Considerations on (S)TEM instrumentation for high resolution imaging
3. Lectures on aberrations, aberration correction and aberration corrected images
4. HRTEM and HRSTEM simulation
5. Data analysis, phase restoration and lattice-strain analysis
Literature- Detailed course manual
- Williams, Carter: Transmission Electron Microscopy, 2nd ed., Springer, 2009
- Williams, Carter (eds.), Transmission Electron Microscopy - Diffraction, Imaging, and Spectrometry, Springer 2016
- Erni, Aberration-corrected imaging in transmission electron microscopy, 2nd ed., Imperial College Press, 2015.
- Egerton: Physical Principles of Electron Microscopy: an introduction to TEM, SEM and AEM, Springer Verlag, 2007
Prerequisites / NoticeThe students should fulfil one or more of these prerequisites:
- Prior attendance to the ScopeM TEM basic course
- Prior attendance to ETH EM lectures (327-0703-00L Electron Microscopy in Material Science)
- Prior TEM experience
327-2129-00LAnalytical Electron Microscopy Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
W1 credit2P
AbstractThe main goal of this hands-on course is to provide students with fundamental understanding of underlying physical processes, experimental set-up solutions and hands-on practical experience of analytical electron microscopy (AEM) technique for microstructure characterisation, specifically Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) and spectrum imaging (SI) technique.
Objective- understanding of physical processes that enable the EDS technique and data evaluation algorithms;
- hand-on experience of data acquisition and evaluation routines including
o practical understanding of different data acquisition set-ups,
o optimization of acquisition parameters for most reliable quantification of the results,
o the knowledge of the available and most reliable quantification algorithms and their handling
o the knowledge of data evaluation routines and possible handicaps for reliable elemental content distribution analyses and material composition quantification
o the effect of the specimen geometry on the data and experimental solutions for minimization of the artefacts
ContentThis advanced course provides analytical EM techniques to the students with prior EM experience (TEM or SEM). At the end of the course, students will understand the physical processes that enable the EDS technique and data evaluation algorithms and apply the technique for their own research.
- Introduction to analytical electron microscopy: theory and instrumentation.
- Lectures on EDS, WDS
- Practical on EDS-SEM: data acquisition and analysis.
- Practical on EDS-TEM: data acquisition and analysis.
The hand-on trainings are to be carried-out on a real-life specimen, provided by lecturers and / by students.
Lecture notesProvided in the course Moodle-page
Literature- Egerton: Physical Principles of Electron Microscopy: an introduction to TEM, SEM and AEM. Springer Verlag, 2007
- Williams & Carter: Transmission Electron Microscopy: A Textbook for Material Sciences. Plenum Press, 2nd Edition 2009, ISBD: 0 306 45247-2
- Goodhew, Humphreys & Beanland: Electron Microscopy and Analyses, Third edition. CRC Press, 2000
- Carter & Williams: Transmission Electron Microscopy: Diffraction, Imaging and Spectrometry. Springer Verlag, 2016, DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-26651-0
- Reed: Electron Microprobe Analysis and Scanning Electron Microscopy in Geology. Cambridge University Press, 2010
Prerequisites / Notice- Master student or PhD student who has experience with EM (SEM or TEM) techniques or prior attendance of one of the following courses: Microscopy Training SEM1 (327-2125-00L) or Microscopy Training TEM1(327-2126-00L)
- Attendance of the following courses is of advantage, but not required: Scattering Techniques for Material Characterization (327-2137-00L) or Elements of Microscopy (227-0390-00L) or Electron Microscopy in Material Science (327-0703-00L)
327-2130-00LIntroducing Photons, Neutrons and Muons for Materials Characterisation Restricted registration - show details
Only for MSc Materials Science and MSc Physics.
W2 credits3GA. Hrabec
AbstractThe course takes place at the campus of the Paul Scherrer Institute. The program consists of introductory lectures on the use of photons, neutrons and muons for materials characterization, as well as tours of the large scale facilities of PSI.
ObjectiveThe aim of the course is that the students acquire a basic understanding on the interaction of photons, neutrons and muons with matter and how one can use these as tools to solve specific problems.
ContentThe course runs for one week in June (21st to 25th), 2021. It takes place at the campus of the Paul Scherrer Institute. The morning consists of introductory lectures on the use of photons, neutrons and muons for materials characterization. In the afternoon tours of the large scale facilities of PSI (Swiss Light Source, Swiss Spallation Neutron Source, Swiss Muon Source, Swiss Free Electron Laser), are foreseen, as well as in depth visits to some of the instruments. At the end of the week, the students are required to give an oral presentation about a scientific topic involving the techniques discussed. Time for the presentation preparations will be allocated in the afternoon.



• Interaction of photons, neutrons and muons with matter

• Production of photons, neutrons and muons

• Experimental setups: optics and detectors

• Crystal symmetry, Bragg’s law, reciprocal lattice, structure factors

• Elastic and inelastic scattering with neutrons and photons

• X-ray absorption spectroscopy, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism

• Polarized neutron scattering for the study of magnetic materials

• Imaging techniques using x-rays and neutrons

• Introduction to muon spin rotation

• Applications of muon spin rotation
Lecture notesSlides from the lectures will be available on the internet prior to the lectures.
Literature• Philip Willmott: An Introduction to Synchrotron Radiation: Techniques and Applications, Wiley, 2011

• J. Als-Nielsen and D. McMorrow: Elements of Modern X-Ray Physics, Wiley, 2011.

• G.L. Squires, Introduction to the Theory of Thermal Neutron Scattering, Dover Publications (1997).

• Muon Spin Rotation, Relaxation, and Resonance, Applications to Condensed Matter"

Alain Yaouanc and Pierre Dalmas de Réotier, Oxford University Press, ISBN: 9780199596478

• “Physics with Muons: from Atomic Physics to Condensed Matter Physics”, A. Amato

https://www.psi.ch/lmu/EducationLecturesEN/A_Amato_05_06_2018.pdf
Prerequisites / NoticeThis is a block course for students who have attended courses on condensed matter or materials physics.

Registration at PSI website (http://indico.psi.ch/event/PSImasterschool) required by March 17th, 2021.
327-2133-00LAdvanced Joining TechnologiesW3 credits3GL. Da Silva Duarte
AbstractIntroduction to fundamental aspects of joining technologies of (dis)similar materials for severe operating conditions. Interface reaction processes of metal/alloys/ceramic. While focused on materials issues, issues related to joint design, processing, quality assurance, process economics, and joint performance in service will also be addressed.
ObjectiveTechnical goals, the student will be able to:
1. Describe the fundamentals mechanisms of different joining technologies. Identify advantages and limitations of each method.
2. Be able to apply the basic knowledge on phase diagrams in order to choose the best alloys for joining, process parameters (Temperature and time), joining methods and costs.
3. Describe common types of joining defects and be able to describe their potential influences during application/service.
4. Predict microstructures and/or phase transformations of materials after the joining process based on the phase diagrams information.
5. Identify suitable characterization techniques (destructive and non-destructive testing) and assess the joining properties.
6. Understand diffusion phenomena affecting joining interface during industrial applications and the materials limitations in aggressive environments.
7. Identify and explain the influence of thermal stress affecting the joining interface of common engineering materials.
ContentThe most important types of joining and interface mechanisms will be presented and discussed during the different lectures. For each specific joining technology, relevant technology aspects of the process, experimental characterization (destructive and non- destructive) methods will be presented always bringing industry examples for each joining technology.
This combination allows the student to connect the basics of material science concepts with practical aspects of joining technology and the research on joining technologies.
Following topics will be presented:
1. Introduction to Joining Technologies
2. Phase diagrams and thermodynamics; their importance in joining process
3. The basic metallurgy of welding: Brazing, Transient-Liquid-Phase Bonding and Soldering
4. Coatings and nano-reactive foils as filler materials
5. Advanced joining of alloys and intermetallic alloys
6. Advanced joining of polymers, ceramics and composites
7. Advanced joining with dissimilar materials
8. Characterization techniques: Destructive and Non-destructive methods
9. Defects and joining reliability
10. Corrosion environments and hydrogen embrittlement
11. Joining technologies as repairing technique
12. Other advanced joining methods (e.g. living tissue)
Lecture notesA script in English covering the lecture content is available online on the ETHZ website. Hardcopies of the script will be distributed during the lecture.
LiteratureThe following books help to deep lecture contents on Advanced Joining Technologies and offers additional and more detailed description of the phenomena/methods presented in the lecture script:

1) Handbook of Plastics Joining: A Practical Guide, Edited by
The Welding Institute, Cambridge, UK, ISBN: 978-0-8155-1581-4

2) Solders and Soldering: Materials, Design, Production, and Analysis for Reliable Bonding; by Howard H., McGraw-Hill. ISBN-13: 978-0070399709

3) Principles of Soldering by Giles Humpston and David M. Jacobson. ASM International, 2004. ISBN: 978-0-87170-792-5

4) Principles of Brazing by Giles Humpston and David M. Jacobson. ASM International, 2004. ISBN: 0-87170-812-4
327-2134-00LIntroduction to MetamaterialsW Dr2 credits2GH. Galinski
AbstractThe main course objectives are to introduce students to the exciting world of metamaterials designed for optical and mechanical applications. Focus is on its most important physical concepts and fabrication techniques.
ObjectiveThe main course objectives are to introduce students to the exciting world of metamaterials designed for optical and mechanical applications. Focus is on its most important physical concepts and fabrication techniques.
ContentMetamaterials are artificial designer materials with properties that may not be found in nature. They can be designed to possess unique electromagnetic or mechanical properties, which allow to explore new physical phenomena such as negative refraction and negative Poisson's ratio, negative compressibility transitions, perfect lenses, optical and mechanical cloaking. In addition, metamaterials are promising candidates to improve the environment by enhancing energy harvesting from the sun.

Topics to be covered: Metal optics and plasmonics, metamaterials and metasurfaces, epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) materials, negative refraction, negative Poisson ratio materials, plasmonic-enhanced light harvesting.
327-2135-00LAdvanced Analytical TEM Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
Number of participants limited to 12.
Master students will have priority over PhD students. More information here: https://scopem.ethz.ch/education/MTP.html
W Dr2 credits3G
AbstractThe course focuses on the fundamental understanding and hands-on knowledge of analytical Transmission Electron Microscopy (ATEM) techniques: electron dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), energy filtered TEM and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The lectures will be followed by demonstrations and acquisition sessions TEM instruments.The lectures on statistical treatment of raw data sets and on
Objective• Setting-up the optimal operation conditions for reliable EDX analysis and quantification.
• Setting-up the optimal operation conditions for the reliable EFTEM analyses.
• Setting-up the optimal operation conditions for the reliable EELS analyses.
• EDX data acquisition, on-line analysis and quantification.
• EFTEM data acquisition and analysis.
• EELS acquisition analyses.
Content1. Fundamentals of analytical TEM.
2. Electron Optics and Instrumentation. Spectrum Imaging.
3. Quantitative X-ray Spectrometry.
4. EELS.
5. EFTEM.
6. Statistical treatment of raw data.
7. EDX. Quantification and data evaluation.
8. Demonstrations on EDX, EELS, and EFTEM data acquisitions.
9. Practical sessions for students with provided specimens. Practical sessions for
students with their own specimens.
10. Questions and such: open discussion.
11. Student presentations.
Literature• Egerton: Physical Principles of Electron Microscopy: an introduction to TEM, SEM and AEM, Springer Verlag, 2007
• Williams, Carter: Transmission Electron Microscopy, Plenum Press, 2nd Edition 2009
• Egerton: Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy in the Electron Microscopy, 3rd Edition,
Springer, 2011.
Prerequisites / NoticeNo mandatory prerequisites. Prior attendance to EM Basic lectures (327-0703-00L, 227- 0390-00L) and to the Microscopy Training TEM I - Introduction to TEM course (327-2126- 00L) is recommended.
327-2139-00LDiffraction Physics in Materials ScienceW3 credits3GR. Erni
AbstractThe lecture focuses on diffraction and scattering phenomena in materials science beyond basic Bragg diffraction. Introducing the 1st-order Born approximation and Kirchoff’s theory, diffraction from ideal and non-ideal crystals is treated including, e.g., temperature and shape effects, ordering phenomena, small-angle scattering and dynamical diffraction theories.
Objective• To become familiar with advanced diffraction phenomena in order to be able to explore the structure and properties of (solid) matter and their defects.
• To build up a generally applicable and fundamental theoretical understanding of scattering and diffraction effects.
• To learn about limitations of the methods and the underlying theory which is commonly used to analyze diffraction data.
ContentThe course provides a general introduction to advanced diffraction phenomena in materials science. The lecture series covers the following topics: derivation of a general scattering theory based on Green’s function as basis for the introduction of the first-order Born approximation; Kirchhoff’s diffraction theory with its integral theorem and the specific cases of Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction; diffraction from ideal crystals and diffraction from real crystals considering temperature effects expressed by the temperature Debye-Waller factor and by thermal diffuse scattering, atomic size effects expressed by the static Debye-Waller factor and diffuse scattering due to the modulation of the Laue monotonic scattering as a consequence of local order or clustering; the basics of small-angle scattering; and finally approaches used to treat dynamical diffraction are introduced and exemplified by performing simulations. In addition, the specifics of X-ray, electron and neutron scattering are being discussed. The course is complemented by a lab visit, live demos, selected exercises and short topical presentations given by the participants.
Lecture notesFull-text script is available covering within about 100 pages the core topics of the lecture and all necessary derivations.
Literature- Diffraction Physics, 3rd ed., J. M. Cowley, Elsevier, 1994.
- X-Ray Diffraction, B. E. Warren, Dover, 1990.
- Diffraction from Materials, 2nd ed., L. H. Schwartz, J. B. Cohen, Springer, 1987.
- X-Ray Diffraction – In Crystals, Imperfect Crystals and Amorphous Bodies, A. Guinier, Dover, 1994.
- Aberration-corrected imaging in transmission electron microscopy, 2nd ed., R. Erni, Imperial College Press, 2015.
Prerequisites / NoticeBasics of crystallography and the concept of reciprocal space, basics of electromagnetic and particle waves (but not mandatory)
327-2140-00LFocused Ion Beam and Applications Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 6. PhD students will be asked for a fee. https://scopem.ethz.ch/education/MTP.html

Registration form: (Link)
W Dr1 credit2PP. Zeng, A. G. Bittermann, S. Gerstl, L. Grafulha Morales, J. Reuteler
AbstractThe introductory course on Focused Ion Beam (FIB) provides theoretical and hands-on learning for new operators, utilizing lectures, demonstrations and hands-on sessions.
Objective- Set-up, align and operate a FIB-SEM successfully and safely.
- Accomplish operation tasks and optimize microscope performances.
- Perform sample preparation (TEM lamella, APT probe…) using FIB-SEM.
- Perform other FIB techniques, such as characterization
- At the end of the course, students will know how to set-up FIB-SEM, how to prepare TEM lamella/APT probe and how to utilize FIB techniques.
ContentThis course provides FIB techniques to students with previous SEM experience.
- Overview of FIB theory, instrumentation, operation and applications.
- Introduction and discussion on FIB and instrumentation.
- Lectures on FIB theory.
- Lectures on FIB applications.
- Practicals on FIB-SEM set-up, cross-beam alignment.
- Practicals on site-specific cross-section and TEM lamellar preparation.
- Lecture and demonstration on FIB automation.
Literature- Detailed course manual.
- Giannuzzi, Stevie: Introduction to focused ion beams instrumentation, theory, techniques, and practice, Springer, 2005.
- Orloff, Utlaut, Swanson: High resolution focused ion beams: FIB and its applications, Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, 2003.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe students should fulfil one or more of these prerequisites:
- Prior attendance to the ScopeM Microscopy Training SEM I: Introduction to SEM (327-2125-00L).
- Prior SEM experience.
327-2141-00LMaterials+ Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants is limited to 25.
MSc Materials Science students will have priority over other students.
W6 credits6GH. Galinski, R. Nicolosi Libanori
AbstractMaterials+ is a team-based learning course focusing on sustained learning of key material concepts. This course teaches critical thinking and solving hands on material problems. The students will work in groups of five to solve a materials challenge. The eight week-long project includes a poster presentation and culminates in a materials challenge, where all groups compete against each other.
ObjectiveThe overarching goal of this course is to provide students a risk-friendly environment, where they can learn the tools and mind-set to aim for scientific breakthroughs. The materials challenge is thought to be a stimulus rather than a goal, to aim for new solutions and creative ideas.
Students enrolled in the course will acquire technical skills on materials selection, integration and engineering. Furthermore, they will develop personal and social competencies, especially in decision-making, communication, cooperation, coordination, adaptability and flexibility, creative and critical thinking, project management, problem-solving, integrity and ethics.
ContentIn each term, the students will solve a materials challenge in class by applying three "state-of-the-art" material science concepts.
Students will take an active role as they work with their peers in small groups to strengthen and apply their learned expert skills.
The course is designed to promote student learning of key material concepts in an applied context and stimulate the developing of soft skills from inter- and intra-team social interactions.
327-2142-00LOrganic Electronic Materials
This course will take place at EPFL and will be streamed to students enrolled at ETHZ.
W4 credits3V + 1UH. Frauenrath
AbstractThis course will introduce students to the structural requirements of charge transport in organic materials as well as synthetic methods for their preparation.
ObjectiveBy the end of the course, the student must be able to:
- Describe electronic structure of aromatic compounds, electron delocalisation
- Draw molecular orbital diagrams of pi-conjugated systems
- Discriminate charge generation mechanisms and species (solitons, polarons, bipolarons)
- Apply synthesis methods appropriate for pi-conjugated molecules
- Categorize different classes of organic electronic materials
- Elaborate functioning of organic solar cells, field-effect transistors, light-emmitting diodes
Content1. Introduction, Motivation, and Overview
- Research in Materials Related to Energy Conversion and Storage
- Basics of Supramolecular Chemistry
2. Charge Transport in Organic Molecules and Materials
- Chemical Bonding in Organic Molecules
- Electron Delocalization in Molecules with pi-Conjugated Systems
- Charge Generation and Transport in Molecules and Bulk Materials
3. Synthesis and Properties of Organic Electronic Materials
- General Strategies
- Oligo(phenylene)s and Poly(phenylene)s
- Oligo(thiophene)s and Poly(thiophene)s
- Poly(phenylene vinylene)s
- Other Low Molecular Weight Organic Semiconductors
4. Fabrication and Characterization of Organic Electronic Devices
- Organic Field-Effect Transistors (OFET)
- Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (OLED)
- Organic Solar Cells (OSC)
327-2221-00LAdvanced Surface Characterisation TechniquesW4 credits2V + 2UA. Rossi Elsener-Rossi
AbstractThis course will be dedicated to the application of surface analytical techniques for the characterization of nanostructured materials and the understanding of their reactivity. Applications to innovative materials relevant for industries will be provided during the course.
ObjectiveAcquisition of a sound basis on qualitative and quantitative analysis of XPS, AES and SIMS data based on practical examples and exercises from tribology, polymer science, biomaterials, passivity, nanostructured materials (according to the interests of participants).

Learn the capabilities and limitations of the techniques for materials characterization.
ContentXPS and AES: Instrumental parameters (sources, analyzer); data acquisition; energy and intensity calibration; data processing (satellite subtraction, background subtraction, curve-fitting); qualitative analysis (BE shifts, satellites); quantitative analysis of homogeneous, layered and nanostructured surfaces.

Examples will cover chemical, physical, & electrical characterization of films, surfaces, particles & interfaces.

Errors in quantitative analysis; transmission function, comparison of data from different instruments; depth-profiling techniques; imaging acquisition and processing

SIMS: Principle of the technique; overview on the instrumentation: Choice of primary ion; Mass scale calibration; Linearity of the intensity scale (dead-time correction); Repeatability and reproducibility; an introduction to data interpretation and multivariate techniques will be also provided.

Composition depth-profiling by XPS and Auger over 100's nm is presented by using noble gas ions (e.g. Ar+) sputtering while acquiring spectra. The advantages and limitations of depth-profiling with C60 source that reduces or eliminates sputter induced artifacts for organic materials will be discussed.
Angle Resolved XPS in combination with mathematical methods can provide gradient and layer ordering information within the first monolayers down to 10 nm:practical examples will be presented.

ISO and ASTM standards will be also presented during the course.

Case studies, Visit to the laboratory, Computer-assisted data processing in the classroom.
Lecture notesCopy of the overheads will be available after the lecture.

Papers used for the case studies will be also distributed.
LiteratureD. Briggs, Surface analysis of polymers by XPS and static SIMS, Cambridge Solid State Science Series, 1998

J.C. Riviere and S. Myhra, Handbook of surface and Interface Analysis, Marcel Dekker Inc.

D. Briggs and M.P. Seah, Practical Surface Analysis, vol.1, John Wiley & Sons, Chichester.

J.C. Vickerman, Surface Analysis - the principal techniques, John Wiley & Sons, Chichester.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe students should have attended and passed the following exams:
general chemistry, general physics and an introductory course on surface analysis techniques.
327-2223-00LAtomic Force Microscopy in Materials Science Information Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
Number of participants limited to 18.
W4 credits6GL. Isa
AbstractThis course is a hands-on introduction to atomic force microscopy (AFM). It consists of lectures and practical exercises involving actual AFM use, macroscopic mechanical models of AFM, and computer simulations. Most lab work and the capstone research project will be done in teams of two or three students.
ObjectiveThe objectives of the course are for students to become familiar with the concepts of and equipment for AFM, to understand their results, and to competently use an AFM for a short research project.
Lecture notesYouTube.com/AtomicForceMicro, NaioAFM Tutorials 1-8, AFM Lessons 1-30
327-2224-00LMaP Distinguished Lecture Series on Additive Manufacturing
Does not take place this semester.
This course is primarily designed for MSc and doctoral students. Guests are welcome.
W Dr1 credit2Sfurther lecturers
AbstractThis course is an interdisciplinary colloquium on Additive Manufacturing (AM) involving different internationally renowned speakers from academia and industry giving lectures about their cutting-edge research, which highlights the state-of-the-art and frontiers in the AM field.
ObjectiveParticipants become acquainted with the state-of-the-art and frontiers in Additive Manufacturing, which is a topic of global and future relevance from the field of materials and process engineering. The self-study of relevant literature and active participation in discussions following presentations by internationally renowned speaker stimulate critical thinking and allow participants to deliberately discuss challenges and opportunities with leading academics and industrial experts and to exchange ideas within an interdisciplinary community.
ContentThis course is a colloquium involving a selected mix of internationally renowned speaker from academia and industry who present their cutting-edge research in the field of Additive Manufacturing. The self-study of relevant pre-read literature provided in advance to each lecture serves as a basis for active participation in the critical discussions following each presentation.
Lecture notesSelected scientific pre-read literature (max. three articles per lecture) relevant for and discussed at the end of each individual lecture is posted in advance on the course web page
Prerequisites / NoticeParticipants should have a solid background in materials science and/or engineering.
327-2225-00LMaP Distinguished Lecture Series on Soft Robotics
This course is primarily designed for MSc and doctoral students. Guests are welcome.
W Dr1 credit2SR. Katzschmann, L. Schefer
AbstractThis course is an interdisciplinary colloquium on Soft Robotics involving different internationally renowned speakers from academia and industry giving lectures about their cutting-edge research, which highlights the state-of-the-art and frontiers in the Soft Robotics field.
ObjectiveParticipants become acquainted with the state-of-the-art and frontiers in Soft Robotics, which is a topic of global and future relevance from the field of materials and process engineering. The self-study of relevant literature and active participation in discussions following presentations by internationally renowned speakers stimulate critical thinking and allow participants to deliberately discuss challenges and opportunities with leading academics and industrial experts and to exchange ideas within an interdisciplinary community.
ContentThis course is a colloquium involving a selected mix of internationally renowned speaker from academia and industry who present their cutting-edge research in the field of Soft Robotics. The self-study of relevant pre-read literature provided in advance to each lecture serves as a basis for active participation in the critical discussions following each presentation.
Lecture notesSelected scientific pre-read literature (max. three articles per lecture) relevant for and discussed during the lectures is posted in advance on the course web page.
Prerequisites / NoticeParticipants should have a solid background in materials science and/or engineering.
327-4105-00LIntegrity of Materials and StructuresW4 credits2V + 2UG. Piskoty, M.  Barbezat, T. Graule
AbstractThe course approaches failures in metallic, ceramic and polymer components as well as structures.
Objective1) Understanding common failure mechanisms of materials and structures

2) Obtaining knowledge about the methodology of failure analysis

3) Learning to apply the different investigation methods appropriately
ContentSTRUCTURES: In most failure cases, the material used is only one of various aspects to be considered. Consequently, successful failure analysis requires a comprehensive interdisciplinary approach. The systematic procedure, which involves the preservation of evidence, followed by establishing and evaluating hypotheses and completed by drawing conclusions, will be explored interactively, based on variegated failure cases.

METALS: After a brief overview of the most failure-relevant properties of metallic materials, focusing on steel, different common failure mechanisms and the related investigation approaches will be demonstrated based on case studies from different fields like transportation, machinery and building structures.

CERAMICS: Ceramics are used in applications where electrical insulation, resistance to wear, or the ability to withstand high temperatures are needed. Failure mechanisms in ceramic components under operating conditions are analyzed: corrosion due to fluids, erosion due to fluids loaded with particles, hot gas corrosion, creep.

POLYMERS: Methodology of failure analysis on polymer materials: system approach, mechanisms like aging in polymers, analysis of thermoplast, thermosets and elastomer failures based on application oriented cases. Team exercises on selected failure cases.
Prerequisites / NoticeUntil further notice, this lecture will take place online. Further information is given on moodle.
327-4200-00LBio-Inspired Active and Adaptive MaterialsW3 credits2GR. Nicolosi Libanori
AbstractThis course offers a comprehensive description of the molecular mechanisms that are at the origin of the functions carried out by complex out-of-equilibrium materials systems in living organisms. Through discussions, we will demonstrate strategies of implementing such molecular-based vital functions found in biological systems into synthetic materials.
ObjectiveBy the end of this course, students will be able to correlate dissipative molecular mechanisms with active and interactive functions found in living organisms. They will be able to apply and integrate key out-of-equilibrium concepts towards functional active and adaptive devices and material systems.
Content- Dynamic molecular systems
- Active, adaptive and autonomous molecular systems
- Temporal regulation in biological and bio-inspired systems
- Temporal control in biological systems
- Temporal control in bio-inspired systems
- Autonomous molecular structures
- Out-of-equilibrium biological and bio-inspired systems
- Decay of metastable and steady-state systems
- Transient self-assembly with active environments and active structural systems
- Motion and work generation
- Molecular motion mechanisms in biology
- Bio-inspired motors and walkers
- Harnessing molecular work at the macroscale
- Information processing in autonomous molecular systems
- Sensing, adaptation and communication in biology
- Reaction-diffusion in continuous systems
LiteratureCopies of the slides will be made available for download before each lecture.
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