Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2021

Public Policy Bachelor Information
Elective Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
363-0764-00LProject ManagementW2 credits2VC. G. C. Marxt
AbstractThe course gives a detailed introduction into various aspects of classic and agile project management. Established concepts and methods for initiating, planning and executing projects are introduced and major challenges discussed. Additionally the course covers different agile and hybrid project management concepts.
ObjectiveProjects are not only the base of work in modern enterprises but also the primary type of cooperation with customers. Students of ETH will often work in or manage projects in the course of their career. Good project management knowledge is not only a guarantee for individual but also for company wide success.

The goal of this course is to give a detailed introduction into project management, more specific participants
- will understand the basics of successful classic and agile project management
- are able to apply the concepts and methods of project management in their day to day work
- are able to identify different project management practices and are able to suggest improvements
- will contribute to projects in your organization in a positive way
- will be able to plan and execute projects successfully.
ContentThe competitiveness of companies is driven by the development of a concise strategy and its successful implementation. Especially strategy execution poses several challenges to senior management: clear communication of goals, ongoing follow up of activities, a sound monitoring and control system. All these aspect are covered by successfully implementing and applying program and project management. As an introductory course we will focus mainly on project management.
In the last decade project management has become an important discipline in management and several internationally recognized project management methods can be found: PMBOK, IPMA ICB, PRINCE 2, etc. These frameworks have proven to be very useful in day-to-day work.
Unfortunately the environment companies are working in has changed parallel to the rise of PM as a discipline. Incremental but even more important fundamental changes happen more often and much faster than a decade ago. Experience has shown that the classic PM approaches lack the inherent dynamics to cope with these challenges. So overtime new methods have surfaced, such as SCRUM. These methods are called Agile Project Management methods and follow a dynamic model of reality, called complex adaptive systems perspective.
This course will cover both classic and agile project management topics. The first part of the semester will lay the basics by discussing the classic way of planning, organizing and executing a project based on its life cycle. Topics covered include: drafting project proposals, stake holder analysis, different aspects of project planning, project organization, project risk management, project execution, project control, leadership in projects incl. conflict mitigation strategies, termination and documentation. In the second part basic conceptual topics for agile project management such as the agile manifesto, SCRUM, Lean, Kanban, XP, rapid results are covered. The course tries to tap into pre-existing knowledge of the participants using a very interactive approach including in-class discussion, short exercises and case studies.
Lecture notesNo
The lecture slides and other additional material (papers, book chapters, case studies, etc.) will be available for download from Moodle before each class.
363-0532-00LEconomics of Sustainable DevelopmentW3 credits2VL. Bretschger
AbstractConcepts and indicators of sustainable development, paradigms of weak and strong sustainability;
neoclassical and endogenous growth models;
economic growth in the presence of exhaustible and renewable resources; pollution, environmental policy and growth;
role of substitution and technological progress;
Environmental Kuznets Curve; sustainability policy.
ObjectiveThe aim is to develop an understanding of the implications of sustainable development for the long-run development of economies. It is to be shown to which extent the potential for growth to be sustainable depends on substitution possibilities, technological change and environmental policy.
After successful completion of this course, students are able to
1. understand the causes of long-term economic development
2. analyse the influence of natural resources and pollution on the development of social welfare
3. to appropriately classify the role of politics in the pursuit of sustainability goals.
ContentThe lecture introduces different concepts and paradigms of sustainable development. Building on this foundation and following a general introduction to the modelling of economic growth, conditions for growth to be sustainable in the presence of pollution and scarce natural resources are derived. Special attention is devoted to the scope for substitution and role of technological progress in overcoming resource scarcities. Implications of environmental externalities are regarded with respect to the design of environmental policies.
Concepts and indicators of sustainable development, paradigms of weak and strong sustainability, sustainability optimism vs. pessimism;
introduction to neoclassical and endogenous growth models;
pollution, environmental policy and growth;
role of substitution possibilities and technological progress;
Environmental Kuznets Curve: concept, theory and empirical results;
economic growth in the presence of exhaustible and renewable resources, Hartwick rule, resource saving technological change.
Lecture notesWill be provided successively in the course of the semester.
LiteratureBretschger, F. (1999), Growth Theory and Sustainable Development, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.

Bretschger, L. (2004), Wachstumstheorie, Oldenbourg, 3. Auflage, München.

Bretschger, L. (2018), Greening Economy, Graying Society, CER-ETH Press, ETH Zurich.

Perman, R., Y. Ma, J. McGilvray and M. Common (2011), Natural Resource and Environmental Economics, Longman , 4th ed., Essex.

Neumayer, E. (2003), Weak and Strong Sustainability, 2nd ed., Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.
851-0585-43LExperimental Game TheoryW2 credits2VA. Diekmann
AbstractThe course addresses principles and methods of experimental game theory. It focuses on experiments about social interaction, conflict and cooperation, emergence of cooperation and experimental validity of concepts for strategic behaviour in decision-making situations.
ObjectiveLearn the fundamentals and logic of thinking about experimental methods and experimental game theory. Apply experimental game theory methods to strategic interaction situations.
ContentDie Spieltheorie stellt Modelle zur Beschreibung und Analyse sozialer und strategischer Interaktionen zur Verfügung.
Schwerpunkt der Vorlesung sind experimentelle Studien und empirische Anwendungen der Theorie in verschiedenen Bereichen. Dazu zählen sozialtheoretische Analysen von Kooperation, des sozialen Austauschs, von Institutionen und Normen, sozialen Dilemmata und Reziprozität ebenso wie Anwendungen auf strategisches Verhalten in Politik und zwischen Staaten und Firmen, den Auswirkungen von Reziprozitätsnormen auf dem Arbeitsmarkt und einige Anwendungen in der Biologie. Experimentelle Studien zeigen allerdings, dass häufig die strikten Rationalitätsanforderungen der "Standardtheorie" nicht erfüllt sind. Unter dem Stichwort "Behavioural Game Theory" werden in der Vorlesung auch Theorievarianten vorgestellt, die mit den experimentellen Beobachtungen von Entscheidungen "begrenzt rationaler" Akteure besser im Einklang stehen.
Lecture notesFolien der Spieltheorie-Vorlesung und Literatur (Fachartikel, Kapitel aus Lehrbüchern) können auf der Webseite der Vorlesung eingesehen und heruntergeladen werden.
LiteratureKurzer Überblick in Kapitel 10 von Diekmann, Andreas, 2016. Spieltheorie. Einführung, Beispiele, Experimente. 4. Aufl. Reinbek: Rowohlt.
Ausführlich: John H. Kagel und Alvin E. Roth, Hg., 1995, Handbook of Experimental Economics. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press.
(Ein Handapparat dieser und weiterer Literatur wird in der D-GESS-Bibliothek bereitgestellt.)
Literatur zum Download befindet sich auch auf der Webseite:
Link
Prerequisites / NoticeInteresse am Thema und Motivation zur Mitarbeit.
363-1070-00LCyber SecurityW3 credits2GS. Frei
AbstractThis course provides a solid understanding of the fundamental mechanics and limitations of cyber security to provide guidance for future leaders as well as individuals constituting our society.
Introduction to the concepts, developments, and the current state of affairs in the cyber security domain. We look at the topic from the attackers, defenders and societies perspective.
ObjectiveUpon completion of this course students understand the essential developments, principles, challenges as well as the the limitations and the state of practice in cyber security from the technological, economic, legal, and social perspective.
The course provides an interdisciplinary overview, guidance, and understanding of the dynamics in cyber security to guide decision making in business and society. Students understand the topics from the attackers, defenders, and societies perspective.
ContentIntroduction
- Brief history of the rise of the Internet from the attackers, defenders, commercial and society perspective
- Learning points from past and current assumptions, approaches, successes, failures, and surprises

Internet Infrastructure
- Establish a high level understanding of the fundamental design principals and functional blocks of the Internet infrastructure
- Understand strengths and weaknesses of present design choices from security perspective
- High level understanding of relevant networking concepts, protocols, software applications, policies, processes & organizations in order to assess these topics
- Establish a functional, high level understanding of relevant aspects of cryptography

Cyber Security & Risk
- Recognize cyber security as an interdisciplinary, highly dynamic, complex and adaptive system where increased interaction and dependencies between physical, communication, and social layers brings fundamentally different (and unpredictable) threats
- Core security assets such as: confidentiality, integrity, availability, authenticity, accountability, non repudiation, privacy
- Dominant players, protocols, and technologies
- Different threat actors along the dimensions attacker goals, resources, approach, and threat

Economics of Cyber Security
Understand security challenges and limitations from an economic, rather than technological perspective
- From security perspective: incentives of industry vs. users, security as a negative externality, zero marginal cost of software, network effect, time to market, lock-in, switching cost, economics of usability, security as a trade-off
- Social and psychological aspects of security

Attacker Capabilities
- Attacker capabilities and the offensive use from technical, economic, organizational, and operational perspective
- Understand common and novel attack and evasion techniques, proliferation of expertise and tools, optimal timing to use zero-day attacks
- Attack types and malware development lifecycle and detection evasion techniques
- Botnets, exploit markets, plausible deniability, distributed denial of service (DDoS)
- Processes and dynamics in the (in)security community, cyber-underground

Defense Options and Limitations
- Functional principles, capabilities, and limitations of diverse protection and detection technologies
- Security effectiveness and evaluation/testing of security technologies
- Trade-off between efficiency and resilience against structurally novel attacks
- Effectiveness baseline security measures
- Know cyber information sources and frameworks

Cyber Security Challenges
- Increasing software complexity and vulnerabilities, the illusion of secure software
- Full disclosure debate, economics of bug bounty programs
- Internet of things, Industry control systems (SCADA/ICS)
- Security and integrity of the supply chain (IoT, Smart-X)
- Social media and mass protests
- Erosion of privacy

Legal Aspects
- Legal aspects of cyber security, compliance, and policies
- Know the fundamental national and international legal and regulatory requirements in connection with cyber security on a cross-sector and sector-specific level
- Understanding of legal risks and measures for risk mitigation

Guest Talks:
- Pascal Gujer - Digital Forensics Expert Kapo Zurich (Cantonal Police Departement Zurich)
- Maxim Salomon - Previously at Roche now with Google as Technical Program Manager for Security of Mergers & Acquisitions "The safety vs. security of cyber physical systems"
- Marc Ruef - Security Expert, "Navigating the Cyber Underground"
- Roger Halbheer - Executive Security Advisor for Microsoft in EMEA
Lecture notesLecture slides will be available on the site of the lecture:

https://www.xyotta.com

Collaboradom: Cyber Security Course 2021

To get access ask freist@ethz.ch for the registration code once the course has begun
LiteraturePaper reading provided during the lectures
Prerequisites / Noticenone
860-0022-00LComplexity and Global Systems Science Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 50.

Prerequisites: solid mathematical skills.

Particularly suitable for students of D-ITET, D-MAVT and ISTP
W3 credits2SD. Helbing, S. Mahajan
AbstractThis course discusses complex techno-socio-economic systems, their counter-intuitive behaviors, and how their theoretical understanding empowers us to solve some long-standing problems that are currently bothering the world.
ObjectiveParticipants should learn to get an overview of the state of the art in the field, to present it in a well understandable way to an interdisciplinary scientific audience, to develop models for open problems, to analyze them, and to defend their results in response to critical questions. In essence, participants should improve their scientific skills and learn to think scientifically about complex dynamical systems.
ContentThis course starts with a discussion of the typical and often counter-intuitive features of complex dynamical systems such as self-organization, emergence, (sudden) phase transitions at "tipping points", multi-stability, systemic instability, deterministic chaos, and turbulence. It then discusses phenomena in networked systems such as feedback, side and cascading effects, and the problem of radical uncertainty. The course progresses by demonstrating the relevance of these properties for understanding societal and, at times, global-scale problems such as traffic jams, crowd disasters, breakdowns of cooperation, crime, conflict, social unrests, political revolutions, bubbles and crashes in financial markets, epidemic spreading, and/or "tragedies of the commons" such as environmental exploitation, overfishing, or climate change. Based on this understanding, the course points to possible ways of mitigating techno-socio-economic-environmental problems, and what data science may contribute to their solution.
Lecture notes"Social Self-Organization
Agent-Based Simulations and Experiments to Study Emergent Social Behavior"
Helbing, Dirk
ISBN 978-3-642-24004-1
LiteraturePhilip Ball
Why Society Is A Complex Matter
https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783642289996

Globally networked risks and how to respond
Nature: https://www.nature.com/articles/nature12047

Global Systems Science and Policy
Link

Managing Complexity: Insights, Concepts, Applications
https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783540752608

Further links:

http://global-systems-science.org

Link

Link

https://ec.europa.eu/digital-single-market/en/global-systems-science

Further literature will be recommended in the lectures.
Prerequisites / NoticeMathematical skills can be helpful
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