Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2021

Computational Science and Engineering Bachelor Information
For All Programme Regulations
Additional Electives from the Fields of Specialization (CSE Master)
recognition of 227-0662-00L and 227-0662-10L requires the successful completion of both course units
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-1228-00LCloud Dynamics: Hurricanes Information W4 credits3GU. Lohmann
AbstractHurricanes are among the most destructive elements in the atmosphere. This lecture will discuss the physical requirements for their formation, life cycle, damage potential and their relationship to global warming. It also distinguishes hurricanes from thunderstorms and tornadoes.
ObjectiveAt the end of this course students will be able to distinguish the formation and life cycle mechanisms of tropical cyclones from those of extratropical thunderstorms/cyclones, project how tropical cyclones change in a warmer climate based on their physics and evaluate different tropical cyclone modification ideas.
Contentsee course outline at: https://iac.ethz.ch/edu/courses/master/modules/cloud-dynamics
Lecture notesSlides will be made available
LiteratureA literature list can be found here: https://www.iac.ethz.ch/edu/courses/master/modules/cloud_dynamics
Prerequisites / NoticeAt least one introductory lecture in Atmospheric Science or Instructor's consent. This lecture will build on some concepts of atmospheric dynamics and their governing equations. Thus, mathematical knowledge will be needed to use the equations to understand the material of the course.
701-1270-00LHigh Performance Computing for Weather and ClimateW3 credits3GO. Fuhrer
AbstractState-of-the-art weather and climate simulations rely on large and complex software running on supercomputers. This course focuses on programming methods and tools for understanding, developing and optimizing the computational aspects of weather and climate models. Emphasis will be placed on the foundations of parallel computing, practical exercises and emerging trends such as using GPUs.
ObjectiveAfter attending this course, students will be able to:
- Understand a broad variety of high performance computing concepts relevant for weather and climate simulations
- Work with weather and climate simulation codes that run on large supercomputers
ContentHPC Overview:
- Why does weather and climate require HPC?
- Today's HPC: Beowulf-style clusters, massively parallel architectures, hybrid computing, accelerators
- Scaling / Parallel efficiency
- Algorithmic motifs in weather and climate

Writing HPC code:
- Data locality and single node efficiency
- Shared memory parallelism with OpenMP
- Distributed memory parallelism with MPI
- GPU computing
- High-level programming and domain-specific languages
Literature- Introduction to High Performance Computing for Scientists and Engineers, G. Hager and G. Wellein, CRC Press, 2011
- Computer Organization and Design, D.H. Patterson and J.L. Hennessy
- Parallel Computing, A. Grama, A. Gupta, G. Karypis, V. Kumar (https://www-users.cs.umn.edu/~karypis/parbook/)
- Parallel Programming in MPI and OpenMP, V. Eijkhout (http://pages.tacc.utexas.edu/~eijkhout/pcse/html/index.html)
Prerequisites / Notice- fundamentals of numerical analysis and atmospheric modeling
- basic experience in a programming language (C/C++, Fortran, Python, …)
- experience using command line interfaces in *nix environments (e.g., Unix, Linux)
151-0110-00LCompressible FlowsW4 credits2V + 1UT. Rösgen
AbstractTopics: unsteady one-dimensional subsonic and supersonic flows, acoustics, sound propagation, supersonic flows with shocks and Prandtl-Meyer expansions, flow around slender bodies, shock tubes, reaction fronts (deflagration and detonation).
Mathematical tools: method of characteristics and selected numerical methods.
ObjectiveIllustration of compressible flow phenomena and introduction to the corresponding mathematical description methods.
ContentThe interaction of compressibility and inertia is responsible for wave generation in a fluid. The compressibility plays an important role for example in unsteady phenomena, such as oscillations in gas pipelines or exhaust pipes. Compressibility effects are also important in steady subsonic flows with high Mach numbers (M>0.3) and in supersonic flows (e.g. aeronautics, turbomachinery).
The first part of the lecture deals with wave propagation phenomena in one-dimensional subsonic and supersonic flows. The discussion includes waves with small amplitudes in an acoustic approximation and waves with large amplitudes with possible shock formation.
The second part deals with plane, steady supersonic flows. Slender bodies in a parallel flow are considered as small perturbations of the flow and can be treated by means of acoustic methods. The description of the two-dimensional supersonic flow around bodies with arbitrary shapes includes oblique shocks and Prandtl-Meyer expansions etc.. Various boundary conditions, which are imposed for example by walls or free-jet boundaries, and interactions, reflections etc. are taken into account.
Lecture notesnot available
Literaturea list of recommended textbooks is handed out at the beginning of the lecture.
Prerequisites / Noticeprerequisites: Fluiddynamics I and II
327-0613-00LComputer Applications: Finite Elements in Solids and Structures Information
The course will only take place if at least 7 students are enrolled.
W4 credits2V + 2UA. Gusev
AbstractTo introduce the Finite Element Method to the students with a general interest in the topic
ObjectiveTo introduce the Finite Element Method to the students with a general interest in the topic
ContentIntroduction; Energy formulations; Displacement finite elements; Solutions to the finite element equations; Linear elements; Convergence, compatibility and completeness; Higher order elements; Beam and frame elements, Plate and shell elements; Dynamics and vibration; Generalization of the Finite Element concepts (Galerkin-weighted residual and variational approaches)
Lecture notesAutographie
Literature- Astley R.J. Finite Elements in Solids and Structures, Chapman & Hill, 1992
- Zienkiewicz O.C., Taylor R.L. The Finite Element Method, 5th ed., vol. 1, Butterworth-Heinemann, 2000
151-0212-00LAdvanced CFD MethodsW4 credits2V + 1UP. Jenny
AbstractFundamental and advanced numerical methods used in commercial and open-source CFD codes will be explained. The main focus is on numerical methods for conservation laws with discontinuities, which is relevant for trans- and hypersonic gas dynamics problems, but also CFD of incompressible flows, Direct Simulation Monte Carlo and the Lattice Boltzmann method are explained.
ObjectiveKnowing what's behind a state-of-the-art CFD code is not only important for developers, but also for users in order to choose the right methods and to achieve meaningful and accurate numerical results. Acquiring this knowledge is the main goal of this course.

Established numerical methods to solve the incompressible and compressible Navier-Stokes equations are explained, whereas the focus lies on finite volume methods for compressible flow simulations. In that context, first the main theory and then numerical schemes related to hyperbolic conservation laws are explained, whereas not only examples from fluid mechanics, but also simpler, yet illustrative ones are considered (e.g. Burgers and traffic flow equations). In addition, two less commonly used yet powerful approaches, i.e., the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) and Lattice Boltzmann methods, are introduced.

For most exercises a C++ code will have to be modified and applied.
Content- Finite-difference vs. finite-element vs. finite-volume methods
- Basic approach to simulate incompressible flows
- Brief introduction to turbulence modeling
- Theory and numerical methods for compressible flow simulations
- Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC)
- Lattice Boltzmann method
Lecture notesPart of the course is based on the referenced books. In addition, the participants receive a manuscript and the slides.
Literature"Computational Fluid Dynamics" by H. K. Versteeg and W. Malalasekera.
"Finite Volume Methods for Hyperbolic Problems" by R. J. Leveque.
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowledge in
- fluid dynamics
- numerical mathematics
- programming (programming language is not important, but C++ is of advantage)
401-8908-00LContinuous Time Quantitative Finance (University of Zurich)
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at UZH.
UZH Module Code: MFOEC204

Mind the enrolment deadlines at UZH:
https://www.uzh.ch/cmsssl/en/studies/application/deadlines.html
W3 credits3VUniversity lecturers
AbstractAmerican Options, Stochastic Volatility, Lévy Processes and Option Pricing, Exotic Options, Transaction Costs and Real Options.
ObjectiveThe course focuses on the theoretical foundations of modern derivative pricing. It aims at deriving and explaining important option pricing models by relying on some mathematical tools of continuous time finance.
A particular focus on jump processes is given. The introduction of possible financial crashes is now essential in some models and a clear understanding of Poisson processes is therefore important. A standard background in stochastic calculus is required.
ContentStochastic volatility models
Itô's formula and Girsanov theorem for jump-diffusion processes
The pricing of options in presence of possible discontinuities
Exotic options
Transaction costs
Lecture notesSee: http://www.isb.uzh.ch/institut/staff/chesney.marc/teaching/
LiteratureSee: http://www.isb.uzh.ch/institut/staff/chesney.marc/teaching/
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course replaces "Continuous Time Quantitative Finance" (MFOEC108), which will be discontinued. Students who have taken "Continuous Time Quantitative Finance" (MFOEC108) in the past, are not allowed to book this course "Continuous Time Quantitative Finance" (MFOEC204).
227-0662-00LOrganic and Nanostructured Optics and Electronics (Course)
Does not take place this semester.
W3 credits2GV. Wood
AbstractThis course examines the optical and electronic properties of excitonic materials that can be leveraged to create thin-film light emitting devices and solar cells. Laboratory sessions provide students with experience in synthesis and optical characterization of nanomaterials as well as fabrication and characterization of thin film devices.
ObjectiveGain the knowledge and practical experience to begin research with organic or nanostructured materials and understand the key challenges in this rapidly emerging field.
Content0-Dimensional Excitonic Materials (organic molecules and colloidal quantum dots)

Energy Levels and Excited States (singlet and triplet states, optical absorption and luminescence).

Excitonic and Polaronic Processes (charge transport, Dexter and Förster energy transfer, and exciton diffusion).

Devices (photodetectors, solar cells, and light emitting devices).
LiteratureLecture notes and reading assignments from current literature to be posted on website.
227-0662-10LOrganic and Nanostructured Optics and Electronics (Project) Information Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
W3 credits2AV. Wood
AbstractThis course examines the optical and electronic properties of excitonic materials that can be leveraged to create thin-film light emitting devices and solar cells. Laboratory sessions provide students with experience in synthesis and optical characterization of nanomaterials as well as fabrication and characterization of thin film devices.
ObjectiveGain the knowledge and practical experience to begin research with organic or nanostructured materials and understand the key challenges in this rapidly emerging field.
Content0-Dimensional Excitonic Materials (organic molecules and colloidal quantum dots)

Energy Levels and Excited States (singlet and triplet states, optical absorption and luminescence).

Excitonic and Polaronic Processes (charge transport, Dexter and Förster energy transfer, and exciton diffusion).

Devices (photodetectors, solar cells, and light emitting devices).
LiteratureLecture notes and reading assignments from current literature to be posted on website.
Prerequisites / NoticeAdmission is conditional to passing 227-0662-00L Organic and Nanostructured Optics and Electronics (Course)
262-0200-00LBayesian Phylodynamics – Taming the BEASTW4 credits2G + 2AT. Stadler, T. Vaughan
AbstractHow fast is COVID-19 spreading at the moment? How fast was Ebola spreading in West Africa? Where and when did these epidemic outbreak start? How can we construct the phylogenetic tree of great apes, and did gene flow occur between different apes? At the end of the course, students will have designed, performed, presented, and discussed their own phylodynamic data analysis to answer such questions.
ObjectiveAttendees will extend their knowledge of Bayesian phylodynamics obtained in the “Computational Biology” class (636-0017-00L) and will learn how to apply this theory to real world data. The main theoretical concepts introduced are:
* Bayesian statistics
* Phylogenetic and phylodynamic models
* Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods
Attendees will apply these concepts to a number of applications yielding biological insight into:
* Epidemiology
* Pathogen evolution
* Macroevolution of species
ContentDuring the first part of the block course, the theoretical concepts of Bayesian phylodynamics will be presented by us as well as leading international researchers in that area. The presentations will be followed by attendees using the software package BEAST v2 to apply these theoretical concepts to empirical data. We will use previously published datasets on e.g. COVID-19, Ebola, Zika, Yellow Fever, Apes, and Penguins for analysis. Examples of these practical tutorials are available on https://taming-the-beast.org/.
In the second part of the block course, students choose an empirical dataset of genetic sequencing data and possibly some non-genetic metadata. They then design and conduct a research project in which they perform Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of their dataset. A final written report on the research project has to be submitted after the block course for grading.
Lecture notesAll material will be available on https://taming-the-beast.org/.
LiteratureThe following books provide excellent background material:
• Drummond, A. & Bouckaert, R. 2015. Bayesian evolutionary analysis with BEAST.
• Yang, Z. 2014. Molecular Evolution: A Statistical Approach.
• Felsenstein, J. 2003. Inferring Phylogenies.
More detailed information is available on https://taming-the-beast.org/.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis class builds upon the content which we teach in the Computational Biology class (636-0017-00L). Attendees must have either taken the Computational Biology class or acquired the content elsewhere.
701-1708-00LInfectious Disease DynamicsW4 credits2VS. Bonhoeffer, R. D. Kouyos, R. R. Regös, T. Stadler
AbstractThis course introduces into current research on the population biology of infectious diseases. The course discusses the most important mathematical tools and their application to relevant diseases of human, natural or managed populations.
ObjectiveAttendees will learn about:
* the impact of important infectious pathogens and their evolution on human, natural and managed populations
* the population biological impact of interventions such as treatment or vaccination
* the impact of population structure on disease transmission

Attendees will learn how:
* the emergence spread of infectious diseases is described mathematically
* the impact of interventions can be predicted and optimized with mathematical models
* population biological models are parameterized from empirical data
* genetic information can be used to infer the population biology of the infectious disease

The course will focus on how the formal methods ("how") can be used to derive biological insights about the host-pathogen system ("about").
ContentAfter an introduction into the history of infectious diseases and epidemiology the course will discuss basic epidemiological models and the mathematical methods of their analysis. We will then discuss the population dynamical effects of intervention strategies such as vaccination and treatment. In the second part of the course we will introduce into more advanced topics such as the effect of spatial population structure, explicit contact structure, host heterogeneity, and stochasticity. In the final part of the course we will introduce basic concepts of phylogenetic analysis in the context of infectious diseases.
Lecture notesSlides and script of the lecture will be available online.
LiteratureThe course is not based on any of the textbooks below, but they are excellent choices as accompanying material:
* Keeling & Rohani, Modeling Infectious Diseases in Humans and Animals, Princeton Univ Press 2008
* Anderson & May, Infectious Diseases in Humans, Oxford Univ Press 1990
* Murray, Mathematical Biology, Springer 2002/3
* Nowak & May, Virus Dynamics, Oxford Univ Press 2000
* Holmes, The Evolution and Emergence of RNA Viruses, Oxford Univ Press 2009
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowledge of population dynamics and population genetics as well as linear algebra and analysis will be an advantage.
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