Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2021

Mechanical Engineering Master Information
Core Courses
Micro & Nanosystems
The courses listed in this category “Core Courses” are recommended. Alternative courses can be chosen in agreement with the tutor.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0060-00LThermodynamics and Transport Phenomena in NanotechnologyW4 credits2V + 2UT. Schutzius, D. Taylor
AbstractThe lecture deals with thermodynamics and transport phenomena in nano- and microscale systems. Typical areas of applications are microelectronics manufacturing and cooling, manufacturing of novel materials and coatings, surface technologies, wetting phenomena and related technologies, and micro- and nanosystems and devices.
ObjectiveThe student will acquire fundamental knowledge of interfacial and micro-nanoscale thermofluidics including electric field and light interaction with surfaces. Furthermore, the student will be exposed to a host of applications ranging from superhydrophobic surfaces and microelectronics cooling to solar energy, all of which will be discussed in the context of the course. The student will also judge state-of-the-art scientific research in these areas.
ContentThermodynamic aspects of intermolecular forces; Interfacial phenomena; Surface tension; Wettability and contact angle; Wettability of Micro/Nanoscale textured surfaces: superhydrophobicity and superhydrophilicity.

Physics of micro- and nanofluidics as well as heat and mass transport phenomena at the nanoscale.

Scientific communication and exposure to state-of-the-art scientific research in the areas of Nanotechnology and the Water-Energy Nexus.
Lecture notesyes
151-0116-10LHigh Performance Computing for Science and Engineering (HPCSE) for Engineers II Information W4 credits4GP. Koumoutsakos, S. M. Martin
AbstractThis course focuses on programming methods and tools for parallel computing on multi and many-core architectures. Emphasis will be placed on practical and computational aspects of Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation including the implementation of relevant algorithms on HPC architectures.
ObjectiveThe course will teach
- programming models and tools for multi and many-core architectures
- fundamental concepts of Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation (UQ+P) for computational models of systems in Engineering and Life Sciences
ContentHigh Performance Computing:
- Advanced topics in shared-memory programming
- Advanced topics in MPI
- GPU architectures and CUDA programming

Uncertainty Quantification:
- Uncertainty quantification under parametric and non-parametric modeling uncertainty
- Bayesian inference with model class assessment
- Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation
Lecture noteshttps://www.cse-lab.ethz.ch/teaching/hpcse-ii_fs21/
Class notes, handouts
Literature- Class notes
- Introduction to High Performance Computing for Scientists and Engineers, G. Hager and G. Wellein
- CUDA by example, J. Sanders and E. Kandrot
- Data Analysis: A Bayesian Tutorial, D. Sivia and J. Skilling
- An introduction to Bayesian Analysis - Theory and Methods, J. Gosh, N. Delampady and S. Tapas
- Bayesian Data Analysis, A. Gelman, J. Carlin, H. Stern, D. Dunson, A. Vehtari and D. Rubin
- Machine Learning: A Bayesian and Optimization Perspective, S. Theodorides
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents must be familiar with the content of High Performance Computing for Science and Engineering I (151-0107-20L)
151-0172-00LMicrosystems II: Devices and Applications Information W6 credits3V + 3UC. Hierold, C. I. Roman
AbstractThe students are introduced to the fundamentals and physics of microelectronic devices as well as to microsystems in general (MEMS). They will be able to apply this knowledge for system research and development and to assess and apply principles, concepts and methods from a broad range of technical and scientific disciplines for innovative products.
ObjectiveThe students are introduced to the fundamentals and physics of microelectronic devices as well as to microsystems in general (MEMS), basic electronic circuits for sensors, RF-MEMS, chemical microsystems, BioMEMS and microfluidics, magnetic sensors and optical devices, and in particular to the concepts of Nanosystems (focus on carbon nanotubes), based on the respective state-of-research in the field. They will be able to apply this knowledge for system research and development and to assess and apply principles, concepts and methods from a broad range of technical and scientific disciplines for innovative products.

During the weekly 3 hour module on Mondays dedicated to Übungen the students will learn the basics of Comsol Multiphysics and utilize this software to simulate MEMS devices to understand their operation more deeply and optimize their designs.
ContentTransducer fundamentals and test structures
Pressure sensors and accelerometers
Resonators and gyroscopes
RF MEMS
Acoustic transducers and energy harvesters
Thermal transducers and energy harvesters
Optical and magnetic transducers
Chemical sensors and biosensors, microfluidics and bioMEMS
Nanosystem concepts
Basic electronic circuits for sensors and microsystems
Lecture notesHandouts (on-line)
151-0530-00LNonlinear Dynamics and Chaos IIW4 credits4GG. Haller
AbstractThe internal structure of chaos; Hamiltonian dynamical systems; Normally hyperbolic invariant manifolds; Geometric singular perturbation theory; Finite-time dynamical systems
ObjectiveThe course introduces the student to advanced, comtemporary concepts of nonlinear dynamical systems analysis.
ContentI. The internal structure of chaos: symbolic dynamics, Bernoulli shift map, sub-shifts of finite type; chaos is numerical iterations.

II.Hamiltonian dynamical systems: conservation and recurrence, stability of fixed points, integrable systems, invariant tori, Liouville-Arnold-Jost Theorem, KAM theory.

III. Normally hyperbolic invariant manifolds: Crash course on differentiable manifolds, existence, persistence, and smoothness, applications.
IV. Geometric singular perturbation theory: slow manifolds and their stability, physical examples. V. Finite-time dynamical system; detecting Invariant manifolds and coherent structures in finite-time flows
Lecture notesStudents have to prepare their own lecture notes
LiteratureBooks will be recommended in class
Prerequisites / NoticeNonlinear Dynamics I (151-0532-00) or equivalent
151-0620-00LEmbedded MEMS Lab
Number of participants limited to 20.
W5 credits3PC. Hierold, M. Haluska
AbstractPractical course: Students are introduced to the process steps required for the fabrication of MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical System) and carry out the fabrication and testing steps in the clean rooms themselves. Additionally, they learn the requirements for working in clean rooms. Processing and characterization will be documented and analyzed in a final report.
ObjectiveStudents learn the individual process steps that are required to make a MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical System). Students carry out the process steps themselves in laboratories and clean rooms. Furthermore, participants become familiar with the special requirements (cleanliness, safety, operation of equipment and handling hazardous chemicals) of working in the clean rooms and laboratories. The entire production, processing, and characterization of the MEMS is documented and evaluated in a final report.
ContentWith guidance from a tutor, the individual silicon microsystem process steps that are required for the fabrication of an accelerometer are carried out:
- Photolithography, dry etching, wet etching, sacrificial layer etching, various cleaning procedures
- Packaging and electrical connection of a MEMS device
- Testing and characterization of the MEMS device
- Written documentation and evaluation of the entire production, processing and characterization
Lecture notesA document containing theory, background and practical course content is distributed in the informational meeting.
LiteratureThe document provides sufficient information for the participants to successfully participate in the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeParticipating students are required to attend all scheduled lectures and meetings of the course.

Participating students are required to provide proof that they have personal accident insurance prior to the start of the laboratory portion of the course.

This master's level course is limited to 20 students per semester for safety and efficiency reasons.
If there are more than 20 students registered, we regret to restrict access to this course by the following rules:

Priority 1: master students of the master's program in "Micro and Nanosystems"

Priority 2: master students of the master's program in "Mechanical Engineering" with a specialization in Microsystems and Nanoscale Engineering (MAVT-tutors Profs Dual, Hierold, Koumoutsakos, Nelson, Norris, Poulikakos, Pratsinis, Stemmer), who attended the bachelor course "151-0621-00L Microsystems Technology" successfully.

Priority 3: master students, who attended the bachelor course "151-0621-00L Microsystems Technology" successfully.

Priority 4: all other students (PhD, bachelor, master) with a background in silicon or microsystems process technology.

If there are more students in one of these priority groups than places available, we will decide with respect to (in following order) best achieved grade from 151-0621-00L Microsystems Technology, registration to this practicum at previous semester, and by drawing lots.
Students will be notified at the first lecture of the course (introductory lecture) as to whether they are able to participate.

The course is offered in autumn and spring semester.
151-0622-00LMeasuring on the Nanometer ScaleW2 credits2GA. Stemmer
AbstractIntroduction to theory and practical application of measuring techniques suitable for the nano domain.
ObjectiveIntroduction to theory and practical application of measuring techniques suitable for the nano domain.
ContentConventional techniques to analyze nano structures using photons and electrons: light microscopy with dark field and differential interference contrast; scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy. Interferometric and other techniques to measure distances. Optical traps. Foundations of scanning probe microscopy: tunneling, atomic force, optical near-field. Interactions between specimen and probe. Current trends, including spectroscopy of material parameters.
Lecture notesSlides and recordings available via Moodle (registered participants only).
151-0628-00LScanning Probe Microscopy Lab Restricted registration - show details
Limited number of participants.
Please address your application to Andreas Stemmer (astemmer@ethz.ch).

Simultaneous enrolment in 151-0622-00L Measuring on the Nanometer Scale is required.
W2 credits2PA. Stemmer
AbstractPractical application of scanning probe microscopy techniques in the field of nanoscale and molecular electronics. Limited access.
ObjectiveDesign, realisation, evaluation, and interpretation of experiments in scanning probe microscopy.
Prerequisites / NoticeApplication required! The number of participants is limited.
Block course after the end of the semester.

Enrollment in the Master course 151-0622-00L Measuring on the Nanometer Scale is required.

Applications include (i) a summary of your research experience in micro and nanoscale science, (ii) a short description of your goals for the next three years, and (iii) a statement of what you personally expect to gain from attending this course.
Send applications to Andreas Stemmer astemmer@ethz.ch
151-0630-00LNanorobotics Information W4 credits2V + 1US. Pané Vidal
AbstractNanorobotics is an interdisciplinary field that includes topics from nanotechnology and robotics. The aim of this course is to expose students to the fundamental and essential aspects of this emerging field.
ObjectiveThe aim of this course is to expose students to the fundamental and essential aspects of this emerging field. These topics include basic principles of nanorobotics, building parts for nanorobotic systems, powering and locomotion of nanorobots, manipulation, assembly and sensing using nanorobots, molecular motors, and nanorobotics for nanomedicine.
151-0642-00LSeminar on Micro and NanosystemsE-0 credits1SC. Hierold
AbstractScientific presentations from the field of Micro- and Nanosystems
ObjectiveThe students will be informed about the latest news from the state-of-the-art in the field and will take the opportunity to start scientific and challenging discussions with the presenters.
ContentSelected and hot topics from Micro- and Nanosystems, progress reports from PhD projects.
151-0931-00LSeminar on Particle TechnologyE-0 credits3SS. E. Pratsinis
AbstractThe latest advances in particle technology are highlighted focusing on aerosol fundamentals in connection to materials processing and nanoscale engineering. Students attend and give research presentations for the research they plan to do and at the end of the semester they defend their results and answer questions from research scientists. Familiarize the students with the latest in this field.
ObjectiveThe goal of the seminar is to introduce and discuss newest developments in particle science and engineering. Emphasis is placed on the oral presentation of research results, validation and comparison with existing
data from the literature. Students learn how to organize and deliver effectively a scientific presentation and how to articulate and debate scientific results.
ContentThe seminar addresses synthesis, characterization, handling and modeling of particulate systems (aerosols, suspensions etc.) for applications in ceramics, catalysis, reinforcements, pigments, composites etc. on the examples of newest research developments. It comprises particle - particle interactions, particle - fluid interactions and the response of the particulate system to the specific application.
Prerequisites / NoticeVoraussetzungen: Particle Technology (30-902) or Particulate Processes (151-0903-00)
227-0455-00LTerahertz: Technology and ApplicationsW5 credits3G + 3AK. Sankaran
AbstractThis block course will provide a solid foundation for understanding physical principles of THz applications. We will discuss various building blocks of THz technology - components dealing with generation, manipulation, and detection of THz electromagnetic radiation. We will introduce THz applications in the domain of imaging, sensing, communications, non-destructive testing and evaluations.
ObjectiveThis is an introductory course on Terahertz (THz) technology and applications. Devices operating in THz frequency range (0.1 to 10 THz) have been increasingly studied in the recent years. Progress in nonlinear optical materials, ultrafast optical and electronic techniques has strengthened research in THz application developments. Due to unique interaction of THz waves with materials, applications with new capabilities can be developed. In theory, they can penetrate somewhat like X-rays, but are not considered harmful radiation, because THz energy level is low. They should be able to provide resolution as good as or better than magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), possibly with simpler equipment. Imaging, very-high bandwidth communication, and energy harvesting are the most widely explored THz application areas. We will study the basics of THz generation, manipulation, and detection. Our emphasis will be on the physical principles and applications of THz in the domain of imaging, sensing, communications, non-destructive testing and evaluations.

The second part of the block course will be a short project work related to the topics covered in the lecture. The learnings from the project work should be presented in the end.
ContentPART I:

- INTRODUCTION -
Chapter 1: Introduction to THz Physics
Chapter 2: Components of THz Technology

- THz TECHNOLOGY MODULES -
Chapter 3: THz Generation
Chapter 4: THz Detection
Chapter 5: THz Manipulation

- APPLICATIONS -
Chapter 6: THz Imaging / Sensing / Communication
Chapter 7: THz Non-destructive Testing
Chapter 8: THz Applications in Plastic & Recycling Industries

PART 2:

- PROJECT WORK -
Short project work related to the topics covered in the lecture.
Short presentation of the learnings from the project work.
Full guidance and supervision will be given for successful completion of the short project work.
Lecture notesSoft-copy of lectures notes will be provided.
Literature- Yun-Shik Lee, Principles of Terahertz Science and Technology, Springer 2009
- Ali Rostami, Hassan Rasooli, and Hamed Baghban, Terahertz Technology: Fundamentals and Applications, Springer 2010
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic foundation in physics, particularly, electromagnetics is required.
Students who want to refresh their electromagnetics fundamentals can get additional material required for the course.
227-0662-00LOrganic and Nanostructured Optics and Electronics (Course)
Does not take place this semester.
W3 credits2GV. Wood
AbstractThis course examines the optical and electronic properties of excitonic materials that can be leveraged to create thin-film light emitting devices and solar cells. Laboratory sessions provide students with experience in synthesis and optical characterization of nanomaterials as well as fabrication and characterization of thin film devices.
ObjectiveGain the knowledge and practical experience to begin research with organic or nanostructured materials and understand the key challenges in this rapidly emerging field.
Content0-Dimensional Excitonic Materials (organic molecules and colloidal quantum dots)

Energy Levels and Excited States (singlet and triplet states, optical absorption and luminescence).

Excitonic and Polaronic Processes (charge transport, Dexter and Förster energy transfer, and exciton diffusion).

Devices (photodetectors, solar cells, and light emitting devices).
LiteratureLecture notes and reading assignments from current literature to be posted on website.
227-0662-10LOrganic and Nanostructured Optics and Electronics (Project) Information Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
W3 credits2AV. Wood
AbstractThis course examines the optical and electronic properties of excitonic materials that can be leveraged to create thin-film light emitting devices and solar cells. Laboratory sessions provide students with experience in synthesis and optical characterization of nanomaterials as well as fabrication and characterization of thin film devices.
ObjectiveGain the knowledge and practical experience to begin research with organic or nanostructured materials and understand the key challenges in this rapidly emerging field.
Content0-Dimensional Excitonic Materials (organic molecules and colloidal quantum dots)

Energy Levels and Excited States (singlet and triplet states, optical absorption and luminescence).

Excitonic and Polaronic Processes (charge transport, Dexter and Förster energy transfer, and exciton diffusion).

Devices (photodetectors, solar cells, and light emitting devices).
LiteratureLecture notes and reading assignments from current literature to be posted on website.
Prerequisites / NoticeAdmission is conditional to passing 227-0662-00L Organic and Nanostructured Optics and Electronics (Course)
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