Autumn Semester 2020 takes place in a mixed form of online and classroom teaching.
Please read the published information on the individual courses carefully.

Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2014

Electrical Engineering and Information Technology Master Information
Major Courses
A total of 42 CP must be achieved during the Master Program. The individual study plan is subject to the tutor's approval.
Computers and Networks
Core Subjects
These core subjects are particularly recommended for the field of "Computers and Networks".
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0781-00LLow-Power System DesignW6 credits2V + 2UJ. Beutel
AbstractIntroduction to low-power and low-energy design techniques from a systems perspective including aspects both from hard- and software. The focus of this lecture is on cutting across a number of related fields discussing architectural concepts, modeling and measurement techniques as well as software design mainly using the example of networked embedded systems.
ObjectiveKnowledge of the state-of-the-art in low power system design, understanding recent research results and their implication on industrial products.
ContentDesigning systems with a low energy footprint is an increasingly important. There are many applications for low-power systems ranging from mobile devices powered from batteries such as today's smart phones to energy efficient household appliances and datacenters. Key drivers are to be found mainly in the tremendous increase of mobile devices and the growing integration density requiring to carefully reason about power, both from a provision and consumption viewpoint. Traditional circuit design classes introduce low-power solely from a hardware perspective with a focus on the power performance of a single or at most a hand full of circuit elements. Similarly, low-power aspects are touched in a multitude of other classes, mostly as a side topic. However in successfully designing systems with a low energy footprint it is not sufficient to only look at low-power as an aspect of second class. In modern low-power system design advanced CMOS circuits are of course a key ingredient but successful low-power integration involves many more disciplines such as system architecture, different sources of energy as well as storage and most importantly software and algorithms. In this lecture we will discuss aspects of low-power design as a first class citizen introducing key concepts as well as modeling and measurement techniques focusing mainly on the design of networked embedded systems but of course equally applicable to many other classes of systems. The lecture is further accompanied by a reading seminar as well as exercises and lab sessions.
Lecture notesExercise and lab materials, copies of lecture slides.
LiteratureA detailed reading list will be made available in the lecture.
Prerequisites / NoticeKnowledge in embedded systems, system software, (wireless) networking, possibly integrated circuits, and hardware software codesign.
252-1414-00LSystem SecurityW5 credits2V + 2US. Capkun, A. Perrig
AbstractThe first part of the lecture covers individual system's aspects starting with tamperproof or tamperresistant hardware in general over operating system related security mechanisms to application software systems, such as host based intrusion detection systems. In the second part, the focus is on system design and methodologies for large projects.
ObjectiveIn this lecture, students learn about the security requirements and capabilities that are expected from modern hardware, operating systems and other software environments. An overview of available technologies, algorithms and standards is given, with which these requirements can be met.
ContentThe first part of the lecture covers individual system's aspects starting with tamperproof or tamperresistant hardware in general over operating system related security mechanisms to application software systems such as host based intrusion detetction systems. The main topics covered are: tamper resistant hardware, CPU support for security, protection mechanisms in the kernel, file system security (permissions / ACLs / network filesystem issues), IPC Security, mechanisms in more modern OS, such as Capabilities and Zones, Libraries and Software tools for security assurance, etc.

In the second part, the focus is on system design and methodologies for large projects. The main question answered is how to get a large secure system. Topics include: patch management, common software faults (buffer overflows, etc.), writing secure software (design, architecture, QA, testing), compiler-supported security, langauge-supported security (java...), logging and auditing (BSM audit, dtrace, ...), cryptographic support, TCG, secure file systems, dos/windows/ windowsXP security issues.

Along the lectures, model cases will be elaborated and evaluated in the exercises.
Recommended Subjects
These courses are recommended, but you are free to choose courses from any other special field. Please consult your tutor.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0101-00LDiscrete-Time and Statistical Signal ProcessingW6 credits4GH.‑A. Loeliger
AbstractThe course introduces some fundamental topics of digital signal processing with a bias towards applications in communications: discrete-time linear filters, equalization, DFT, discrete-time stochastic processes, elements of detection theory and estimation theory, LMMSE estimation and LMMSE filtering, LMS algorithm, Viterbi algorithm.
ObjectiveThe course introduces some fundamental topics of digital signal processing with a bias towards applications in communications. The two main themes are "linearity" and "probability". In the first part of the course, we deepen our understanding of discrete-time linear filters. In the second part of the course, we review the basics of probability theory and discrete-time stochastic processes. We then discuss some basic concepts of detection theory and estimation theory, as well as some practical methods including LMMSE estimation
and LMMSE filtering, the LMS algorithm, and the Viterbi algorithm.
ContentDiscrete-time linear systems and the z-transform.
Discrete time and continuous time: forth and back.
Digital filters.
DFT.
Elements of probability theory.
Discrete-time stochastic processes.
Elements of detection theory and estimation theory.
Linear estimation and filtering.
Wiener filter.
LMS algorithm.
Viterbi algorithm.
Lecture notesLecture Notes.
227-0103-00LControl Systems Information W6 credits2V + 2UM. Morari
AbstractStudy of concepts and methods for the mathematical description and analysis of dynamical systems. The concept of feedback. Design of control systems for single input - single output and multivariable systems.
ObjectiveStudy of concepts and methods for the mathematical description and analysis of dynamical systems. The concept of feedback. Design of control systems for single input - single output and multivariable systems.
ContentProcess automation, concept of control. Modelling of dynamical systems - examples, state space description, linearisation, analytical/numerical solution. Laplace transform, system response for first and second order systems - effect of additional poles and zeros. Closed-loop control - idea of feedback. PID control, Ziegler - Nichols tuning. Stability, Routh-Hurwitz criterion, root locus, frequency response, Bode diagram, Bode gain/phase relationship, controller design via "loop shaping", Nyquist criterion. Feedforward compensation, cascade control. Multivariable systems (transfer matrix, state space representation), multi-loop control, problem of coupling, Relative Gain Array, decoupling, sensitivity to model uncertainty. State space representation (modal description, controllability, control canonical form, observer canonical form), state feedback, pole placement - choice of poles. Observer, observability, duality, separation principle. LQ Regulator, optimal state estimation.
LiteratureG.F. Franklin, J.D. Powell, A. Emami-Naeini. Feedback Control of Dynamic Systems. 6th edition, Prentice Hall, Version 2009, Reading, ISBN 978-0-1350-150-9.Softcover student's edition ca. CHF 110.-. (Spring 2013)
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Signal and Systems Theory II.

MATLAB is used for system analysis and simulation.
227-0197-00LWearable Systems IW6 credits4GG. Tröster, U. Blanke
AbstractContext recognition in mobile communication systems like mobile phone and wearable computer will be studied using advanced methods from sensor data fusion, pattern recognition, statistics, data mining and machine learning.
Context comprises the behavior of individuals and of groups, their activites as well as the local and social environment.
ObjectiveFuture mobile systems will act as personal and cooperative assistant by providing the appropriate information and services. The systems consist of a smart phone which communicates with sensors on-body and in the environment. Context comprises user's behavior, his activities, his local and social environment.

In the data path from the sensor level to signal segmentation to the classification of the context, advanced methods of signal processing, pattern recognition and machine learning will be applied. Sensor data generated by crowdsouring methods are integrated. The validation using MATLAB is followed by implementation and testing on a smart phone.
Context recognition as the crucial function of mobile systems is the main focus of the course. Using MatLab the participants implement and verify the discussed methods also using a smart phone.
ContentThe next generation of mobile communication systems are integrated in our clothes and act as personal and cooperative assistant providing information we need just now (see www.wearable.ethz.ch). Context recognition - what is the situation of the user, his activity, his environment, how is he doing, what are his needs - as the central functionality of mobile systems constitutes the focus of the course.

The main topics of the course include
Sensor nets, sensor signal processing, data fusion, segmentation, Bayes Decision Theory, Decision Trees, Random Forest, kNN-Methods, Support Vector Machine, Hidden Markov Models, Adaboost, Crowdsourcing, SOM and clustering.

The exercises show concrete design problems like motion and gesture recognition using distributed sensors, detection of activity patterns and identification of the local environment.

Presentations of the PhD students and the visit at the Wearable Computing Lab introduce in current research topics and international research projects.

Language: german/english (depending on the participants)
Lecture notesLecture notes for all lessons, assignments and solutions.
http://www.ife.ee.ethz.ch/education/wearable_systems_1
LiteratureLiterature will be announced during the lessons.
Prerequisites / NoticeNo special prerequisites
227-0377-00LPhysics of Failure and Failure Analysis of Electronic Devices and EquipmentW3 credits2VU. Sennhauser
AbstractFailures have to be avoided by proper design, material selection and manufacturing. Properties, degradation mechanisms, and expected lifetime of materials are introduced and the basics of failure analysis and analysis equipment are presented. Failures will be demonstrated experimentally and the opportunity is offered to perform a failure analysis with advanced equipment in the laboratory.
ObjectiveIntroduction to the degradation and failure mechanisms and causes of electronic components, devices and systems as well as to methods and tools of reliability testing, characterization and failure analysis.
ContentSummary of reliability and failure analysis terminology; physics of failure: materials properties, physical processes and failure mechanisms; failure analysis of ICs, PCBs, opto-electronics, discrete and other components and devices; basics and properties of instruments; application in circuit design and reliability analysis
Lecture notesComprehensive copy of transparencies
252-0437-00LDistributed Algorithms Information W4 credits3VF. Mattern
AbstractModels of distributed computations, time space diagrams, virtual time, logical clocks and causality, wave algorithms, parallel and distributed graph traversal, consistent snapshots, mutual exclusion, election and symmetry breaking, distributed termination detection, garbage collection in distributed systems, monitoring distributed systems, global predicates.
ObjectiveBecome acquainted with models and algorithms for distributed systems.
ContentVerteilte Algorithmen sind Verfahren, die dadurch charakterisiert sind, dass mehrere autonome Prozesse gleichzeitig Teile eines gemeinsamen Problems in kooperativer Weise bearbeiten und der dabei erforderliche Informationsaustausch ausschliesslich über Nachrichten erfolgt. Derartige Algorithmen kommen im Rahmen verteilter Systeme zum Einsatz, bei denen kein gemeinsamer Speicher existiert und die Übertragungszeit von Nachrichten i.a. nicht vernachlässigt werden kann. Da dabei kein Prozess eine aktuelle konsistente Sicht des globalen Zustands besitzt, führt dies zu interessanten Problemen.
Im einzelnen werden u.a. folgende Themen behandelt:
Modelle verteilter Berechnungen; Raum-Zeit Diagramme; Virtuelle Zeit; Logische Uhren und Kausalität; Wellenalgorithmen; Verteilte und parallele Graphtraversierung; Berechnung konsistenter Schnappschüsse; Wechselseitiger Ausschluss; Election und Symmetriebrechung; Verteilte Terminierung; Garbage-Collection in verteilten Systemen; Beobachten verteilter Systeme; Berechnung globaler Prädikate.
Literature- F. Mattern: Verteilte Basisalgorithmen, Springer-Verlag
- G. Tel: Topics in Distributed Algorithms, Cambridge University Press
- G. Tel: Introduction to Distributed Algorithms, Cambridge University Press, 2nd edition
- A.D. Kshemkalyani, M. Singhal: Distributed Computing, Cambridge University Press
- N. Lynch: Distributed Algorithms, Morgan Kaufmann Publ
227-0447-00LImage Analysis and Computer Vision Information W6 credits3V + 1UG. Székely, O. Göksel, L. Van Gool
AbstractLight and perception. Digital image formation. Image enhancement and feature extraction. Unitary transformations. Color and texture. Image segmentation and deformable shape matching. Motion extraction and tracking. 3D data extraction. Invariant features. Specific object recognition and object class recognition.
ObjectiveOverview of the most important concepts of image formation, perception and analysis, and Computer Vision. Gaining own experience through practical computer and programming exercises.
ContentThe first part of the course starts off from an overview of existing and emerging applications that need computer vision. It shows that the realm of image processing is no longer restricted to the factory floor, but is entering several fields of our daily life. First it is investigated how the parameters of the electromagnetic waves are related to our perception. Also the interaction of light with matter is considered. The most important hardware components of technical vision systems, such as cameras, optical devices and illumination sources are discussed. The course then turns to the steps that are necessary to arrive at the discrete images that serve as input to algorithms. The next part describes necessary preprocessing steps of image analysis, that enhance image quality and/or detect specific features. Linear and non-linear filters are introduced for that purpose. The course will continue by analyzing procedures allowing to extract additional types of basic information from multiple images, with motion and depth as two important examples. The estimation of image velocities (optical flow) will get due attention and methods for object tracking will be presented. Several techniques are discussed to extract three-dimensional information about objects and scenes. Finally, approaches for the recognition of specific objects as well as object classes will be discussed and analyzed.
Lecture notesCourse material Script, computer demonstrations, exercises and problem solutions
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
Basic concepts of mathematical analysis and linear algebra. The computer exercises are based on Linux and C.
The course language is English.
227-0555-00LFault Tolerance in Distributed Systems Restricted registration - show details W4 credits3GR. Wattenhofer
AbstractFault-tolerance (failure models, consensus, agreement), replication (primary copy, 2PC, 3PC, Paxos, quorum systems), shared memory (spin locks, concurrency)
ObjectiveBecome acquainted with pertinent technologies and architectures of fault-tolerant distributed systems.
ContentWe discuss fault-tolerance issues (models, consensus, agreement) as well as replication issues (primary copy, 2PC, 3PC, Paxos, quorum systems, distributed storage) and problems with asynchronous multiprocessing (shared memory, spin locks, concurrency).
Prerequisites / NoticeThis lecture takes place in the second half of the semester; the lecture is the second part of the lecture "Verteilte Systeme" (Distributed Systems, 252-0213-00L). Students may attend at most one of the two lectures.
227-0627-00LApplied Computer ArchitectureW6 credits4GA. Gunzinger
AbstractThis lecture gives an overview of the requirements and the architecture of parallel computer systems, performance, reliability and costs.
ObjectiveUnderstand the function, the design and the performance modeling of parallel computer systems.
ContentThe lecture "Applied Computer Architecture" gives technical and corporate insights in the innovative Computer Systems/Architectures (CPU, GPU, FPGA, special processors) and their real implementations and applications. Often the designs have to deal with technical limits.
Which computer architecture allows the control of the over 1000 magnets at the Swiss Light Source (SLS)?
Which architecture is behind the alarm center of the Swiss Railway (SBB)?
Which computer architectures are applied for driver assistance systems?
Which computer architecture is hidden behind a professional digital audio mixing desk?
How can data volumes about 30 TB/s, produced by a protone accelerator, be processed in real time?
Can the weather forecast also be processed with GPUs?
How can a good computer architecture be found?
Which are the driving factors in succesful computer architecture design?
Lecture notesScript and exercices sheets.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
Basics of computer architecture.
151-0593-00LEmbedded Control SystemsW4 credits6GJ. S. Freudenberg, L. Guzzella, M. Schmid Daners
AbstractThis course provides a comprehensive overview of embedded control systems. The concepts introduced are implemented and verified on a microprocessor-controlled haptic device.
ObjectiveFamiliarize students with main architectural principles and concepts of embedded control systems.
ContentAn embedded system is a microprocessor used as a component in another piece of technology, such as cell phones or automobiles. In this intensive two-week block course the students are presented the principles of embedded digital control systems using a haptic device as an example for a mechatronic system. A haptic interface allows for a human to interact with a computer through the sense of touch.

Subjects covered in lectures and practical lab exercises include:
- The application of C-programming on a microprocessor
- Digital I/O and serial communication
- Quadrature decoding for wheel position sensing
- Queued analog-to-digital conversion to interface with the analog world
- Pulse width modulation
- Timer interrupts to create sampling time intervals
- System dynamics and virtual worlds with haptic feedback
- Introduction to rapid prototyping
Lecture notesLecture notes, lab instructions, supplemental material
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite courses are Control Systems I and Informatics I.

This course is restricted to 33 students due to limited lab infrastructure. Interested students please contact Marianne Schmid (E-Mail: schmid@idsc.mavt.ethz.ch)
After your reservation has been confirmed please register online at www.mystudies.ethz.ch.

Detailed information can be found on the course website www.idsc.ethz.ch/Courses/embedded_control_systems
252-1411-00LSecurity of Wireless NetworksW5 credits2V + 1U + 1AS. Capkun, C. Soriente
AbstractCore Elements: Wireless communication channel, Wireless network architectures and protocols, Attacks on wireless networks, Protection techniques.
ObjectiveAfter this course, the students should be able to: describe and classify security goals and attacks in wireless networks; describe security architectures of the following wireless systems and networks: 802.11, GSM/UMTS, RFID, ad hoc/sensor networks; reason about security protocols for wireless network; implement mechanisms to secure
802.11 networks.
ContentWireless channel basics. Wireless electronic warfare: jamming and target tracking. Basic security protocols in cellular, WLAN and
multi-hop networks. Recent advances in security of multi-hop networks; RFID privacy challenges and solutions.
Electronics and Photonics
Core Subjects
These core subjects are particularly recommended for the field of "Electronics and Photonics".
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0605-00LNanosystemsW4 credits4GA. Stemmer
AbstractFrom atoms to molecules to condensed matter: characteristic properties of simple nanosystems and how they evolve when moving towards complex ensembles.
Intermolecular forces, their macroscopic manifestations, and ways to control such interactions.
Self-assembly and directed assembly of 2D and 3D structures.
Special emphasis on the emerging field of molecular electronic devices.
ObjectiveFamiliarize students with basic science and engineering principles governing the nano domain.
ContentThe course addresses basic science and engineering principles ruling the nano domain. We particularly work out the links between topics that are traditionally taught separately.

Special emphasis is placed on the emerging field of molecular electronic devices, their working principles, applications, and how they may be assembled.

Topics are treated in 2 blocks:

(I) From Quantum to Continuum
From atoms to molecules to condensed matter: characteristic properties of simple nanosystems and how they evolve when moving towards complex ensembles.

(II) Interaction Forces on the Micro and Nano Scale
Intermolecular forces, their macroscopic manifestations, and ways to control such interactions.
Self-assembly and directed assembly of 2D and 3D structures.
Literature- Kuhn, Hans; Försterling, H.D.: Principles of Physical Chemistry. Understanding Molecules, Molecular Assemblies, Supramolecular Machines. 1999, Wiley, ISBN: 0-471-95902-2
- Chen, Gang: Nanoscale Energy Transport and Conversion. 2005, Oxford University Press, ISBN: 978-0-19-515942-4
- Ouisse, Thierry: Electron Transport in Nanostructures and Mesoscopic Devices. 2008, Wiley, ISBN: 978-1-84821-050-9
- Wolf, Edward L.: Nanophysics and Nanotechnology. 2004, Wiley-VCH, ISBN: 3-527-40407-4

- Israelachvili, Jacob N.: Intermolecular and Surface Forces. 2nd ed., 1992, Academic Press,ISBN: 0-12-375181-0
- Evans, D.F.; Wennerstrom, H.: The Colloidal Domain. Where Physics, Chemistry, Biology, and Technology Meet. Advances in Interfacial Engineering Series. 2nd ed., 1999, Wiley, ISBN: 0-471-24247-0
- Hunter, Robert J.: Foundations of Colloid Science. 2nd ed., 2001, Oxford, ISBN: 0-19-850502-7
Prerequisites / NoticeCourse format:

Lectures: Thursday 10-12, ML F 36

Homework: Mini-Reviews
Students select a paper (list distributed in class) and expand the topic into a Mini-Review that illuminates the particular field beyond the immediate results reported in the paper.
227-0147-00LVLSI II: Design of Very Large Scale Integration CircuitsW7 credits5GH. Kaeslin, N. Felber
AbstractThis second course in our VLSI series is concerned with how to turn digital netlists into safe, testable and manufacturable mask layout, taking into account various parasitic effects (clock skew, metastability, ground bounce, IR-drop, electromigration, ESD, latchup). Economic aspects and management issues of VLSI projects are also addressed.
ObjectiveKnow how to design digital VLSI circuits that are safe, testable, durable, and make economic sense.
ContentThe second course begins with a thorough discussion of various technical aspects at the circuit and layout level before moving on to economic issues of VLSI. Topics include:
- Limitations of functional design verification, design for test.
- Synchronous clocking disciplines compared, clock skew, clock distribution, input/output timing.
- Synchronization and metastability.
- CMOS transistor-level circuits of gates, flip-flops and random access memories.
- Sinks of energy in CMOS circuits.
- Power estimation and low-power design.
- Current research in low-energy computing.
- Layout parasitics, interconnect delay, static timing analysis.
- Switching currents, ground bounce, IR-drop, power distribution.
- Floorplanning, chip assembly, packaging.
- Layout design at the mask level, physical design verification.
- Electromigration, electrostatic discharge, and latch-up.
- Models of industrial cooperation in microelectronics.
- The caveats of virtual components.
- The cost structures of ASIC development and manufacturing.
- Market requirements, decision criteria, and case studies.
- Yield models.
- Avenues to low-volume fabrication.
- Marketing aspects and case studies.
- Management of VLSI projects.

Exercises are concerned with back-end design (floorplanning, placement, routing, clock and power distribution, layout verification). Industrial CAD tools are being used.
Lecture notesEnglish lecture notes.

All written documents in English.
LiteratureH. Kaeslin: "Digital Integrated Circuit Design, from VLSI Architectures to CMOS Fabrication" Cambridge University Press, 2008, ISBN 9780521882675
Prerequisites / NoticeHighlight:
Students are offered the opportunity to design a circuit of their own which then gets actually fabricated as a microchip! Students who elect to participate in this program register for a term project at the Integrated Systems Laboratory in parallel to attending the VLSI II course.

Prerequisites:
"VLSI I: from Architectures to Very Large Scale Integration Circuits and FPGAs" or equivalent knowledge.

Further details:
http://www.iis.ee.ethz.ch/stud_area/vorlesungen/vlsi2.en.html
227-0197-00LWearable Systems IW6 credits4GG. Tröster, U. Blanke
AbstractContext recognition in mobile communication systems like mobile phone and wearable computer will be studied using advanced methods from sensor data fusion, pattern recognition, statistics, data mining and machine learning.
Context comprises the behavior of individuals and of groups, their activites as well as the local and social environment.
ObjectiveFuture mobile systems will act as personal and cooperative assistant by providing the appropriate information and services. The systems consist of a smart phone which communicates with sensors on-body and in the environment. Context comprises user's behavior, his activities, his local and social environment.

In the data path from the sensor level to signal segmentation to the classification of the context, advanced methods of signal processing, pattern recognition and machine learning will be applied. Sensor data generated by crowdsouring methods are integrated. The validation using MATLAB is followed by implementation and testing on a smart phone.
Context recognition as the crucial function of mobile systems is the main focus of the course. Using MatLab the participants implement and verify the discussed methods also using a smart phone.
ContentThe next generation of mobile communication systems are integrated in our clothes and act as personal and cooperative assistant providing information we need just now (see www.wearable.ethz.ch). Context recognition - what is the situation of the user, his activity, his environment, how is he doing, what are his needs - as the central functionality of mobile systems constitutes the focus of the course.

The main topics of the course include
Sensor nets, sensor signal processing, data fusion, segmentation, Bayes Decision Theory, Decision Trees, Random Forest, kNN-Methods, Support Vector Machine, Hidden Markov Models, Adaboost, Crowdsourcing, SOM and clustering.

The exercises show concrete design problems like motion and gesture recognition using distributed sensors, detection of activity patterns and identification of the local environment.

Presentations of the PhD students and the visit at the Wearable Computing Lab introduce in current research topics and international research projects.

Language: german/english (depending on the participants)
Lecture notesLecture notes for all lessons, assignments and solutions.
http://www.ife.ee.ethz.ch/education/wearable_systems_1
LiteratureLiterature will be announced during the lessons.
Prerequisites / NoticeNo special prerequisites
227-0301-00LOptical Communication FundamentalsW6 credits2V + 1U + 1PJ. Leuthold
AbstractTransmitters and receivers are the basic building blocks of communication links. In this lecture we discuss the path of an analog signal in the transmitter to the digital world in an optical communication link and back to the analog world at the receiver. The lecture is organized to cover the fundamentals of all important optical and optoelectronic components in a fiber communications system.
ObjectiveFundamentals of optical communications systems with an emphasis on transmitters and receivers.
ContentChapter 1: Introduction: Analog/Digital Conversion, The Communication Channel, Shannon Channel Capacity.

Chapter 2: The Transmitter: Components of a Transmitter, The Spectrum of a Signal, Optical Modulators, Modulation Formats.

Chapter 3: Signal-to-Noise Ratio, Intersymbol Interference, Electronic Coding.

Chapter 4: Multiplexing techniques (WDM/FDM, TDM, OFDM, Nyquist Multiplexing, OCDMA).

Chapter 5: Optical Amplifiers (Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers, Erbium Doped Fiber Amplifiers, Raman Amplifiers).

Chapter 6: The Receiver: pin-Photodiodes, Polarisation Demultiplexing, Phase Estimation, Clock Recovery.

Chapter 7: Noise: Noise Mechanisms, Photocurrent Noise, Thermal Noise, Electronic Amplifiers Noise, Optical Amplifier Noise.

Chapter 8: Receiver and Detector Errors: Detection Errors of On-Off Keying, Detection Errors of M-Ary Signals, Direct-, Heterodyne and Homodyne Reception.
Lecture notesLecture notes are handed out.
Prerequisites / NoticeFundamentals of Electromagnetic Fields & Bachelor Lectures on Physics (see Bsc ITET).
227-0655-00LNonlinear OpticsW6 credits2V + 1UJ. Leuthold
AbstractNonlinear Optics deals with the interaction of light with material, the response of material to light and the mathematical framework to describe the phenomena. As an example we will cover fundamental phenomena such as the refractive index, the electro-optic effect, second harmonic generation, four-wave mixing or soliton propagation and others.
ObjectiveThe important nonlinear optical phenomena are understood and can be classified. The effects can be described mathematical by means of the susceptibility.
ContentChapter 1: The Wave Equations in Nonlinear Optics
Chapter 2: Nonlinear Effects - An Overview
Chapter 3: The Nonlinear Optical Susceptibility
Chapter 4: Second Harmonic Generation
Chapter 5: The Electro-Optic Effect and the Electro-Optic Modulator
Chapter 6: Acousto-Optic Effect
Chapter 7: Nonlinear Effects of Third Order
Chapter 8: Nonlinear Effects in Media with Gain
LiteratureLecture notes are handed out.
Prerequisites / NoticeFundamentals of Electromagnetic Fields (Maxwell Equations) & Bachelor Lectures on Physics
227-0663-00LNano-Optics Information W6 credits2V + 2UL. Novotny
AbstractNano-Optics is the study of optical phenomena and techniques on the nanometer scale. It is an emerging field of study motivated by the rapid advance of nanoscience and technology. It embraces topics such as plasmonics, optical antennas, optical trapping and manipulation, and high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy.
ObjectiveUnderstanding concepts of light localization and light-matter interactions on the nanoscale.
ContentStarting with an angular spectrum representation of optical fields the role of inhomogeneous evanescent fields is discussed. Among the topics are: theory of strongly focused light, point spread functions, resolution criteria, confocal microscopy, and near-field optical microscopy. Further topics are: optical interactions between nanoparticles, atomic decay rates in inhomogeneous environments, single molecule spectroscopy, light forces and optical trapping, photonic bandgap materials, and theoretical methods in nano-optics.
Prerequisites / Notice- Electrodynamics (or equivalent)
- Physics I+II
227-1033-00LNeuromorphic Engineering I Information W6 credits2V + 3UT. Delbrück, G. Indiveri, S.‑C. Liu
AbstractThis course covers analog circuits with emphasis on neuromorphic engineering: MOS transistors in CMOS technology, static circuits, dynamic circuits, systems (silicon neuron, silicon retina, motion circuits) and an introduction to multi-chip systems. The lectures are accompanied by weekly laboratory sessions.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of the characteristics of neuromorphic circuit elements and their interaction in parallel networks.
ContentNeuromorphic circuits are inspired by the structure, function and plasticity of biological neurons and neural networks. Their computational primitives are based on physics of semiconductor devices. Neuromorphic architectures often rely on collective computation in parallel networks. Adaptation, learning and memory are implemented locally within the individual computational elements. Transistors are often operated in weak inversion (below threshold), where they exhibit exponential I-V characteristics and low currents. These properties lead to the feasibility of high-density, low-power implementations of functions that are computationally intensive in other paradigms. The high parallelism and connectivity of neuromorphic circuits permit structures with massive feedback without iterative methods and convergence problems and real-time processing networks for high-dimensional signals (e.g. vision). Application domains of neuromorphic circuits include silcon retinas and cochleas, real-time emulations of networks of biological neurons, and the development of autonomous robotic systems. This course covers devices in CMOS technology (MOS transistor below and above threshold, floating-gate MOS transistor, phototransducers), static circuits (differential pair, current mirror, transconductance amplifiers, multipliers, power-law circuits, resistive networks, etc.), dynamic circuits (linear and nonlinear filters, adaptive circuits), systems (silicon neuron, silicon retina, motion circuits) and an introduction to multi-chip systems. The lectures are accompanied by weekly laboratory sessions on the characterization of neuromorphic circuits, from elementary devices to systems.
LiteratureS.-C. Liu et al.: Analog VLSI Circuits and Principles; various publications.
Prerequisites / NoticeParticular: The course is highly recommended for those who intend to take the spring semester course 'Neuromorphic Engineering II', that teaches the conception and layout of such circuits with a set of inexpensive software tools, ending with an optional submission of a mini-project for CMOS fabrication.

Prerequisites: Background in basics of semiconductor physics helpful, but not required.
402-0255-00LIntroduction to Solid State PhysicsW10 credits3V + 2UK. Ensslin
AbstractThe course provides an introduction to solid state physics, covering several topics that are later discussed in more detail in other more specialized lectures. The central topics are: solids and their lattice structures; interatomic bindings; lattice dynamics, electronic properties of insulators, metals, semiconductors, transport properties, magnetism, superconductivity.
ObjectiveIntroduction to Solid State Physics.
ContentThe course provides an introduction to solid state physics, covering several topics that are later discussed in more detail in other more specialized lectures. The central topics are: solids and their lattice structures; interatomic bindings; lattice dynamics, thermal properties of insulators; metals (classical and quantum mechanical description of electronic states, thermal and transport properties of metals); semiconductors (bandstructure and n/p-type doping); magnetism, superconductivity.
Lecture notesA Manuscript is distributed.
LiteratureIbach & Lüth, Festkörperphysik
C. Kittel, Festkörperphysik
Ashcroft & Mermin, Festkörperphysik
W. Känzig, Kondensierte Materie
Prerequisites / NoticeVoraussetzungen: Physik I, II, III wünschenswert
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