Ab 2. November 2020 findet das Herbstsemester 2020 online statt. Ausnahmen: Veranstaltungen, die nur mit Präsenz vor Ort durchführbar sind.
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Suchergebnis: Katalogdaten im Herbstsemester 2016

Doktorat Departement Umweltsystemwissenschaften Information
Mehr Informationen unter: https://www.ethz.ch/de/doktorat.html
Umweltwissenschaften
Ökologie und Evolution
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
701-1676-01LLandscape Genetics Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to 14.

Prerequisites: good knowledge in population genetics and experience in using GIS is required.
W2 KP3GR. Holderegger, J. Bolliger, F. Gugerli
KurzbeschreibungThis six-day winter school aims at teaching advanced Master students, PhD students and postdocs on landscape genetics. It provides both theoretical background as well as hands-on exercises on major topics of contemporary landscape genetics and landscape genomics such as landscape effects on gene flow and adpative genetic variation in a landscape context.
LernzielLandscape genetics is an evolving scientific field of both basic and applied interest. Researchers as well as conservation managers make increasing use of landscape genetic thinking and methods. Landscape genetics builds on concepts and methods from landscape ecology and population genetics. This winter school introduces advanced students to major concepts and methods of landscape genetics and genomics, i.e. (i) the study of landscape effects on dispersal and gene flow and (ii) the study of the interactions between the environment and adaptive genetic variation. The winter school focuses on currently used methods and hands-on exercises. It is specifically aimed at the needs of advanced students (Master, PhD and postdocs).
InhaltThemes:
(1) Genetic data: estimates of gene flow; genetic distances; assignment tests and parentage analysis.
(2) Landscape data: landscape resistance and least cost paths; transects
(3) Landscape genetic analysis of gene flow: partial Mantel tests and causal modeling; multiple regression on distance matrices and mixed effects models.
(4) Networks and graph theory.
(5) Landscape genomics: adaptive genetic variation; outlier detection; environmental association.
(6) Overlays: Bayesian clustering; barrier detection; kriging.
SkriptHand-outs will be distributed.
LiteraturThe course requires 4 hours of preparatory reading of selected papers on landscape genetics. These papers will be distributed by e-mail.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesGrading will be according to a short written report (4 pages) on one of the themes of the course (workload: about 8 hours) and according to student contributions during the course.

Prerequisites: students should have basic knowledge in population genetics, GIS and R.
551-0737-00LExperimental Ecology: Evolution and Ecology Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen W2 KP2SS. Bonhoeffer
KurzbeschreibungInteraction seminar. Student-mediated presentations, guests and discussions on current themes in ecology, evolutionary and population biology.
LernzielGetting familiar with scientific arguments and discussions. Overview of current research topics. Making contacts with fellow students in other groups.
InhaltScientific talks and discussions on changing subjects.
SkriptNone
LiteraturNone
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesFor information and details: http://www.eco.ethz.ch/news/zis
or contact: Lehre-eve@env.ethz.ch
Mensch-Umwelt Systeme
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
701-1651-00LEnvironmental Governance Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Maximale Teilnehmerzahl: 30
W3 KP2GE. Lieberherr, G. de Buren, R. Schweizer
KurzbeschreibungThe course addresses environmental policies, focusing on new steering approaches, which are generally summarized as environmental governance. The course also provides students with tools to analyze environmental policy processes and assesses the key features of environmental governance by examining various practical environmental policy examples.
LernzielTo understand how an environmental problem may (not) become a policy and explain political processes, using basic concepts and techniques from political science.

To analyze the evolution as well as the key elements of environmental governance.

To be able to identify the main challenges and opportunities for environmental governance and to critically discuss them with reference to various practical policy examples.
InhaltImprovements in environmental quality and sustainable management of natural resources cannot be achieved through technical solutions alone. The quality of the environment and the achievement of sustainable development strongly depend on human behavior and specifically the human uses of nature. To influence human behavior, we rely on public policies and other societal rules, which aim to steer the way humans use natural resources and their effects on the environment. Such steering can take place through government intervention alone. However, this often also involves governance, which includes the interplay between governmental and non-governmental actors, the use of diverse tools such as emission standards or financial incentives to steer actors' behavior and can occur at the local, regional, national or international level.

In this course, we will address both the practical aspects of as well as the scientific debate on environmental governance. The course gives future environmental experts a strong basis to position themselves in the governance debate, which does not preclude government but rather involves a spectrum from government to governance.

Key questions that this course seeks to answer: What are the core characteristics of environmental challenges from a policy perspective? What are key elements of 'environmental governance' and how legitimate and effective are these approaches in addressing persistent environmental challenges?
SkriptLecture slides and additional course material will be provided throughout the semester.
LiteraturWe will mostly work with readings from the following books:
- Carter, N. (2007). The politics of the environment: Ideas, activism, policy (2nd ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
- Hogl, K., Kvarda, E., Nordbeck, R., Pregernig, M. (Eds) (2012): Environmental Governance: The Challenge of Legitimacy and Effectiveness. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing Limited.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesA detailed course schedule will be made available at the beginning of the semester.

We recommend that students have (a) three-years BSc education of a (technical) university; (b) successfully completed Bachelor introductory course to environmental policy (Entwicklungen nationaler Umweltpolitik (or equivalent)) and (c) familiarity with key issues in environmental policy and some fundamental knowledge of one social science or humanities discipline (political science, economics, sociology, history, psychology, philosophy)
851-0589-00LTechnology and Innovation for DevelopmentW3 KP2VP. Aerni
KurzbeschreibungTechnological change plays a crucial role in efforts to create a more sustainable future. In this context, policy decision makers must design rules that minimize its risks and maximize its benefits for society at large. The course discusses this challenge from an interdisciplinary perspective taking into account legal, economic, historical, development and environmental aspects..
Lernziel- to recognize the challenges and opportunities of technological change in terms of sustainable development
- to become familiar with policy instruments to promote innovation
- to improve understanding of political decision-making processes in the regulation of science & technology
- improved understanding of the role of science and technology in the context of human and societal development
InhaltScience and Technology Policy is normally associated with the improvement of national competitiveness; yet, it is also an integral part of effective environmental and development policies.
The course will discuss the challenges and opportunities of technological change in terms of sustainable development and show how public policy on the national and the international level is responding to this change.

In this context, students are to become familiar with the basic principles of political economy and New Growth Theory and how such theories help explain political decisions as well as political outcomes in the area of Science, Technology and Innovation. State interventions are either designed to regulate (e.g. environmental regulations, anti-trust law) or facilitate (e.g. intellectual property rights protection, public investment in R&D and technical education, technology transfer) technological change. This will be illustrated by looking at different industries and different national systems of innovation. Subsequently the positive and negative consequences for society and the natural environment will be discussed from a short-term and a long-term perspective.
SkriptReader with issue-specific articles. E-version is partly available under
Link
LiteraturAerni, P. 2015a. Entrepreneurial Rights as Human Rights: Why Economic Rights Must Include the Human Right to Science and the Freedom to Grow Through Innovation. Banson, Cambridge, UK

Aerni, P. 2015b. The Sustainable Provision of Environmental Services: From Regulation to Innovation. Springer, Heidelberg.

Aerni, P., Gagalac, F., Scholderer, J. 2016. The role of biotechnology in combating climate change: A question of politics. Science and Public Policy, 43 (1): 13-28.

Aerni, P., Nichterlein, K., Rudgard, S, Sonnino, A. 2015. Making Agricultural Innovation Systems (AIS) Work for Development in Tropical Countries. Sustainability 7 (1): 831-850.

Aerni, P. 2013b. Do Private Standards encourage or hinder trade and innovation? NCCR Trade Working Paper 18/2013.

Aerni, P. 2009a. What is Sustainable Agriculture? Empirical Evidence of Diverging Views in Switzerland and New Zealand. Ecological Economics 68(6): 1872-1882.

Aerni, P. 2007. Exploring the Linkages between Commerce, Higher Education and Human Development: A Historical Review. ATDF Journal 4(2): 35-47.

Aerni, P. 2004. Risk, Regulation and Innovation: The Case of Aquaculture and Transgenic Fish. Aquatic Sciences 66: 327-341.

Arthur, B. 2009. The Nature of Technology. New York: Free Press.

Baylis, K./Rausser, G. C. and Leo S. 2005. Including Non-Trade Concerns: The Environment in EU and US Agricultural Policy. International Journal of Agricultural Resources Governance and Ecology, 4 (3/4): 262-276.

Brown, T. (2013) The Precautionary Principle is a blunt instrument. The Guardian. July 9, 2013.

Burk, D. L. & Lemley, M. A. 2009. The Patent Crisis and How to Solve it. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Burk, D., L. 2013. Patent Reform in the United States: Lessons Learned. Regulation: 1-25.

Carr, N. 2008. The Big Switch. Rewiring the World from Edison to Google. W. W. Norton & Company, New York.

Christensen, C. 2011. Innovatior's Dilemma. Harper Business, New York.

Christensen, Jon. 2013. The Biggest Wager. Nature 500: 273-4.

Diamond, Jared. 2013. The World Until Yesterday: What Can We Learn from Traditional Societies. Viking, New York.

Diamond, Jared. 1999. Guns, Germs and Steel. New York: Norton.

Farber, Daniel. 2000. Eco-pragmatism: Making Sensible Environmental Decisions in an Uncertain World. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2000.

Farinelli, F., Bottini, M., Akkoyunlu, S., Aerni, P. 2011. Green entrepreneurship: the missing link towards a greener economy. ATDF Journal 8(3/4): 42-48.

Freidberg, S. (2007). Supermarkets and imperial knowledge. Cultural Geographies, 14(3): 321-342.

Goldstone, Jeffrey. 2010. Engineering Culture, Innovation, and Modern Wealth Creation. In: C. Karlsson, R.R. Stough, B. Johansson (eds) Entrepreneurship and Innovations in Functional Regions. Northampton: Edgar Elgar.

Hamblin, J. D. 2013. Arming Mother Nature: The Birth of Catastrophic Environmentalism. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Jefferson, D. J., Graff, G. D, Chi-Ham, C. L. & Bennett, A. B. (2015) The emergence of agbiogenerics. Nature Biotechnology 33 (8): 819-823

Juma, Calestous. 2016. Innovation and its Enemies. Oxford University Press.

Kaul, Inge, Grunberg, Isabelle, and Marc A. Stern (eds). 1999. 'Global Public Goods. International Cooperation in the 21th century.' Published for the United Nations Development Program. New York: Oxford University Press.

Rosenberg, Nathan. 2000.'Schumpeter and the Endogeneity of Technology'. London: Routledge.

Warsh, David. 2006. Knowledge and the Wealth of Nations. New York: W.W. Norton & Company.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThe 2-hour course (5-7 p.m.) will be held as a series of lectures. The course materials will be available in form of an electronic Reader at the beginning of the semester.
The class will be taught in English.
Students will be asked to give a (a) presentation (15 Minutes) or write a review paper based on a article selected from the electronic script, and (b) they will have to pass a written test at the end of the course in order to obtain 3 credit points in the ECTS System. In the final mark (a) will have a weight of 40% and (b) 60%.
701-1543-00LTransdisciplinary Methods and ApplicationsW3 KP2GP. Krütli, M. Stauffacher
KurzbeschreibungThe course deals with transdisciplinary (td) methods, concepts and their applications in the context of case studies and other problem oriented research projects. Td methods are used in research at the science-society interface and when collaborating across scientific disciplines.
Students learn to apply methods within a functional framework. The format of the course is seminar-like, interactive.
LernzielAt the end of the course students should:

Know:
-Function, purpose and algorithm of a selected number of transdisciplinary methods

Understand:
-Functional application in case studies and other problem oriented projects

Be able to reflect on:
-Potential, limits, and necessity of transdisciplinary methods

Be prepared for:
-Transdisciplinary Case Study 2017
InhaltThe lecture is structured as follows:

- Overview of concepts and methods of inter-/transdisciplinary integration of knowledge, values and interests (approx. 20%)
- Analysis of a selected number of transdisciplinary methods focusing problem framing, problem analysis, and impact (approx. 50%)
- Practical application of the methods in a broader project setting (approx. 30%)
SkriptHandouts are provided by the lecturers
LiteraturSelected scientific articles and book-chapters
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThis course is recommended and helpful for students participating in the Transdisciplinary Case Study 2017.
701-1551-00LSustainability AssessmentW3 KP2GP. Krütli, C. E. Pohl
KurzbeschreibungThe course deals with the concepts and methodologies for the analysis and assessment of sustainable development. A special focus is given to the social dimension and to social justice as a guiding principle of sustainability as well as to trade-offs between the three dimensions of sustainability.

The course is seminar-like, interactive.
LernzielAt the end oft he course students should

Know:
- core concepts of sustainable development, and;
- the concept of social justice - normatively and empirically - as a core element of social sustainability;
- important empirical methods for the analysis and assessment of local / regional sustainability issues.

Understand and reflect on:
- the challenges of trade-offs between the different goals of sustainable development;
- and the respective impacts on individual and societal decision-making.
InhaltThe course is structured as follows:
- Overview of rationale, objectives, concepts and origins of sustainable development;
- Importance and application of sustainability in science, politics, society, and economy;
- Sustainable (local / regional) development in different national / international contexts;
- Analysis and evaluation methods of sustainable development with a focus on social justice;
- Trade-offs in selected examples.
SkriptHandouts.
LiteraturSelected scientific articles & book chapters
Wald- und Landschaftsmanagement
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
701-1615-00LAdvanced Forest PathologyW3 KP2GT. N. Sieber
KurzbeschreibungIn-depth understanding of concepts, insight into current research and experience with methods of Forest Pathology based on selected pathosystems.
LernzielTo know current biological and ecological research on selected diseases, to be able to comment on it and to understand the methods.
To understand the dynamics of selected pathosystems and disturbance processes.
To be able to diagnose tree diseases and injuries.
To know forest protection strategies and to be able to comment on them.
InhaltStress and disease, virulence and resistance, disease diagnosis and damage assessment, tree disease epidemiology, disease management, ecosystem pathology.
Systems (examples): Air pollution and trees, endophytic fungi, mycorrhiza, wood decay, conifer- root rot, Phytophthora diseases, chestnut canker and its hypoviruses, urban trees, complex diseases, emerging diseases
Skriptno script, the ppt-presentations and specific articles will be made available
Literaturamong others:
Edmonds, R.L., Agee, J.K., Gara, R.I. (2000): Forest Health and protection. Boston: Mc Graw-hill.
Lundquist, J.E., Hamelin, R.C. (2005): Forest Pathology. From genes to landscapes. St. Paul, Minnesota: APS-Press.
Tainter, F.H., Baker, F.A. (1996): principles of Forest pathology. New York: Wiley.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThe course is composed of introductory lectures, practical work, discussions and reading. The participants should have basic knowledge in forest pathology (corresponding to the course 701-0563-00 "Wald- und Baumkrankheiten, see teaching book of H. Butin: Tree diseases and disorders, Oxford University Press 1995. 252 pp.).
701-1631-00LFoundations of Ecosystem Management Information W5 KP3GJ. Ghazoul, C. Garcia
KurzbeschreibungThis course introduces the broad variety of conflicts that arise in projects focusing on sustainable management of natural resources. It explores case studies of ecosystem management approaches and considers their practicability, their achievements and possible barriers to their uptake.
LernzielStudents should be able to
a) propose appropriate and realistic solutions to ecosystem management problems that integrate ecological, economic and social dimensions across relevant temporal and spatial scales.
b) identify important stakeholders, their needs and interests, and the main conflicts that exist among them in the context of land and resource management.
InhaltTraditional management systems focus on extraction of natural resources, and their manipulation and governance. However, traditional management has frequently resulted in catastrophic failures such as, for example, the collapse of fish stocks and biodiversity loss. These failures have stimulated the development of alternative ‘ecosystem management’ approaches that emphasise the functionality of human-dominated systems. Inherent to such approaches are system-wide perspectives and a focus on ecological processes and services, multiple spatial and temporal scales, as well as the need to incorporate diverse stakeholder interests in decision making. Thus, ecosystem management is the science and practice of managing natural resources, biodiversity and ecological processes, to meet multiple demands of society. It can be local, regional or global in scope, and addresses critical issues in developed and developing countries relating to economic and environmental security and sustainability.

This course provides an introduction to ecosystem management, and in particular the importance of integrating ecology into management systems to meet multiple societal demands. The course explores the extent to which human-managed terrestrial systems depend on underlying ecological processes, and the consequences of degradation of these processes for human welfare and environmental well-being. Building upon a theoretical foundation, the course will tackle issues in resource ecology and management, notably forests, agriculture and wild resources within the broader context of sustainability, biodiversity conservation and poverty alleviation or economic development. Case studies from tropical and temperate regions will be used to explore these issues. Dealing with ecological and economic uncertainty, and how this affects decision making, will be discussed. Strategies for conservation and management of terrestrial ecosystems will give consideration to landscape ecology, protected area systems, and community management, paying particular attention to alternative livelihood options and marketing strategies of common pool resources.
SkriptNo Script
LiteraturChichilnisky, G. and Heal, G. (1998) Economic returns from the biosphere. Nature, 391: 629-630.
Daily, G.C. (1997) Nature’s Services: Societal dependence on natural ecosystems. Island Press. Washington DC.
Hindmarch, C. and Pienkowski, M. (2000) Land Management: The Hidden Costs. Blackwell Science.
Millenium Ecosystem Assessment (2005) Ecosystems and Human Well-being: Synthesis. Island Press, Washington DC.
Milner-Gulland, E.J. and Mace, R. (1998) Conservation of Biological Resources. Blackwell Science.
Gunderson, L.H. and Holling, C.S. (2002) Panarchy: understanding transformations in human and natural systems. Island Press.
701-1651-00LEnvironmental Governance Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Maximale Teilnehmerzahl: 30
W3 KP2GE. Lieberherr, G. de Buren, R. Schweizer
KurzbeschreibungThe course addresses environmental policies, focusing on new steering approaches, which are generally summarized as environmental governance. The course also provides students with tools to analyze environmental policy processes and assesses the key features of environmental governance by examining various practical environmental policy examples.
LernzielTo understand how an environmental problem may (not) become a policy and explain political processes, using basic concepts and techniques from political science.

To analyze the evolution as well as the key elements of environmental governance.

To be able to identify the main challenges and opportunities for environmental governance and to critically discuss them with reference to various practical policy examples.
InhaltImprovements in environmental quality and sustainable management of natural resources cannot be achieved through technical solutions alone. The quality of the environment and the achievement of sustainable development strongly depend on human behavior and specifically the human uses of nature. To influence human behavior, we rely on public policies and other societal rules, which aim to steer the way humans use natural resources and their effects on the environment. Such steering can take place through government intervention alone. However, this often also involves governance, which includes the interplay between governmental and non-governmental actors, the use of diverse tools such as emission standards or financial incentives to steer actors' behavior and can occur at the local, regional, national or international level.

In this course, we will address both the practical aspects of as well as the scientific debate on environmental governance. The course gives future environmental experts a strong basis to position themselves in the governance debate, which does not preclude government but rather involves a spectrum from government to governance.

Key questions that this course seeks to answer: What are the core characteristics of environmental challenges from a policy perspective? What are key elements of 'environmental governance' and how legitimate and effective are these approaches in addressing persistent environmental challenges?
SkriptLecture slides and additional course material will be provided throughout the semester.
LiteraturWe will mostly work with readings from the following books:
- Carter, N. (2007). The politics of the environment: Ideas, activism, policy (2nd ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
- Hogl, K., Kvarda, E., Nordbeck, R., Pregernig, M. (Eds) (2012): Environmental Governance: The Challenge of Legitimacy and Effectiveness. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing Limited.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesA detailed course schedule will be made available at the beginning of the semester.

We recommend that students have (a) three-years BSc education of a (technical) university; (b) successfully completed Bachelor introductory course to environmental policy (Entwicklungen nationaler Umweltpolitik (or equivalent)) and (c) familiarity with key issues in environmental policy and some fundamental knowledge of one social science or humanities discipline (political science, economics, sociology, history, psychology, philosophy)
701-1671-00LSampling Techniques for Forest InventoriesW3 KP2VD. Mandallaz
KurzbeschreibungIntroduction to design and model assisted sampling theory for finite populations as well as to the infinite population model for forest inventory. Two-phase two-stage forest inventories with simple or cluster sampling. Small area estimation. Presentation of the Swiss National Inventory.
Short introduction to Kriging techniques.
LernzielStudents should have a good understanding of the concepts of general sampling theory in a modern framework. They should also master the specific problems arising in forest inventory and be able, if necessary, to read more specialized books or research papers.
InhaltInclusion probabilities. Horwitz-Thompson estimates. Simple random sampling. Stratified sampling. PPS sampling and multi-stage sampling. Model assisted procedures. Formalism of sampling theory in forest inventory. One-phase simple and cluster sampling schemes. Two-phase two-sampling schemes. Model-dependent and model assisted procedures. Small area estimation. Kriging techniques. The Swiss National Forest Inventory.
SkriptSampling techniques for forest inventories. Daniel Mandallaz, Chapman and Hall. A free electronic copy of the book is also available. A PDF file containing parts of the book will be mailed to the participants
LiteraturSampling methods for multiresource forest inventory. H.T. Schreuder, T.G. Gregoire, G.B. Wood, 1993, Wiley.
Model assisted survey sampling, C.E. Särndal, B. Swenson, J. Wretman, 2003, Springer.
Sampling methods, remote sensing and GIS multisource forest inventory
M. Köhl, S. Magnussen, M. Marchetti, 2006, Springer.
Sampling techniques for forest inventories, Daniel Mandallaz, 2007, Chapman and Hall.
T.G. Gregoire, H.T. Valentine. Sampling strategies for natural resources and the environment, Chapman and Hall.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesA simulation software will be used throughtout the lectures to illustrate the theoretical developments. Upon request a half day field demonstration can be organized at the WSL outside the lecture time. A repetitorium for the exam is also offered.
751-5125-00LStable Isotope Ecology of Terrestrial Ecosystems Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen W2 KP2GR. A. Werner, N. Buchmann, A. Gessler
KurzbeschreibungThis course provides an overview about the applicability of stable isotopes (carbon 13C, nitrogen 15N, oxygen 18O and water 2H) to process-oriented ecological research. Topics focus on stable isotopes as indicators for the origin of pools and fluxes, partitioning of composite fluxes as well as to trace and integrate processes. In addition, students carry out a small project during lab sessions.
LernzielStudents will be familiar with basic and advanced applications of stable isotopes in studies on plants, soils, water and trace gases, know the relevant approaches, concepts and recent results in stable isotope ecology, know how to combine classical and modern techniques to solve ecophysiological or ecological problems, learn to design, carry out and interpret a small IsoProject, practice to search and analyze literature as well as to give an oral presentation.
InhaltThe analyses of stable isotopes often provide insights into ecophysiological and ecological processes that otherwise would not be available with classical methods only. Stable isotopes proved useful to determine origin of pools and fluxes in ecosystems, to partition composite fluxes and to integrate processes spatially and temporally.

This course will provide an introduction to the applicability of stable isotopes to ecological research questions. Topics will focus on carbon (13C), nitrogen (15N), oxygen (18O) and hydrogen (2H) at natural isotope abundance and tracer levels. Lectures will be supplemented by intensive laboratory sessions, short presentations by students and computer exercises.
SkriptHandouts will be available on the webpage of the course.
LiteraturWill be discussed in class.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThis course is based on fundamental knowledge about plant ecophysiology, soil science, and ecology in general. Course will be taught in English.
102-0675-00LErdbeobachtungW4 KP3GI. Hajnsek, E. Baltsavias
KurzbeschreibungDas Ziel der Lehrveranstalltung ist die Vermittlung von Grundlagen über Erdbeobachtungs-Sensoren, Techniken und Methodiken zur Bestimmung von bio-/geo-physikalischen Umweltparametern.
LernzielDie Lehrveranstalltung sollte Grundlagen und einen Überblick über derzeitige und zukünftige Erdbeobachtungssensoren und deren Einsatz zur Umweltparameterbestimmung vermitteln. Die Studenten sollten am Ende der Veranstalltung Wissen über
1. Grundlagen zum Messprinzip
2. Grundlagen in der Bildaufnahme
3. Grundlagen zu den sensorspezifischen Geometrien
4. Sensorspezifische Bestimmung von Umweltparametern
erworben haben.
InhaltDie Lehrveranstaltung gibt einen Einblick in die heutige Erdbeoachtung mit dem follgenden skizzierten Inhalt:
1. Einführung in die Fernerkundung von Luft- und Weltraum gestützen Systemen
2. Einführung in das Elektromagnetische Spektrum
3. Einführung in optische Systeme (optisch und hyperspektral)
4. Einführung in Mikrowellen-Technik (aktiv und passiv)
5. Einführung in atmosphärische Systeme (meteo und chemisch)
6. Einführung in die Techniken und Methoden zur Bestimmung von Umweltparametern
7. Einführung in die Anwendungen zur Bestimmung von Umweltparametern in der Hydrologie, Glaziologie, Forst und Landwirtschaft, Geologie und Topographie
SkriptFolien zu jeden Vorlesungsblock werden zur Verfügung gestellt.
LiteraturAusgewählte Literatur wird am Anfang der Vorlesung vorgestellt.
701-1681-00LElement Balancing and Soil Functions in Managed EcosystemsW3 KP2GA. Keller
KurzbeschreibungDie Stoffbilanzierung von landwirtschaftlichen Böden und die Bewertung von Bodenfunktionen wird in praktischen Computerübungen an realen Fallbeispielen angewandt, um Vorsorgemassnahmen gegen Bodenbelastungen zu planen, und um eine nachhaltige Nutzung von regionalen Agrarökosystemen auch im Kontext der Raumplanung zu unterstützen.
LernzielDie Studierende können veränderte Landnutzungen auf die Stoffkreisläufe von Agrarökosystemen und den Dienstleistungen des Bodens (Bodenfunktionen) abschätzen und kritisch beurteilen. Sie entwerfen Lösungsansätze für stoffliche Bodenschutzprobleme auf regionaler Ebene und lernen unterschiedliche Methoden zur Bewertung von Bodenfunktionen kennen.
InhaltDie Studenten wenden eine regionale Bilanzierungsmethode für schweizer Regionen in Computerübungen an und bewerten relevante Bodenfunktionen der landwirtschaftlichen Böden. Sie beurteilen die Nachhaltigkeit gegenwärtiger Landnutzungen und optimieren die Nährstoff- und Schwermetallflüsse in Agrarökosystemen mit geeigneten Massnahmen. Die StudentInnen werden die Gelegenheit haben spezifische Szenarien zu berechnen. Besonderes Augenmerk gilt den Dienstleistungen des Bodens (Regulierungs- , Produktions- und Lebensraumfunktion) und deren Bewertung auf der Basis von Bodenkartierungsdaten.
SkriptLiteratur und Übungsunterlagen Fallstudie
LiteraturLiteratur wird in der Vorlesung abgegeben.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesDie Lehrveranstaltung ist aufgeteilt in Vorlesungsstunden und Übungsstunden im Computerraum. Die Veranstaltung findet 14 tägig im Block à 4 h statt.
Voraussetzung (Empfohlen):
- Bodenschutz und Landnutzung
- Biochemistry of Trace Elements
- Angewandte Bodenökologie
701-1776-00LGeographische Datenverarbeitung mit Python und ArcGISW1 KP2UA. Baltensweiler
KurzbeschreibungDer Kurs vermittelt die Grundlagen von Python und gibt eine Einführung in das Geoprocessing Framework von ArcGIS. Zusätzlich werden verschiedene Python-Bibliotheken (numyp, Scipy, GDAL, statsmodels, pandas) eingeführt, die den Funktionsumfang des Geoprocessing Frameworks zusätzlich erweitern.
LernzielDie Studierenden erlernen die Grundlagen der geographischen Datenverarbeitung mit der Programmiersprache Python und ArcGIS (arcpy). Sie sind damit in der Lage eigene Prozessabläufe und Modelle bei der Geodatenverarbeitung zu implementieren. Die Studenten können open source Bibliotheken in ihre Pyhonskripte integrieren und lernen wie die Bibliotheken auf räumliche Datensätze angewendet werden.
InhaltDer Kurs vermittelt ein vertieftes Verständnis des Geoprocessing Frameworks arcpy und behandelt grundlegende Sprachelemente von Python wie Datentypen, Kontrollstrukturen, Funktionen usw. Im weiteren wird die Anwendung von verbreiteten Python-Bibliotheken in Kombination mit räumlichen Datensätze gezeigt.
SkriptSkript, Übungen und Musterlösungen werden zur Verfügung gestellt.
LiteraturLutz M. (2013): Learning Python, 5th Edition, O'Reilly Media
De Smith M., Goodchild, M.F., Longley, P. A. (2006): Geospatial Analysis, Troubador Publishing Ltd.
Zandbergen P. A. (2013): Python Scripting for ArcGIS. Esri Press.
Allen, D. A. (2014): GIS Tutorial for Python Scripting. ESRI Press.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesDer Kurs wird auf Deutsch gehalten. Sämtliche Materialien werden in Englisch zur Verfügung gestellt. Kenntnisse in ArcGIS werden vorausgesetzt.
701-1682-00LDendroecologyW3 KP3GC. Bigler, A. Rigling, K. Treydte
KurzbeschreibungDer Kurs Dendroökologie vermittelt theoretische und praktische Aspekte der Dendrochronologie. Die Bedeutung verschiedener Umwelteinflüsse auf Jahrringmerkmale wird aufgezeigt. Die Studierenden lernen unterschiedliche Methoden, um Jahrringe zu datieren und sie verstehen, wie ökologische und umweltbedingte Prozesse und Muster mit Hilfe von Jahrringen rekonstruiert werden können.
LernzielDie Studierenden...
- verstehen, wie Holz aufgebaut ist und wie Jahrringstrukturen gebildet werden.
- können verschiedene Jahrringmerkmale erkennen und beschreiben.
- verstehen die theoretischen und praktischen Aspekte der Datierung von Jahrringen.
- lernen Effekte unterschiedlicher abiotischer und biotischer Umwelteinflüsse (Klima, Standort, Konkurrenz, Insekten, Feuer, physikalisch-mechanische Einwirkungen) auf Bäume und Jahrringe kennen.
- entdecken ein Werkzeug, um Prozesse der globalen Umweltveränderungen zu verstehen und zu rekonstruieren.
- lernen Software für die Datierung, Standardisierung und Analyse von Jahrringen kennen.
- erhalten praktische Erfahrungen durch die Veranschaulichung mit Hölzern (Bohrkerne, Stammscheiben, Keile), durch Probenahme im Feld und eigenes Messen und Datieren von Jahrringen im Jahrringlabor.
- lösen R-basierte Übungen (R Tutorial wird angeboten) und beantworten Fragen in Moodle.
- erarbeiten eine eigenständige Fragestellung zu einem dendroökologischen Thema und schreiben eine kurze Literaturarbeit basierend auf wissenschaftlichen Artikeln.
Inhalt- Übersicht und Geschichte der Dendrochronologie
- Prinzipien der Dendrochronologie
- Evolution von Jahrringen
- Bildung und Struktur von Holz und Jahrringen
- Intra-saisonales Jahrringwachstum
- Kontinuierliche und diskontinuierliche Jahrringmerkmale
- Probenentnahme und Messung
- Kreuzdatierungsmethoden (visuell, Skeleton Plots, quantitativ)
- Standardisierung von Jahrringkurven
- Entwicklung von Jahrring-Chronologien
- Dendrogeomorphologie, Dendrohydrologie, Dendroglaziologie
- Stabile Isotopen
- Klima, Klima-Wachstumsbeziehungen, Klimarekonstruktionen
- Alters- und Grössenstrukturen, Walddynamik (Verjüngung, Wachstum, Konkurrenz, Mortalität)
- Störungsökologie (Feuer, Insekten, Windwurf)
- Einsatz der Jahrringforschung in der Praxis und in interdisziplinären Forschungsprojekten
- Feld- und Labortag (Datum für einen ganzen Tag oder zwei Halbtage wird gemeinsam zu Beginn des Semesters mit den Studierenden gesucht): Besprechung von dendroökologischen Fragestellungen im Wald; Beprobung von Bäumen; Einblick in verschiedene Jahrringprojekte im Labor (Eidgenössische Forschungsanstalt für Wald Schnee und Landschaft WSL)
SkriptSkripte (in Englisch) werden in der Vorlesung abgegeben.

Die Skripte sowie weitere Dokumente (Papers, Software) können nach Einschreibung im Kurs auch auf Moodle (https://moodle-app2.let.ethz.ch) runtergeladen werden.
LiteraturLiteraturlisten werden in der Vorlesung verteilt.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesZeitplan (total 90 Stunden): Es finden 12 Doppelstunden Vorlesung statt (total 24 Stunden Präsenzzeit) sowie ein Feld- und Labortag (8 Stunden Präsenzzeit). Zusätzlich wird von den Studierenden 18 Stunden für die Vor- und Nachbearbeitung der Vorlesungen sowie 18 Stunden für die Übungen erwartet. Für die Laborarbeit sind 4 Stunden und für das Projekt 18 Stunden reserviert.

Die Unterrichtssprache ist Deutsch und Englisch, auf Wunsch nur Englisch.

Voraussetzungen:
Grundlagen der Biologie, Ökologie und Waldökologie
701-1695-00LSoil Science SeminarZ0 KP1SR. Schulin
KurzbeschreibungInvited external speakers present their research on current issues in the field of soil science and discuss their results with the participants. The program will be announced through various channels and also be made available through the teaching materials.
LernzielMaster and PhD students are introduced to current areas of research in soil sciences and get first-hand experience in scientific discussion.
Inter- und transdisziplinäre Kurse
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
701-0015-00LSeminar on Transdisciplinary Research for Sustainable DevelopmentW2 KP2SC. E. Pohl, M. Stauffacher
KurzbeschreibungThe seminar is designed for students and researchers (MA, PhD, PostDoc) who use inter- and transdisciplinary elements in their projects. It addresses the challenges of this research: How to integrate disciplines? How (and in what role) to include societal actors? How to bring results to fruition? We discuss these questions based on case studies and theories and on the participant's projects.
LernzielThe participants understand the specific challenges of inter- and transdisciplinary research in general and in the context of sustainable development in particular. They know methods and concepts to address these challenges and apply them to their research projects.
InhaltThe seminar covers the following topics:
(1) Theories and concepts of inter- and transdisciplinary research
(2) The specific challenges of inter- and transdisciplinary research
(3) Involving stakeholders
(4) Collaborating disciplines
(5) Exploration of tools and methods
(6) Analysing participants' projects to improve inter- and transdisciplinary elements
LiteraturLiterature will be made available to the participants
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThe seminar is specifically suitable for PhD or PostDoc researchers. It is open to master students (minor "global change and sustainability") and further interested people, who preferably are preparing, or working on, a project/thesis.
701-1503-00LCCES Winter School "Science Meets Practice"W4 KP9AC. Adler, P. Fry, P. Krütli, C. E. Pohl
KurzbeschreibungIncreasingly, scientists need to interact more with people and institutions outside the scientific community. This requires the capability to understand and critically reflect about scientific activities and consequences for society and environment and to communicate with confidence. The CCES Winter School builds capacity to create and manage interactions between science and society.
Lernziel1. To acquire knowledge of key aspects of the interplay between science and practice
2. To reflect on and understand the role and consequences of scientific activity in relation to society and environment
3. To acquire skills and learn about a systematic application of methods to create and manage interactions between science and society
Inhalt*** Please note that the correct dates for the CCES Winter School 2017 are 9-12 January and 6-9 February, 2017 ***

The CCES Winter School provides insights into theoretical and methodological foundations on the challenges of knowledge exchange and dialogue between science and practice. It offers media and knowledge management training for enhancing stakeholder involvement. Selected case examples support group work discussions and analysis. Real stakeholder meetings are organized for testing techniques in view of identifying diverse expectations and needs and working towards solutions. Together the Winter School participants and stakeholders experience and develop ways for better linking environmental science and practice.

The course is structured by an intimate interconnection between theoretical inputs, reflection and translation into own topics and projects. The course offers insights into a wide spectrum of crossing boundaries between science and practice (e.g. information, consultation, co-production of knowledge) and provides test fields for and room for reflection of own experiences.

The first block with inputs, individual and group work, and reflection is a preparation for the second block, which focuses on implementation of stakeholder interactions. Between the two blocks coached project work is offered.

The CCES Winter School takes place at Propstei Wislikofen in January and February 2017. Accommodation is provided.
SkriptCourse materials (e.g. slides, articles, toolboxes) are provided for preparatory reading and during the course (in Moodle).
LiteraturCollection of key literature in online reader in Moodle.
Voraussetzungen / Besonderes*** Please note that the correct dates for the CCES Winter School 2017 are 9-12 January and 6-9 February, 2017 ***

The CCES Winter School addresses PhD students and postdocs from environmental and natural sciences, engineering, and social sciences related to sustainable development. Participants are required to apply online providing key information about their interest and PhD project - details and application form can be found here: http://www.cces.ethz.ch/winterschool/

The Winter School runs with a maximum of 25 participants.
The Winter School 2017 will be delivered by a diverse group of coaches and experienced intermediaries:
- Carolina Adler (USYS TdLab, ETH Zurich)
- Pius Krütli (USYS TdLab, ETH Zurich)
- Christian Pohl (USYS TdLab, ETH Zürich)
- Patricia Fry (Wissensmanagement Umwelt GmbH)
- Christoph Clases (AOC Unternehmensberatung)

The total time requirement is in the range of 120 hours, equivalent to 4 ECTS. The learning control focuses on i) active participation, engagement in case examples, and reflection against the background of own projects and experiences, 2) active team involvement in implementing tasks on information, consultation, and co-production of knowledge, including the design and organization of stakeholder meetings. The course is successfully completed by pass (pass/no pass, thus no marks). The language of the Winter School is English. Stakeholder meetings will be in the local language (Swiss German) and translation into English is provided.

There is a participation fee of 400 CHF for the course, which is a contribution to the costs for the two blocks at the seminar venue Propstei Wislikofen, organizational support as well as material for the stakeholder meetings. Travel expenses to the venue are to be borne by the participants.
Allgemeine und wissenschaftliche Kompetenzen
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
701-0019-00LReadings in Environmental Thinking Information W3 KP2SJ. Ghazoul, G. Hirsch Hadorn, A. Patt
KurzbeschreibungThis course introduces students to foundational texts that led to the emergence of the environment as a subject of scientific importance, and shaped its relevance to society. Above all, the course seeks to give confidence and raise enthusiasm among students to read more widely around the broad subject of environmental sciences and management both during the course and beyond.
LernzielThe course will provide students with opportunities to read, discuss, evaluate and interpret key texts that have shaped the environmental movement and, more specifically, the environmental sciences. Students will gain familiarity with the foundational texts, but also understand the historical context within which their academic and future professional work is based. More directly, the course will encourage debate and discussion of each text that is studied, from both the original context as well as the modern context. In so doing students will be forced to consider and justify the current societal relevance of their work.
InhaltThe course will be run as a ‘book reading club’. The first session will provide a short introduction as to how to explore a particular text (that is not a scientific paper) to identify the key points for discussion.

Thereafter, in each week a text (typically a chapter from a book or a paper) considered to be seminal or foundational will be assigned by a course lecturer. The lecturer will introduce the selected text with a brief background of the historical and cultural context in which it was written, with some additional biographical information about the author. He/she will also briefly explain the justification for selecting the particular text.

The students will read the text, with two to four students (depending on class size) being assigned to present it at the next session. Presentation of the text requires the students to prepare by, for example:
• identifying the key points made within the text
• identifying issues of particular personal interest and resonance
• considering the impact of the text at the time of publication, and its importance now
• evaluating the text from the perspective of our current societal and environmental position

Such preparation would be supported by a mid-week ‘tutorial’ discussion (about 1 hour) with the assigning lecturer.

These students will then present the text (for about 15 minutes) to the rest of the class during the scheduled class session, with the lecturer facilitating the subsequent class discussion (about 45 minutes). Towards the end of the session the presenting students will summarise the emerging points (5 minutes) and the lecturer will finish with a brief discussion of how valuable and interesting the text was (10 minutes). In the remaining 15 minutes the next text will be presented by the assigning lecturer for the following week.
LiteraturThe specific texts selected for discussion will vary, but examples include:
Leopold (1949) A Sand County Almanach
Carson (1962) Silent Spring
Egli, E. (1970) Natur in Not. Gefahren der Zivilisationslandschaft
Lovelock (1979) Gaia: A new look at life on Earth
Naess (1973) The Shallow and the Deep.
Roderick F. Nash (1989) The Rights of Nature
Jared Diamond (2005) Collapse
Robert Macfarlane (2007) The Wild Places

Discussions might also encompass films or other forms of media and communication about nature.
701-0017-00LEAWAG PhD Skills Seminar
Findet dieses Semester nicht statt.
W2 KP2SJ. Jokela, J. Hering
KurzbeschreibungPurpose is to discuss and teach the professional skills that are needed in science (or future career in science). Course consists of lectures and practical sessions. Course is organized by Eawag scientists.
LernzielPurpose is to discuss and teach the professional skills that are needed in science (or future career in science). Course consists of lectures and practical sessions.
InhaltLectures and exercises in:
Project management
Application of research grants
Scientific publishing
Reviewing
Writing papers
Applying jobs
Job interviews
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