Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2016

MAS in Medical Physics Information
Specialization: General Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering
Major in Bioimaging
Electives
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0605-00LNanosystemsW4 credits4GA. Stemmer, J.‑N. Tisserant
AbstractFrom atoms to molecules to condensed matter: characteristic properties of simple nanosystems and how they evolve when moving towards complex ensembles.
Intermolecular forces, their macroscopic manifestations, and ways to control such interactions.
Self-assembly and directed assembly of 2D and 3D structures.
Special emphasis on the emerging field of molecular electronic devices.
ObjectiveFamiliarize students with basic science and engineering principles governing the nano domain.
ContentThe course addresses basic science and engineering principles ruling the nano domain. We particularly work out the links between topics that are traditionally taught separately.

Special emphasis is placed on the emerging field of molecular electronic devices, their working principles, applications, and how they may be assembled.

Topics are treated in 2 blocks:

(I) From Quantum to Continuum
From atoms to molecules to condensed matter: characteristic properties of simple nanosystems and how they evolve when moving towards complex ensembles.

(II) Interaction Forces on the Micro and Nano Scale
Intermolecular forces, their macroscopic manifestations, and ways to control such interactions.
Self-assembly and directed assembly of 2D and 3D structures.
Literature- Kuhn, Hans; Försterling, H.D.: Principles of Physical Chemistry. Understanding Molecules, Molecular Assemblies, Supramolecular Machines. 1999, Wiley, ISBN: 0-471-95902-2
- Chen, Gang: Nanoscale Energy Transport and Conversion. 2005, Oxford University Press, ISBN: 978-0-19-515942-4
- Ouisse, Thierry: Electron Transport in Nanostructures and Mesoscopic Devices. 2008, Wiley, ISBN: 978-1-84821-050-9
- Wolf, Edward L.: Nanophysics and Nanotechnology. 2004, Wiley-VCH, ISBN: 3-527-40407-4

- Israelachvili, Jacob N.: Intermolecular and Surface Forces. 2nd ed., 1992, Academic Press,ISBN: 0-12-375181-0
- Evans, D.F.; Wennerstrom, H.: The Colloidal Domain. Where Physics, Chemistry, Biology, and Technology Meet. Advances in Interfacial Engineering Series. 2nd ed., 1999, Wiley, ISBN: 0-471-24247-0
- Hunter, Robert J.: Foundations of Colloid Science. 2nd ed., 2001, Oxford, ISBN: 0-19-850502-7
Prerequisites / NoticeCourse format:

Lectures and Mini-Review presentations: Thursday 10-13, ML F 36

Homework: Mini-Reviews
Students select a paper (list distributed in class) and expand the topic into a Mini-Review that illuminates the particular field beyond the immediate results reported in the paper.
227-0391-00LMedical Image AnalysisW3 credits2GP. C. Cattin, M. A. Reyes Aguirre
AbstractIt is the objective of this lecture to introduce the basic concepts used
in Medical Image Analysis. In particular the lecture focuses on shape
representation schemes, segmentation techniques, and the various image registration methods commonly used in Medical Image Analysis applications.
ObjectiveThis lecture aims to give an overview of the basic concepts of Medical Image Analysis and its application areas.
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowledge of computer vision would be helpful.
227-0965-00LMicro and Nano-Tomography of Biological TissuesW4 credits3GM. Stampanoni, P. A. Kaestner
AbstractThe lecture introduces the physical and technical know-how of X-ray tomographic microscopy. Several X-ray imaging techniques (absorption-, phase- and darkfield contrast) will be discussed and their use in daily research, in particular biology, is presented. The course discusses the aspects of quantitative evaluation of tomographic data sets like segmentation, morphometry and statistics.
ObjectiveIntroduction to the basic concepts of X-ray tomographic imaging, image analysis and data quantification at the micro and nano scale with particular emphasis on biological applications
ContentSynchrotron-based X-ray micro- and nano-tomography is today a powerful technique for non-destructive, high-resolution investigations of a broad range of materials. The high-brilliance and high-coherence of third generation synchrotron radiation facilities allow quantitative, three-dimensional imaging at the micro and nanometer scale and extend the traditional absorption imaging technique to edge-enhanced and phase-sensitive measurements, which are particularly suited for investigating biological samples.

The lecture includes a general introduction to the principles of tomographic imaging from image formation to image reconstruction. It provides the physical and engineering basics to understand how imaging beamlines at synchrotron facilities work, looks into the recently developed phase contrast methods, and explores the first applications of X-ray nano-tomographic experiments.

The course finally provides the necessary background to understand the quantitative evaluation of tomographic data, from basic image analysis to complex morphometrical computations and 3D visualization, keeping the focus on biomedical applications.
Lecture notesAvailable online
LiteratureWill be indicated during the lecture.
227-0967-00LComputational Neuroimaging Clinic Information
Prerequisite: Successful completion of course "Methods & Models for fMRI Data Analysis" (227-0969-00L).
W3 credits2VK. Stephan
AbstractThis seminar teaches problem solving skills for computational neuroimaging, based on joint analyses of neuroimaging and behavioural data. It deals with a wide variety of real-life problems that are brought to this meeting from the neuroimaging community at Zurich, e.g. mass-univariate and multivariate analyses of fMRI/EEG data, or generative models of fMRI, EEG, or behavioural data.
Objective1. Consolidation of theoretical knowledge (obtained in the following courses: 'Methods & models for fMRI data analysis', 'Translational Neuromodeling', 'Computational Psychiatry') in a practical setting.
2. Acquisition of practical problem solving strategies for computational modeling of neuroimaging data.
ContentThis seminar teaches problem solving skills for computational neuroimaging, based on joint analyses of neuroimaging and behavioural data. It deals with a wide variety of real-life problems that are brought to this meeting from the neuroimaging community at Zurich, e.g. mass-univariate and multivariate analyses of fMRI/EEG data, or generative models of fMRI, EEG, or behavioural data.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe participants are expected to have successfully completed at least one of the following courses:
'Methods & models for fMRI data analysis',
'Translational Neuromodeling',
'Computational Psychiatry'
227-0969-00LMethods & Models for fMRI Data Analysis Information W6 credits4VK. Stephan
AbstractThis course teaches methods and models for fMRI data analysis, covering all aspects of statistical parametric mapping (SPM), incl. preprocessing, the general linear model, statistical inference, multiple comparison corrections, event-related designs, and Dynamic Causal Modelling (DCM), a Bayesian framework for identification of nonlinear neuronal systems from neurophysiological data.
ObjectiveTo obtain in-depth knowledge of the theoretical foundations of SPM
and DCM and of their application to empirical fMRI data.
ContentThis course teaches state-of-the-art methods and models for fMRI data analysis. It covers all aspects of statistical parametric mapping (SPM), incl. preprocessing, the general linear model, frequentist and Bayesian inference, multiple comparison corrections, and event-related designs, and Dynamic Causal Modelling (DCM), a Bayesian framework for identification of nonlinear neuronal systems from neurophysiological data. A particular emphasis of the course will be on methodological questions arising in the context of studies in psychiatry, neurology and neuroeconomics.
376-1279-00LVirtual Reality in Medicine Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
W3 credits2VR. Riener
AbstractVirtual Reality has the potential to support medical training and therapy. This lecture will derive the technical principles of multi-modal (audiovisual, haptic, tactile etc.) input devices, displays and rendering techniques. Examples are presented in the fields of surgical training, intra-operative augmentation, and rehabilitation. The lecture is accompanied by practical courses and excursions.
ObjectiveProvide theoretical and practical knowledge of new principles and applications of multi-modal simulation and interface technologies in medical education, therapy, and rehabilitation.
ContentVirtual Reality has the potential to provide descriptive and practical information for medical training and therapy while relieving the patient and/or the physician. Multi-modal interactions between the user and the virtual environment facilitate the generation of high-fidelity sensory impressions, by using not only visual and auditory modalities, but also kinesthetic, tactile, and even olfactory feedback. On the basis of the existing physiological constraints, this lecture will derive the technical requirements and principles of multi-modal input devices, displays, and rendering techniques. Several examples are presented that are currently being developed or already applied for surgical training, intra-operative augmentation, and rehabilitation. The lecture will be accompanied by several practical courses on graphical and haptic display devices as well as excursions to facilities equipped with large-scale VR equipment.

Target Group:
Students of higher semesters and PhD students of
- D-HEST, D-MAVT, D-ITET, D-INFK, D-PHYS
- Robotics, Systems and Control Master
- Biomedical Engineering/Movement Science and Sport
- Medical Faculty, University of Zurich
Students of other departments, faculties, courses are also welcome!
LiteratureBook: Virtual Reality in Medicine. Riener, Robert; Harders, Matthias; 2012 Springer.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course language is English.
Basic experience in Information Technology and Computer Science will be of advantage
More details will be announced in the lecture.
402-0674-00LPhysics in Medical Research: From Atoms to Cells Information W6 credits2V + 1UB. K. R. Müller
AbstractScanning probe and diffraction techniques allow studying activated atomic processes during early stages of epitaxial growth. For quantitative description, rate equation analysis, mean-field nucleation and scaling theories are applied on systems ranging from simple metallic to complex organic materials. The knowledge is expanded to optical and electronic properties as well as to proteins and cells.
ObjectiveThe lecture series is motivated by an overview covering the skin of the crystals, roughness analysis, contact angle measurements, protein absorption/activity and monocyte behaviour.

As the first step, real structures on clean surfaces including surface reconstructions and surface relaxations, defects in crystals are presented, before the preparation of clean metallic, semiconducting, oxidic and organic surfaces are introduced.

The atomic processes on surfaces are activated by the increase of the substrate temperature. They can be studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The combination with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) allows determining the sizes of the critical nuclei and the other activated processes in a hierarchical fashion. The evolution of the surface morphology is characterized by the density and size distribution of the nanostructures that could be quantified by means of the rate equation analysis, the mean-field nucleation theory, as well as the scaling theory. The surface morphology is further characterized by defects and nanostructure's shapes, which are based on the strain relieving mechanisms and kinetic growth processes.

High-resolution electron diffraction is complementary to scanning probe techniques and provides exact mean values. Some phenomena are quantitatively described by the kinematic theory and perfectly understood by means of the Ewald construction. Other phenomena need to be described by the more complex dynamical theory. Electron diffraction is not only associated with elastic scattering but also inelastic excitation mechanisms that reflect the electronic structure of the surfaces studied. Low-energy electrons lead to phonon and high-energy electrons to plasmon excitations. Both effects are perfectly described by dipole and impact scattering.

Thin-films of rather complex organic materials are often quantitatively characterized by photons with a broad range of wavelengths from ultra-violet to infra-red light. Asymmetries and preferential orientations of the (anisotropic) molecules are verified using the optical dichroism and second harmonic generation measurements. These characterization techniques are vital for optimizing the preparation of medical implants and the determination of tissue's anisotropies within the human body.

Cell-surface interactions are related to the cell adhesion and the contractile cellular forces. Physical means have been developed to quantify these interactions. Other physical techniques are introduced in cell biology, namely to count and sort cells, to study cell proliferation and metabolism and to determine the relation between cell morphology and function.

3D scaffolds are important for tissue augmentation and engineering. Design, preparation methods, and characterization of these highly porous 3D microstructures are also presented.

Visiting clinical research in a leading university hospital will show the usefulness of the lecture series.
Major in Bioengineering
Core Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0965-00LMicro and Nano-Tomography of Biological TissuesW4 credits3GM. Stampanoni, P. A. Kaestner
AbstractThe lecture introduces the physical and technical know-how of X-ray tomographic microscopy. Several X-ray imaging techniques (absorption-, phase- and darkfield contrast) will be discussed and their use in daily research, in particular biology, is presented. The course discusses the aspects of quantitative evaluation of tomographic data sets like segmentation, morphometry and statistics.
ObjectiveIntroduction to the basic concepts of X-ray tomographic imaging, image analysis and data quantification at the micro and nano scale with particular emphasis on biological applications
ContentSynchrotron-based X-ray micro- and nano-tomography is today a powerful technique for non-destructive, high-resolution investigations of a broad range of materials. The high-brilliance and high-coherence of third generation synchrotron radiation facilities allow quantitative, three-dimensional imaging at the micro and nanometer scale and extend the traditional absorption imaging technique to edge-enhanced and phase-sensitive measurements, which are particularly suited for investigating biological samples.

The lecture includes a general introduction to the principles of tomographic imaging from image formation to image reconstruction. It provides the physical and engineering basics to understand how imaging beamlines at synchrotron facilities work, looks into the recently developed phase contrast methods, and explores the first applications of X-ray nano-tomographic experiments.

The course finally provides the necessary background to understand the quantitative evaluation of tomographic data, from basic image analysis to complex morphometrical computations and 3D visualization, keeping the focus on biomedical applications.
Lecture notesAvailable online
LiteratureWill be indicated during the lecture.
376-1103-00LFrontiers in NanotechnologyW4 credits4VV. Vogel, further lecturers
AbstractMany disciplines are meeting at the nanoscale, from physics, chemistry to engineering, from the life sciences to medicine. The course will prepare students to communicate more effectively across disciplinary boundaries, and will provide them with deep insights into the various frontiers.
ObjectiveBuilding upon advanced technologies to create, visualize, analyze and manipulate nano-structures, as well as to probe their nano-chemistry, nano-mechanics and other properties within manmade and living systems, many exciting discoveries are currently made. They change the way we do science and result in so many new technologies.

The goal of the course is to give Master and Graduate students from all interested departments an overview of what nanotechnology is all about, from analytical techniques to nanosystems, from physics to biology. Students will start to appreciate the extent to which scientific communities are meeting at the nanoscale. They will learn about the specific challenges and what is currently “sizzling” in the respective fields, and learn the vocabulary that is necessary to communicate effectively across departmental boundaries.

Each lecturer will first give an overview of the state-of-the art in his/her field, and then describe the research highlights in his/her own research group. While preparing their Final Projects and discussing them in front of the class, the students will deepen their understanding of how to apply a range of new technologies to solve specific scientific problems and technical challenges. Exposure to the different frontiers will also improve their ability to conduct effective nanoscale research, recognize the broader significance of their work and to start collaborations.
ContentStarting with the fabrication and analysis of nanoparticles and nanostructured materials that enable a variety of scientific and technical applications, we will transition to discussing biological nanosystems, how they work and what bioinspired engineering principles can be derived, to finally discussing biomedical applications and potential health risk issues. Scientific aspects as well as the many of the emerging technologies will be covered that start impacting so many aspects of our lives. This includes new phenomena in physics, advanced materials, novel technologies and new methods to address major medical challenges.
Lecture notesAll the enrolled students will get access to a password protected website where they can find pdf files of the lecture notes, and typically 1-2 journal articles per lecture that cover selected topics.
376-1714-00LBiocompatible MaterialsW4 credits3GK. Maniura, J. Möller, M. Zenobi-Wong
AbstractIntroduction to molecules used for biomaterials, molecular interactions between different materials and biological systems (molecules, cells, tissues). The concept of biocompatibility is discussed and important techniques from biomaterials research and development are introduced.
ObjectiveThe class consists of three parts:
1. Introdcution into molecular characteristics of molecules involved in the materials-to-biology interface. Molecular design of biomaterials.
2. The concept of biocompatibility.
3. Introduction into methodology used in biomaterials research and application.
ContentIntroduction into native and polymeric biomaterials used for medical applications. The concepts of biocompatibility, biodegradation and the consequences of degradation products are discussed on the molecular level. Different classes of materials with respect to potential applications in tissue engineering and drug delivery are introduced. Strong focus lies on the molecular interactions between materials having very different bulk and/or surface chemistry with living cells, tissues and organs. In particular the interface between the materials surfaces and the eukaryotic cell surface and possible reactions of the cells with an implant material are elucidated. Techniques to design, produce and characterize materials in vitro as well as in vivo analysis of implanted and explanted materials are discussed.
In addition, a link between academic research and industrial entrepreneurship is established by external guest speakers.
Lecture notesHandouts can be accessed online.
LiteratureLiteratur
Biomaterials Science: An Introduction to Materials in Medicine, Ratner B.D. et al, 3rd Edition, 2013
Comprehensive Biomaterials, Ducheyne P. et al., 1st Edition, 2011

(available online via ETH library)

Handouts provided during the classes and references therin.
636-0003-00LBiological Engineering and BiotechnologyW6 credits3VM. Fussenegger
AbstractBiological Engineering and Biotechnology will cover the latest biotechnological advances as well as their industrial implementation to engineer mammalian cells for use in human therapy. This lecture will provide forefront insights into key scientific aspects and the main points in industrial decision-making to bring a therapeutic from target to market.
Objective1. Insight Into The Mammalian Cell Cycle. Cycling, The Balance Between Proliferation and Cancer - Implications For Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing. 2. The Licence To Kill. Apoptosis Regulatory Networks - Engineering of Survival Pathways To Increase Robustness of Production Cell Lines. 3. Everything Under Control I. Regulated Transgene Expression in Mammalian Cells - Facts and Future. 4. Secretion Engineering. The Traffic Jam getting out of the Cell. 5. From Target To Market. An Antibody's Journey From Cell Culture to The Clinics. 6. Biology and Malign Applications. Do Life Sciences Enable the Development of Biological Weapons? 7. Functional Food. Enjoy your Meal! 8. Industrial Genomics. Getting a Systems View on Nutrition and Health - An Industrial Perspective. 9. IP Management - Food Technology. Protecting Your Knowledge For Business. 10. Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing I. Introduction to Process Development. 11. Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing II. Up- stream Development. 12. Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing III. Downstream Development. 13. Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing IV. Pharma Development.
Lecture notesHandsout during the course.
Practical Work
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
465-0800-00LPractical Work Restricted registration - show details
Only for MAS in Medical Physics
O4 creditsexternal organisers
AbstractThe practical work is designed to train the students in the solution of a specific problem and provides insights in the field of the selected MAS specialization. Tutors propose the subject of the project, the project plan, and the roadmap together with the student, as well as monitor the overall execution.
ObjectiveThe practical work is aimed at training the student’s capability to apply and connect specific skills acquired during the MAS specialization program towards the solution of a focused problem.
Electives
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0604-00LMicrorobotics Information
Does not take place this semester.
W4 credits3GB. Nelson
AbstractMicrorobotics is an interdisciplinary field that combines aspects of robotics, micro and nanotechnology, biomedical engineering, and materials science. The aim of this course is to expose students to the fundamentals of this emerging field. Throughout the course students are expected to submit assignments. The course concludes with an end-of-semester examination.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to expose students to the fundamental aspects of the emerging field of microrobotics. This includes a focus on physical laws that predominate at the microscale, technologies for fabricating small devices, bio-inspired design, and applications of the field.
ContentMain topics of the course include:
- Scaling laws at micro/nano scales
- Electrostatics
- Electromagnetism
- Low Reynolds number flows
- Observation tools
- Materials and fabrication methods
- Applications of biomedical microrobots
Lecture notesThe powerpoint slides presented in the lectures will be made available in hardcopy and as pdf files. Several readings will also be made available electronically.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture will be taught in English.
227-0386-00LBiomedical Engineering Information W4 credits3GJ. Vörös, S. J. Ferguson, S. Kozerke, U. Moser, M. Rudin, M. P. Wolf, M. Zenobi-Wong
AbstractIntroduction into selected topics of biomedical engineering as well as their relationship with physics and physiology. The focus is on learning the concepts that govern common medical instruments and the most important organs from an engineering point of view. In addition, the most recent achievements and trends of the field of biomedical engineering are also outlined.
ObjectiveIntroduction into selected topics of biomedical engineering as well as their relationship with physics and physiology. The course provides an overview of the various topics of the different tracks of the biomedical engineering master course and helps orienting the students in selecting their specialized classes and project locations.
ContentIntroduction into neuro- and electrophysiology. Functional analysis of peripheral nerves, muscles, sensory organs and the central nervous system. Electrograms, evoked potentials. Audiometry, optometry. Functional electrostimulation: Cardiac pacemakers. Function of the heart and the circulatory system, transport and exchange of substances in the human body, pharmacokinetics. Endoscopy, medical television technology. Lithotripsy. Electrical Safety. Orthopaedic biomechanics. Lung function. Bioinformatics and Bioelectronics. Biomaterials. Biosensors. Microcirculation.Metabolism.
Practical and theoretical exercises in small groups in the laboratory.
Lecture notesIntroduction to Biomedical Engineering
by Enderle, Banchard, and Bronzino

AND

https://www1.ethz.ch/lbb/Education/BME
327-1101-00LBiomineralization Information W2 credits2GK.‑H. Ernst
AbstractThe course addresses undergraduate and graduate students interested in getting introduced into the basic concepts of biomineralization.
ObjectiveThe course aims to introduce the basic concepts of biomineralization and the underlying principles, such as supersaturation, nucleation and growth of minerals, the interaction of biomolecules with mineral surfaces, and cell biology of inorganic materials creation. An important part of this class is the independent study and the presentation of original literature from the field.
ContentBiomineralization is a multidisciplinary field. Topics dealing with biology, molecular and cell biology, solid state physics, mineralogy, crystallography, organic and physical chemistry, biochemistry, dentistry, oceanography, geology, etc. are addressed. The course covers definition and general concepts of biomineralization (BM)/ types of biominerals and their function / crystal nucleation and growth / biological induction of BM / control of crystal morphology, habit, shape and orientation by organisms / strategies of compartmentalization / the interface between biomolecules (peptides, polysaccharides) and the mineral phase / modern experimental methods for studying BM phenomena / inter-, intra, extra- and epicellular BM / organic templates and matrices for BM / structure of bone, teeth (vertebrates and invertebrates) and mollusk shells / calcification / silification in diatoms, radiolaria and plants / calcium and iron storage / impact of BM on lithosphere and atmosphere/ evolution / taxonomy of organisms.

1. Introduction and overview
2. Biominerals and their functions
3. Chemical control of biomineralization
4. Control of morphology: Organic templates and additives
5. Modern methods of investigation of BM
6. BM in matrices: bone and nacre
7. Vertebrate teeth
8. Invertebrate teeth
9. BM within vesicles: calcite of coccoliths
10. Silica
11. Iron storage and mineralization
Lecture notesScript with more than 600 pages with many illustrations will be distributed free of charge.
Literature1) S. Mann, Biomineralization, Oxford University Press, 2001, Oxford, New York
2) H. Lowenstam, S. Weiner, On Biomineralization, Oxford University Press, 1989, Oxford
3) P. M. Dove, J. J. DeYoreo, S. Weiner (Eds.) Biomineralization, Reviews in Mineralogoy & Geochemistry Vol. 54, 2003
Prerequisites / NoticeEach attendee is required to present a publication from the field. The selection of key papers is provided by the lecturer.
No special requirements are needed for attending. Basic knowledge in chemistry and cell biology is expected.
376-1622-00LPractical Methods in Tissue Engineering Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 12.
W5 credits4PK. Würtz-Kozak, M. Zenobi-Wong
AbstractThe goal of this course is to teach MSc students the necessary skills for doing research in the fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.
ObjectivePractical exercises and demonstrations on topics including sterile cell culture, light microscopy and histology, protein and gene expression analysis, and viability assays are covered. The advantages of 3D cell cultures will be discussed and practical work on manufacturing and evaluating hydrogels and scaffolds for tissue engineering will be performed in small groups. In addition to practical lab work, the course will teach skills in data acquisition/analysis.
402-0674-00LPhysics in Medical Research: From Atoms to Cells Information W6 credits2V + 1UB. K. R. Müller
AbstractScanning probe and diffraction techniques allow studying activated atomic processes during early stages of epitaxial growth. For quantitative description, rate equation analysis, mean-field nucleation and scaling theories are applied on systems ranging from simple metallic to complex organic materials. The knowledge is expanded to optical and electronic properties as well as to proteins and cells.
ObjectiveThe lecture series is motivated by an overview covering the skin of the crystals, roughness analysis, contact angle measurements, protein absorption/activity and monocyte behaviour.

As the first step, real structures on clean surfaces including surface reconstructions and surface relaxations, defects in crystals are presented, before the preparation of clean metallic, semiconducting, oxidic and organic surfaces are introduced.

The atomic processes on surfaces are activated by the increase of the substrate temperature. They can be studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The combination with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) allows determining the sizes of the critical nuclei and the other activated processes in a hierarchical fashion. The evolution of the surface morphology is characterized by the density and size distribution of the nanostructures that could be quantified by means of the rate equation analysis, the mean-field nucleation theory, as well as the scaling theory. The surface morphology is further characterized by defects and nanostructure's shapes, which are based on the strain relieving mechanisms and kinetic growth processes.

High-resolution electron diffraction is complementary to scanning probe techniques and provides exact mean values. Some phenomena are quantitatively described by the kinematic theory and perfectly understood by means of the Ewald construction. Other phenomena need to be described by the more complex dynamical theory. Electron diffraction is not only associated with elastic scattering but also inelastic excitation mechanisms that reflect the electronic structure of the surfaces studied. Low-energy electrons lead to phonon and high-energy electrons to plasmon excitations. Both effects are perfectly described by dipole and impact scattering.

Thin-films of rather complex organic materials are often quantitatively characterized by photons with a broad range of wavelengths from ultra-violet to infra-red light. Asymmetries and preferential orientations of the (anisotropic) molecules are verified using the optical dichroism and second harmonic generation measurements. These characterization techniques are vital for optimizing the preparation of medical implants and the determination of tissue's anisotropies within the human body.

Cell-surface interactions are related to the cell adhesion and the contractile cellular forces. Physical means have been developed to quantify these interactions. Other physical techniques are introduced in cell biology, namely to count and sort cells, to study cell proliferation and metabolism and to determine the relation between cell morphology and function.

3D scaffolds are important for tissue augmentation and engineering. Design, preparation methods, and characterization of these highly porous 3D microstructures are also presented.

Visiting clinical research in a leading university hospital will show the usefulness of the lecture series.
535-0423-00LDrug Delivery and Drug TargetingW2 credits2VJ.‑C. Leroux, D. Brambilla
AbstractThe students gain an overview on current principles, methodologies and systems for controlled delivery and targeting of drugs. This enables the students to understand and evaluate the field in terms of scientific criteria.
ObjectiveThe students dispose of an overview on current principles and systems for the controlled delivery and targeting of drugs. The focus of the course lies on developing a capacity to understand the involved technologies and methods, as well as an appreciation of the chances and constraints of their therapeutic usage, with prime attention on anticancer drugs, therapeutic peptides, proteins, nucleic acids and vaccines.
ContentThe course covers the following topics: drug targeting and delivery principles, radiopharmaceuticals, macromolecular drug carriers, liposomes, micelles, micro/nanoparticles, gels and implants, administration of vaccines, delivery of active agents in tissue engineeering, targeting at the gastrointestinal level, synthetic carriers for nucleic acid drugs, ophthalmic devices and novel trends in transdermal and nasal drug delivery.
Lecture notesSelected lecture notes, documents and supporting material will be directly provided or may be downloaded using

http://www.galenik.ethz.ch/teaching/drug_del_drug_targ

The website also displays additional information on peroral delivery systems, transdermal systems and systems for alternative routes (nasal, pulmonary) of delivery. These fields are covered in detail in the course Galenische Pharmazie II (Galenical Pharmacy II).
LiteratureY. Perrie, T. Rhades. Pharmaceutics - Drug Delivery and Targeting, second edition, Pharmaceutical Press, London and Chicago, 2012.

Further references will be provided in the course.
551-1295-00LIntroduction to Bioinformatics: Concepts and Applications Information W6 credits4GW. Gruissem, K. Bärenfaller, A. Caflisch, G. Capitani, J. Fütterer, M. Robinson, A. Wagner
AbstractStorage, handling and analysis of large datasets have become essential in biological research. The course will introduce students to a number of applications of bioinformatics in biology. Freely accessible software tools and databases will be explained and explored in theory and praxis.
ObjectiveIntroduction to Bioinformatics I: Concepts and Applications (formerly Bioinformatics I) will provide students with the theoretical background of approaches to store and retrieve information from large databases. Concepts will be developed how DNA sequence information can be used to understand phylogentic relationships, how RNA sequence relates to structure, and how protein sequence information can be used for genome annotation and to predict protein folding and structure. Students will be introduced to quantitative methods for measuring gene expression and how this information can be used to model gene networks. Methods will be discussed to construct protein interaction maps and how this information can be used to simulate dynamic molecular networks.

In addition to the theoretical background, the students will develop hands-on experiences with the bioinformatics methods through guided exercises. The course provides students from different backgrounds with basic training in bioinformatics approaches that have impact on biological, chemical and physics experimentation. Bioinformatics approaches draw significant expertise from mathematics, statistics and computational science.

Although "Intoduction to Bioinformatics I" will focus on theory and praxis of bioinformatics approaches, the course provides an important foundation for the course "Introduction to Bioinformatics II: Fundamentals of computer science, modeling and algorithms" that will be offered in the following semester.
ContentBioinformatics I will cover the following topics:

From genes to databases and information
BLAST searches
Prediction of gene function and regulation
RNA structure prediction
Gene expression analysis using microarrays
Protein sequence and structure databases
WWW for bioinformatics
Protein sequence comparisons
Proteomics and de novo protein sequencing
Protein structure prediction
Cellular and protein interaction networks
Molecular dynamics simulation
Major in Bioelectronics
Core Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0604-00LMicrorobotics Information
Does not take place this semester.
W4 credits3GB. Nelson
AbstractMicrorobotics is an interdisciplinary field that combines aspects of robotics, micro and nanotechnology, biomedical engineering, and materials science. The aim of this course is to expose students to the fundamentals of this emerging field. Throughout the course students are expected to submit assignments. The course concludes with an end-of-semester examination.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to expose students to the fundamental aspects of the emerging field of microrobotics. This includes a focus on physical laws that predominate at the microscale, technologies for fabricating small devices, bio-inspired design, and applications of the field.
ContentMain topics of the course include:
- Scaling laws at micro/nano scales
- Electrostatics
- Electromagnetism
- Low Reynolds number flows
- Observation tools
- Materials and fabrication methods
- Applications of biomedical microrobots
Lecture notesThe powerpoint slides presented in the lectures will be made available in hardcopy and as pdf files. Several readings will also be made available electronically.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture will be taught in English.
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