Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2019

Health Sciences and Technology Master Information
Major in Human Movement Science and Sport
Electives
Elective Courses II
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
376-1397-00LOrthopaedic Biomechanics Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 48.
W3 credits2GR. Müller, P. Atkins
AbstractThis course is aimed at studying the mechanical and structural engineering of the musculoskeletal system alongside the analysis and design of orthopaedic solutions to musculoskeletal failure.
ObjectiveTo apply engineering and design principles to orthopaedic biomechanics, to quantitatively assess the musculoskeletal system and model it, and to review rigid-body dynamics in an interesting context.
ContentEngineering principles are very important in the development and application of quantitative approaches in biology and medicine. This course includes a general introduction to structure and function of the musculoskeletal system: anatomy and physiology of musculoskeletal tissues and joints; biomechanical methods to assess and quantify tissues and large joint systems. These methods will also be applied to musculoskeletal failure, joint replacement and reconstruction; implants; biomaterials and tissue engineering.
Lecture notesStored on ILIAS.
LiteratureOrthopaedic Biomechanics:
Mechanics and Design in Musculoskeletal Systems

Authors: Donald L. Bartel, Dwight T. Davy, Tony M. Keaveny
Publisher: Prentice Hall; Copyright: 2007
ISBN-10: 0130089095; ISBN-13: 9780130089090
Prerequisites / NoticeLectures will be given in English.
376-1400-00LTransfer of Technologies into Neurorehabilitation Restricted registration - show details W3 credits2VC. Müller, R. Gassert, R. Riener, H. Van Hedel, N. Wenderoth
AbstractThe course focuses on clinical as well as industrial aspects of advanced technologies and their transfer into neurorehabilitation from both theoretical and practical perspectives. The students will learn the basics of neurorehabilitation and the linkage to technologies, gain insight into the development within the medtech field and learn applications of technologies in clinical settings.
ObjectiveThe students will:
- Learn basics and principles of clinical neuroscience and neurorehabilitation.
- Gain insight into the technical basics of advanced technologies and the transfer into product development processes.
- Gain insight into the application, the development and integration of advanced technologies in clinical settings. This includes the advantages and limitations according to different pathologies and therapy goals.
- Get the opportunity to test advanced technologies in practical settings.
- Learn how to transfer theoretical concepts to actual settings in different working fields.
ContentMain focus:
- Neurobiological principles applied to the field of neurorehabilitation.
- Clinical applications of advanced rehabilitation technologies.
- Visit medical technology companies, rehabilitation centers and labs to gain deeper insight into the development, application and evaluation of advanced technologie
Lecture notesTeaching materials will be provided for the individual events and lectures.
- Slides (pdf files)
- Information sheets and flyers of the visited companies, labs and clinics
376-1620-00LSkeletal Repair Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 42.

Only for Health Sciences and Technology MSc and Biomedical Engineering MSc.
W3 credits3GS. Grad, D. Eglin, F. Moriarty, M. Stoddart
AbstractThe course gives an introduction into traumatic and degenerative pathologies of skeletal tissues. Emphasis is put on bone, cartilage and intervertebral disc. Established and new treatments are described, including cell, gene and molecular therapy, biomaterials, tissue engineering and infection prevention. In vitro/in vivo models are explained.
ObjectiveThe objectives of this course are to acquire a basic understanding of
(1) important pathologies of skeletal tissues and their consequences for the patient and the public health
(2) current surgical approaches for skeletal repair, their advantages and drawbacks
(3) recent advances in biological strategies for skeletal repair, such as (stem) cell therapy, gene therapy, biomaterials and tissue engineering
(4) pathology, prevention and treatment of implant associated infections
(5) in vitro and in vivo models for basic, translational and pre-clinical studies
ContentAccording to the expected background knowledge, the cellular and extracellular composition and the structure of the skeletal tissues, including bone, cartilage, intervertebral disc, ligament and tendon will briefly be recapitulated. The functions of the healthy tissues and the impact of acute injury (e.g. bone fracture) or progressive degenerative failure (e.g. osteoarthritis) will be demonstrated. Physiological self-repair mechanisms, their limitations, and current (surgical) treatment options will be outlined. Particular emphasis will be put on novel approaches for biological repair or regeneration of critical bone defects, damaged hyaline cartilage of major articulating joints, and degenerative intervertebral disc tissues. These new treatment options include autologous cell therapies, stem cell applications, bioactive factors, gene therapy, biomaterials or biopolymers; while tissue engineering / regenerative medicine is considered as a combination of some of these factors. In vitro bioreactor systems and in vivo animal models will be described for preclinical testing of newly developed materials and techniques. Bacterial infection as a major complication of invasive treatment will be explained, covering also established and new methods for its effective inhibition. Finally, the translation of new therapies for skeletal repair from the laboratory to the clinical application will be illustrated by recent developments.
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowledge in the cellular and molecular composition, structure and function of healthy skeletal tissues, especially bone, cartilage and intervertebral disc are required; furthermore, basic understanding of biomaterial properties, cell-surface interactions, and bacterial infection are necessary to follow this course.
376-1624-00LPractical Methods in Biofabrication Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 12.
W5 credits4PM. Zenobi-Wong, S. Schürle-Finke, K. Würtz-Kozak
AbstractBiofabrication involves the assembly of materials, cells, and biological building blocks into grafts for tissue engineering and in vitro models. The student learns techniques involving the fabrication and characterization of tissue engineered scaffolds and the design of 3D models based on medical imaging data. They apply this knowledge to design, manufacture and evaluate a biofabricated graft.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to give students hands-on experience with the tools required to fabricate tissue engineered grafts. During the first part of this course, students will gain practical knowledge in hydrogel synthesis and characterization, fuse deposition modelling and stereolithography, bioprinting and bioink design, electrospinning, and cell culture and viability testing. They will also learn the properties of common biocompatible materials used in fabrication and how to select materials based on the application requirements. The students learn principles for design of 3D models. Finally the students will apply their knowledge to a problem-based project.
Prerequisites / NoticeNot recommended if passed 376-1622-00 Practical Methods in Tissue Engineering
376-1721-00LBone Biology and Consequences for Human HealthW2 credits2VG. A. Kuhn, J. Goldhahn, E. Wehrle
AbstractBone is a complex tissue that continuously adapts to mechanical and metabolic demands. Failure of this remodeling results in reduced mechanic stability ot the skeleton. This course will provide the basic knowledge to understand the biology and pathophysiology of bone necessary for engineering of bone tissue and design of implants.
ObjectiveAfter completing this course, students will be able to understand:
a) the biological and mechanical aspects of normal bone remodeling
b) pathological changes and their consequences for the musculoskeletal system
c) the consequences for implant design, tissue engineering and treatment interventions.
ContentBone adapts continuously to mechanical and metabolic demands by complex remodeling processes. This course will deal with biological processes in bone tissue from cell to tissue level. This lecture will cover mechanisms of bone building (anabolic side), bone resorption (catabolic side), their coupling, and regulation mechanisms. It will also cover pathological changes and typical diseases like osteoporosis. Consequences for musculoskeletal health and their clinical relevance will be discussed. Requirements for tissue engineering as well as implant modification will be presented. Actual examples from research and development will be utilized for illustration.
376-1724-00LAppropriate Health System Design Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 42.
W3 credits2VW. Karlen
AbstractThis course elaborates upon relevant aspects in the conception, implementation and distribution of health devices and systems that effectively meet peoples and societies' needs in a local context. Four key elements of appropriateness (usage, cost, durability and performance) that are integral to the engineering design process are extensively discussed and applied.
ObjectiveThe main goals are to
> Evaluate the appropriateness of health systems to the cultural, financial, environmental and medical context in which they will be applied
and
> Design health systems from a user's perspective for a specific context

At the end of the course, students can
> name, understand and describe the 4 main principles that define appropriate technology
> apply these principles to critically analyze and assess health systems and technology
> project him/herself into a unfamiliar person and context and create hypotheses as to that person's needs, requirements, and priorities
> modify specifications of existing systems to improve appropriateness
> discuss the challenges and illustrate the the ethical and societal consequences of proposed design modifications
> communicate effectively the results of his/her system analysis and implementation strategies to non-specialists
ContentThe course will be interactive and involve roleplay. Please do not sign up for this course if you are not ready to leave your comfort zone in class. The lectures are divided in two parts:
The first part elaborates upon the important concepts of the design of health care devices and systems, and discusses implementation and dissemination strategies. We focus on communities such as low income households, the elderly, and patients with chronic illnesses that have special needs. Topics covered include point-of-care diagnostics, information and communication technologies, mobile health, user interactions, and also the social-cultural considerations.
The second part consists of elaboration of an appropriate device conducted by student groups. Each group will analyse an existing product or solution, critically assess its appropriateness according to the criteria learned in class, and provide explanations as to why the system succeeds or fails. The students will also present design improvements. Grading will be based on a written case report due in the middle of the semester and a final seminar presentation in form of a poster discussion and demo.
LiteratureWHO, "Medical Devices: Managing the Mismatch", 2010.
http://www.who.int/medical_devices/publications/med_dev_man-mismatch/en/

PATH, "The IC2030 report. Reimagining Global Health," 2015. http://ic2030.org/report/

R. Malkin and K. Von Oldenburg Beer, "Diffusion of novel healthcare technologies to resource poor settings," Annals of Biomedical Engineering, vol. 41, no. 9, pp. 1841:50, 2013.
Prerequisites / NoticeTarget Group:
Students of higher semesters and doctoral students of
- D-MAVT, D-ITET, D-INFK, D-HEST
- Biomedical Engineering, Robotics, Systems and Control
- Medical Faculty, University of Zurich
Students of other departments, faculties, courses are also welcome
376-1974-00LColloquium in Biomechanics Information W2 credits2KB. Helgason, S. J. Ferguson, R. Müller, J. G. Snedeker, B. Taylor, K. Würtz-Kozak, M. Zenobi-Wong
AbstractCurrent topics in biomechanics presented by speakers from academia and industry.
ObjectiveGetting insight into actual areas and problems of biomechanics.
376-1986-00LBayesian Data Analysis on Models of Behavior
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at UZH.
UZH Module Code: DOEC0829

Mind the enrolment deadlines at UZH:
https://www.uzh.ch/cmsssl/en/studies/application/mobilitaet.html
W3 credits2SR. Polania, University lecturers
AbstractMaking sense of the data acquired via experiments is fundamental in many fields of sciences. This course is designed for students/researchers who want to gain practical experience with data analysis based on Bayesian inference. Coursework involves practical demonstrations and discussion of solutions for data analysis problems. No advanced knowledge of statistics and probability is required.
ObjectiveThe overall goal of this course it that the students are able to develop both analytic and problem-solving skills that will serve to draw reasonable inferences from observations. The first objective is to make the participants familiar with the conceptual framework of Bayesian data analysis. The second goal is to introduce the ideas of modern Bayesian data analysis, including techniques such as Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques, alongside the introduction of programming tools that facilitate the creation of any Bayesian inference model. Throughout the course, this will involve practical demonstrations with example datasets, homework, and discussions that should convince the participants of this course that it is possible to make inference and understand the data acquired from the experiments that they usually obtain in their own research (starting from simple linear regressions all the way up to more complex models with hierarchical structures and dependencies). After working through this course, the participants should be able to build their own inference models in order to interpret meaningfully their own data.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe very basics (or at least intuition) of programming in either Matlab or R
402-0673-00LPhysics in Medical Research: From Humans to CellsW6 credits2V + 1UB. K. R. Müller
AbstractThe aim of this lecture series is to introduce the role of physics in state-of-the-art medical research and clinical practice. Topics to be covered range from applications of physics in medical implant technology and tissue engineering, through imaging technology, to its role in interventional and non-interventional therapies.
ObjectiveThe lecture series is focused on applying knowledge from physics in diagnosis, planning, and therapy close to clinical practice and fundamental medical research. Beside a general overview, the lectures give a deep insight into a very few selected techniques, which will help the students to apply the knowledge to a broad range of related techniques.

In particular, the lectures will elucidate the physics behind the X-ray imaging currently used in clinical environment and contemporary high-resolution developments. It is the goal to visualize and quantify (sub-)microstructures of human tissues and implants as well as their interface.

Ultrasound is not only used for diagnostic purposes but includes therapeutic approaches such as the control of the blood-brain barrier under MR-guidance.

Physicists in medicine are working on modeling and simulation. Based on the vascular structure in cancerous and healthy tissues, the characteristic approaches in computational physics to develop strategies against cancer are presented. In order to deliberately destroy cancerous tissue, heat can be supplied or extracted in different manner: cryotherapy (heat conductivity in anisotropic, viscoelastic environment), radiofrequency treatment (single and multi-probe), laser application, and proton therapy.

Medical implants play an important role to take over well-defined tasks within the human body. Although biocompatibility is here of crucial importance, the term is insufficiently understood. The aim of the lectures is the understanding of biocompatibility performing well-defined experiments in vitro and in vivo. Dealing with different classes of materials (metals, ceramics, polymers) the influence of surface modifications (morphology and surface coatings) are key issues for implant developments, which might be bio-inspired.

Mechanical stimuli can drastically influence soft and hard tissue behavior. The students should realize that a physiological window exists, where a positive tissue response is expected and how the related parameter including strain, frequency, and resting periods can be selected and optimized for selected tissues such as bone.

For the treatment of severe incontinence, we are developing artificial smart muscles. The students should have a critical look at promising solutions and the selection procedure as well as realize the time-consuming and complex way to clinical practice.

The course will be completed by relating the numerous examples and a common round of questions.
ContentThis lecture series will cover the following topics:
Introduction: Imaging the human body down to individual cells and beyond
Development of artificial muscles for incontinence treatment
X-ray-based computed tomography in clinics and related medical research
High-resolution micro computed tomography
Phase tomography using hard X-rays in biomedical research
Metal-based implants and scaffolds
Natural and synthetic ceramics for implants and regenerative medicine
Biomedical simulations
Polymers for medical implants
From open surgery to non-invasive interventions - Physical approaches in medical imaging
Dental research
Focused Ultrasound and its clinical use
Applying physics in medicine: Benefitting patients
Lecture noteshttp://www.bmc.unibas.ch/education/ETH_Zurich.phtml

login and password to be provided during the lecture
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents from other departments are very welcome to join and gain insight into a variety of sophisticated techniques for the benefit of patients.
No special knowledge is required. Nevertheless, gaps in basic physical knowledge will require additional efforts.
535-0534-00LDrug, Society and Public HealthW1 credit1VJ. Steurer, R. Heusser
AbstractIntroduction of basic concepts and methods in Public Health, epidemiology, and Evidence Based Medicine. An overview on concepts and principles of clinical trials on efficacy of drugs
ObjectiveStudents know the concepts and principles of epidemiological and clinical research, they are informed about the principles of evidence based medicine and know how and where to search for evidence.
ContentEinführung in Epidemiologie / Pharmakoepidemiologie / Evidence-based Medicine: Grundbegriffe, Studiendesigns, object-design, statistische Grundlagen, Kausalität in der Pharmako-Epidemiologie, Methoden und Konzepte, Fallbeispiele.
Lecture notesWird abgegeben
Literature- F. Gutzwiller/ F. Paccaud (Hrsg.): Sozial- und Präventivmedizin - Public Health. 4. Aufl. 2011, Verlag Hans Huber, Bern
- R. Beaglehole, R. Bonita, T. Kjellström: Einführung in die Epidemiologie. 1997, Verlag Hans Huber, Bern
- L. Gordis: Epidemiology, 4 th Ed. 2009, W.B. Saunders Comp.
- K.J. Rothman, S. Greenland: Modern Epidemiology, 2. Ed. 1998, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
- A.G. Hartzema, M. Porta, H.H. Tilson (Eds.): Pharmacoepidemiology - An Introduction. 3. Ed. Harvey Whitney Comp., Cincinnati
- R. Bonita, R. Beaglehole. Einführung in die Epidemiologie, 2. überarbeitete Auflage, 2008 Huber Verlag.
- B.L. Strom (Eds.): Pharmacoepidemiology. 3. Ed. 2000, Wiley & Sons Ltd., Chichester
- S.E. Straus, W.S. Richardson, P.Glasziou, R.B. Haynes: Evidence-based Medicine. 2005, Churchill Livingstone, London
- U. Jaehde, R.Radziwill, S. Mühlebach, W. Schnack (Hrsg): Lehrbuch der Klinischen Pharmazie
- L.M. Bachmann, M.A. Puhan, J.Steurer (Eds.): Patientenorientierte Forschung. EInführung in die Planung und Durchführung einer Studie. Verlag Hans Huber, 2008
701-1704-01LHealth Impact Assessment: Concepts and Case StudiesW3 credits2VM. Winkler, C. Guéladio, M. Röösli, J. M. Utzinger
AbstractThis course introduces the concept of health impact assessment (HIA) and discusses a suite of case studies in industrialised and developing countries. HIA pursues an inter- and multidisciplinary approach, employs qualitative and quantitative methods with the overarching goal to influence decision-making.
ObjectiveAfter successful completion of the course, students should be able to:
o critically reflect on the concept of HIA and the different steps from screening to implementation and monitoring; and
o apply specific tools and methodologies for HIA of policies, programmes and projects in different social, ecological and epidemiological settings.
ContentThe course will present a broad set of tools and methods for the systematic and evidence-based judgment of potential health effects related to policies, programmes and projects. Methodological features will be introduced and applied to a variety of case studies in the public sector (e.g. traffic-related air pollution, passive smoking and waste water management) and private sector (e.g. water resource developments and extractive industries) all over the world.
Lecture notesHandouts will be distributed.
LiteratureWhenever possible, at least one peer-reviewed paper will be made available for each session.
Major in Human Health, Nutrition and Environment
Compulsory Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
376-0302-00LPracticing Translational Science Restricted registration - show details
Only for Health Sciences and Technology MSc.
O2 credits4AJ. Goldhahn, S. Ben-Menahem, C. Ewald, W. Karlen
AbstractTranslational Science is a cross disciplinary scientific research that is motivated by the need for practical applications that help patients. The students should apply knowledge they gained in the prior course during a team approach focused on one topic provided by the supervisor. Each student has to take a role in the team and label clear responsibility and contribution.
ObjectiveAfter completing this course, students will be able to apply:
a) Principles of translational science (including project planning, ethics application, basics of resource management and interdisciplinary communication)
b) The use of a translational approach in project planning and management
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite: lecture 376-0300-00 "Translational Science for Health and Medicine" passed.
Electives
Electives Courses I
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
376-1724-00LAppropriate Health System Design Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 42.
W3 credits2VW. Karlen
AbstractThis course elaborates upon relevant aspects in the conception, implementation and distribution of health devices and systems that effectively meet peoples and societies' needs in a local context. Four key elements of appropriateness (usage, cost, durability and performance) that are integral to the engineering design process are extensively discussed and applied.
ObjectiveThe main goals are to
> Evaluate the appropriateness of health systems to the cultural, financial, environmental and medical context in which they will be applied
and
> Design health systems from a user's perspective for a specific context

At the end of the course, students can
> name, understand and describe the 4 main principles that define appropriate technology
> apply these principles to critically analyze and assess health systems and technology
> project him/herself into a unfamiliar person and context and create hypotheses as to that person's needs, requirements, and priorities
> modify specifications of existing systems to improve appropriateness
> discuss the challenges and illustrate the the ethical and societal consequences of proposed design modifications
> communicate effectively the results of his/her system analysis and implementation strategies to non-specialists
ContentThe course will be interactive and involve roleplay. Please do not sign up for this course if you are not ready to leave your comfort zone in class. The lectures are divided in two parts:
The first part elaborates upon the important concepts of the design of health care devices and systems, and discusses implementation and dissemination strategies. We focus on communities such as low income households, the elderly, and patients with chronic illnesses that have special needs. Topics covered include point-of-care diagnostics, information and communication technologies, mobile health, user interactions, and also the social-cultural considerations.
The second part consists of elaboration of an appropriate device conducted by student groups. Each group will analyse an existing product or solution, critically assess its appropriateness according to the criteria learned in class, and provide explanations as to why the system succeeds or fails. The students will also present design improvements. Grading will be based on a written case report due in the middle of the semester and a final seminar presentation in form of a poster discussion and demo.
LiteratureWHO, "Medical Devices: Managing the Mismatch", 2010.
http://www.who.int/medical_devices/publications/med_dev_man-mismatch/en/

PATH, "The IC2030 report. Reimagining Global Health," 2015. http://ic2030.org/report/

R. Malkin and K. Von Oldenburg Beer, "Diffusion of novel healthcare technologies to resource poor settings," Annals of Biomedical Engineering, vol. 41, no. 9, pp. 1841:50, 2013.
Prerequisites / NoticeTarget Group:
Students of higher semesters and doctoral students of
- D-MAVT, D-ITET, D-INFK, D-HEST
- Biomedical Engineering, Robotics, Systems and Control
- Medical Faculty, University of Zurich
Students of other departments, faculties, courses are also welcome
363-1066-00LDesigning Effective Projects for Promoting Health@Work Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30.
W3 credits2GG. Bauer, R. Brauchli, G. J. Jenny
AbstractThe fast changing, flexible and performance-oriented economy implies increasing challenges and opportunities for the health of employees. Creating good working conditions and promoting healthy lifestyles of employees becomes more and more important for employers and employees. Students learn how to develop an effective, real-life project of their choice to promote health@work.
ObjectiveStudents become familiar with challenges and opportunities of a changing world of work. They get an overview of intervention approaches and principles in the fields of worksite health promotion as well as work and organizational psychology. On this basis, they learn how to develop an effective, real life worksite health promotion project of their choice – addressing lifestyle factors or working conditions.
During the project work, they learn to follow the typical phases of selecting/framing a relevant work-related health issue, conducting an analysis, formulating smart objectives, developing a realistic action plan, estimating the time and money needed for these actions, and finally evaluating the impact of the project. This will strengthen their general project management skills.
Students will know how to apply key quality criteria of health promotion projects: 1.) how to follow a systematic, evidence-based approach (project management), 2.) how to assure involvement of and thus acceptance by the users (participation), 3.) how to consider both individual, lifestyle-related and organizational, work-related factors (comprehensiveness), and 4.) how to integrate the project into the routine of the organization to assure sustainability (integration). This will increase the impact of future health promotion projects developed by the students.
D-MTEC students will be able to systematically address employee health and performance in their future management practice. D-HEST students will be able to apply their health promotion knowledge to the challenging context of corporations. D-USYS students will be able to consider lifestyle factors and the working environment in their future work. The exchange among these interdisciplinary student groups will foster their ability to solve real life problems in a transdisciplinary manner. Finally, students get acquainted how to design their future work in a health promoting way.
Content1. Challenges in health@work and intervention approaches
2. Lifestyle interventions at work incl. digital tools
3. Personal and organizational strategies for promoting healthy work
4. Core concepts, values and principles in promoting health@work;
introduction to project work & 7-pillar planning model
5. Framing and analysis of health@work issues
6. Participatory priority setting in health@work projects and defining outcome objectives
7. Combining levels of interventions and defining process objectives
8. Project management
9. Evaluation of process and outcomes
10. Preparation* & presentation of posters of group work

Each lecture combines an input by an expert in the respective field and group discussions. During 8 sessions students will directly apply the acquired knowledge to an own, individual project on a self-chosen topic on health@work. Tutors closely support the students in designing their projects. During the last two dates, the students present their projects to the entire class in a poster format. This presentation will be commented by the course leader and serves as the final course assessment.
Prerequisites / NoticeA course for students dedicated to applied learning through projects. As the whole course is designed as a hands-on workshop for the students, active participation in all lectures is expected. Class size limited to 30 students.
752-6104-00LNutrition for Health and DevelopmentW2 credits2VM. B. Zimmermann
AbstractThe course presents nutrition and health issues with a special focus on developing countries. Micronutrient deficiencies including assessment and prevalence and food fortification with micronutrients.
ObjectiveKnowing commonly used nutrition and health indicators to evaluate the nutritional status of populations. Knowing and evaluating nutritional problems in developing countries. Understanding the problem of micronutrient deficiencies and the principles of food fortification with micronutrients.
ContentThe course presents regional and global aspects and status of food security and commonly used nutrition and health indicators. Child growth, childhood malnutrition and the interaction of nutrition and infectious diseases in developing countries. Specific nutritional problems in emergencies. The assessment methods and the prevalence of micronutrient deficiencies at regional and global level. The principles of food fortification with micronutrients and examples fortification programs.
Lecture notesThe lecture details are available.
LiteratureLeathers and Foster, The world food problem, Tackling the causes of undernutrition in the third world. 3rd ed., 2004. Semba and Bloem, Nutrition and health in developing countries, 2nd edition, Humana Press, 2008. WHO, FAO, Guidelines on food fortification with micronutrients, WHO, 2006.
Elective Courses II
Module: Infectious Diseases
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-1708-00LInfectious Disease DynamicsW4 credits2VS. Bonhoeffer, R. D. Kouyos, R. R. Regös, T. Stadler
AbstractThis course introduces into current research on the population biology of infectious diseases. The course discusses the most important mathematical tools and their application to relevant diseases of human, natural or managed populations.
ObjectiveAttendees will learn about:
* the impact of important infectious pathogens and their evolution on human, natural and managed populations
* the population biological impact of interventions such as treatment or vaccination
* the impact of population structure on disease transmission

Attendees will learn how:
* the emergence spread of infectious diseases is described mathematically
* the impact of interventions can be predicted and optimized with mathematical models
* population biological models are parameterized from empirical data
* genetic information can be used to infer the population biology of the infectious disease

The course will focus on how the formal methods ("how") can be used to derive biological insights about the host-pathogen system ("about").
ContentAfter an introduction into the history of infectious diseases and epidemiology the course will discuss basic epidemiological models and the mathematical methods of their analysis. We will then discuss the population dynamical effects of intervention strategies such as vaccination and treatment. In the second part of the course we will introduce into more advanced topics such as the effect of spatial population structure, explicit contact structure, host heterogeneity, and stochasticity. In the final part of the course we will introduce basic concepts of phylogenetic analysis in the context of infectious diseases.
Lecture notesSlides and script of the lecture will be available online.
LiteratureThe course is not based on any of the textbooks below, but they are excellent choices as accompanying material:
* Keeling & Rohani, Modeling Infectious Diseases in Humans and Animals, Princeton Univ Press 2008
* Anderson & May, Infectious Diseases in Humans, Oxford Univ Press 1990
* Murray, Mathematical Biology, Springer 2002/3
* Nowak & May, Virus Dynamics, Oxford Univ Press 2000
* Holmes, The Evolution and Emergence of RNA Viruses, Oxford Univ Press 2009
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowledge of population dynamics and population genetics as well as linear algebra and analysis will be an advantage.
Module: Nutrition and Health
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
752-1300-00LIntroduction to ToxicologyW3 credits2VR. Eggen, S. J. Sturla
AbstractIntroduction to how chemical properties and biological interactions govern the disposition and influences of toxicants.
ObjectiveThe objectives are for the student to establish a framework for examining adverse effects resulting from exposures to toxicants by understanding key mechanisms that give rise to toxic responses and disease processes.
ContentThis course will introduce mechanisms governing the chemical disposition and biological influences of toxicants. The course is geared toward advanced bachelors students in food science, environmental science, and related disciplines, such as chemistry, biology and pharmaceutical sciences. Examples of topics include: dose-response relationships and risk assessment, absorption, transport, and biotransformation of xenobiotic chemicals; Carcinogenesis; DNA damage, repair, and mutation; Immunotoxicity; Neurotoxicity; and modern toxicity testing strategies. These fundamental concepts in Mechanistic Toxicology will be integrated with examples of toxicants relevant to food, drugs and the environment.
LiteratureCasarett & Doull's Toxicology, The Basic Science of Poisons. Seventh Edition. Editor: Curtis D. Klaassen, 2008, McGraw-Hill. (available on-line)
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowledge of organic chemistry and biochemistry is required.
752-1300-01LFood Toxicology Information W2 credits1VS. J. Sturla, N. Antczak
AbstractBuilds on a foundation in Toxicology fundamentals to address situations and toxins relevant to Food Science, Nutrition, and Food Safety & Quality.
ObjectiveCourse objectives are for the student to have a broad awareness of toxicant classes and toxicants relevant to food, and to know their identities (i.e. chemical structure or biological nature), origins, relevance of human exposures, general mode of biological action, and potential mitigation strategies.
ContentBuilds on a foundation in Toxicology fundamentals to address situations relevant to Food Science, Nutrition, and Food Safety & Quality. Representative topics: Toxic Phytochemicals and Mycotoxins, Industrial Contaminants and Packaging Materials, Toxicants formed During Food Processing, Alcohol and Tobacco. The class is comprised of bi-weekly lectures, independent reading, and preparation of an independent evaluation of a food-related toxin.
LiteratureReading from the primary literature will be referenced in class and posted to the course website.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course "Introduction to Toxicology" (752-1300-00V) is a prerequisite for the students who want to take this course. Equivalent course may be accepted; contact the instructor.
752-6102-00LThe Role of Food and Nutrition for Disease PreventionW3 credits2VM. Andersson
AbstractThe course teaches the links between the diet and the etiology and progression of chronic diseases.
ObjectiveTo examine and understand the protective effects of foods and food ingredients in the maintenance of health and the prevention of chronic disease, as well as the progression of complications of chronic diseases.
ContentThe course evaluates food and nutrition in relation to primary and secondary prevention of chronic diseases.
Lecture notesThere is no script. Powerpoint presentations and relevant literature will be made available online to students.
LiteratureObligatory course literature to be provided by the responsible lecturer and the individual invited lecturers.
Prerequisites / NoticeNo compulsory prerequisites, but prior completion of Introduction to Nutritional Science (752-6001-00L) and Advanced Topics in Nutritional Science (752-6002-00L) is strongly adviced.
752-6302-00LPhysiology of Eating Information W3 credits2VW. Langhans
AbstractIntroduction to the basic knowledge necessary for an understanding of the physiology and pathology of hunger, satiety, and body weight control, how this knowledge is generated, and how it helps improve nutritional advice for healthy people as well as nutritional guidelines for patients.
ObjectiveThis course requires basic knowledge in physiology and is designed to build on course HE03 “Selected Topics in Physiology Related to Nutrition.” The course covers psychological and physiological determinants of food selection and amount eaten. The aim is to introduce the students to (a) the basic knowledge necessary for an understanding of the physiology and pathology of hunger, satiety, and body weight control, (b) how new scientific knowledge in this area is generated, (c) how this basic knowledge helps improve nutritional advice for healthy people as well as nutritional guidelines for patients. Major topics are: Basic scientific concepts for the physiological study of eating in animals and humans; the psychopharmacology of reward; endocrine and metabolic controls of eating; the neural control of eating; psychological aspects of eating; eating behavior and energy balance; exercise, eating and body weight; popular diets and their evaluation; epidemiology, clinical features and the treatment of psychiatric eating disorders; epidemiology, clinical features and the treatment of obesity, including related aspects of non-insulin dependent diabetes; mechanisms of cachexia and anorexia during illness; exogenous factors that influence eating, including pharmaceutical drugs, alcohol, coffee, etc.
Lecture notesHandouts will be provided
LiteratureLiterature will be discussed in class
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