Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2021

Architecture Bachelor Information
Bachelor Studies (Programme Regulations 2017)
Architectural Design
Architectural Design (4. Semester)
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
052-0546-21LArchitectural Design IV: "Small Pleasures of Life" (A.Spiro) Information
Please register (www.mystudies.ethz.ch) only after the internal enrolment for the design classes (see http://www.einschreibung.arch.ethz.ch/design.php).
Students who do not wish to change the design class don't have to participate in the internal enrolment.

Project grading at semester end is based on the list of enrolments on 2nd April 2021, 24:00 h (valuation date) only. Deleting or enrolling after the aforementioned date is prohibited!
W14 credits2V + 14UD. Mettler, A. Spiro, E. Christ, T. Crowther, T. Emerson, C. Gantenbein, D. Studer
AbstractWe design residential buildings in the urban context of the city of Zurich. From a selection of construction sites, you determine the best suited for your project and develop a specific form of living right down to the materialization in detail. Inspirational buildings, whose architectural elements and spatial situations are the inspiration for your living ideas, serve as the starting point.
Objective- Design of an urban residential building with a specific form of living that relates to the context
- Getting to know standards and typologies in residential construction
- Anchoring the project in urban space through intensive analysis of the access from the street to the apartment, development of your own access idea including the entrance situation
- Taking a stance on the ground floor in the city dwelling
- Understanding of the relationship between space, structure, construction and detail
- Development of a spatial and atmospheric quality based on the approximation via component references and their materialization
- Development of personal components in the interior and on the facade on a scale of 1:10
- High quality representation in collage, line (floor plan 1: 100, floor plan 1:50, detailed drawing) and model (interior model 1:20)
ContentSmall Pleasures of Life is the name of a series of sketches by Alison and Peter Smithson. The episodic drawings of everyday living situations illuminate functional issues, but at the same time stimulate the senses and leave room for the imagination to visualize the in between ’.

In the spring semester we deal with the topic of living. The architect's ultimate task is simple and difficult at the same time, it requires precision, hard work and imagination. Providing people with a home is perhaps the oldest, but certainly the most elementary task of architecture. The basic needs - protection and comfort - have changed little over time, but the way we live together has changed. In the past year in particular, the living range has acquired an additional function: In addition to living, space should now also be created to work. This new coexistence will also occupy us in the coming semester.

In the spirit of Smithson's ‘Small Pleasures of Life’, we first examine the elementary situations of living and ask ourselves: What does it take for an everyday living situation to become a spatial experience? What makes an apartment so unique that I don't want to exchange it for a bigger one despite the limited space? Can I set up a nice workspace without needing another room?
First you ‘reconstruct’ the floor plan and section based on pictures of selected interiors of existing houses and invent something new. By closely observing reference buildings and reading excerpts from the text, you will acquire a wealth of knowledge about the most diverse elements of a living situation - from the kitchen to the stairs to storage space. Building on this, you develop your own living idea and design an "ideal" apartment floor plan in which the situations studied at the beginning play a key role. Only now do you come to the construction site, locate your ’ideal’ apartment in the urban space and adapt it to the circumstances of the specific situation.

We have selected four attractive building sites with different characteristics in the city of Zurich. We design new buildings on parcels that are under-used and whose urban conditions are already heavily influenced by the neighboring buildings. The challenge of increased density requires ingenuity and experimentation. With spatially surprising solutions, we want to prove that architectural wealth can make you forget confined spaces. Because compaction through more building mass alone does not make sense. Rather, by densification we mean a larger number of residents and a more diverse range of options on the same area. Only in this way is densification sustainable and contributes to the revitalization of the quarter.

[...] For example, the architect's task is to create a warm, comfortable space. Carpets are warm and cozy. So he decides to spread a carpet on the floor and hang up four to form the four walls. But you can't build a house out of carpets. Both the carpet and the tapestry require a structural framework that keeps them in the right position. Inventing this framework is the architect's second task. [...] writes Adolf Loos in, “The Principle of Clothing”, 1898. In a recently published article, the architecture critic Sabine von Fischer also refers to textiles and demands of the apartment 'The cut of an apartment must fit as well as a dress; cuddly for comfort and with scope for movement ’.
The character and shape of your floor plan lead to the choice of a suitable supporting structure and materials. The inherent conditions of the chosen construction method and the associated material as well as the parameters of the location form the framework for your design of a contemporary urban apartment.
Lecture notesDigital course material is provided by the chair.
LiteratureBook recommendation BUK I - IV: "Construction";
A reference work on contemporary construction
German or English
360 pages, 171 images, 20 color images, texts
ISBN 978-3-0356-2225-6
Online reference source: https://www.hochparterre-buecher.ch/ Konstruktions.html
Prerequisites / NoticeHead: Prof. Annette Spiro
Senior assistant: Florian Schrott
Assistants: Rosário Gonçalves, Nicole Leuthold, Tobia Rapelli, Luis Sarabia

Common welcome to the 2nd annual course: Tuesday, February 23rd, 2021, 10 a.m. on Zoom (Link see Info Office and the chair's website)
Introduction: Tuesday, 02/23/2021, 10.30 a.m. on Zoom, https://ethz.zoom.us/j/93658020622

work in groups
With a few exceptions, the design semester is completed in pairs.

Tool
The hypothetical ‘reconstruction drawing’ and the measurements are just as much design and work equipment as the collage and the furnishing plan. In addition to drawing plans, we mainly work with physical models and photography. In a full-day workshop at the beginning of the semester, a proven model photographer and architect introduces the secrets of model photography. Further topics are structure, construction and material. According to the chosen construction method, you also design a constructive detail.

The semester is accompanied by inputs on the individual tools and on the subject of housing construction. Invited architects complete the program with guest lectures.
052-0542-21LArchitectural Design IV: Real Architecture: Workspace (E.Christ / Ch.Gantenbein) Information
Please register (www.mystudies.ethz.ch) only after the internal enrolment for the design classes (see http://www.einschreibung.arch.ethz.ch/design.php).
Students who do not wish to change the design class don't have to participate in the internal enrolment.

Project grading at semester end is based on the list of enrolments on 2nd April 2021, 24:00 h (valuation date) only. Deleting or enrolling after the aforementioned date is prohibited!
W14 credits2V + 14UE. Christ, D. Mettler, A. Spiro, T. Crowther, T. Emerson, C. Gantenbein, D. Studer
AbstractWhat will the workplace of tomorrow look like?
Designing a project in four steps:
1. Envisioning scenarios about the future of the workplace.
2. Design of a spatial system to the scenario.
3. Translating the system into an architectural structure in wood.
4. Developing of the real project.
ObjectiveDevelop an independent, responsible and visionary attitude towards a current social issue. Ability to critically read and discuss (architectural) theoretical texts and relate them to the question. Develop an independent project that is coherent in terms of urban planning, typology, form and construction in a methodically controlled process.
ContentOur studio’s second semester is the conceptual counterpart of the first semester: research and examination of history is contrasted with a real project, in the here and now where the office of the past will become the workplace of the future.

The starting point of the design is a reflection on today's working environment. How and where is work performed and with what means? Is the much-cited "home office" really a desirable alternative to the office desk? And what role does the physical space play in this choice? Which are the spatial needs when it comes to being creative and productive? Texts, lectures, seminars, and discussions will help us to develop various theses on tomorrow’s working environment. Drawing on these inputs, the students will develop scenarios for their individual project at a specific location.
The here and now involves a confrontation with the challenges of our environment and calls for action. In our case, it also means to design responsibly. Thus, working with a renewable building material is one of the many contributions in reaction to climate change. As a sustainable material, wood offers unexpected possibilities, especially for contemporary urban architecture and it will become the compulsory material in all student projects. In the course of the semester we will visit historical as well as contemporary wooden buildings, and exchange ideas with experts.
Methodologically, "Workspace" directly draws on the previous semester "The Office": the typologies and principles studied during the first semester are further developed in the second semester’s project and linked to the specific aspects of scenario and location. The broad idea of an architectural form and type thus gets a concrete and specific formulation. And there, in its real application in a definite case, the architectural form also acquires its social, economic and ultimately political relevance. When ideal becomes real.
LiteratureBook recommendation BUK I - IV: "Construction";
A reference work on contemporary construction
German or English
360 pages, 171 images, 20 color images, texts
ISBN 978-3-0356-2225-6
Online reference source: https://www.hochparterre-buecher.ch/ Konstruktions.html
052-0544-21LArchitectural Design IV: What's in Store? (T.Emerson) Information
Please register (www.mystudies.ethz.ch) only after the internal enrolment for the design classes (see http://www.einschreibung.arch.ethz.ch/design.php).
Students who do not wish to change the design class don't have to parcitipate in the internal enrolment.

Project grading at semester end is based on the list of enrolments on 2nd April 2021, 24:00 h (valuation date) only. Deleting or enrolling after the aforementioned date is prohibited!
W14 credits2V + 14UT. Emerson, D. Mettler, A. Spiro, E. Christ, T. Crowther, C. Gantenbein, D. Studer
AbstractThe provocation that ‘shopping is over’ which opened last semester HS20 has turned out be truer than imagined. Department stores are falling around the world. We will consider a future for the legendary Zurich department store Jelmoli. Not because it is failing, but because of its continued success.
ObjectiveCritical thinking, personal attitude:
-Demonstrate, through design work, a critical understanding of climate change and the ethical responsibilities of the architect
-Reflect on pieces of work in progress or already completed both individually and in conversation with peers and faculty
-Demonstrate, through design work, a growing knowledge of contemporary and historical architectural discourse
-Critically interpret requirements and working priorities in light of constraints to work practice arising from Covid and home working. Communicate with teaching team if difficulties arise.

Working methodology:
-Conduct qualitative site/building analysis through photography and observational drawing
-Perform basic topographic surveying
-Use archives to conduct systematic analysis into social history, uses, materials, etc.
-Interpret and synthesize information into a concise and ongoing knowledge base for the design of a project
-Develop an understanding of the geology, climate, ecology, etc. of a place
-Assimilate small, fragmentary observations into broad understanding of place

Acquisition of subject-specific knowledge:
-Consider and understand the relationship and impact of a design on a wider landscape
-Understand the impacts of construction on ecology
-Demonstrate an understanding of the impacts of time on the repair and maintenance of a project
-Demonstrate an understanding of contemporary and historical construction techniques
-Demonstrate a critical understanding of the use of materials in relation to non-renewable resources, embodied energy, recyclability

Conversion of a conceptual intention into an architectural project:
-Develop an integrated and relevant structural, constructional and environmental concept for the project
-Formulate a spatial concept for a project, demonstrating an understanding of conceptual, spatial and programmatic decisions
-Design with reference to historical, political, cultural and other creative and technical fields
-Demonstrate an ability to assimilate a broad range of working practices, identifying and engaging especially with those which help to demonstrate and further your ideas

Capability to design:
-Demonstrate an ability to design interior and exterior spaces, as well as the thresholds and the surrounding spaces
-Demonstrate awareness of a design project’s environmental performance in construction and in use
-Demonstrate a good understanding of professional regulation and ethical responsibilities of the architect
-Design buildings, spaces and landscapes which are fully accessible

Representation and presentation in different media:
-Develop a critical eye in photography of place, space and design work with reference to broad photographic traditions
-Develop model making skills of small conceptual models (carved and cast for the Atlas and design working models made of everyday household materials with precise conceptual purpose
-Demonstrate high technical and critical proficiency in 2D and 3D CAD drafting and modelling
-Develop an understanding of the status and purpose of different kinds of representation, and deploy them effectively
-Use detailed drawings and models to illustrate the constructional concept of a project
-Demonstrate high technical and critical proficiency in image making and collage
- Clearly and concisely describe a concept, working practice, and outcome through written and oral material in English or German.
-Explore use of film and short film clips to present three-dimensional work. Note, advanced editing skills is not required.

Engagement in the studio:
-Actively participate in group projects such as the garden
-Actively listen to others
-Be able to learn alone, as part of a group and as a whole studio
-Demonstrate an ability to work comfortably with ambiguity as circumstances change
-At all times demonstrate honesty, integrity and respect for fellow students, teachers and staff.
ContentWhen an ancient tree falls in a closed canopy forest, far from being the end of life, light enters the dark space, “mixing new nutrients into the soil from debris, and initiating a race for succession.” [1] The old tree simply and naturally makes space for the new. This universal cycle, which is as much spatial as it is biological, may explain at least in part, the fascination for ruins in the modern era. In the nineteenth century Romantic imagination, the ruin showed architecture at its most pure, freed from the burdens of complex function, at one with nature. But today such processes may be more than nostalgia, they may just be the beginning of another age.

The provocation that ‘shopping is over’ which opened last semester HS20 has turned out be truer than imagined. Department stores are falling around the world. We will consider a future for the legendary Zurich department store Jelmoli. Not because it is failing, but because of its continued success. Jelmoli’s evolution has not only witnessed the emergence of metropolitan Zurich, it has participated and even anticipated many of the urban and social transformations which are once again pressing in our own time.

The future department store lies within the existing walls if only it were allowed to diversify naturally. We need to shift our attention towards what already exists, to be attentive to architecture, materials and techniques which have given us the spaces of everyday life. Today’s new reality requires us to look more closely, to document, to excavate, to release new spaces in existing fabric and breathe new life into the city. Each stone block, steel column, sheet of glass, plasterboard partition has been placed in space according to the rules and needs of its time. The architecture, reimagined as an Atlas which can be edited, cut, thinned, renewed with the precision of the architect and the care of a gardener.

The porosity of the city is central to its ecological recovery. New species of plants, insects and mammals are rediscovering habitats in the unseen corners of the city. Perhaps now is the moment to welcome them into the heart of things by looking at urban development in reverse. But not a return towards origins per se, but to acknowledge that the world is cyclical and after the growth comes decay followed by recycling in order to grow back stronger, more diverse and resilient.

But as much as this question may be about the future of cities and the culture of retail, we shall approach the project by direct means of architecture. We shall initiate a series of simple constructional operations on the site of Jelmoli at Seidenhof; the first is to record what is there through the act of surveying; measuring, photographing and drawing what we see. The second will be to excavate material from the sealed city fabric (like the ancient tree falling in the forest) to create or recreate new spaces for new ecologies. And the final stage will be to re-inhabit the excavated city to propose the future of retail that contributes to the human and non-human ecologies of the city.

We shall initiate a series of simple constructional operations on the site of Jelmoli at Seidenhof; the first is to record what is there through the act of surveying; measuring, photographing and drawing what we see. The second will be to excavate material from the sealed city fabric (like the ancient tree falling in the forest) to create or recreate new spaces for new ecologies. And the final stage will be to re-inhabit the excavated city to propose the future of retail that contributes to the human and non-human ecologies of the city.

[1] S Denizen, The Flora of Bombed Areas (an allegorical key), The Botanical City, M Gandy and S Jasper (eds), Jovis, 2020, pp 40.
Lecture notesAtlas
The act of surveying will be expanded by what cannot be seen but can be deduced from archives documents and social histories. And what is neither visible in the place or contained in records can be induced by speculation into and beyond the walls of Jelmoli. The materials extractions and transformations that constitute the built and the supply chains interacting with social habits to constitute its uses. And finally, the traces that bear witness to the passage of time.

Excavation
With the Atlas, we shall ask you to excavate the built fabric of Seidenhof; to introduce spaces for an enlarged and more diverse environment. By stripping away layers of construction or cutting segments, we will ask you to open the city block for re-inhabitation. The new spaces may be invented from within the city block or simply rediscovered from its evolution. Their potential lies in how they will extend the range of environments for human and non-human users and in the re-use of the materials produced in the process.

Inhabitation
With the Seidenhof opened for earth, light water and air to play their natural role, you will design the next layer of re-inhabitation by Jelmoli. How can the future department store be model for a botanical city? How can the interaction of environments respond to the social, ecological and commercial needs of the city? And most importantly, what how will architecture and construction find the form and expression that connects the past with most pressing issues of tomorrow?
LiteratureEssential Texts

Ms. Consumer. The making of public space.
Chuihua Judy Chung. 2000
in: Harvard Design Guide to Shopping. p. 504-525

The science of the concrete.
Claude Levi Strauss. 1962
Chapter one in: The savage Mind.

The Ruin
Mark Pimlott. 2016
in: The Public Interior as Idea and Project.

Climates: Architecture and the Planetary Imaginary
Eva Horn. 2016

Dasgupta Review: Nature’s value must be at the heart of economics.
Fred Lewsey. University of Cambridge. 2021



Extended Reading

Garden as Theater as Museum
Dan Graham. 1993
in: Rock my Religion

Congestion Without Matter. Parc de la Villette. Paris. France. Competition 1982
OMA. Rem Koolhaas and Bruce Mau. 1995
in: SMLXL

Collision City and the Politics of ‘Bricolage’
Colin Rowe and Fred Koetter. 1978
in: Collage City



Book recommendation BUK I - IV: "Construction";
A reference work on contemporary construction
German or English
360 pages, 171 images, 20 color images, texts
ISBN 978-3-0356-2225-6
Online reference source: https://www.hochparterre-buecher.ch/ Konstruktions.html
Architectural Design (from 5. Semester on)
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
052-1130-21LArchitectural Design V-IX: Bergell - Records of a Territory (GD C.Menn) Information Restricted registration - show details
Please register (www.mystudies.ethz.ch) only after the internal enrolment for the design classes (see http://www.einschreibung.arch.ethz.ch/design.php).

Project grading at semester end is based on the list of enrolments on 2nd April 2021, 24:00 h. This is the ultimate deadline to unsubscribe or enroll for the studio!
W14 credits16UC. Menn
AbstractIs the Bergell a geographically and economically isolated "chamber" in the border area? A remote place of poetry, but of standstill and resignation, threatened by nature? In our exploratory notes we are interested in the relationship between the landscape and the architecture and their history of ideas.
ObjectiveThe students learn to discover a landscape and cultural area in its multi-layered temporal and spatial dimensions, which enables them to take a critical approach to the present. You will learn from this and from the resource of the location to form an architectural idea and develop it into a consistent project.
ContentThe geography and history of the valley is characterized by amplitudes and contrasts. Topographically and climatically a steep drop from the alpine pass heights to the almost Mediterranean Lombardy plain, for centuries one of the most important alpine transit arteries favored the implementation of a foreign culture that combined with the symbiotic rural way of life. The relocation of traffic routes and geopolitical shifts initiated isolation and migration in the first half of the 19th century, which the construction of power plants in the 1950s counteracted. The recent landslide in Bondo exemplified the consequences of climate change in the Alpine region.

We are looking for an approach to the present by researching the territory and understanding the history and its structural forms. Is the Bergell a geographically and economically isolated "chamber" in the border area? A remote place of poetry, but of standstill and resignation, threatened by nature? In our exploratory notes we are interested in the relationship between the landscape and the architecture and their history of ideas.

Based on our analysis, we design a public meeting space, a "multi uso"
for the people of the valley. The multi-purpose room damaged by the landslide raises the social need for a place of identification and orientation, for which we consider the entire valley area as a possible location. Using speculative interventions, we take an architectural position in the reference space of history and landscape. - Perhaps as foreign as the idea of ​​baroque geometry in the steep mountain landscape, as rigorous as the Albignia dam, as inconspicuous as the rural Cascina in the chestnut grove or as poetically enigmatic as the garden of ruins of Lan Müraia. They all aim to emerge in their attitude from the structure of the valley and finally to be woven into it again as a critical re-recording of the territory.
Prerequisites / NoticeIndividual work and group work, whereof at least 3-4 week of group work.
Mid term crits: 16.3. / 20.4. / 11.5.
Costs: CHF 150.--.
052-1182-21LArchitectural Design V-IX: Spaces for Universities - Design as Criticism II (Ch.Kerez) Information Restricted registration - show details
Please register (www.mystudies.ethz.ch) only after the internal enrolment for the design classes (see http://www.einschreibung.arch.ethz.ch/design.php).

Project grading at semester end is based on the list of enrolments on 2nd April 2021, 24:00 h. This is the ultimate deadline to unsubscribe or enroll for the studio!
W14 credits16UC. Kerez
AbstractThe design process is part of preparing for the daily professional life of an architect. Point of departure for this semester will be nine case studies, consisting of existing, curated competition briefs from different countries and fields of work. All of the cases describe accommodation for research and teaching activities at universities.
ObjectiveThe design studio aims to provide an insight into the history and development of spaces at universities and to foster understanding of current course on this issue in several disciplines and in different countries.

This semester the design studio will focus on University Campuses.
Students will develop a design based on a given brief and will deal with the theme through a critical approach. Analysis of relevant case-studies, meticulous understanding of fundamental aspects of the given task, fast track design methods leading to alternative concepts should establish the strategic and factual basis for a critical understanding on how contemporary University buildings and Campuses can be thought today.
ContentThe design process is part of preparing for the daily professional life of an architect. Point of departure for this semester will be nine case studies, consisting of existing, curated competition briefs from different countries and fields of work. All of the cases describe accommodation for research and teaching activities at universities.
The design studio aims to provide an insight into the history and development of spaces at universities and to foster understanding of current course on this issue in several disciplines and in different countries.
Design is understood as a means of critiquing and investigating these wide-ranging fields of activity. The design of the architectural project ensues from analytical understanding of the task at hand, with the goal of helping students develop their own, independent approach to design.
The students will use Rhino3D to design and explain the projects. The spatial experience will be illustrated in filmed sequences, for which they will receive additional support.
Prerequisites / NoticeIndividual work and group work, whereof 3-4 weeks of group work.
Mid-term crits: Dates will follow.
Costs: CHF 30.--.
052-1104-21LArchitectural Design V-IX: Athens Derelict Plug-In (GD A. Antonakakis) Information Restricted registration - show details
Please register (www.mystudies.ethz.ch) only after the internal enrolment for the design classes (see http://www.einschreibung.arch.ethz.ch/design.php).

Project grading at semester end is based on the list of enrolments on 2nd April 2021, 24:00 h. This is the ultimate deadline to unsubscribe or enroll for the studio!
W14 credits16UA. Antonakakis
AbstractAthens Derelict Plug-In proposes an investigation and a set of designs taking place in Athens. Projected at the many layers of the city, the design process is addressed to a palimpsest of different phases of the urban landscape. After many decades of decline of the downtown, an idiosyncratic functional void in the midst of the built city center is created.
ObjectiveThe objective of the course is to explore the urban environment and to suggest ways to improve some of its components. The way individuals and groups perceive and appropriate the city is presented and put under question in lectures and seminars, finally researched in the studio.

Of special interest will be the focus on areas where the new hybridic public domain meets the transformed domestic sphere and the diffuse borders between them. The studio includes codification of quantifiable data; pinpointing of physical elements that grant some specific character to urban space; description of people’s everyday life and the possible projections of it that could transform it in the direction of the use of the available infrastructure; the design is aiming at solving specific problems, but more than this – since we will work with semi-abandoned areas of the city center – contributes to upgrading the selected areas for different forms of life.

The particular modes of thinking are projected onto an architectural production that takes under consideration the mutations that occur under the influence of different factors (historical, social, cultural, technological, but also interpretational, theoretical, and critical).
ContentAthens Derelict Plug-In proposes an investigation and a set of designs taking place in Athens. Projected at the many layers of the city, the design process is addressed to a palimpsest of different phases of the urban landscape. After many decades of decline of the downtown, an idiosyncratic functional void in the midst of the built city center is created. The city center was mostly used at its ground floor, hosting mostly shops, bars and restaurants, while the multistoried buildings in it (polykatoikies, or office ensembles, and high manufacturing buildings) were usually abandoned at the upper parts of the modern constructions. Today partly inhabited by users of the common internet infrastructure, Athens downtown is more and more served by independent courier and food delivery services that circulate goods and food coming from invisible peripheral warehouses and ghost kitchens. It is operating by elaborate ordering or more complicated logistic systems of classification, digital control of the provisions and response to order making. In this sense, the project beyond its specificity becomes an architectural essay about the transformation of the decline of the city into a post-pandemic state; an unconditional investigation about the use of infrastructure operating on a multitude of scales. Such new urban arrangements become important not only for Athens, but also for cities becoming ghosts elsewhere. This generic new field of research is projected at an existing unfunctional urban organism in order to test the options of its possible promises for new forms of life.

Athens Derelict Plug-In is a project that investigates the relationship of the general condition of networks to the idiosyncratic field of a doubly ruined city. The presence of the ancient layers of the city, whose remains still lie under the new constructions of modern Athens, is doubled by this modern ruin being touched by the economic turmoil of the last decades; both invisible and visible ruins act as a promising field to deal with a different architecture. The abandoned existing structures in the midst of a developed network can open alternative understandings of what their inhabitation could mean. “The program for an unlimited extension of networks to a neutral field” – if we can name the process of urbanization this way – is expanded already on the internet and reinforced as a new set of facilities to which the derelict material city can be connected. Data infrastructure, besides determining the functioning of the city, can open the city for a different character of use. The presence of the infrastructure constitutes a new type of empty space which can be experienced as hybridic in many senses.
LiteratureGilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, A Thousand Plateaus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia, trans. Brian Massumi (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1987) Marc Augé, Non-places: Introduction to an Anthropology of Supermodernity (London: Verso, 1995) David Harvey, Spaces of Global Capitalism: Towards a Theory of Uneven Geographical Development (London: Verso, 2006) James Bridle, New Dark Age: Technology and the End of the Future, (London: Verso, 2018). Graham Harman, Tool-Being: Heidegger and the Metaphysics of Objects (Chicago: Carus, 2002), Graham Harman, Object-Oriented Ontology: A New Theory of Everything, (London: Penguin Books, 2018). Manuel Castells, The Informational City: Information Technology, Economic Restructuring, and the Urban-Regional Process (Oxford: Blackwell, 1989). Manuel Castells, Rise of the Network Society Edward Hollis, The Secret Lives of Buildings, Portobello Books, 2009. Alberto Toscano, ‘Logistics and Opposition,’ Mute, 9 August 2011, http://metamute.org. Jacques Rancière, Disagreement: Politics and Philosophy, trans. Julie Rose (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1999)
Keller Easterling, Extrastatecraft: The Power of Infrastructure Space (London: Verso, 2014). Keller Easterling, Enduring Innocence: Global Architecture and Its Political Masquerades (Cambridge, MA: MIT, 2005).
Massimo Cacciari, ‘Nomads in Prison,’ Casabella 705 (2002).
Richard Hanley, ed., Moving People, Goods, and Information in the 21st Century (New York: Routledge, 2004).
Deborah Cowen, The Deadly Life of Logistics: Mapping Violence in Global Trade (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2014), 125–127.
Jesse LeCavalier, ‘The Restlessness of Objects’, Cabinet 47 (2012)
Clare Lyster, Learning from Logistics: How Networks Change Our Cities (Basel, Berlin: Birkhäuser, 2016)
Maxwell G. Lay, Ways of the World: A History of the World's Roads and of the Vehicles That Used Them (Sydney: Rutgers University Press, 1992).
Richard de Neufville and Amedeo R. Odoni, Airport Systems: Planning, Design and Management (New York: Mc Graw Hill Education, 2003)
Mark Levinson, The Box: How the Shipping Container Made the World Smaller and the World Economy Bigger (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2008).
Deborah Cowen, ‘Containing Insecurity: Logistics Space, U.S. Port Cities, and the “War on Terror”’, in Disrupted Cities: When Infrastructure Fails, ed. Stephen Graham (Routledge, 2010)
Kushal Nahata, ‘Trends that will revolutionize logistics in 2018’, Material Handling and Logistics News, 26 December 2017, http://mhlnews.com.
Jasper Bernes, ‘Logistics, Counterlogistics and the Communist Prospect’, Endnotes 3 (September 2013), https://endnotes.org.uk.
Markus Hesse, The City as a Terminal: The Urban Context of Logistics and Freight Transport (London: Routledge, 2008).
Carolina A. Miranda, ‘The Unbearable Awkwardness of Automation’, The Atlantic, 13 June 2018, https://theatlantic.com.
Gabrielle Espredy, ‘Building Data: Field Notes on the Future of the Past’, Places Journal (September 2013), https://doi.org/10.22269/130923.
Pier Vittorio Aureli, The Possibility of an Absolute Architecture (Cambridge: MIT Press, 2011).
Prerequisites / NoticeThematic and methodic focus :
Architecture, Urban planning and development, Landscape architecture, Model making, Visualization, Representation techniques, Moving drawings, Photoshop, Video montage.

Individual work and group work, whereof 5 or more weeks group work.

Mid term crits: 16.3., 20.4., 11.5.

Costs: CHF 100.--
052-1124-21LArchitectural Design V-IX: Temporary Construction. Design of Circular Structures (R. Boltshauser GD) Information Restricted registration - show details
Please register (www.mystudies.ethz.ch) only after the internal enrolment for the design classes (see http://www.einschreibung.arch.ethz.ch/design.php).

Project grading at semester end is based on the list of enrolments on 2nd April 2021, 24:00 h. This is the ultimate deadline to unsubscribe or enroll for the studio!
W14 credits16UR. Boltshauser
AbstractA new awareness of our limited resources and their use are bringing low-carbon materials and the permanent or renewed use of components back to the fore. We want to take the principle of planning circular buildings to extremes, understand / design buildings as temporary structures and make a contribution to energy generation / urban greening / noise reduction.
Objective• Dealing with dense, sustainable, simple building
• Development of a broad theoretical and historical knowledge of a
topic in order to transfer the resulting findings to the current context
• Understanding of sustainable building techniques and building
materials
• Holistic design of spatial atmospheres in the interplay of context,
construction, climate, sustainability and materiality
• Recognizing the potential of building materials with different
technical properties in order to develop own ideas for new building
systems and translate them into a design
• Practical work on the model and in the visualization program as par
of the design process
ContentA new awareness of our limited resources and their use is bringing low-CO2 materials and the permanent or renewed use of building components back to the fore - and this is also urgently needed. We want to take the principle of planning circular buildings to the extreme and understand and design buildings as temporary structures. At the same time, we want to contribute to energy generation, urban greening, noise reduction, the creation of public spaces or the development of new living and working opportunities.

This path, which we want to explore in the spring semester of 2021, is the design of temporary buildings whose components can be used several times and which can thus be integrated into a circular cycle with the least possible losses. With this strategy, land reserves are occupied only as long as necessary for their use. Areas in which the development strategies are not clear can be put to interim use, and existing buildings can be maintained and expanded for longer. The building sites are located in the city of Zurich, the utilization concept is developed in connection with selected strategies of climate-conscious building. Depending on the concept, it may be useful to test and demonstrate the functionality of the structure on different parcels in the city. Based on an analysis of site potential, site-specific as well as flexible structures and energy concepts will nevertheless be designed. In parallel with the design and construction, we will include grey energy demand, operational energy as well as energy generation.

However, designing with climate as a factor concerns us not only on the technical and constructional level, but also on the architectural level. The architecture should be able to find a new, contemporary expression under the aspects of climate-conscious building as well as in connection with the use and the service life.
Already during the construction of a building, consideration is given to its limited life span and possible further use, both in the choice of materials, construction methods and supporting structure. Designing and constructing with this goal in mind means an intensive examination of the material and the components. While in the classical design process a space is designed and only later materialized and constructed, these aspects must be considered from the very beginning.
Prerequisites / NoticeIndividual work and group work, whereof 3-4 weeks group work.
Mid term crits: 16.3., 20.4., 11.5.
No extra costs.
052-1150-21LArchitectural Design V-IX: New Urban Landscapes - Focal Points of Urban Densification (M.Brakebusch) Information Restricted registration - show details
Please register (www.mystudies.ethz.ch) only after the internal enrolment for the design classes (see http://www.einschreibung.arch.ethz.ch/design.php).

Project grading at semester end is based on the list of enrolments on 2nd April 2021, 24:00 h. This is the ultimate deadline to unsubscribe or enroll for the studio!
W14 credits16UM. Brakebusch Geser
AbstractWith the help of cartographic and statistical surveys, digital and analog, we figure out the limits of the individual metropolitan areas with regard to their possible compression and cooling. After an initial deep drilling in Zurich (in HS20), we will continue with the investigations in the Basel metropolitan area in FS21.
Objective- Analyze the landscape conditions for the Development of the city
- Learning the basics of urban climate planning
- Developing a specific vocabulary (concepts) in Area of ​​landscape
architecture
- Development of an urban / landscape architecture project
ContentCase Study 2: Metropolitan Area Basel
The global phenomenon of the rise in temperature requires individual solutions for the increasingly heated and dense settlement area, depending on the local conditions of the place. The programs presented for heat reduction describe fields of action and approaches that are mostly thought out selectively and remain within the political administrative boundaries. However, the federalism of Switzerland leads to an area-wide settlement of the Swiss plateau, the extent of which is given by the geological morphology of Switzerland with the mountain ranges of the Jura and the Alps. The three metropolitan areas of Zurich, Basel and Geneva extend from east to west, and in addition to their urban density, they also have the largest calculated temperature rise.

In the Design Studio "New Urban Landscapes" with the help of cartographic and statistical surveys, digital and analog, we figure out the limits of the individual metropolitan areas with regard to their possible compression and cooling. After an initial deep drilling in Zurich (in HS20), we will continue with the investigations in the Basel metropolitan area in FS21.

An analysis phase in which experts impart knowledge and tools in the field of urban climate and GIS application is followed by a spatially evaluating synthesis workshop as the conclusion of the four-week group work. The aim of this is to locate a definable room / s for the subsequent nine-week draft. After the semester week, the individual determination of one's own perimeter and program for the urban, landscape architectural design begins. Subject-specific vocabulary and knowledge imparted in the process should help to describe and further develop one's own ideas for the location and its landscape-architectural formulation in a joint discourse.
Prerequisites / NoticeIndividual work and group work, whereas 3-4 weeks of group work.
Mid-term crits: 16.3., 27.4., 12.5.
Kosten: CHF 20.--.
052-1120-21LArchitectural Design V-IX: E.A.N.@M - Experiments on Architecture and Nature [at] Mäusebunker Information Restricted registration - show details
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Project grading at semester end is based on the list of enrolments on 2nd April 2021, 24:00 h. This is the ultimate deadline to unsubscribe or enroll for the studio!
W14 credits16UA. Brandlhuber
AbstractMäusebunker, the former animal testing laboratory in Berlin, survived its almost inevitable demolition, thanks to the joined forces of architects, politicians and citizens. Now that the building got a second chance the question is: What is the future of Mäusebunker?
Together we will answer this question by proposing an architectural design for re-using the iconic brutalist building.
Objective1. Gathering all building data regarding structure, building systems and biotope by establishing recurring meetings with our collaborators, working in three groups:
- Chair of Structural Design (Prof. Schwartz)
- Climate Engineering (Transsolar)
- Landscape and Nature (Sandra Bartoli)

The output of this phase will result in a ‘Mäusebunker Atlas‘ with three layers.

2. Consolidating the research to define a pre-scheme that brings together and translates the data during a collective workshop. The output of this phase will result in a common ‘Mäusebunker Masterplan’.

3. Individually designing the diferent zones of the pre- scheme, implementing the spatial and programmatic requirements of our users (E.A.N. @M).

Communicating the design and arguments through video, based on the accompanying seminar Access to Tools. Using techniques from scenography and filmmaking, such as green screen, model to film, etc. This will help us communicate the designs to the broader audience in a compressed and self-explanatory manner.

The semester will conclude with the final reviews. Each presentation will include a one-minute video pitching the proposal and will be streamed on our TV channel station+.
ContentMäusebunker, the former animal testing laboratory in Berlin, survived its almost inevitable demolition, thanks to the joined forces of architects, politicians and citizens. Now that the building got a second chance the question is: What is the future of Mäusebunker?

Together we will answer this question by proposing an architectural design for re-using the iconic brutalist building.

The sixties were a decade of technological thriving – first man on Moon versus gloomy scientific achievement which had been used in the Vietnam War. The social and environmental implications of these novel technologies were still unknown at that time.

The estrangement of people from technological progress and change, led a group of artists and engineers to establish an organisation: E.A.T. (Experiments on Art and Technology). They aimed at facilitating the direct collaboration between artists and engineers, set within the industrial environment, in which the technology was being developed. Together, they were speculating about the impact of such collaborations on industries, technology and individuals itself.

At the same time, the Mäusebunker, one of Europe ́s biggest animal testing facilities was designed and built and reflected the common understanding of human—non- human relations at that time. Its high hygiene and security standards made the building inaccessible to the public, which created a certain myth of what was happening behind closed walls, doors, holes and tubes. Soon after its opening, the first protests against the institution began to form, but it took a long time before it eventually closed in 2020 and was declared to be demolished.

Why? Because a re-use of the typology seemed both uneconomical and unrealistic. Thus, the city did not want to impose the high costs on its citizens. Alternatively to its intended demolition, we will transform the building architecturally and ideologically. Therefore, we will develop a spatial strategy for the existing building to become a laboratory for architecture, art and research on multi- species cohabitation.


Cohabitation:
Today, the current environmental and biodiversity crisis has transformed our ecosystem fundamentally. The collaboration between humans and non-humans is the only alternative for all of us – planetary – to survive: we must not only co-exist but co-operate. This is what we mean by cohabitation, an idea that has been explored in the previous design studios:

‘Housing the Non-Human 01’ focused on decentring humans from the design process, and developing new design strategies of spatial production for multispecies cohabitation.
‘Housing the Non-Human 02’ pushed the topic further, rethinking the balance between the built and the natural environment by intervening on an existing built structure in order to allow for multi-species cohabitation.

‘On Housing the Non-Human 03’ will go beyond scenarios and speculations. For our architectural design we want to recapture the spirit — interdisciplinary & collaboratively — of E.A.T. and develop an architectural project for our fictional cultural organization: E.A.N. @M (Experiments on Architecture and Nature [at] Mäusebunker).
Prerequisites / NoticeIndividual work and group work, whereof 3-4 weeks of group work.
Mid-term crits: 30.3., 4./5.5.
No extra costs.
052-1102-21LArchitectural Design V-IX: Quinten - Architecture From an Understanding of Space (G.A.Caminada) Information Restricted registration - show details
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Project grading at semester end is based on the list of enrolments on 2.4.21, 24:00 h (valuation date) only.
Ultimate deadline to unsubscribe or enroll for the studio is 2.4.21, 24:00 h.
W14 credits16UG. A. Caminada
AbstractWe would like to examine the most important elements in creating a strong sense of place. We design architecture in selected locations in Quinten, aiming to create a house that both reflects today's knowledge and the features and conditions unique to its location.
ObjectiveArchitecture requires a fine perception of what already exists and a courageous design for what is to come. As a basic prerequisite for both moments, we consider a sustainable attitude to be developed from the lifeworld collective. The aim of the course is to strengthen the sensitivity for such an attitude. At the same time the skills should be learned to make this attitude effective. Dealing with the immediate reality of construction and material plays a key role here.
ContentQuinten is a small community on Lake Walen. The villagers see the functionality and thus the viability of the village as endangered in the long term. The necessary village size to guarantee an independent existence is unrealistic. The federalist principle in Switzerland has set itself the goal of preserving settlement even in places that have fallen below a critical limit for a functioning place. The proximity to urban space continues to promise economic advantages. Villages like Quinten suddenly get a boost from the changed perspectives from other camps. The ecological threat to our environment and a global pandemic have changed our view of living space. For places like Quinten, the question arises: isn't the physical distance to the urban and its apparent otherness the most important potential? In this paradigm shift, the question is not about the quantity (number of inhabitants) but about the quality (sensitivity) of the change. What could a development look like that guarantees an existence outside the purely rational?

Some social and cultural scientists are calling for a new understanding of space due to the ecological consequences. In architecture, this requirement immediately leads to the question of the relationship between space and place. How do we think of creating conditions for good places in space? As residents of the room, we are part of an undefined area. It is limitless, an interweaving of different worlds. In order to be able to act, we have to scale the space in smaller units. The territory of our work and thus our responsibility is thus determined. Only this clarity enables responsibility and, in the best case, ends with meanings and values. That's where the place is.

Within the process of understanding space, it is important to know the entities or substances of the limited space - existing and expected. The entities in Quinten are the mild climate, the constantly changing wind, the distinctive topography made up of lake and mountain, the special vegetation, the limited accessibility and others. These politically activated entities are different in the agglomeration of Zurich than in Quinten. By grasping the properties of these different entities, we take care of the space in which we expand. When developing smaller units within the larger unit, we are cosmopolitan and local actors at the same time. Remaining in a self-sufficient world would be just as disastrous as merely looking at the global. The space is given, it is not yet a place. In space you act politically, in place sensually.

In a new understanding of space, it must succeed in bringing politics, spatial planning, economy, tourism, craft and architecture together into a conglomerate, keeping them in balance and aligning them with a common goal. The development must be controlled from within, from close by, not through strategies and universal concepts from a great altitude. Then we approach a (new) culture of space.


Full Program: caminada.arch.ethz.ch
Prerequisites / NoticeIndividual work only.
Mid-term crits: Dates will follow
Costs: CHF 100.--.
052-1142-21LArchitectural Design V-IX: Making Plans for Living Together (A.Caruso) Information Restricted registration - show details
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Project grading at semester end is based on the list of enrolments on 2nd April 2021, 24:00 h. This is the ultimate deadline to unsubscribe or enroll for the studio!
W14 credits16UA. Caruso
AbstractWe will make detailed plans for living together: Imagine ourselves freed from the false dogma of social Darwinism, in a place where essential tasks like caring for people, growing food and living in balance with our environment, are more important than non-essential activities like banking and academia. We will study models of mutual aid in the human, animal and vegetal worlds.
ObjectiveQualification to control the design process increasingly independent and with sole responsibility and to find to an individual design methodology and attitude.
ContentCharles Darwin’s On the Origin of the Species was based on its author’s observations of the natural world. Its emphasis on competition and on the evolutionary success of nature’s predators was also informed by Darwin’s experience of the competitive ravages of industrial England. The idea of a ‘social Darwinism’ was used as justification by the 19th century industrial elite for the social damage that was inherent to the industrial economy. In the age of science, what was true for nature, they argued, was equally true for the political and the social. Critiques of the apparent determinism of Darwin’s theory emerged as soon as his book was published, and a particularly eloquent and comprehensive response, Mutual Aid – A Factor of Evolution was published by Peter Kropotkin at the end of the 19th century. Based on observations, and more pragmatic than ideological, the book describes how widespread and important, mutually beneficial cooperation and reciprocity are in both the animal kingdom and within the history of human societies.

This semester we will make detailed plans for living together. We will imagine ourselves freed from the false dogma of social Darwinism, in a place where essential tasks like caring for people, growing food and living in balance with our environment, are more important than non-essential activities like banking and academia. We will study models of mutual aid in the human, animal and vegetal worlds through references that are modest in size but that engage with matters of material, technique and society altogether, acknowledging that these are different facets of large and necessarily interconnected systems. Some of our references, like the Shaker community of Mount Lebanon are historic, some like the Chelsea Hotel are urban, others like Melliodora in Australia are ongoing experiments. Withdrawing from the centre, these settlements seek out the space and the time to make societies that could be more equitable, providing alternatives to the mainstreams of their time. With a range of principles and techniques, from forms of governance to methods of upcycling and spatial experimentation, we will work on a series of sites in and around Zurich, considering programme and material, human and animal inhabitation, allowing a complexity of subjects of equivalent importance to inform the development of the designs.
Prerequisites / NoticeGroup work only.
Mid-term crits: Dates to follow.
Costs: CHF 100.--.
052-1146-21LArchitectural Design V-IX: Voluptas S1E6 Apollo (F.Charbonnet/P.Heiz) Information Restricted registration - show details
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Project grading at semester end is based on the list of enrolments on 2nd April 2021, 24:00 h. This is the ultimate deadline to unsubscribe or enroll for the studio!
W14 credits16UF. Charbonnet, P. Heiz
AbstractThe semester "Apollo" aims at designing erratic hyper-contexts generated by hypothetical ruling incentives: as a marker of singularities, it is to become the passionate catalogue raisonné of elemental urban idiosyncrasies.
ObjectiveObjectives:
Research & curation of contemporary concepts, articulation of a discursive argument, visual literacy & storytelling, editing & montage, architectural drafting.

Incentives:
Movies & filmmaking, territorial & urban scale, collectivity, situations & artefacts, socio-political dimension, critical position, contemporary conditions.

Steps:
(1) Analyse a movie, research contemporary concepts, identify potentials, articulate a critical position.
(2) Project an urban scenario on both the artefactual and the territorial scale, focussing on collectiveness and the socio-political aspects of society.
(3) Express a critical position towards a contemporary condition by the means of such a fictive context in both image and plan.
(4) Train rhetorics and argumentation, master drafting skills as well as image montage.
Content"Dionysos / Apollo" is to become a rambling exploration on the lookout for an urban environment beyond reasonable or irrational, good and evil. Considering humankind as embedded in (and dependent on) its geological era, we look upon history’s intertwined layers as torpid raw potential to be fully deployed, appropriated and composed with – joyfully disrespecting historical authenticity. The visionary Hístor seeks, finds novelty in the old, rather than an unfounded assertion of the present with the past. Simultaneously, all thoughts and actions are rooted in essence in the terrestrial now.
The semester APOLLO aims at designing erratic hyper-contexts generated by hypothetical ruling incentives: as a marker of singularities, it is to become the passionate catalogue raisonné of elemental urban idiosyncrasies.

Project:
Students interpret, negotiate, and make meaning from information presented in a source movie, before transcribing their subjective reading to a telling but suggestive cinematographic draft (1.80x1.80m). Audacious and unprecedented urban environments are then extrapolated from the narrative as singular metropolitan orthoimages (1.80x1.80m) become the recording canvas of these proliferating storylines.
The complementary drawing and image both crystallize the fictional metropolis’ shared desires and aspirations in an effort to re-write an alternate architectural and territorial fiction and reflect critically on contemporary conditions, overthrowing socio-economic status quo.
Furthermore, students will construct an argumentative arsenal to support their discursive argument, based on an encyclopedic compilation of evocative historical sources.
Prerequisites / NoticeGroup work only.
Mid term crits: open, date will follow.
Costs: CHF 30.--
052-1106-21LArchitectural Design V-IX: 3,3%, 33,3%, 333%. Re-Thinking-Re Re-Zu-rich (a.o. Prof. J. de Vylder) Information Restricted registration - show details
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Project grading at semester end is based on the list of enrolments on 2nd April 2021, 24:00 h. This is the ultimate deadline to unsubscribe or enroll for the studio!
W14 credits16UJ. De Vylder
AbstractRE-Thinking-RE
Nevertheless, the RE-prefix. In all its newfound ambitions and its very first fragile exercises in recent decades. Yet a critical RE-considering is not wrong now, or early at all. To keep pace with the idea that RE-USE should be more and should be part of RE-attitude. So just to be more than physical RE-use and rather to be physical RE-attitude.
ObjectiveAll in all, one can say that the "Learning Objectives" – humble ambitions - and "Learning Outcomes" - possible answers - can be summarized by the next 3 expectations:

- As the studio explores the "Economy" of "Less Action" in the perspective of a better "Ecology of Life"; the "Research" attitude is to find "Realistic Realities" for RE-use - the "Alternative", RE-Thinking-RE gives RE-use a chance to be more than a "Tendency".

- Because the studio believes that it is not only a matter of project, but also a matter of "Urge", the pedagogical ambition is not only to make Architecture - the "Act" - but also to raise "the Architect" - the "Attitude Universum" as a "Carrousel" and as a "Journey".

- As the studio second life is the drawing and the model, the writing and the debate, the "Form" will be given to all unseen outcome when the "Method" of "Research" has no limit on the "Mix" of "Media" from analogue to digital.
ContentThe 3.33% 333% studio had its first run a while ago - let's call it the PILOT 33.3% studio 2018 - The results of that studio were not only inspiring but also thought-provoking.
What is the 3,33% 33,3% 333% studio about?
At a first glance, it seemed like just a numbers game. But it was clear that it means much more.

RE-
re-use re-store rest-ore re-pair
re-act re-cycle re-care re-accept
re-sumptions re-compress(ions)* re-economy*
re-love re-leave re-less re-confirm
re-silience re-vive re-live
re-veal un-re-vel
re-collage re-configurate
re-observe re-call re-read re-focus re-draw re-practice re-detail re-invent re-question
re-strategy re-confront re-venture

re-re

RE-Thinking RE

Nevertheless, the RE-prefix. In all its newfound ambitions and its very first fragile exercises in recent decades. Yet a critical RE-Considering is not wrong now, or early at all. To keep pace with the idea that RE-Use should be more and should be part of RE-Attitude. So just to be more than physical RE-Use and rather to be physical RE-Attitude.

The 33.3% or RE- is the first possible critical variant of 100% act. The idea that a "Context" can be "Approached" rather by "Intervention - Economy - Ecology" - and that this could be good enough as a new standard.

In this 33.3% studio - semester or master studio - we will study this. The studio will explore the possibilities of a more restrained, humble but precise action. This is in many ways an attitude of economy of means. Less energy of action, of course, means less economy and ecology, but it could also require changing the attitude of use effectively today. This could also make it a question of ergonomics: how to "Use" the given context differently and yet act less.

How to find a new "Rich-Ness" in ZU-RICH. That is the question this "33.3% Semester Studio" will ask. And this for the next three spring semesters.
Prerequisites / NoticeIndividual work and group work, whereof 5 or more weeks of group work.
Mid-term crits: 9.3. / 13.4.
No extra costs.
052-1136-21LArchitectural Design V-IX: Elements (A.Deuber) Information Restricted registration - show details
Please register (www.mystudies.ethz.ch) only after the internal enrolment for the design classes (see http://www.einschreibung.arch.ethz.ch/design.php).

Project grading at semester end is based on the list of enrolments on 2nd April 2021, 24:00 h. This is the ultimate deadline to unsubscribe or enroll for the studio!
W14 credits16UA. Deuber
AbstractStudents have the opportunity to examine architectural elements that define their architecture. We carry out this search throughout the semester and divide it into three phases: element, structure and whole. We will delve deeply into the architectural space and the materialized elements that define that space.
ObjectiveThe students develop a design based on the architectural theme of "elements" with the integrated disciplines of structural design. They deal with the topic, a specific material of its constructive logic and supporting structure. The aim is to arrive at a holistic design for all designs based on individual inspiration and the logic of the material and to visualize this at the end.
ContentStudents have the opportunity to examine architectural elements that define their architecture. We carry out this search throughout the semester and divide it into three phases: element, structure and whole. We will delve deeply into the architectural space and the materialized elements that define that space.

In a first step, elements that define the space are explored. Based on an inspiration, an element is designed as an object that represents this inspiration. The object leads to a structure and its own detailed architectural project with an individual program in a specific location.

The students work with different types of renderings (rendering of the element, the structure, the rooms), as well as detailed black and white CAD drawings and texts.
Prerequisites / NoticeIndividual work only.
Mit term crits: 16/17 March, 20/21 April, 4/5 May 2021.
Costs: CHF 100.

Introduction: 23.2.21, 10:00 h, Zoom-ID: 995 4984 0569 .

Assistants: Lorenz Bachmann, Elena Miegel
Integrated discipline (3 ETCS points): Chair for structural design, Prof. Schwartz (requirement: design and supporting structure are mutually dependent)
Experts 3D visualization: Stefan Meyer, Boris Dudesek, Lukas Burkhard
052-1132-21LArchitectural Design V-IX: Let's Walk About Form (a.o. Prof. An Fonteyne) Information Restricted registration - show details
Please register (www.mystudies.ethz.ch) only after the internal enrolment for the design classes (see http://www.einschreibung.arch.ethz.ch/design.php).

Project grading at semester end is based on the list of enrolments on 2nd April 2021, 24:00 h. This is the ultimate deadline to unsubscribe or enroll for the studio!
W14 credits16UA. Fonteyne
Abstract“Each form is an active force, it creates the community, it is life itself made manifest.” These words by Alison and Peter Smithson point at a strong belief in the power of forms in the city, claiming their active force, their generative potential, beyond a mere question of appearance or taste.
This semester, together, we will investigate the possibility of the form as a project in itself.
Objective- We will walk and discover what we can see when we look at the
context of a street over and over again. Based on those
observations, we will select relevant sites of intervention.
- We will carry out a collective reflection on form, and all that it can
do for architecture, for the city, for society, as a volume, an element,
an ornament.
- Through formal additions we will seek to establish new relations
within the existing urban conditions we will encounter.
- We will rethink form as a place that can be inhabited from the inside
and from the outside, that affords, connects, articulates, polarizes,
cuts.
- We will explore how a form can contribute to a more inviting public
space, reflecting on ownership and usership.
- We will learn from a series of guests presenting their visions on form from an architectural, artistic, or research point of view.
Content“Each form is an active force, it creates the community, it is life itself made manifest.” These words by Alison and Peter Smithson point at a strong belief in the power of forms in the city, claiming their active force, their generative potential, beyond a mere question of appearance or taste.

Although architecture is a de facto formal activity, claiming form as the main purpose of a design reflection exposes one to the dismissal of being a formalist. Thinking about form, pure form, seems to have many pitfalls: producing an all too autonomous architecture, a self-centered building, an architect’s dream, disconnected from reality, and that once again won’t change anything fundamentally.
So how can we reassert that form does matter? That, as the Smithsons point out, form is actually about life, and about community, about all the things that the form enables around and within itself?

Starting from this question, we will attempt to carry out a thorough reflection on forms in their plastic, but also in their many social, political and contextual implications. To do so, we will start by observing a selection of ‘pure forms’, and their iterations in architecture, on different scales, in different places and times, but also in art history, in crafts, or in the Zurich urban context. This individual research will result in a collective Atlas of Forms, coming together in the first weeks of the studio to then feed the rest of the semester. A research that will be accompanied by the figures of Aldo and Hannie Van Eyck, whose many thematic writings on form will be read collectively, and elaborated upon.

In parallel, we will once again observe a street starting in Zurich and extending into its periphery, cutting through heterogeneous neighborhoods and urban conditions. We will develop a walking practice, a habit of observing this strip, over and over again, learning to discover the hidden qualities of the everyday. A way to go beyond what we think we know, and make the familiar seem strange again.
An investigative process that will result in a situated knowledge. A knowledge ‘from within’ which will allow to identify relevant sites of intervention as well as investigate the agency of the architect, and will help formulate proposals to install forms along that street, establishing a new set of affordances, a connection, an articulation, a polarity, a cut. A relational approach, observing the individual form, and all that it can do for its material and social surroundings. In the process, we will discover what the pure forms of the Atlas can become: a building’s volume, an element, an ornament. Over the course of that journey, we will be accompanied by a series of guests presenting their own relationship to the idea of form.

This semester, together, we will investigate the possibility of the form as a project in itself. Forms that are not hermetic or self-referential, but open ones, that dialogue, that signal, that offer.
Prerequisites / NoticeIndividual work and group work, whereof 5 or more weeks of group work.
Mid-term crits: 16./17.3., 4./5.5.
Costs: CHF 100.--
052-1128-21LArchitectural Design V-IX: Stadtpark Katzenbach. Shaping a New Peri-Urban Park in Zurich Nord Information Restricted registration - show details
Please register (www.mystudies.ethz.ch) only after the internal enrolment for the design classes (see http://www.einschreibung.arch.ethz.ch/design.php).

Project grading at semester end is based on the list of enrolments on 2nd April 2021, 24:00 h. This is the ultimate deadline to unsubscribe or enroll for the studio!
W14 credits16UC. Girot
AbstractThe Landscape Architecture Studio of Prof. Christophe Girot will design a new peri-urban park on the Katzenbach plain. The park will provide the inhabitants of Affoltern and Seebach with a new vision of public space that exploits the infrastructure, ecological value, and the productive landscape unique to the peri-urban area of Zürich Nord.
ObjectiveWe will work on the Katzensee area and its Hinterland (a protected nature reserve) and the space in between Affoltern and Seebach along the 7km long Katzenbach, Zurich’s longest open stream. The site borders a dynamic urban area which has been transformed from a pastoral landscape of scattered farmsteads into the city’s largest growing residential district with a projected population growth rate of over 17% until at least 2038. Affoltern has yet to transform any of the areas zoned for public space into significant public parks.
When viewing the remaining ‘space in-between’ Affoltern and Seebach from the perspective of the open space, recasting sprawling settlements as urban islands within a larger territory, the area holds significant value as a potential site for Zurich’s first large-scale urban park. This raises the question: what can we do as designers to give this area a structure that can hold over time and improve the quality of living at the northern edge of the city?

The FS 2021 Design Studio will focus on large-scale urban landscape design through digital point cloud modeling. During the semester, students will acquire skills in point cloud technology, digital 3D modeling and visualization techniques.

The goal of the studio is to develop a peri-urban park along the Katzenbach between Affoltern and Seebach. Students will work with microtopography and the topology of water to restructure the plain into a patchwork of public programs.

The design will follow a three-scales approach: urban design (large scale), park design (medium scale) and detail design (small scale).
ContentThe studio is structured into three phases and includes multiple site visits.

PHASE 1: SITE VISIT, URBAN DESIGN AND HYPOTHESIS
In the first part of the semester, students will focus on the urban design scale in the area between Affoltern and Seebach. After an introduction, a site visit will give the students a better understanding of the area. They will analyze the periphery of Affoltern and Seebach, identify and structure areas for public space along the urban edges and envision a landscape park using the Katzenbach as a strategic backbone to connect the urban context of Glattpark with the rural setting of the Katzenseen.
In this phase, students will also attend guest lectures on urban design and park design. A one-day design charrette with experts will help to build basic knowledge of the peri-urban area and to create the first urban park sketches.

PHASE 2: DESIGN DEVELOPMENT THROUGH MODELING AND ITERATION
This phase will be dedicated to the focus area, namely the perimeter of the new public park. At this landscape scale, they will focus on the topology of water, microtopography and propose a program appropriate for the park.
Furthermore, they will be introduced to key tools such as 3D scanning and point cloud technology to generate topographies for 3D modeling.

PHASE 3: PROJECT SYNTHESIS AND VISUALIZATION
In the final part of the semester, students will focus on further defining the social aspects of the park area through detail design. By applying modeling and visualization techniques, they will illustrate the recreational activities and opportunities for social gathering of their detail area.
Lecture notesA course booklet will be provided at the introduction.
LiteratureA course booklet will be provided at the introduction. Furthermore, a semester apparat will be available to the students at the ILA Library.
Prerequisites / Notice- Introduction: Tuesday 23.02.2021, 10:00h
- The studio space is ETH Hönggerberg HIL C40.1 (we will work via Zoom)
- The design will be developed in groups of two, with individual assignments
- Language of instruction is English; Assistance in English or German
- The studio includes "Integrierte Disziplin Planung (Ch.Girot)", 3 ETCS credits
052-1118-21LArchitectural Design V-IX: Preserve - Densify - Continue to Build (M. Guyer) Information Restricted registration - show details
Please register (www.mystudies.ethz.ch) only after the internal enrolment for the design classes (see http://www.einschreibung.arch.ethz.ch/design.php).

Project grading at semester end is based on the list of enrolments on 2nd April 2021, 24:00 h. This is the ultimate deadline to unsubscribe or enroll for the studio!
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W14 credits16UM. Guyer
AbstractWe examine the architectural, social, structural, spatial and visual potential of the existing building and question the common practice of densification by replacing new buildings. It's about dealing with what already exists, transforming something that already exists, reusing it and adding it in a meaningful way.
ObjectiveAbility to develop a design from an idea, a concept, to a fully evolved project; to continually self-critically question the intermediary stages in this process; and, simultaneously, to find an individual design methodology and design stance.
ContentWe question the common practice of densification with replacement new buildings and give the existing structure more weight in terms of sustainable urban development. We are looking for solutions where, even under the pressure of doubling the utilization, the existing building is preserved by being reinterpreted and revitalized, renovated and rebuilt, expanded and stocked up. The stock as part of the city's history is increasingly seen as an important cultural resource for shaping the future and the stored, social, structural, spatial and visual potential is activated for new projects. The bulkiness of existing buildings often provides food for thought for new solutions and discoveries. It is important to find the right balance between old and new and to accept heterogeneity, contrasts and leaps in scale as part of the future city.

The focus is on Altstetten, which is shown in the structure plan as the quarter with high densification potential in the west of Zurich. In terms of population and area, it is the largest district in the city and has the most jobs. With the smallest proportion of Wilhelminian style buildings and the largest proportion of new buildings since 1990, it is a very heterogeneous quarter that has developed dynamically. Five different areas have been selected as design laboratories, each with its own urban planning objective. The Neumarkt Altstetten is to strengthen the district center around Lindenplatz, the Farbhof area is to create a square situation as a western gateway to Altstetten, the Hero building is to become a further developed urban building block in the service area of ​​the station, the Bachwiesen area is to maintain the garden city vision despite the densification, the Freihof area is to retain the high quality heterogeneity of an urban area reveal. The areas show the diversity of the quarter: the Farbhof area is in the west, the Freihof area in the east of Badenerstrasse, the Bachwiesen area in the south, the Hero area in the north of Altstetterstrasse. The Neumarkt Altstetten is located at the intersection of the two main axes.

n view of the current urban space deficits between newer area developments, not only the transitions between public, semi-private and private outdoor spaces within the areas, but also the relationship between the areas and the surroundings and the urban body are dealt with. Since the quality of the open space is essential during compression, courtyards and spaces between sidewalks and house edges should be made usable and accessible and be of use to the public and the owners alike.

A sensible mix of uses, new work and living typologies, suitable ground floor use, new supporting structures, intelligent building envelopes, greenery, innovative energy concepts and reuse / recycle / upcycle concepts are decisive for the design. These main topics are deepened with lectures, workshops and visits. A collection of texts and reference examples is continuously expanded during the semester and is available as a document for everyone for inspiration.

With the introductory exercise “Image - Form”, the existing situation is felt in a playful and intuitive way and the right thing to see is learned. In the first review, the concept is summarized in a concise presentation. These results are continuously processed and are part of the final submission. The projects are discussed at the final reviews with guests and the chair in the range of concept ideas, urban planning and architectural presence, dealing with the existing structure and the quality of the outdoor and indoor spaces.
Prerequisites / NoticeGroup work only.
Mid-term crits: 16./17.3., 13./14.4., 1./5.5.
Costs: CHF 50.--.
052-1134-21LArchitectural Design V-IX: Material Gesture - Textile (A. Holtrop) Information Restricted registration - show details
Please register (www.mystudies.ethz.ch) only after the internal enrolment for the design classes (see http://www.einschreibung.arch.ethz.ch/design.php).

Project grading at semester end is based on the list of enrolments on 2nd April 2021, 24:00 h. This is the ultimate deadline to unsubscribe or enroll for the studio!
W14 credits16UA. Holtrop
AbstractIn times of constant and unpredictable change, we look at textile as one of the most adaptive and comforting materials.
ObjectiveWhen we take all aspects of the material into consideration – the geology, the sourcing, the industry, the different properties, the craftsmanship, the specialised techniques and the cultural significance – we can deploy the full potential of the inherent qualities of the material itself and our way of working it in what we call MATERIAL GESTURE.

In this design studio, you will define your gestures of making and working with material(s) through research and experiment, and in response to the topic of the studio. You are required to produce an architecture that results from your specific engagement with the material and the spatial condition you construct with it. The architecture that results from this approach does not reference or represent something, but simply attempts to exist as a physical spatial reality in its own right.

Your research should be supported by the knowledge made available by our studio, and engaged through you with the use of available resources and facilities at departments of the ETH and from external specialists/fabricators.

Throughout the whole semester, and for your final presentation, we require that you work with physical (fragment) models of your building in the actual material(s). It is important, in this design studio, not to make a complete building, but to show and support the found values of the material engagement in a spatial way, based on the full potential of the inherent qualities of the material itself and your way of working it.
ContentWe will study space as an adaptive environment in which textile plays a central role, from rugs and tents that can be traveled with, to technologically advanced woven fabrics that can transform to changing conditions.

Through the theory of Gottfried Semper, we will look back at textiles, which were used as a bonding material to string and bind, and as woven material to cover, to protect and to enclose.
Prerequisites / NoticeIndividual work only.
Mid term crits: 20./21. June 21.
Costs: CHF 100.--
052-1110-21LArchitectural Design V-IX: Meteora #04 Alienations (L. Hovestadt) Information Restricted registration - show details
Please register (www.mystudies.ethz.ch) only after the internal enrolment for the design classes (see http://www.einschreibung.arch.ethz.ch/design.php).

Project grading at semester end is based on the list of enrolments on 2nd April 2021, 24:00 h. This is the ultimate deadline to unsubscribe or enroll for the studio!
W14 credits16UL. Hovestadt
AbstractThis studio works on the idea that a substantial understanding of
todays technology (internet of things, big data, machine
intelligence...) changes the perspective to architectural theory
and will result in different architectural designs and building
constructions.
Objective1) Identification and understanding of the challenges of todays technologies;
2) techniques of working within the plenty of the internet;
3) a methodology to design digital architectures;
4) understanding of the shift from hard building construction to soft building applications, and
5) an understanding of the importance of becoming a literate digital
persona in order to be an architect today.
ContentMETEORA #04 ALIENATIONS

in the time of corona,
sitting at home,
connected with the world.

we feel like laughing.
sitting at the edge of the world.
we start thinking.

an alien building of the last century (ludwig wittgenstein house, vienna, 1928)
meets
an alien figure of today's media (lenny belardo aka jude law by paolo sorrentino, 2016)

you look at me
and I look at you.

I'm the world,
I'm the world,
the world in a box.

METEORA #04 is an architectonic exercise
on our cultural heritage
and its challenges of today.

white noise,
beautiful white noise.

in a room without a roof
i'm staring at the ceiling.

METEORA #04  will use artificial intelligence
        to write a text to explicate a precise position in today's world,
        to create a spectrum of images to reflect this world
        and design an architectural artefact which brings things into adequate proportions

in the plentiful noise of today
lenny will help us to talk about the world today, and
ludwig will help us to make detailed architectonic arguments.
Prerequisites / NoticeIndividual work only.
Mid term crits: Dates will follow.
No extra costs!
052-1116-21LArchitectural Design V-IX: Tourism Behaviorology in Switzerland (M.Kaijima) Information Restricted registration - show details
Please register (www.mystudies.ethz.ch) only after the internal enrolment for the design classes (see http://www.einschreibung.arch.ethz.ch/design.php).

Project grading at semester end is based on the list of enrolments on 2nd April 2021, 24:00 h. This is the ultimate deadline to unsubscribe or enroll for the studio!
W14 credits16UM. Kaijima
AbstractThe tourism industry is important economic sector in Switzerland to activate the rural area for exchange between local and global. A role of architecture is creating local identity. We engage with the question of tourism architecture in Interlaken and Grindelwald with historical perspective to use image through actor-network drawing for arguments and critics in the future local context.
Objective<Understanding of Architectural Behaviorology concept>
Today’s local populations and ecologies are confronted by a raft of critical issues that have become manifest at a shared global level. A key worldwide aspect in these interlinked challenges is the dual phenomena of aging societies and the depopulation of rural areas, whereby the development of modern technology and industry in the course of the 20th century has played a huge role in triggering these problems by establishing barriers between everyday life and local resources, such as nature, human skills and accumulated knowledge. Rural communities based on small-scale primary industries, which have traditionally been vital not only in securing national food supplies but also in maintaining a sustainable ecosystem balance between mankind and nature, face a growing struggle in terms of generational succession and transfer.
Architectural Behaviorology is our design theory and methodology whose objective is to rediscover the forgotten values of resources through the lens of ethnography. It tries to find barriers and challenge them in order to create better accessibilities to local resources, and to activate the behaviors of actors, both human and resource.
Architectural Behaviorology introduces better understanding on architectural form in the relationship with various behaviors of things, such as nature, human, and buildings.
Using the core design approach of architectural behaviourology the research project advocates and demonstrates, both theoretically and in real-world practice, the significance of creating urban-rural commons to rejuvenate community livelihoods with small-scale primary industries (farming, fisheries, and forestry), taking both Asia (Japan) and Europe (Switzerland) as geographically distant yet mutually applicable and promising applied settings.

<Learning research method>
Actor-network Drawing is design research platform in the chair learning from Actor-Network Theory (ANT) from Bruno Latour’s: Science In Action: How to Follow Scientists and Engineers Through Society (Harvard University Press, Cambridge Mass., USA. 1987). It is for sharing research observations for area and to bridge them towards design practice and also finding hybrid knowledge between place(before 20 century model), space (20 century model) and network (21 century model). We are learning the hand drawing as a physical movement as digesting the gap between life and information setting real experience as our knowledge. And also drawing manner is allowing us to dialogue with history and to discuss between ourselves.

<Learning design method>
How we design using resources to create and to emphasis local network to be sustain the society by learning typologies and material, skill, people.

<Learning visualization method by actor net-work mapping, model, a large hand drawing
>
Integration of the visualization would be discussed under intention of the project to create architectural language for social context.

<Learning structure and material>
Integration of the concept from detail of structure and material to environmental scale as architectural language. Students would consider the network of the architectural meaning from history to today.
Content<Tourism Behaviorology in Switzerland>
The tourism industry is one of Switzerland’s most important economic sectors and employs around 4% of the working population. Tourism is also the most important driver of exchange between the rural and the urban community.
At the crossroads of Europe, Switzerland has always attracted visitors. In the 18th centuries, Romantic literature and art engendered unparalleled enthusiasm for the mountains. In the 19th century, it was discovered that high altitude fresh air had a therapeutic effect on lung disease and Swiss alpine villages began to market themselves as health resorts too. In 2015, the Swiss tourism industry generated around 2.8% of the country’s gross domestic product, or a total of CHF 17.4 billion.
Thanks to a steadily growing infrastructure network of hotels, railways, cable cars, shops and restaurants, small mountain villages are able to handle this sheer number of visitors. But what role do these infrastructures play in the appearance of the small villages and towns, sought by tourists? Strengthening the local character and creating a local identity is an important role architecture has to play in a touristic town or village. The architecture, as well as the entire tourism industry, have to keep a good balance between touristic and local aspects, between the local and global economy.
This semester we will engage with the question of tourism architecture in the case of Interlaken and Grindelwald in the canton of Bern. We will critically examine the existing context by researching its history, analyzing its actor network, and propose and argument how the two towns could be developed further. How should they look like? What should they offer? And how will the ongoing Corona pandemic and the rising temperature due to climate change affect the tourism industry in the long run?

<Schedule>
Week 1
2.23 9.00 Orientation
13.00 Workshop
17.30 Site selection
2.24 8.30-16.30 Desk critiques
16.30 Input lecture and text discussion
Week2
3.2 7.00-18.00 Site Visit
3.3 8.30-18.00 Desk Critiques(13.00-13.30 Input Lecture and text discussion)
Week3
3.9 8.30-16.30 Desk critiques
16.30-Input lecture and text discussion
3.10 Parity Talks
Week4
3.16 8.30-16.30 Desk critiques
16.30-Input lecture and text discussion
3.17 8.30-18.00 Desk Critiques(13.00-13.30 Input Lecture and text discussion)
Week5
Seminar Week Off
Week6
3.30/31 8.30-18.00 Mid Review1
Week7
Easter Holiday
Week8
4.13 8.30-18.00 Desk Critiques
4.14 8.30-18.00 Desk Critiques(13.00-13.30 Input Lecture and text discussion)
Week9
4.20 8.30-18.00 Desk Critiques
4.21 8.30-18.00 Desk Critiques
13.00-13.30 Input Lecture and text discussion
Week10
4.27/28 8.30-18.00 Mid Review 2
Week11
5.04 8.30-18.00 Desk Critiques
5.05 8.30-18.00 Desk Critiques(13.00-13.30 Input Lecture and text discussion)
Week12
5.11 8.30-18.00 Desk Critiques
5.12 8.30-18.00 Desk Critiques
13.00-13.30 Input Lecture and text discussion
Week13
5.18 8.30-18.00 Desk Critiques
5.19 8.30-18.00 Desk Critiques(13.00-13.30 Input Lecture and text discussion)
Week14
5.25/26 8.30-18.00 Desk Critiques
Week15
6.1/2 8.30-18.00 Final Review

<Assignment and deadline>
Mid Review 1 Assignment (dead line 3.29 17.00):
Actor Network Drawing Area Size: 6 x A3
Picture Essay
Text (400 words)
Mid Review 2 Assignment(dead line 4.26 17.00):
Actor Network Drawing Project Size: 12 x A3
containing: Plan(s), Section(s), Elevation(s)
Model(s)
Text (ca. 400 words)
Final Review Assignment (dead line 5.31 12.00):
Actor Network Drawing Project Size: 12 x A3
containing: Plan(s), Section(s), Elevation(s), Detail(s)
Model(s)
Text (ca. 400 words)
LiteratureBruno Latour: Science In Action: How to Follow Scientists and Engineers Through Society (Harvard University Press, Cambridge Mass., USA. 1987)
Atelier Bow-Wow: Graphic Anatomy 1, TOTO Publishing, 2007
Atelier Bow-Wow: Graphic Anatomy 2,TOTO Publishing, 2012
Momoyo Kaijima, Junzo Kuroda, Yoshiharu Tsukamoto: Made in Tokyo, Kajima Publisher,2001
Momoyo Kaijima, Laurent Stalder, Yu Iseki: Architectural Ethnography, TOTO Publishing, 2018
Andreas Kalpakchi,Momoyo Kaijima,Laurent Stalder/ETH Zurich: Arch+238 Architektur Ethnografie, Arch+,2020
Prerequisites / NoticeOrientation 2.23 9.00 @https://ethz.zoom.us/j/7392997400

Individual work and group work, where of 1-2 weeks of group work.
Final review:6.1./2
Mid-term crits: 3.30./31 and 4.27./28
Costs: CHF 100.--.

<Integrated Discipline: Tourism Behaviorology in Switzerland>
The design course is tough in collaboration with the chair for the theory of architecture. The „integrated discipline“ aims to support the students in their research. Is is organised in two parts: A methodological introduction and a field research on a particular building / neighborhood / place in Interlaken or Grindelwald. The task will be a picture-essay, that will constitute the base of the actor-network drawing.
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