Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2021

Doctoral Department of Physics Information
Doctoral and Post-Doctoral Courses
Please note that this is an INCOMPLETE list of courses.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
376-1792-00LIntroductory Course in Neuroscience II (University of Zurich)
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at UZH.
UZH Module Code: SPV0Y020

Mind the enrolment deadlines at UZH:
https://www.uzh.ch/cmsssl/en/studies/application/deadlines.html
W2 credits2VUniversity lecturers
AbstractThis course discusses behavioral aspects in neuroscience. Modern brain imaging methods are described. Clinical issues including diseases of the nervous system are studied. Sleep research and neuroimmunology are discussed. Finally, the course deals with the basic concepts in psychiatry.
Objective
Prerequisites / NoticeFür Doktorierende des Zentrums für Neurowissenschaften Zürich.
101-0178-01LUncertainty Quantification in Engineering Information W3 credits2GS. Marelli, B. Sudret
AbstractUncertainty quantification aims at studying the impact of aleatory and epistemic uncertainty onto computational models used in science and engineering. The course introduces the basic concepts of uncertainty quantification: probabilistic modelling of data (copula theory), uncertainty propagation techniques (Monte Carlo simulation, polynomial chaos expansions), and sensitivity analysis.
ObjectiveAfter this course students will be able to properly pose an uncertainty quantification problem, select the appropriate computational methods and interpret the results in meaningful statements for field scientists, engineers and decision makers. The course is suitable for any master/Ph.D. student in engineering or natural sciences, physics, mathematics, computer science with a basic knowledge in probability theory.
ContentThe course introduces uncertainty quantification through a set of practical case studies that come from civil, mechanical, nuclear and electrical engineering, from which a general framework is introduced. The course in then divided into three blocks: probabilistic modelling (introduction to copula theory), uncertainty propagation (Monte Carlo simulation and polynomial chaos expansions) and sensitivity analysis (correlation measures, Sobol' indices). Each block contains lectures and tutorials using Matlab and the in-house software UQLab (www.uqlab.com).
Lecture notesDetailed slides are provided for each lecture. A printed script gathering all the lecture slides may be bought at the beginning of the semester.
Prerequisites / NoticeA basic background in probability theory and statistics (bachelor level) is required. A summary of useful notions will be handed out at the beginning of the course.

A good knowledge of Matlab is required to participate in the tutorials and for the mini-project.
402-0620-00LCurrent Topics in Accelerator Mass Spectrometry and Its ApplicatonsE-0 credits1SM. Christl, S. Willett
AbstractThe seminar is aimed at all students who, during their studies, are confronted with age determination methods based on long-living radionuclides found in nature. Basic methodology, the latest developments, and special examples from a wide range of applications will be discussed.
ObjectiveThe seminar provides the participants an overview about newest trends and developments of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and related applications. In their talks and subsequent discussions the participants learn intensively about the newest trends in the field of AMS thus attaining a broad knowledge on both, the physical principles and the applications of AMS, which goes far beyond the horizon of their own studies.
402-0248-00LElectronics for Physicists II (Digital) Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30.
W4 credits4GY. M. Acremann
AbstractThe course will start with logic and finite state machines. These concepts will be applied in practical exercises using FPGAs. Based on this knowledge we will cover the working principles of microprocessors. We will cover combined systems where a micro processor is used for the complex parts and specialized logic on the FPGA is in charge of processing time-critical signals.
ObjectiveThe goal of this lecture is to give an overview over digital electronic design needed for timing and data acquisition systems used in physics. After this lecture you will have the knowledge to design digital systems based on FPGAs and microcontrollers.
ContentThe goal of this lecture is to give an overview over digital electronic design needed for timing and data acquisition systems used in physics. After this lecture you will have the knowledge to design digital systems based on FPGAs and micro controllers.

Contents:
Combinational logic
Flip-Flops
Binary representations of numbers, binary arithmetic
Counters, shift registers

Hardware description languages (mostly VHDL)
Field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs)
From algorithm to architecture
Finite state machines

Buses (parallel, serial)
The SPI bus

Digital signal processing
The sampling theorem
Z-transform,
Digital filters
Frequency conversion

The microprocessor (illustrated on an open-source implementation of the RISC-V microprocessor)
SPI bus with a micro controller
Combined systems: FPGA for the time critical part, processor for the user interface
System-on-chip (FPGA based)
Prerequisites / NoticeWe recommend the students to have taken Analog Electronics for Physicists or to have knowledge of basic analog electronics.

Students (or at least each group of 2 / 3 students) need a laptop computer, preferably running Linux or Windows. For other operating systems we recommend running Linux or Windows on a virtual machine.
402-0395-00LMultimessenger Constraints of Generalizations of Gravity
Does not take place this semester.
W8 credits3GL. Heisenberg
AbstractThe LIGO detections of Gravitational Waves have started the field of Gravitational Wave astronomy. This opens an exiting opportunity to test gravity theories in regimes where it has not been tested yet. Together with standard cosmological observations, one can put tight multimessenger constraints on different cosmological models.
ObjectiveThese lecture series will be dedicated to combining theory with cosmological observations. First of all, I will discuss the consistent construction of prominent gravity theories, both from a geometrical as well as field theory perspectives. I will introduce more general space-time geometries as well as the building blocks of field theories based on additional degrees of freedom in the gravity sector. Coming from the theory side, I will explain the theoretical constraints and consistency checks that can be applied to fundamental gravity theories. In the observational side, the confrontation of gravity theories with cosmological observations is a crucial ingredient in testing these theories. A natural starting point will be the study of the background evolution. Theory parameters can then be constrained using the distance redshift relation from Supernovae, the distance priors method from CMB and BAO measurements. Given the recent developments in gravitational wave physics, I will discuss the implications of alternative gravity theories in the regime of strong gravity.
LiteratureUseful reading materials: cosmology book by Matthias Bartelmann, gravitational waves book by Michele Maggiore and the articles arXiv:1807.01725, arXiv:1806.05195
227-0390-00LElements of MicroscopyW4 credits3GM. Stampanoni, G. Csúcs, A. Sologubenko
AbstractThe lecture reviews the basics of microscopy by discussing wave propagation, diffraction phenomena and aberrations. It gives the basics of light microscopy, introducing fluorescence, wide-field, confocal and multiphoton imaging. It further covers 3D electron microscopy and 3D X-ray tomographic micro and nanoimaging.
ObjectiveSolid introduction to the basics of microscopy, either with visible light, electrons or X-rays.
ContentIt would be impossible to imagine any scientific activities without the help of microscopy. Nowadays, scientists can count on very powerful instruments that allow investigating sample down to the atomic level.
The lecture includes a general introduction to the principles of microscopy, from wave physics to image formation. It provides the physical and engineering basics to understand visible light, electron and X-ray microscopy.
During selected exercises in the lab, several sophisticated instrument will be explained and their capabilities demonstrated.
LiteratureAvailable Online.
402-0395-50LCosmological Frontiers of GravityW4 credits2GL. Heisenberg
AbstractThese lecture series will be dedicated to different advanced topics within the framework of theoretical cosmology and gravity. A detailed introduction into the successful construction of gravitational interactions will be given, together with their cosmological implications.
ObjectiveThese lecture series will be dedicated to combining theory with cosmological observations. First of all, I will discuss the consistent construction of prominent gravity theories, both from a geometrical as well as field theory perspectives. I will introduce more general space-time geometries as well as the building blocks of field theories based on additional degrees of freedom in the gravity sector. Coming from the theory side, I will explain the theoretical constraints and consistency checks that can be applied to fundamental gravity theories. In the observational side, the confrontation of gravity theories with cosmological observations is a crucial ingredient in testing these theories. A natural starting point will be the study of the background evolution. Theory parameters can then be constrained using the distance redshift relation from Supernovae, the distance priors method from CMB and BAO measurements. Given the recent developments in gravitational wave physics, I will discuss the implications of light bosons in the regime of strong gravity.
LiteratureUseful reading materials: cosmology book by Matthias Bartelmann, gravitational waves book by Michele Maggiore and the articles arXiv:1807.01725, arXiv:1806.05195
402-0533-00LQuantum Acoustics and Optomechanics
Does not take place this semester.
W6 credits2V + 1UY. Chu
AbstractThis course gives an introduction to the interaction of mechanical motion with electromagnetic fields in the quantum regime. There are parallels between the quantum descriptions of mechanical resonators, electrical circuits, and light, but each system also has its own unique properties. We will explore how interfacing them can be useful for technological applications and fundamental science.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is provide the introductory knowledge necessary to understand current research in quantum acoustics and optomechanics. As part of this goal, we will also cover some related aspects of acoustics, quantum optics, and circuit/cavity quantum electrodynamics.
ContentThe focus of this course will be on the properties of and interactions between mechanical and electromagnetic systems in the context of quantum information and technologies. We will only briefly touch upon precision measurement and sensing with optomechanics since it is the topic of another course (227-0653-00L). Some topics that will be covered are:
- Mechanical motion and acoustics in solid state materials
- Quantum description of motion, electrical circuits, and light.
- Different models for quantum interactions: optomechanical, Jaynes-Cummings, etc.
- Mechanisms for mechanical coupling to electromagnetic fields: piezoelectricity, electrostriction, radiation pressure, etc.
- Coherent interactions vs. dissipative processes: phenomenon and applications in different regimes.
- State-of the art electromechanical and optomechanical systems.
Lecture notesNotes will be provided for each lecture.
LiteratureParts of books and research papers will be used.
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowledge of quantum mechanics would be highly useful.
402-0532-50LQuantum Solid State Magnetism IIW6 credits2V + 1UK. Povarov
AbstractThis course covers the modern developments and problems in the field of solid state magnetism. It has the special emphasis on the phenomena that go beyond semiclassical approximation, such as quantum paramagnets, spin liquids and magnetic frustration. The course is aimed at both the experimentalists and theorists, and the theoretical concepts are balanced by the experimental data.
ObjectiveLearn the modern approach to the complex magnetic phases of matter and the transitions between them. A number of theoretical approaches that go beyond the linear spin wave theory will be discussed during the course, and an overview of the experimental status quo will be given.
Content- Phase transitions in the magnetic matter. Classical and quantum criticality. Consequences of broken symmetries for the spectral properties. Absence of order in the low-dimensional systems. Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition and its relevance to “layered” magnets.

- Failures of linear spin wave theory. Spin wave decays. Antiferromagnets as bosonic systems. Gapped “quantum paramagnets” and their phase diagrams. Extended spin wave theory. Magnetic “Bose-Einstein condensation”.

- Spin systems in one dimension: XY, Ising and Heisenberg model. Lieb-Schultz-Mattis theorem. Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid description of the XXZ spin chains. Spin ladders and Haldane chains. Critical points in one dimension and generalized phase diagram.

- Effects of disorder in magnets. Harris criterion. “Spin islands” in depleted gapped magnets.

- Introduction into magnetic frustration. Order-from-disorder phenomena and triangular lattice in the magnetic field. Frustrated chain and frustrated square lattice models. Exotic magnetic states in two dimensions.
Lecture notesA comprehensive textbook-like script is provided.
LiteratureIn principle, the script is sufficient as study material. Additional reading:

-"Interacting Electrons and Quantum Magnetism" by A. Auerbach
-"Basic Aspects of The Quantum Theory of Solids " by D. Khomskii
-"Quantum Physics in One Dimension" by T. Giamarchi
-"Quantum Theory of Magnetism: Magnetic properties of Materials" by R. M. White
-"Frustrated Spin Systems" ed. H. T. Diep
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite:
402-0861-00L Statistical Physics
402-0501-00L Solid State Physics


Not prerequisite, but a good companion course:
402-0871-00L Solid State Theory
402-0257-00L Advanced Solid State Physics
402-0535-00L Introduction to Magnetism
402-0532-00L Quantum Solid State Magnetism I
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