Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2021

Computational Science and Engineering Bachelor Information
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Electives
In the ‘electives’ subcategory, at least two course units must be successfully completed.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
252-3900-00LBig Data for Engineers Information
This course is not intended for Computer Science and Data Science MSc students!
W6 credits2V + 2U + 1AG. Fourny
AbstractThis course is part of the series of database lectures offered to all ETH departments, together with Information Systems for Engineers. It introduces the most recent advances in the database field: how do we scale storage and querying to Petabytes of data, with trillions of records? How do we deal with heterogeneous data sets? How do we deal with alternate data shapes like trees and graphs?
ObjectiveThis lesson is complementary with Information Systems for Engineers as they cover different time periods of database history and practices -- you can even take both lectures at the same time.

The key challenge of the information society is to turn data into information, information into knowledge, knowledge into value. This has become increasingly complex. Data comes in larger volumes, diverse shapes, from different sources. Data is more heterogeneous and less structured than forty years ago. Nevertheless, it still needs to be processed fast, with support for complex operations.

This combination of requirements, together with the technologies that have emerged in order to address them, is typically referred to as "Big Data." This revolution has led to a completely new way to do business, e.g., develop new products and business models, but also to do science -- which is sometimes referred to as data-driven science or the "fourth paradigm".

Unfortunately, the quantity of data produced and available -- now in the Zettabyte range (that's 21 zeros) per year -- keeps growing faster than our ability to process it. Hence, new architectures and approaches for processing it were and are still needed. Harnessing them must involve a deep understanding of data not only in the large, but also in the small.

The field of databases evolves at a fast pace. In order to be prepared, to the extent possible, to the (r)evolutions that will take place in the next few decades, the emphasis of the lecture will be on the paradigms and core design ideas, while today's technologies will serve as supporting illustrations thereof.

After visiting this lecture, you should have gained an overview and understanding of the Big Data landscape, which is the basis on which one can make informed decisions, i.e., pick and orchestrate the relevant technologies together for addressing each business use case efficiently and consistently.
ContentThis course gives an overview of database technologies and of the most important database design principles that lay the foundations of the Big Data universe.

It targets specifically students with a scientific or Engineering, but not Computer Science, background.

We take the monolithic, one-machine relational stack from the 1970s, smash it down and rebuild it on top of large clusters: starting with distributed storage, and all the way up to syntax, models, validation, processing, indexing, and querying. A broad range of aspects is covered with a focus on how they fit all together in the big picture of the Big Data ecosystem.

No data is harmed during this course, however, please be psychologically prepared that our data may not always be in normal form.

- physical storage: distributed file systems (HDFS), object storage(S3), key-value stores

- logical storage: document stores (MongoDB), column stores (HBase)

- data formats and syntaxes (XML, JSON, RDF, CSV, YAML, protocol buffers, Avro)

- data shapes and models (tables, trees)

- type systems and schemas: atomic types, structured types (arrays, maps), set-based type systems (?, *, +)

- an overview of functional, declarative programming languages across data shapes (SQL, JSONiq)

- the most important query paradigms (selection, projection, joining, grouping, ordering, windowing)

- paradigms for parallel processing, two-stage (MapReduce) and DAG-based (Spark)

- resource management (YARN)

- what a data center is made of and why it matters (racks, nodes, ...)

- underlying architectures (internal machinery of HDFS, HBase, Spark)

- optimization techniques (functional and declarative paradigms, query plans, rewrites, indexing)

- applications.

Large scale analytics and machine learning are outside of the scope of this course.
LiteraturePapers from scientific conferences and journals. References will be given as part of the course material during the semester.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course is not intended for Computer Science and Data Science students. Computer Science and Data Science students interested in Big Data MUST attend the Master's level Big Data lecture, offered in Fall.

Requirements: programming knowledge (Java, C++, Python, PHP, ...) as well as basic knowledge on databases (SQL). If you have already built your own website with a backend SQL database, this is perfect.

Attendance is especially recommended to those who attended Information Systems for Engineers last Fall, which introduced the "good old databases of the 1970s" (SQL, tables and cubes). However, this is not a strict requirement, and it is also possible to take the lectures in reverse order.
252-0312-00LUbiquitous Computing Information W6 credits2V + 3AC. Holz
AbstractUbiquitous Computing means interacting with information and with each other anywhere, mediated through miniature technology everywhere. We will investigate the technical aspects of Ubicomp, particularly sensing, processing, and sense making: input (touch & gesture), activity, monitoring cardiovascular health and neurological conditions, context & location sensing, affective computing.
ObjectiveThe course will combine high-level concepts with low-level technical methods needed to sense, detect, and understand them.

High-level:
– input modalities for interactive systems (touch, gesture)
– "activities" and "events" (exercises and other mechanical activities such as movements and resulting vibrations)
– health monitoring (basic cardiovascular physiology)
– location (GPS, urban simulations, smart cities and development)
– affective computing (emotions, mood, personality)

Low-level:
– sampling (Shannon Nyquist) and filtering (FIR, IIR), time and frequency domains (Fourier transforms)
– cross-modal sensor systems, signal synchronization and correlation
– event detection, classification, prediction using basic signal processing as well as learning-based methods
– sensor types: optical, mechanical/acoustic, electromagnetic

– signals modalities and processing of: application (modalities/methods)
* touch detection (resistive sensing, capacitive sensing, diffuse illumination/DI, spectral reflections, frustrated total internal reflection/FTIR, fingerprint scanning, surface-acoustic waves)
* gesture recognition (inertial sensing through accelerometers, gyroscopes)
* activity detection and tracking (inertial, acoustic, vibrotactile for classification, counting, vibrometry)
* occupation and use (electricity monitoring, water consumption, single-point sensing)
* cardiovascular (electrocardioagraphy, photoplethysmography, pulse oximetry, ballistocardiography, blood pressure, pulse transit time, bio impedance)
* affective computing (heart rate variability, R-R intervals, electrodermal activity, sympathetic tone, facial expressions)
* neurological (fatigue, fatigability)
* location (GPS, BLE, Wifi)
Content"The most profound technologies are those that disappear. They weave themselves into the fabric of everyday life until they are indistinguishable from it" — Mark Weiser, 1991.

This is the premise of Ubiquitous Computing, a vision that is slowly becoming reality as everything is a device and we can interact with information and with each other anywhere, mediated through miniature technology. Along with this change, interaction modalities have changed, too, from explicit input on keyboards and mice to implicit and passively observed input through sensors in the environment (e.g., speakers, cameras, temperature/occupancy detectors) and those we now wear on our bodies (e.g., health sensors, activity sensors, miniature computers we call smartwatches).

In this course, we will look at the technical side of Ubicomp, particularly
– sensing (incl. 'signals', sampling, data acquisition methods, controlled user studies, uncontrolled studies in-the-wild),
– processing (incl. frequencies, feature extraction, detection), and
– sense making: input sensing (touch & gesture), activity sensing (motion), monitoring cardiovascular health, affective state, neurological conditions (with basics on cardiovascular physiology + PPG, PulseOx, ECG, EDA, BCG, SCG, HRV, BioZ, IPG, PAT, PTT), context & location sensing (GPS/Wifi, motion).

Lectures will be accompanied by practical sessions that focus on sensor modalities and signal processing. Here, we will work on existing data sets and devise methods to record our own data for processing and prediction purposes.

A series of reading assignments, covering both well-established publications in Ubicomp as well as emerging results and methods, will bridge the fundamentals and topics taught in class to academic research and real-world problems.

More information on the course site: https://teaching.siplab.org/ubiquitous_computing/2021/
Lecture notesCopies of slides will be made available. Lectures will be recorded and made available online.

More information on the course site: https://teaching.siplab.org/ubiquitous_computing/2021/
LiteratureWill be provided in the lecture. To put you in the mood:
Mark Weiser: The Computer for the 21st Century. Scientific American, September 1991, pp. 94-104
227-1032-00LNeuromorphic Engineering II Information
Information for UZH students:
Enrolment to this course unit only possible at ETH. No enrolment to module INI405 at UZH.

Please mind the ETH enrolment deadlines for UZH students: Link
W6 credits5GT. Delbrück, G. Indiveri, S.‑C. Liu
AbstractThis course teaches the basics of analog chip design and layout with an emphasis on neuromorphic circuits, which are introduced in the fall semester course "Neuromorphic Engineering I".
ObjectiveDesign of a neuromorphic circuit for implementation with CMOS technology.
ContentThis course teaches the basics of analog chip design and layout with an emphasis on neuromorphic circuits, which are introduced in the autumn semester course "Neuromorphic Engineering I".

The principles of CMOS processing technology are presented. Using a set of inexpensive software tools for simulation, layout and verification, suitable for neuromorphic circuits, participants learn to simulate circuits on the transistor level and to make their layouts on the mask level. Important issues in the layout of neuromorphic circuits will be explained and illustrated with examples. In the latter part of the semester students simulate and layout a neuromorphic chip. Schematics of basic building blocks will be provided. The layout will then be fabricated and will be tested by students during the following fall semester.
LiteratureS.-C. Liu et al.: Analog VLSI Circuits and Principles; software documentation.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Neuromorphic Engineering I strongly recommended
227-1034-00LComputational Vision (University of Zurich)
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at UZH.
UZH Module Code: INI402

Mind the enrolment deadlines at UZH:
https://www.uzh.ch/cmsssl/en/studies/application/deadlines.html
W6 credits2V + 1UD. Kiper
AbstractThis course focuses on neural computations that underlie visual perception. We study how visual signals are processed in the retina, LGN and visual cortex. We study the morpholgy and functional architecture of cortical circuits responsible for pattern, motion, color, and three-dimensional vision.
ObjectiveThis course considers the operation of circuits in the process of neural computations. The evolution of neural systems will be considered to demonstrate how neural structures and mechanisms are optimised for energy capture, transduction, transmission and representation of information. Canonical brain circuits will be described as models for the analysis of sensory information. The concept of receptive fields will be introduced and their role in coding spatial and temporal information will be considered. The constraints of the bandwidth of neural channels and the mechanisms of normalization by neural circuits will be discussed.
The visual system will form the basis of case studies in the computation of form, depth, and motion. The role of multiple channels and collective computations for object recognition will
be considered. Coordinate transformations of space and time by cortical and subcortical mechanisms will be analysed. The means by which sensory and motor systems are integrated to allow for adaptive behaviour will be considered.
ContentThis course considers the operation of circuits in the process of neural computations. The evolution of neural systems will be considered to demonstrate how neural structures and mechanisms are optimised for energy capture, transduction, transmission and representation of information. Canonical brain circuits will be described as models for the analysis of sensory information. The concept of receptive fields will be introduced and their role in coding spatial and temporal information will be considered. The constraints of the bandwidth of neural channels and the mechanisms of normalization by neural circuits will be discussed.
The visual system will form the basis of case studies in the computation of form, depth, and motion. The role of multiple channels and collective computations for object recognition will
be considered. Coordinate transformations of space and time by cortical and subcortical mechanisms will be analysed. The means by which sensory and motor systems are integrated to allow for adaptive behaviour will be considered.
LiteratureBooks: (recommended references, not required)
1. An Introduction to Natural Computation, D. Ballard (Bradford Books, MIT Press) 1997.
2. The Handbook of Brain Theorie and Neural Networks, M. Arbib (editor), (MIT Press) 1995.
227-1046-00LComputer Simulations of Sensory Systems Information W3 credits3GT. Haslwanter
AbstractThis course deals with computer simulations of the human auditory, visual, and balance system. The lecture will cover the physiological and mechanical mechanisms of these sensory systems. And in the exercises, the simulations will be implemented with Python. The simulations will be such that their output could be used as input for actual neuro-sensory prostheses.
ObjectiveOur sensory systems provide us with information about what is happening in the world surrounding us. Thereby they transform incoming mechanical, electromagnetic, and chemical signals into “action potentials”, the language of the central nervous system.
The main goal of this lecture is to describe how our sensors achieve these transformations, how they can be reproduced with computational tools. For example, our auditory system performs approximately a “Fourier transformation” of the incoming sound waves; our early visual system is optimized for finding edges in images that are projected onto our retina; and our balance system can be well described with a “control system” that transforms linear and rotational movements into nerve impulses.
In the exercises that go with this lecture, we will use Python to reproduce the transformations achieved by our sensory systems. The goal is to write programs whose output could be used as input for actual neurosensory prostheses: such prostheses have become commonplace for the auditory system, and are under development for the visual and the balance system. For the corresponding exercises, at least some basic programing experience is required!!
ContentThe following topics will be covered:
• Introduction into the signal processing in nerve cells.
• Introduction into Python.
• Simplified simulation of nerve cells (Hodgkins-Huxley model).
• Description of the auditory system, including the application of Fourier transforms on recorded sounds.
• Description of the visual system, including the retina and the information processing in the visual cortex. The corresponding exercises will provide an introduction to digital image processing.
• Description of the mechanics of our balance system, and the “Control System”-language that can be used for an efficient description of the corresponding signal processing (essentially Laplace transforms and control systems).
Lecture notesFor each module additional material will be provided on the e-learning platform "moodle". The main content of the lecture is also available as a wikibook, under http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Sensory_Systems
LiteratureOpen source information is available as wikibook http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Sensory_Systems

For good overviews of the neuroscience, I recommend:

• Principles of Neural Science (5th Ed, 2012), by Eric Kandel, James Schwartz, Thomas Jessell, Steven Siegelbaum, A.J. Hudspeth
ISBN 0071390111 / 9780071390118
THE standard textbook on neuroscience.
NOTE: The 6th edition will be released on February 5, 2021!
• L. R. Squire, D. Berg, F. E. Bloom, Lac S. du, A. Ghosh, and N. C. Spitzer. Fundamental Neuroscience, Academic Press - Elsevier, 2012 [ISBN: 9780123858702].
This book covers the biological components, from the functioning of an individual ion channels through the various senses, all the way to consciousness. And while it does not cover the computational aspects, it nevertheless provides an excellent overview of the underlying neural processes of sensory systems.

• G. Mather. Foundations of Sensation and Perception, 2nd Ed Psychology Press, 2009 [ISBN: 978-1-84169-698-0 (hardcover), oder 978-1-84169-699-7 (paperback)]
A coherent, up-to-date introduction to the basic facts and theories concerning human sensory perception.

• The best place to get started with Python programming are the https://scipy-lectures.org/

On signal processing with Python, my upcoming book
• Hands-on Signal Analysis with Python (Due: January 13, 2021
ISBN 978-3-030-57902-9, https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783030579029)
will contain an explanation to all the required programming tools and packages.
Prerequisites / Notice• Since I have to gravel from Linz, Austria, to Zurich to give this lecture, I plan to hold this lecture in blocks (every 2nd week).
• In addition to the lectures, this course includes external lab visits to institutes actively involved in research on the relevant sensory systems.
402-0738-00LStatistical Methods and Analysis Techniques in Experimental PhysicsW10 credits5GM. Donegà
AbstractThis lecture gives an introduction to the statistical methods and the various analysis techniques applied in experimental particle physics. The exercises treat problems of general statistical topics; they also include hands-on analysis projects, where students perform independent analyses on their computer, based on real data from actual particle physics experiments.
ObjectiveStudents will learn the most important statistical methods used in experimental particle physics. They will acquire the necessary skills to analyse large data records in a statistically correct manner. Learning how to present scientific results in a professional manner and how to discuss them.
ContentTopics include:
- modern methods of statistical data analysis
- probability distributions, error analysis, simulation methos, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, setting limits and introduction to multivariate methods.
- most examples are taken from particle physics.

Methodology:
- lectures about the statistical topics;
- common discussions of examples;
- exercises: specific exercises to practise the topics of the lectures;
- all students perform statistical calculations on (their) computers;
- students complete a full data analysis in teams (of two) over the second half of the course, using real data taken from particle physics experiments;
- at the end of the course, the students present their analysis results in a scientific presentation;
- all students are directly tutored by assistants in the classroom.
Lecture notes- Copies of all lectures are available on the web-site of the course.
- A scriptum of the lectures is also available to all students of the course.
Literature1) Statistics: A guide to the use of statistical medhods in the Physical Sciences, R.J.Barlow; Wiley Verlag .
2) J Statistical data analysis, G. Cowan, Oxford University Press; ISBN: 0198501552.
3) Statistische und numerische Methoden der Datenanalyse, V.Blobel und E.Lohrmann, Teubner Studienbuecher Verlag.
4) Data Analysis, a Bayesian Tutorial, D.S.Sivia with J.Skilling,
Oxford Science Publications.
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowlege of nuclear and particle physics are prerequisites.
636-0016-00LComputational Systems Biology: Stochastic Approaches Information W4 credits3GM. H. Khammash, A. Gupta
AbstractThis course is concerned with the development of computational methods for modeling, simulation, and analysis of stochasticity in living cells. Using these tools, the course explores the richness of stochastic phenomena, how it arises from the interactions of dynamics and noise, and its biological implications.
ObjectiveTo understand the origins and implications of stochastic noise in living cells, and to learn the computational tools for the modeling, simulation, analysis, and identification of stochastic biochemical reaction networks.
ContentThe cellular environment is abuzz with noise. A key source of this noise is the randomness that characterizes the motion of cellular constituents at the molecular level. Cellular noise not only results in random fluctuations (over time) within individual cells, but it is also a main source of phenotypic variability among clonal cell populations.

Review of basic probability and stochastic processes; Introduction to stochastic gene expression; deterministic vs. stochastic models; the stochastic chemical kinetics framework; a rigorous derivation of the chemical master equation; moment computations; linear vs. nonlinear propensities; linear noise approximations; Monte Carlo simulations; Gillespie's Stochastic Simulation Algorithm (SSA) and variants; direct methods for the solution of the Chemical Master Equation; moment closure methods; intrinsic and extrinsic noise in gene expression; parameter identification from noise; propagation of noise in cell networks; noise suppression in cells; the role of feedback; exploiting noise; bimodality and stochastic switches.
LiteratureLiterature will be distributed during the course as needed.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents are expected to have completed the course `Mathematical modeling for systems biology (BSc Biotechnology) or `Computational systems biology (MSc Computational biology and bioinformatics). Concurrent enrollment in `Computational Systems Biology: Deterministic Approaches is recommended.
701-0412-00LClimate SystemsW3 credits2GS. I. Seneviratne, L. Gudmundsson
AbstractThis course introduces the most important physical components of the climate system and their interactions. The mechanisms of anthropogenic climate change are analysed against the background of climate history and variability. Those completing the course will be in a position to identify and explain simple problems in the area of climate systems.
ObjectiveStudents are able
- to describe the most important physical components of the global climate system and sketch their interactions
- to explain the mechanisms of anthropogenic climate change
- to identify and explain simple problems in the area of climate systems
Lecture notesCopies of the slides are provided in electronic form.
LiteratureA comprehensive list of references is provided in the class. Two books are
particularly recommended:
- Hartmann, D., 2016: Global Physical Climatology. Academic Press, London, 485 pp.
- Peixoto, J.P. and A.H. Oort, 1992: Physics of Climate. American Institute of Physics, New York, 520 pp.
Prerequisites / NoticeTeaching: Sonia I. Seneviratne & Lukas Gudmundsson, several keynotes to special topics by other professors
Course taught in german/english, slides in english
327-2201-00LTransport Phenomena IIW5 credits4GJ. Vermant
AbstractNumerical and analytical methods for real-world "Transport Phenomena"; atomistic understanding of transport properties based on kinetic theory and mesoscopic models; fundamentals, applications, and simulations
ObjectiveThe teaching goals of this course are on five different levels:
(1) Deep understanding of fundamentals: kinetic theory, mesoscopic models, ...
(2) Ability to use the fundamental concepts in applications
(3) Insight into the role of boundary conditions
(4) Knowledge of a number of applications
(5) Flavor of numerical techniques: finite elements, lattice Boltzmann, ...
ContentThermodynamics of Interfaces
Interfacial Balance Equations
Interfacial Force-Flux Relations
Polymer Processing
Transport Around a Sphere
Refreshing Topics in Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics
Kinetic Theory of Gases
Kinetic Theory of Polymeric Liquids
Transport in Biological Systems
Dynamic Light Scattering
Lecture notesThe course is based on the book D. C. Venerus and H. C. Öttinger, A Modern Course in Transport Phenomena (Cambridge University Press, 2018)
Literature1. D. C. Venerus and H. C. Öttinger, A Modern Course in Transport Phenomena (Cambridge University Press, 2018)
2. R. B. Bird, W. E. Stewart, and E. N. Lightfoot, Transport Phenomena, 2nd Ed. (Wiley, 2001)
3. Deen,W. Analysis of Transport Phenomena, Oxford University Press, 2012
4. R. B. Bird, Five Decades of Transport Phenomena (Review Article), AIChE J. 50 (2004) 273-287
Prerequisites / NoticeComplex numbers. Vector analysis (integrability; Gauss' divergence theorem). Laplace and Fourier transforms. Ordinary differential equations (basic ideas). Linear algebra (matrices; functions of matrices; eigenvectors and eigenvalues; eigenfunctions). Probability theory (Gaussian distributions; Poisson distributions; averages; moments; variances; random variables). Numerical mathematics (integration). Statistical thermodynamics (Gibbs' fundamental equation; thermodynamic potentials; Legendre transforms; Gibbs' phase rule; ergodicity; partition functions; Einstein's fluctuation theory). Linear irreversible thermodynamics (forces and fluxes; Fourier's, Newton's and Fick's laws for fluxes). Hydrodynamics (local equilibrium; balance equations for mass, momentum, energy and entropy). Programming and simulation techniques (Matlab, Monte Carlo simulations).
401-3902-21LNetwork & Integer Optimization: From Theory to ApplicationW6 credits3GR. Zenklusen
AbstractThis course covers various topics in Network and (Mixed-)Integer Optimization. It starts with a rigorous study of algorithmic techniques for some network optimization problems (with a focus on matching problems) and moves to key aspects of how to attack various optimization settings through well-designed (Mixed-)Integer Programming formulations.
ObjectiveOur goal is for students to both get a good foundational understanding of some key network algorithms and also to learn how to effectively employ (Mixed-)Integer Programming formulations, techniques, and solvers, to tackle a wide range of discrete optimization problems.
ContentKey topics include:
- Matching problems;
- Integer Programming techniques and models;
- Extended formulations and strong problem formulations;
- Solver techniques for (Mixed-)Integer Programs;
- Decomposition approaches.
Literature- Bernhard Korte, Jens Vygen: Combinatorial Optimization. 6th edition, Springer, 2018.
- Alexander Schrijver: Combinatorial Optimization: Polyhedra and Efficiency. Springer, 2003. This work has 3 volumes.
- Vanderbeck François, Wolsey Laurence: Reformulations and Decomposition of Integer Programs. Chapter 13 in: 50 Years of Integer Programming 1958-2008. Springer, 2010.
- Alexander Schrijver: Theory of Linear and Integer Programming. John Wiley, 1986.
Prerequisites / NoticeSolid background in linear algebra. Preliminary knowledge of Linear Programming is ideal but not a strict requirement. Prior attendance of the course Mathematical Optimization is a plus.
401-3908-21LPolynomial OptimizationW6 credits3GA. A. Kurpisz
AbstractIntroduction to Polynomial Optimization and methods to solve its convex relaxations.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is to provide a treatment of non-convex Polynomial Optimization problems through the lens of various techniques to solve its convex relaxations. Part of the course will be focused on learning how to apply these techniques to practical examples in finance, robotics and control.
ContentKey topics include:
- Polynomial Optimization as a non-convex optimization problem and its connection to certifying non-negativity of polynomials
- Optimization-free and Linear Programming based techniques to approach Polynomial Optimization problems.
- Introduction of Second-Order Cone Programming, Semidefinite Programming and Relative Entropy Programming as a tool to solve relaxations of Polynomial Optimization problems.
- Applications to optimization problems in finance, robotics and control.
Lecture notesA script will be provided.
LiteratureOther helpful materials include:
- Jean Bernard Lasserre, An Introduction to Polynomial and Semi-Algebraic Optimization, Cambridge University Press, February 2015
- Pablo Parrilo. 6.972 Algebraic Techniques and Semidefinite Optimization. Spring 2006. Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare, . License: .
Prerequisites / NoticeBackground in Linear and Integer Programming is recommended.
351-1138-00LPRISMA Capstone - Rethinking Sustainable Cities and Communities
Bachelor students get preferential access to this course. All interested students must apply through a separate application process at: https://mtecethz.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_cx4ZghhYhQAY3nT

Participation is subject to successful selection through this sign-up process.
W4 credits4VA. Cabello Llamas, M. Augsburger
AbstractThe goal of this intense one-week course is to bring students from different backgrounds together to make connections between disciplines and to build bridges to society. Supported by student coaches and experts, our student teams will use hands-on Design Thinking methods to address relevant challenges based on the UN sustainable development goals.
ObjectiveIn this intense 7-day block course students will be able to acquire and practice essential cross-disciplinary competencies as well as gaining an understanding of a human-centered innovation process. More specifically students will learn to:
- Work and think in a problem-based way.
- Put their own field into a broader context.
- Engage in collaborative ideation with a multidisciplinary team.
- Identify challenges related to relevant societal issues.
- Develop, prototype and plan innovative solutions for a range of different contexts.
- Innovate in a human-centered way by observing and interacting with key stakeholders.

The acquired methods and skills are based on the ETH competence framework and can be applied to tackle a broad range of problems in academia and society. Moving beyond traditional teaching approaches, this course allows students to engage creatively in a process of rethinking and redesigning aspects and elements of current and future urban areas, actively contributing towards fulfilling the UN SDG 11.
ContentThe course is divided in to three stages:

Warm-up and framing: The goal of this first stage is to get familiar with current problems faced by cities and communities as well as with the Design Thinking process and mindset. The students will learn about the working process, the teaching spaces and resources, as well as their fellow students and the lecturers.

Identifying challenges: The objective is to get to know additional methods and tools to identify a specific challenge relevant for urban areas through fieldwork and direct engagement with relevant stakeholders, resulting in the definition of an actionable problem statement that will form the starting point for the development of innovative solutions.

Solving challenges within current and future context: During this phase, students will apply the learned methods and tools to solve the identified challenge in a multi-disciplinary group by creating, developing and testing high-potential ideas. The ideas are presented to relevant academic, industry and societal stakeholders on the last day of the week.

To facilitate the fast-paced innovation journey, the multidisciplinary teams are supported throughout the week by experienced student coaches.

This course is a capstone for the student-lead initiative PRISMA. (https://www.prisma.ethz.ch/).
Prerequisites / NoticeBachelor students get preferential access to this course. All interested students must apply through a separate application process at: https://mtecethz.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_cx4ZghhYhQAY3nT

Participation is subject to successful selection through this sign-up process.
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