Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2016

MAS in Medical Physics Information
Specialization: General Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering
Major in Bioelectronics
Core Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0386-00LBiomedical Engineering Information W4 credits3GJ. Vörös, S. J. Ferguson, S. Kozerke, U. Moser, M. Rudin, M. P. Wolf, M. Zenobi-Wong
AbstractIntroduction into selected topics of biomedical engineering as well as their relationship with physics and physiology. The focus is on learning the concepts that govern common medical instruments and the most important organs from an engineering point of view. In addition, the most recent achievements and trends of the field of biomedical engineering are also outlined.
ObjectiveIntroduction into selected topics of biomedical engineering as well as their relationship with physics and physiology. The course provides an overview of the various topics of the different tracks of the biomedical engineering master course and helps orienting the students in selecting their specialized classes and project locations.
ContentIntroduction into neuro- and electrophysiology. Functional analysis of peripheral nerves, muscles, sensory organs and the central nervous system. Electrograms, evoked potentials. Audiometry, optometry. Functional electrostimulation: Cardiac pacemakers. Function of the heart and the circulatory system, transport and exchange of substances in the human body, pharmacokinetics. Endoscopy, medical television technology. Lithotripsy. Electrical Safety. Orthopaedic biomechanics. Lung function. Bioinformatics and Bioelectronics. Biomaterials. Biosensors. Microcirculation.Metabolism.
Practical and theoretical exercises in small groups in the laboratory.
Lecture notesIntroduction to Biomedical Engineering
by Enderle, Banchard, and Bronzino

AND

https://www1.ethz.ch/lbb/Education/BME
227-1037-00LIntroduction to Neuroinformatics Information W6 credits2V + 1UK. A. Martin, M. Cook, V. Mante, M. Pfeiffer
AbstractThe course provides an introduction to the functional properties of neurons. Particularly the description of membrane electrical properties (action potentials, channels), neuronal anatomy, synaptic structures, and neuronal networks. Simple models of computation, learning, and behavior will be explained. Some artificial systems (robot, chip) are presented.
ObjectiveUnderstanding computation by neurons and neuronal circuits is one of the great challenges of science. Many different disciplines can contribute their tools and concepts to solving mysteries of neural computation. The goal of this introductory course is to introduce the monocultures of physics, maths, computer science, engineering, biology, psychology, and even philosophy and history, to discover the enchantments and challenges that we all face in taking on this major 21st century problem and how each discipline can contribute to discovering solutions.
ContentThis course considers the structure and function of biological neural networks at different levels. The function of neural networks lies fundamentally in their wiring and in the electro-chemical properties of nerve cell membranes. Thus, the biological structure of the nerve cell needs to be understood if biologically-realistic models are to be constructed. These simpler models are used to estimate the electrical current flow through dendritic cables and explore how a more complex geometry of neurons influences this current flow. The active properties of nerves are studied to understand both sensory transduction and the generation and transmission of nerve impulses along axons. The concept of local neuronal circuits arises in the context of the rules governing the formation of nerve connections and topographic projections within the nervous system. Communication between neurons in the network can be thought of as information flow across synapses, which can be modified by experience. We need an understanding of the action of inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmitters and neuromodulators, so that the dynamics and logic of synapses can be interpreted. Finally, the neural architectures of feedforward and recurrent networks will be discussed in the context of co-ordination, control, and integration of sensory and motor information in neural networks.
376-1714-00LBiocompatible MaterialsW4 credits3GK. Maniura, J. Möller, M. Zenobi-Wong
AbstractIntroduction to molecules used for biomaterials, molecular interactions between different materials and biological systems (molecules, cells, tissues). The concept of biocompatibility is discussed and important techniques from biomaterials research and development are introduced.
ObjectiveThe class consists of three parts:
1. Introdcution into molecular characteristics of molecules involved in the materials-to-biology interface. Molecular design of biomaterials.
2. The concept of biocompatibility.
3. Introduction into methodology used in biomaterials research and application.
ContentIntroduction into native and polymeric biomaterials used for medical applications. The concepts of biocompatibility, biodegradation and the consequences of degradation products are discussed on the molecular level. Different classes of materials with respect to potential applications in tissue engineering and drug delivery are introduced. Strong focus lies on the molecular interactions between materials having very different bulk and/or surface chemistry with living cells, tissues and organs. In particular the interface between the materials surfaces and the eukaryotic cell surface and possible reactions of the cells with an implant material are elucidated. Techniques to design, produce and characterize materials in vitro as well as in vivo analysis of implanted and explanted materials are discussed.
In addition, a link between academic research and industrial entrepreneurship is established by external guest speakers.
Lecture notesHandouts can be accessed online.
LiteratureLiteratur
Biomaterials Science: An Introduction to Materials in Medicine, Ratner B.D. et al, 3rd Edition, 2013
Comprehensive Biomaterials, Ducheyne P. et al., 1st Edition, 2011

(available online via ETH library)

Handouts provided during the classes and references therin.
Practical Work
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
465-0800-00LPractical Work Restricted registration - show details
Only for MAS in Medical Physics
O4 creditsexternal organisers
AbstractThe practical work is designed to train the students in the solution of a specific problem and provides insights in the field of the selected MAS specialization. Tutors propose the subject of the project, the project plan, and the roadmap together with the student, as well as monitor the overall execution.
ObjectiveThe practical work is aimed at training the student’s capability to apply and connect specific skills acquired during the MAS specialization program towards the solution of a focused problem.
Electives
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-1033-00LNeuromorphic Engineering I Information Restricted registration - show details
Registration in this class requires the permission of the instructors. Class size will be limited to available lab spots.
Preference is given to students that require this class as part of their major.
W6 credits2V + 3UT. Delbrück, G. Indiveri, S.‑C. Liu
AbstractThis course covers analog circuits with emphasis on neuromorphic engineering: MOS transistors in CMOS technology, static circuits, dynamic circuits, systems (silicon neuron, silicon retina, silicon cochlea) with an introduction to multi-chip systems. The lectures are accompanied by weekly laboratory sessions.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of the characteristics of neuromorphic circuit elements.
ContentNeuromorphic circuits are inspired by the organizing principles of biological neural circuits. Their computational primitives are based on physics of semiconductor devices. Neuromorphic architectures often rely on collective computation in parallel networks. Adaptation, learning and memory are implemented locally within the individual computational elements. Transistors are often operated in weak inversion (below threshold), where they exhibit exponential I-V characteristics and low currents. These properties lead to the feasibility of high-density, low-power implementations of functions that are computationally intensive in other paradigms. Application domains of neuromorphic circuits include silicon retinas and cochleas for machine vision and audition, real-time emulations of networks of biological neurons, and the development of autonomous robotic systems. This course covers devices in CMOS technology (MOS transistor below and above threshold, floating-gate MOS transistor, phototransducers), static circuits (differential pair, current mirror, transconductance amplifiers, etc.), dynamic circuits (linear and nonlinear filters, adaptive circuits), systems (silicon neuron, silicon retina and cochlea) and an introduction to multi-chip systems that communicate events analogous to spikes. The lectures are accompanied by weekly laboratory sessions on the characterization of neuromorphic circuits, from elementary devices to systems.
LiteratureS.-C. Liu et al.: Analog VLSI Circuits and Principles; various publications.
Prerequisites / NoticeParticular: The course is highly recommended for those who intend to take the spring semester course 'Neuromorphic Engineering II', that teaches the conception, simulation, and physical layout of such circuits with chip design tools.

Prerequisites: Background in basics of semiconductor physics helpful, but not required.
227-2037-00LPhysical Modelling and Simulation Information W5 credits4GC. Hafner, J. Leuthold, J. Smajic
AbstractThis module consists of (a) an introduction to fundamental equations of electromagnetics, mechanics and heat transfer, (b) a detailed overview of numerical methods for field simulations, and (c) practical examples solved in form of small projects.
ObjectiveBasic knowledge of the fundamental equations and effects of electromagnetics, mechanics, and heat transfer. Knowledge of the main concepts of numerical methods for physical modelling and simulation. Ability (a) to develop own simple field simulation programs, (b) to select an appropriate field solver for a given problem, (c) to perform field simulations, (d) to evaluate the obtained results, and (e) to interactively improve the models until sufficiently accurate results are obtained.
ContentThe module begins with an introduction to the fundamental equations and effects of electromagnetics, mechanics, and heat transfer. After the introduction follows a detailed overview of the available numerical methods for solving electromagnetic, thermal and mechanical boundary value problems. This part of the course contains a general introduction into numerical methods, differential and integral forms, linear equation systems, Finite Difference Method (FDM), Boundary Element Method (BEM), Method of Moments (MoM), Multiple Multipole Program (MMP) and Finite Element Method (FEM). The theoretical part of the course finishes with a presentation of multiphysics simulations through several practical examples of HF-engineering such as coupled electromagnetic-mechanical and electromagnetic-thermal analysis of MEMS.
In the second part of the course the students will work in small groups on practical simulation problems. For solving practical problems the students can develop and use own simulation programs or chose an appropriate commercial field solver for their specific problem. This practical simulation work of the students is supervised by the lecturers.
376-1103-00LFrontiers in NanotechnologyW4 credits4VV. Vogel, further lecturers
AbstractMany disciplines are meeting at the nanoscale, from physics, chemistry to engineering, from the life sciences to medicine. The course will prepare students to communicate more effectively across disciplinary boundaries, and will provide them with deep insights into the various frontiers.
ObjectiveBuilding upon advanced technologies to create, visualize, analyze and manipulate nano-structures, as well as to probe their nano-chemistry, nano-mechanics and other properties within manmade and living systems, many exciting discoveries are currently made. They change the way we do science and result in so many new technologies.

The goal of the course is to give Master and Graduate students from all interested departments an overview of what nanotechnology is all about, from analytical techniques to nanosystems, from physics to biology. Students will start to appreciate the extent to which scientific communities are meeting at the nanoscale. They will learn about the specific challenges and what is currently “sizzling” in the respective fields, and learn the vocabulary that is necessary to communicate effectively across departmental boundaries.

Each lecturer will first give an overview of the state-of-the art in his/her field, and then describe the research highlights in his/her own research group. While preparing their Final Projects and discussing them in front of the class, the students will deepen their understanding of how to apply a range of new technologies to solve specific scientific problems and technical challenges. Exposure to the different frontiers will also improve their ability to conduct effective nanoscale research, recognize the broader significance of their work and to start collaborations.
ContentStarting with the fabrication and analysis of nanoparticles and nanostructured materials that enable a variety of scientific and technical applications, we will transition to discussing biological nanosystems, how they work and what bioinspired engineering principles can be derived, to finally discussing biomedical applications and potential health risk issues. Scientific aspects as well as the many of the emerging technologies will be covered that start impacting so many aspects of our lives. This includes new phenomena in physics, advanced materials, novel technologies and new methods to address major medical challenges.
Lecture notesAll the enrolled students will get access to a password protected website where they can find pdf files of the lecture notes, and typically 1-2 journal articles per lecture that cover selected topics.
402-0674-00LPhysics in Medical Research: From Atoms to Cells Information W6 credits2V + 1UB. K. R. Müller
AbstractScanning probe and diffraction techniques allow studying activated atomic processes during early stages of epitaxial growth. For quantitative description, rate equation analysis, mean-field nucleation and scaling theories are applied on systems ranging from simple metallic to complex organic materials. The knowledge is expanded to optical and electronic properties as well as to proteins and cells.
ObjectiveThe lecture series is motivated by an overview covering the skin of the crystals, roughness analysis, contact angle measurements, protein absorption/activity and monocyte behaviour.

As the first step, real structures on clean surfaces including surface reconstructions and surface relaxations, defects in crystals are presented, before the preparation of clean metallic, semiconducting, oxidic and organic surfaces are introduced.

The atomic processes on surfaces are activated by the increase of the substrate temperature. They can be studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The combination with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) allows determining the sizes of the critical nuclei and the other activated processes in a hierarchical fashion. The evolution of the surface morphology is characterized by the density and size distribution of the nanostructures that could be quantified by means of the rate equation analysis, the mean-field nucleation theory, as well as the scaling theory. The surface morphology is further characterized by defects and nanostructure's shapes, which are based on the strain relieving mechanisms and kinetic growth processes.

High-resolution electron diffraction is complementary to scanning probe techniques and provides exact mean values. Some phenomena are quantitatively described by the kinematic theory and perfectly understood by means of the Ewald construction. Other phenomena need to be described by the more complex dynamical theory. Electron diffraction is not only associated with elastic scattering but also inelastic excitation mechanisms that reflect the electronic structure of the surfaces studied. Low-energy electrons lead to phonon and high-energy electrons to plasmon excitations. Both effects are perfectly described by dipole and impact scattering.

Thin-films of rather complex organic materials are often quantitatively characterized by photons with a broad range of wavelengths from ultra-violet to infra-red light. Asymmetries and preferential orientations of the (anisotropic) molecules are verified using the optical dichroism and second harmonic generation measurements. These characterization techniques are vital for optimizing the preparation of medical implants and the determination of tissue's anisotropies within the human body.

Cell-surface interactions are related to the cell adhesion and the contractile cellular forces. Physical means have been developed to quantify these interactions. Other physical techniques are introduced in cell biology, namely to count and sort cells, to study cell proliferation and metabolism and to determine the relation between cell morphology and function.

3D scaffolds are important for tissue augmentation and engineering. Design, preparation methods, and characterization of these highly porous 3D microstructures are also presented.

Visiting clinical research in a leading university hospital will show the usefulness of the lecture series.
529-0837-00LBiomicrofluidic Engineering Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30.
W7 credits3GA. de Mello
AbstractMicrofluidics describes the behaviour, control and manipulation of fluids that are geometrically constrained within sub-microliter environments. The use of microfluidic devices offers an opportunity to control physical and chemical processes with unrivalled precision, and in turn provides a route to performing chemistry and biology in an ultra-fast and high-efficiency manner.
ObjectiveIn the course students will investigate the theoretical concepts behind microfluidic device operation, the methods of microfluidic device manufacture and the application of microfluidic architectures to important problems faced in modern day chemical and biological analysis. A design workshop will allow students to develop new microscale flow processes by appreciating the dominant physics at the microscale. The application of these basic ideas will primarily focus on biological problems and will include a treatment of diagnostic devices for use at the point-of-care, advanced functional material synthesis, DNA analysis, proteomics and cell-based assays. Lectures, assignments and the design workshop will acquaint students with the state-of-the-art in applied microfluidics.
ContentSpecific topics in the course include, but not limited to:

1. Theoretical Concepts
Features of mass and thermal transport on the microscale
Key scaling laws
2. Microfluidic Device Manufacture
Conventional lithographic processing of rigid materials
Soft lithographic processing of plastics and polymers
Mass fabrication of polymeric devices
3. Unit operations and functional components
Analytical separations (electrophoresis and chromatography)
Chemical and biological synthesis
Sample pre-treatment (filtration, SPE, pre-concentration)
Molecular detection
4. Design Workshop
Design of microfluidic architectures for PCR, distillation & mixing
5. Contemporary Applications in Biological Analysis
Microarrays
Cellular analyses (single cells, enzymatic assays, cell sorting)
Proteomics
6. System integration
Applications in radiochemistry, diagnostics and high-throughput experimentation
Lecture notesLecture handouts, background literature, problem sheets and notes will be provided electronically.
636-0003-00LBiological Engineering and BiotechnologyW6 credits3VM. Fussenegger
AbstractBiological Engineering and Biotechnology will cover the latest biotechnological advances as well as their industrial implementation to engineer mammalian cells for use in human therapy. This lecture will provide forefront insights into key scientific aspects and the main points in industrial decision-making to bring a therapeutic from target to market.
Objective1. Insight Into The Mammalian Cell Cycle. Cycling, The Balance Between Proliferation and Cancer - Implications For Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing. 2. The Licence To Kill. Apoptosis Regulatory Networks - Engineering of Survival Pathways To Increase Robustness of Production Cell Lines. 3. Everything Under Control I. Regulated Transgene Expression in Mammalian Cells - Facts and Future. 4. Secretion Engineering. The Traffic Jam getting out of the Cell. 5. From Target To Market. An Antibody's Journey From Cell Culture to The Clinics. 6. Biology and Malign Applications. Do Life Sciences Enable the Development of Biological Weapons? 7. Functional Food. Enjoy your Meal! 8. Industrial Genomics. Getting a Systems View on Nutrition and Health - An Industrial Perspective. 9. IP Management - Food Technology. Protecting Your Knowledge For Business. 10. Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing I. Introduction to Process Development. 11. Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing II. Up- stream Development. 12. Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing III. Downstream Development. 13. Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing IV. Pharma Development.
Lecture notesHandsout during the course.
Major in Neuroinformatics
Core Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-1037-00LIntroduction to Neuroinformatics Information W6 credits2V + 1UK. A. Martin, M. Cook, V. Mante, M. Pfeiffer
AbstractThe course provides an introduction to the functional properties of neurons. Particularly the description of membrane electrical properties (action potentials, channels), neuronal anatomy, synaptic structures, and neuronal networks. Simple models of computation, learning, and behavior will be explained. Some artificial systems (robot, chip) are presented.
ObjectiveUnderstanding computation by neurons and neuronal circuits is one of the great challenges of science. Many different disciplines can contribute their tools and concepts to solving mysteries of neural computation. The goal of this introductory course is to introduce the monocultures of physics, maths, computer science, engineering, biology, psychology, and even philosophy and history, to discover the enchantments and challenges that we all face in taking on this major 21st century problem and how each discipline can contribute to discovering solutions.
ContentThis course considers the structure and function of biological neural networks at different levels. The function of neural networks lies fundamentally in their wiring and in the electro-chemical properties of nerve cell membranes. Thus, the biological structure of the nerve cell needs to be understood if biologically-realistic models are to be constructed. These simpler models are used to estimate the electrical current flow through dendritic cables and explore how a more complex geometry of neurons influences this current flow. The active properties of nerves are studied to understand both sensory transduction and the generation and transmission of nerve impulses along axons. The concept of local neuronal circuits arises in the context of the rules governing the formation of nerve connections and topographic projections within the nervous system. Communication between neurons in the network can be thought of as information flow across synapses, which can be modified by experience. We need an understanding of the action of inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmitters and neuromodulators, so that the dynamics and logic of synapses can be interpreted. Finally, the neural architectures of feedforward and recurrent networks will be discussed in the context of co-ordination, control, and integration of sensory and motor information in neural networks.
551-1295-00LIntroduction to Bioinformatics: Concepts and Applications Information W6 credits4GW. Gruissem, K. Bärenfaller, A. Caflisch, G. Capitani, J. Fütterer, M. Robinson, A. Wagner
AbstractStorage, handling and analysis of large datasets have become essential in biological research. The course will introduce students to a number of applications of bioinformatics in biology. Freely accessible software tools and databases will be explained and explored in theory and praxis.
ObjectiveIntroduction to Bioinformatics I: Concepts and Applications (formerly Bioinformatics I) will provide students with the theoretical background of approaches to store and retrieve information from large databases. Concepts will be developed how DNA sequence information can be used to understand phylogentic relationships, how RNA sequence relates to structure, and how protein sequence information can be used for genome annotation and to predict protein folding and structure. Students will be introduced to quantitative methods for measuring gene expression and how this information can be used to model gene networks. Methods will be discussed to construct protein interaction maps and how this information can be used to simulate dynamic molecular networks.

In addition to the theoretical background, the students will develop hands-on experiences with the bioinformatics methods through guided exercises. The course provides students from different backgrounds with basic training in bioinformatics approaches that have impact on biological, chemical and physics experimentation. Bioinformatics approaches draw significant expertise from mathematics, statistics and computational science.

Although "Intoduction to Bioinformatics I" will focus on theory and praxis of bioinformatics approaches, the course provides an important foundation for the course "Introduction to Bioinformatics II: Fundamentals of computer science, modeling and algorithms" that will be offered in the following semester.
ContentBioinformatics I will cover the following topics:

From genes to databases and information
BLAST searches
Prediction of gene function and regulation
RNA structure prediction
Gene expression analysis using microarrays
Protein sequence and structure databases
WWW for bioinformatics
Protein sequence comparisons
Proteomics and de novo protein sequencing
Protein structure prediction
Cellular and protein interaction networks
Molecular dynamics simulation
Practical Work
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
465-0800-00LPractical Work Restricted registration - show details
Only for MAS in Medical Physics
O4 creditsexternal organisers
AbstractThe practical work is designed to train the students in the solution of a specific problem and provides insights in the field of the selected MAS specialization. Tutors propose the subject of the project, the project plan, and the roadmap together with the student, as well as monitor the overall execution.
ObjectiveThe practical work is aimed at training the student’s capability to apply and connect specific skills acquired during the MAS specialization program towards the solution of a focused problem.
Electives
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-1033-00LNeuromorphic Engineering I Information Restricted registration - show details
Registration in this class requires the permission of the instructors. Class size will be limited to available lab spots.
Preference is given to students that require this class as part of their major.
W6 credits2V + 3UT. Delbrück, G. Indiveri, S.‑C. Liu
AbstractThis course covers analog circuits with emphasis on neuromorphic engineering: MOS transistors in CMOS technology, static circuits, dynamic circuits, systems (silicon neuron, silicon retina, silicon cochlea) with an introduction to multi-chip systems. The lectures are accompanied by weekly laboratory sessions.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of the characteristics of neuromorphic circuit elements.
ContentNeuromorphic circuits are inspired by the organizing principles of biological neural circuits. Their computational primitives are based on physics of semiconductor devices. Neuromorphic architectures often rely on collective computation in parallel networks. Adaptation, learning and memory are implemented locally within the individual computational elements. Transistors are often operated in weak inversion (below threshold), where they exhibit exponential I-V characteristics and low currents. These properties lead to the feasibility of high-density, low-power implementations of functions that are computationally intensive in other paradigms. Application domains of neuromorphic circuits include silicon retinas and cochleas for machine vision and audition, real-time emulations of networks of biological neurons, and the development of autonomous robotic systems. This course covers devices in CMOS technology (MOS transistor below and above threshold, floating-gate MOS transistor, phototransducers), static circuits (differential pair, current mirror, transconductance amplifiers, etc.), dynamic circuits (linear and nonlinear filters, adaptive circuits), systems (silicon neuron, silicon retina and cochlea) and an introduction to multi-chip systems that communicate events analogous to spikes. The lectures are accompanied by weekly laboratory sessions on the characterization of neuromorphic circuits, from elementary devices to systems.
LiteratureS.-C. Liu et al.: Analog VLSI Circuits and Principles; various publications.
Prerequisites / NoticeParticular: The course is highly recommended for those who intend to take the spring semester course 'Neuromorphic Engineering II', that teaches the conception, simulation, and physical layout of such circuits with chip design tools.

Prerequisites: Background in basics of semiconductor physics helpful, but not required.
376-1795-00LAdvanced Course in Neurobiology I (Functional Anatomy of the Rodent Brain) (University of Zurich) Information Restricted registration - show details
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at UZH.
UZH Module Code: SPV0Y009

Mind the enrolment deadlines at UZH:
http://www.uzh.ch/studies/application/mobilitaet_en.html
W2 credits2VJ.‑M. Fritschy, H. U. Zeilhofer
AbstractThe goal of this Advanced Course in Neurobiology is to provide students with a broader knowledge in several important areas of neurobiology. The course consists of four parts: Part I deals with various topics in developmental neurobiology. Part II is devoted to aspects of signal transduction. Part III focuses on synaptic transmission. Part IV gives deeper insights into systems neuroscience.
ObjectiveThis credit point course is designed for doctoral students who have successfully completed the Introductory Course in Neuroscience at the Neuroscience Center Zürich. The goal is to provide students with a broader and deeper knowledge in several important areas of neurobiology.
Prerequisites / NoticeFür Doktorierende des Zentrums für Neurowissenschaften Zürich. Nicht für Master-Studierende geeignet.
376-1791-00LIntroductory Course in Neuroscience I (University of Zurich) Information Restricted registration - show details
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at UZH.
UZH Module Code: SPV0Y005

Mind the enrolment deadlines at UZH:
http://www.uzh.ch/studies/application/mobilitaet_en.html
W2 credits2VJ.‑M. Fritschy, W. Knecht
AbstractThe course gives an introduction to human and comparative neuroanatomy, molecular, cellular and systems neuroscience.
ObjectiveThe course gives an introduction to human and comparative neuroanatomy, molecular, cellular and systems neuroscience.
Content1) Human Neuroanatomy I&II
2) Comparative Neuroanatomy
3) Development I&II
4) Membran and Action Potential
5) Synaptic Transmission & Plasticity I&II
6) Glia and Blodd-Brain-Barrier
7) Somatosensory and Motor System
8) Visual System
9) Auditory System
10) Circuits underlying Emotion
11) Modeling of Neural Circuits
Prerequisites / NoticeFor doctoral students of the Neuroscience Center Zurich (ZNZ).
Major in Biocompatible Materials
Core Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0965-00LMicro and Nano-Tomography of Biological TissuesW4 credits3GM. Stampanoni, P. A. Kaestner
AbstractThe lecture introduces the physical and technical know-how of X-ray tomographic microscopy. Several X-ray imaging techniques (absorption-, phase- and darkfield contrast) will be discussed and their use in daily research, in particular biology, is presented. The course discusses the aspects of quantitative evaluation of tomographic data sets like segmentation, morphometry and statistics.
ObjectiveIntroduction to the basic concepts of X-ray tomographic imaging, image analysis and data quantification at the micro and nano scale with particular emphasis on biological applications
ContentSynchrotron-based X-ray micro- and nano-tomography is today a powerful technique for non-destructive, high-resolution investigations of a broad range of materials. The high-brilliance and high-coherence of third generation synchrotron radiation facilities allow quantitative, three-dimensional imaging at the micro and nanometer scale and extend the traditional absorption imaging technique to edge-enhanced and phase-sensitive measurements, which are particularly suited for investigating biological samples.

The lecture includes a general introduction to the principles of tomographic imaging from image formation to image reconstruction. It provides the physical and engineering basics to understand how imaging beamlines at synchrotron facilities work, looks into the recently developed phase contrast methods, and explores the first applications of X-ray nano-tomographic experiments.

The course finally provides the necessary background to understand the quantitative evaluation of tomographic data, from basic image analysis to complex morphometrical computations and 3D visualization, keeping the focus on biomedical applications.
Lecture notesAvailable online
LiteratureWill be indicated during the lecture.
376-1622-00LPractical Methods in Tissue Engineering Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 12.
W5 credits4PK. Würtz-Kozak, M. Zenobi-Wong
AbstractThe goal of this course is to teach MSc students the necessary skills for doing research in the fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.
ObjectivePractical exercises and demonstrations on topics including sterile cell culture, light microscopy and histology, protein and gene expression analysis, and viability assays are covered. The advantages of 3D cell cultures will be discussed and practical work on manufacturing and evaluating hydrogels and scaffolds for tissue engineering will be performed in small groups. In addition to practical lab work, the course will teach skills in data acquisition/analysis.
376-1714-00LBiocompatible MaterialsW4 credits3GK. Maniura, J. Möller, M. Zenobi-Wong
AbstractIntroduction to molecules used for biomaterials, molecular interactions between different materials and biological systems (molecules, cells, tissues). The concept of biocompatibility is discussed and important techniques from biomaterials research and development are introduced.
ObjectiveThe class consists of three parts:
1. Introdcution into molecular characteristics of molecules involved in the materials-to-biology interface. Molecular design of biomaterials.
2. The concept of biocompatibility.
3. Introduction into methodology used in biomaterials research and application.
ContentIntroduction into native and polymeric biomaterials used for medical applications. The concepts of biocompatibility, biodegradation and the consequences of degradation products are discussed on the molecular level. Different classes of materials with respect to potential applications in tissue engineering and drug delivery are introduced. Strong focus lies on the molecular interactions between materials having very different bulk and/or surface chemistry with living cells, tissues and organs. In particular the interface between the materials surfaces and the eukaryotic cell surface and possible reactions of the cells with an implant material are elucidated. Techniques to design, produce and characterize materials in vitro as well as in vivo analysis of implanted and explanted materials are discussed.
In addition, a link between academic research and industrial entrepreneurship is established by external guest speakers.
Lecture notesHandouts can be accessed online.
LiteratureLiteratur
Biomaterials Science: An Introduction to Materials in Medicine, Ratner B.D. et al, 3rd Edition, 2013
Comprehensive Biomaterials, Ducheyne P. et al., 1st Edition, 2011

(available online via ETH library)

Handouts provided during the classes and references therin.
Practical Work
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
465-0800-00LPractical Work Restricted registration - show details
Only for MAS in Medical Physics
O4 creditsexternal organisers
AbstractThe practical work is designed to train the students in the solution of a specific problem and provides insights in the field of the selected MAS specialization. Tutors propose the subject of the project, the project plan, and the roadmap together with the student, as well as monitor the overall execution.
ObjectiveThe practical work is aimed at training the student’s capability to apply and connect specific skills acquired during the MAS specialization program towards the solution of a focused problem.
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