Autumn Semester 2020 takes place in a mixed form of online and classroom teaching.
Please read the published information on the individual courses carefully.

Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2018

Geomatic Engineering Master Information
Course Units for Additional Admission Requirements
The courses below are only available for MSc students with additional admission requirements.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
103-0254-AALPhotogrammetry
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-5 credits4RK. Schindler
AbstractThe class conveys the basics of photogrammetry. It shall equip students with basic knowledge of the principles, methods and applications of image-based measurement.
ObjectiveUnderstanding the principles, methods and possible applications of photogrammetry. The course also forms the basis for more in-depth studies and self-reliant photogrammetric project work in further photogrammetry courses.
ContentFundamental concepts of photogrammetry, its products and applications: the principle of image-based measurement; digital aerial cameras and related sensors; projective geometry; mathematical modeling, calibration and orientation of cameras; photogrammetric 3D reconstruction and stereoscopy; digital photogrammetric workstations; recording geometry and flight planning
Lecture notesPhotogrammetry - Basics (slides on the web)
Exercise material (on the web)
Literature- Kraus, K.: Photogrammetrie, Band 1: Geometrische Informationen aus Photographien und Laserscanneraufnahmen, mit Beiträgen von Peter Waldhäusl, Walter de Gruyter Verlag, Berlin, 7th edition
- Kraus, K.: Photogrammetrie, Band 2: Verfeinerte Methoden und Anwendungen, mit Beiträgen von J. Jansa und H. Kager, Walter de Gruyter Verlag, Berlin, 3rd edition
- Thomas Luhmann: Nahbereichsphotogrammetrie. Grundlagen, Methoden und Anwendungen, H. Wichmann Verlag, Karlsruhe, 2nd edition 2003
- Richard Hartley and Andrew Zisserman: Multiple View Geometry, Cambridge University Press; 2nd edition 2004
Prerequisites / NoticeRequirements: knowledge of physics, linear algebra and analytical geometry, calculus, least-squares adjustment and statistics, basic programming skills.
103-0255-AALGeodata Analysis
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-2 credits4Rto be announced
AbstractThe course deals with advanced methods in spatial data analysis.
Objective- Understanding the theoretical principles in spatial data analysis.
- Understanding and using methods for spatial data analysis.
- Detecting common sources of errors in spatial data analysis.
- Advanced practical knowledge in using appropriate GIS-tools.
ContentThe course deals with advanced methods in spatial data analysis in theory as well as in practical exercises.
103-0274-AALImage Processing
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-3 credits2RJ. D. Wegner
AbstractThe objective of this lecture is to introduce the basic concepts of image formation and explain the basic methods of signal and image processing.
ObjectiveUnderstanding core methods and algorithms in image processing and computer vision and the underlying signal processing foundations.
Applying image processing algorithms to relevant problems in photogrammetry and remote sensing.
ContentThe following topics will be covered in the course:
- Properties of digital images
- Signal processing/Sampling
- Image enhancement
- Image restoration: Spatial domain
- Image restoration: Fourier domain
- Color/Demosaicing
- Image compression
- Feature extraction
- Texture analysis
- Image segmentation
Lecture notesA script will be provided as PDF files on the lecture website.
LiteratureWe suggest the following textbooks for further reading:

Rafael C. Gonzalez, Richard E. Woods
Digital Image Processing
Prentice Hall International, 2008
ISBN: 013168728X

Rafael C. Gonzalez, Steven L. Eddins, Richard E. Woods:
Digital Image Processing Using MATLAB
Prentice Hall, 2003
ISBN: 0130085197
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture is accompanied by programming assignments, that need to be completed in order to pass the course.
103-0313-AALPlanning I
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-5 credits4RS.‑E. Rabe
AbstractThe lecture introduce into the main-features of spatial planning. Attended will be the themes planning as a national responsibility, instruments of spatial planning, techniques for problem-solutions in spatial planning and the swiss concept for regional planning.
Objective- To get to know the interaction between the community and our living space and their resulting conflicts.
- Link theory and practice in spatial planning.
- To get to know instruments and facilities to process problems in spatial planning.
103-0325-AALPlanning II
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-5 credits4RB. Scholl
AbstractThe lecture imparts methodological and instrumental fundamentals for spatial planning and will be exemplified by exploring Zurich city quarters.
ObjectiveSpatial planning is concerned with the foresighted design of the built and un-built environment. Starting points are spatially relevant problems that need to be explored, clarified and solved. The cornerstone of the course is formed by an independent exploration by the student of Zurich city quarters that involve investigating specific spatially relevant conditions, recognizing regularities and relevant problems.
ContentThe self-study course compromises the following readings:
Chapters of
- Lynch, Kevin: «The Image of the City»
- Alexander, Christopher et al.: «A Pattern Language»
- Mikoleit, Anne and Pürckhauer, Moritz: «Urban Code»

and
SIDAIA - Spatial and Infrastructure Development: an Integrated Approach.

The graded semester performance comprises a condensed paper to be written by the student reflecting both the literature read as well as exemplarily applying the knowledge gained from the literature by independently exploring the two city quarters.
Lecture notescf. content
Literaturecf. content
103-0435-AALLandmanagement
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-5 credits4RS.‑E. Rabe
AbstractSpatial planning on the Commune level with focus on the special land use management. Land re-allocation as an instrument of spatial planning; specific explanations for land re-allocations in rural regions and in construction zones. Land marketing: the view of investors.
ObjectiveGetting knowledge in spatial planning and land re-allocation as an interactive process.
252-0846-AALComputer Science II Information
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-4 credits9RF. O. Friedrich
AbstractTogether with the introductory course Informatics I this course provides the foundations of programming and databases. This course particularly covers algorithms and data structures and basics about design and implementation of databases. Programming language used in this course is Java.
ObjectiveBasing on the knowledge covered by lecture Informatics I, the primary educational objectives of this course are
- constructive knowledge of data structures and algorithms amd
- the knowledge of relational databases and
When successfully attended the course, students have a good command of the mechanisms to construct an object oriented program. They know the typically used control and data structures and understand how an algorithmic problem is mapped to a sufficiently efficient computer program. They have an idea of what happens "behind the secenes" when a program is translated and executed. The know how to write database queries and how to design simple databases.
Secondary goals are an algorithmic computational thinking, undestanding the possibilities and limits of programming and to impart the way of thinking of a computer scientist.
ContentWe discuss the paradigm of object oriented programming, typical data structures and algorithms and design principles for the design and usage of relational databases.
More generally, formal thinking and the need for abstraction and importance of appropriate modelling capabilities will be motivated. The course emphasizes applied computer science. Concrete topics are complexity of algorithms, divide and conquer-principles, recursion, sort- and search-algorithms, backtracking, data structures (lists, stacks, queues, trees) and data management in relational data bases.
Lecture notesThe slides will be available for download on the course home page.
LiteratureRobert Sedgewick, Kevin Wayne, Introduction to Programming in Java: An Interdisciplinary Approach, Addison-Wesley, 2008

T. Cormen, C. Leiserson, R. Rivest, C. Stein, Introduction to Algorithms , 3rd ed., MIT Press, 2009
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites are knowledge and programming experience according to course 252-0845-00 Computer Science I (D-BAUG).
406-0023-AALPhysics Information
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-7 credits15RS. Johnson
AbstractBasic topics in classical as well as modern physics, interplay between basic research and applications.
Objective
ContentElectrodynamics, Thermodynamics, Quantum physics, Waves and Oscillations, special relativity
LiteratureP.A. Tipler and G. Mosca, Physics for scientists and engineers, W.H. Freeman and Company, New York

Hans J. Paus, Physik in Experimenten und Beispielen, Carl Hanser Verlag München Wien (als unterrichtsbegleitendes und ergänzendes Lehrbuch)
406-0141-AALLinear Algebra
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-5 credits11RM. Auer
AbstractIntroduction to Linear Algebra and Numerical Analysis for Engineers. The contents of the course are covered in the book "Introduction to Linear Algebra" by Gilbert Strang (SIAM, 2003). MATLAB is used as a tool to formulate and implement numerical algorithms.
ObjectiveTo acquire basic knowledge of Linear Algebra and of a few fundamental numerical techniques. The course is meant to
hone analytic and algorithmic skills.
Content1. Vectors and vector spaces
2. Solving linear systems of equations (Gaussian elimination)
3. Orthogonality
4. Determinants
5. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors
6. Linear transformations
7. Numerical linear algebra in MATLAB
8. (Piecewise) polynomial interpolation
9. Splines
LiteratureG. Strang, "Introduction to linear algebra", Third edition, 2003,
ISBN 0-9614088-9-8, http://math.mit.edu/linearalgebra/

T. Sauer. "Numerical analysis", Addison-Wesley 2006
406-0242-AALAnalysis II Information
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-7 credits15RM. Akka Ginosar
AbstractMathematical tools of an engineer
ObjectiveMathematics as a tool to solve engineering problems, mathematical formulation of problems in science and engineering. Basic mathematical knowledge of an engineer
ContentMulti variable calculus: gradient, directional derivative, chain rule, Taylor expansion. Multiple integrals: coordinate transformations, path integrals, integrals over surfaces, divergence theorem, applications in physics.
Literature- James Stewart: Multivariable Calculus, Thomson Brooks/Cole
- William L. Briggs / Lyle Cochran: Calculus: Early Transcendentals: International Edition, Pearson Education (Chapters 10 - 14)
406-0243-AALAnalysis I and II Information
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-14 credits30RM. Akka Ginosar
AbstractMathematical tools for the engineer
ObjectiveMathematics as a tool to solve engineering problems. Mathematical formulation of technical and scientific problems. Basic mathematical knowledge for engineers.
ContentShort introduction to mathematical logic.
Complex numbers.
Calculus for functions of one variable with applications.
Simple types of ordinary differential equations.
Simple Mathematical models in engineering.

Multi variable calculus: gradient, directional derivative, chain rule, Taylor expansion. Multiple integrals: coordinate transformations, path integrals, integrals over surfaces, divergence theorem, applications in physics.
LiteratureTextbooks in English:
- J. Stewart: Calculus, Cengage Learning, 2009, ISBN 978-0-538-73365-6
- J. Stewart: Multivariable Calculus, Thomson Brooks/Cole (e.g. Appendix G on complex numbers)
- V. I. Smirnov: A course of higher mathematics. Vol. II. Advanced calculus
- W. L. Briggs, L. Cochran: Calculus: Early Transcendentals: International Edition, Pearson Education
Textbooks in German:
- M. Akveld, R. Sperb: Analysis I, vdf
- M. Akveld, R. Sperb: Analysis II, vdf
- L. Papula: Mathematik für Ingenieure und Naturwissenschaftler, Vieweg Verlag
- L. Papula: Mathematik für Ingenieure 2, Vieweg Verlag
406-0603-AALStochastics (Probability and Statistics)
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-4 credits9RM. Kalisch
AbstractIntroduction to basic methods and fundamental concepts of statistics and
probability theory for non-mathematicians. The concepts are presented on
the basis of some descriptive examples. The course will be based on the
book "Statistics for research" by S. Dowdy et.al. and on the
book "Introductory Statistics with R" by P. Dalgaard.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to build a solid fundament in probability
and statistics. The student should understand some fundamental concepts and
be able to apply these concepts to applications in the real
world. Furthermore, the student should have a basic knowledge of the
statistical programming language "R". The main topics of the course are:
- Introduction to probability
- Common distributions
- Binomialtest
- z-Test, t-Test
- Regression
ContentFrom "Statistics for research":
Ch 1: The Role of Statistics
Ch 2: Populations, Samples, and Probability Distributions
Ch 3: Binomial Distributions
Ch 6: Sampling Distribution of Averages
Ch 7: Normal Distributions
Ch 8: Student's t Distribution
Ch 9: Distributions of Two Variables [Regression]

From "Introductory Statistics with R":
Ch 1: Basics
Ch 2: Probability and distributions
Ch 3: Descriptive statistics and tables
Ch 4: One- and two-sample tests
Ch 5: Regression and correlation
Literature"Statistics for research" by S. Dowdy et. al. (3rd
edition); Print ISBN: 9780471267355; Online ISBN: 9780471477433; DOI:
10.1002/0471477435;
From within the ETH, this book is freely available online under:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/book/10.1002/0471477435

"Introductory Statistics with R" by Peter Dalgaard; ISBN
978-0-387-79053-4; DOI: 10.1007/978-0-387-79054-1
From within the ETH, this book is freely available online under:
http://www.springerlink.com/content/m17578/
  • First page Previous page Page  3  of  3     All