Autumn Semester 2020 takes place in a mixed form of online and classroom teaching.
Please read the published information on the individual courses carefully.

Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2014

Biomedical Engineering Master Information
Master Programme According to Programme Regulations 2013
Track Courses
Biomechanics
Recommended Elective Courses
These courses are particularly recommended for the Biomechanics track. Please consult your track advisor if you wish to select other subjects.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
376-1720-00LApplication of MATLAB in the Human Movement Sciences Information W2 credits2GR.  van de Langenberg
AbstractStudents will learn to import, process and graphically present experimental data using the MATLAB computing environment. Both the data and the methods of analysis will be typical for experiments in Human Movement Science (i.e. kinematics, kinetics and electromyography).
ObjectiveStudents will acquire the ability to independently load, plot, and process kinematic, kinetic and electromyographical data using the MATLAB computing environment.
ContentDrawbacks of Excel; Possibilities in MATLAB; Import of several data formats; Plot of one and more signals; Removing of an offset and filtering of data based on self-written functions; Normalisation and parametrisation of data; Reliability; Interpolation, Differentiation and Integration in MATLAB.
LiteratureDuring the lecture, several electronically available MATLAB introductions are indicated. Course-specific scripts will be provided by the lecturer.
Prerequisites / NoticeA Laptop with MATLAB installed (v2009 or higher) and wireless internet access is mandatory. Two students can share a laptop if necessary. A MATLAB student version can be obtained at Stud-IDES for free.
376-1974-00LColloquium in Biomechanics Information W2 credits2KB. Helgason, S. J. Ferguson, R. Müller, J. G. Snedeker, B. Taylor, M. Zenobi-Wong
AbstractCurrent topics in biomechanics presented by speakers from academia and industry.
ObjectiveGetting insight into actual areas and problems of biomechanics.
376-2017-00LBiomechanics of Sports Injuries and RehabilitationW3 credits2VK.‑U. Schmitt, J. Goldhahn
AbstractThis lectures introduces the basic principles of injury mechanics and rehabilitation focussing on sports injuries.
ObjectiveWithin the scope of this lecture you will learn the basic principles of trauma biomechanics. Based on examples from sports, you will get to know different mechanisms that can possibly result in injury. Investigating the background and cause of injury should allow you to assess the injury risk for sports activities. Furthermore you should be able to develop measures to prevent such injury.
ContentThis lecture deals with the basic principles of injury mechanics and rehabilitation. Mechanisms that can result in injury are presented. Furthermore possibilities to prevent injuries are discussed. Thereby the lecture focuses on sports injuries.
Lecture notesHandouts can be downloaded.
LiteratureSchmitt K-U, Niederer P, M. Muser, Walz F: "Trauma Biomechanics - Accidental Injury in traffic and sports", Springer Verlag
Prerequisites / NoticeA course work is required. The mark of this course work contributes to the final credits for this lecture. Details will be given during the first lecture.
402-0341-00LMedical Physics IW6 credits2V + 1UP. Manser
AbstractIntroduction to the fundamentals of medical radiation physics. Functional chain due to radiation exposure from the primary physical effect to the radiobiological and medically manifest secondary effects. Dosimetric concepts of radiation protection in medicine. Mode of action of radiation sources used in medicine and its illustration by means of Monte Carlo simulations.
ObjectiveUnderstanding the functional chain from primary physical effects of ionizing radiation to clinical radiation effects. Dealing with dose as a quantitative measure of medical exposure. Getting familiar with methods to generate ionizing radiation in medicine and learn how they are applied for medical purposes. Eventually, the lecture aims to show the students that medical physics is a fascinating and evolving discipline where physics can directly be used for the benefits of patients and the society.
ContentThe lecture is covering the basic principles of ionzing radiation and its physical and biological effects. The physical interactions of photons as well as of charged particles will be reviewed and their consequences for medical applications will be discussed. The concept of Monte Carlo simulation will be introduced in the excercises and will help the student to understand the characteristics of ionizing radiation in simple and complex situations. Fundamentals in dosimetry will be provided in order to understand the physical and biological effects of ionizing radiation. Deterministic as well as stochastic effects will be discussed and fundamental knowledge about radiation protection will be provided. In the second part of the lecture series, we will cover the generation of ionizing radiation. By this means, the x-ray tube, the clinical linear accelarator, and different radioactive sources in radiology, radiotherapy and nuclear medicine will be addressed. Applications in radiolgoy, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy will be described with a special focus on the physics underlying these applications.
Lecture notesA script will be provided.
402-0674-00LPhysics in Medical Research: From Atoms to Cells Information W6 credits2V + 1UB. K. R. Müller
AbstractScanning probe and diffraction techniques allow studying activated atomic processes during early stages of epitaxial growth. For quantitative description, rate equation analysis, mean-field nucleation and scaling theories are applied on systems ranging from simple metallic to complex organic materials. The knowledge is expanded to optical and electronic properties as well as to proteins and cells.
ObjectiveThe lecture series is motivated by an overview covering the skin of the crystals, roughness analysis, contact angle measurements, protein absorption/activity and monocyte behaviour.

As the first step, real structures on clean surfaces including surface reconstructions and surface relaxations, defects in crystals are presented, before the preparation of clean metallic, semiconducting, oxidic and organic surfaces are introduced.

The atomic processes on surfaces are activated by the increase of the substrate temperature. They can be studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The combination with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) allows determining the sizes of the critical nuclei and the other activated processes in a hierarchical fashion. The evolution of the surface morphology is characterized by the density and size distribution of the nanostructures that could be quantified by means of the rate equation analysis, the mean-field nucleation theory, as well as the scaling theory. The surface morphology is further characterized by defects and nanostructure's shapes, which are based on the strain relieving mechanisms and kinetic growth processes.

High-resolution electron diffraction is complementary to scanning probe techniques and provides exact mean values. Some phenomena are quantitatively described by the kinematic theory and perfectly understood by means of the Ewald construction. Other phenomena need to be described by the more complex dynamical theory. Electron diffraction is not only associated with elastic scattering but also inelastic excitation mechanisms that reflect the electronic structure of the surfaces studied. Low-energy electrons lead to phonon and high-energy electrons to plasmon excitations. Both effects are perfectly described by dipole and impact scattering.

Thin-films of rather complex organic materials are often quantitatively characterized by photons with a broad range of wavelengths from ultra-violet to infra-red light. Asymmetries and preferential orientations of the (anisotropic) molecules are verified using the optical dichroism and second harmonic generation measurements. These characterization techniques are vital for optimizing the preparation of medical implants and the determination of tissue's anisotropies within the human body.

Cell-surface interactions are related to the cell adhesion and the contractile cellular forces. Physical means have been developed to quantify these interactions. Other physical techniques are introduced in cell biology, namely to count and sort cells, to study cell proliferation and metabolism and to determine the relation between cell morphology and function.

3D scaffolds are important for tissue augmentation and engineering. Design, preparation methods, and characterization of these highly porous 3D microstructures are also presented.

Visiting clinical research in a leading university hospital will show the usefulness of the lecture series.
465-0953-00LBiostatisticsW2 credits2V + 1UB. Sick
AbstractThe course deals with simple quantitative and graphical as well as more complex methods of biostatistics. Contents: Descriptive statistics, probability theory and design of experiments, testing hypotheses, confidence intervals, correlation, simple and multiple linear regression, analysis of variance, logistic regression, survival analysis (Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox-regression).
Objective
551-1295-00LIntroduction to Bioinformatics: Concepts and Applications Information W6 credits4GW. Gruissem, K. Bärenfaller, A. Caflisch, G. Capitani, J. Fütterer, M. Robinson, A. Wagner
AbstractStorage, handling and analysis of large datasets have become essential in biological research. The course will introduce students to a number of applications of bioinformatics in biology. Freely accessible software tools and databases will be explained and explored in theory and praxis.
ObjectiveIntroduction to Bioinformatics I: Concepts and Applications (formerly Bioinformatics I) will provide students with the theoretical background of approaches to store and retrieve information from large databases. Concepts will be developed how DNA sequence information can be used to understand phylogentic relationships, how RNA sequence relates to structure, and how protein sequence information can be used for genome annotation and to predict protein folding and structure. Students will be introduced to quantitative methods for measuring gene expression and how this information can be used to model gene networks. Methods will be discussed to construct protein interaction maps and how this information can be used to simulate dynamic molecular networks.

In addition to the theoretical background, the students will develop hands-on experiences with the bioinformatics methods through guided exercises. The course provides students from different backgrounds with basic training in bioinformatics approaches that have impact on biological, chemical and physics experimentation. Bioinformatics approaches draw significant expertise from mathematics, statistics and computational science.

Although "Intoduction to Bioinformatics I" will focus on theory and praxis of bioinformatics approaches, the course provides an important foundation for the course "Introduction to Bioinformatics II: Fundamentals of computer science, modeling and algorithms" that will be offered in the following semester.
ContentBioinformatics I will cover the following topics:

From genes to databases and information
BLAST searches
Prediction of gene function and regulation
RNA structure prediction
Gene expression analysis using microarrays
Protein sequence and structure databases
WWW for bioinformatics
Protein sequence comparisons
Proteomics and de novo protein sequencing
Protein structure prediction
Cellular and protein interaction networks
Molecular dynamics simulation
Biology Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0945-00LCell and Molecular Biology for EngineersW6 credits4GC. Frei
AbstractThe course gives an introduction into cellular and molecular biology, specifically for students with a background in engineering. The focus will be on the basic organization of eukaryotic cells, molecular mechanisms and cellular functions. Textbook knowledge will be combined with results from recent research and technological innovations in biology.
ObjectiveAfter completing this course, engineering students will be able to apply their previous training in the quantitative and physical sciences to modern biology. Students will also learn the principles how biological models are established, and how these models can be tested.
ContentLectures will include the following topics: DNA, chromosomes, RNA, protein, genetics, gene expression, membrane structure and function, vesicular traffic, cellular communication, energy conversion, cytoskeleton, cell cycle, cellular growth, apoptosis, autophagy, cancer, development and stem cells.

In addition, three journal clubs will be held, where one/two publictions will be discussed. For each journal club, students (alone or in groups of up to three students) have to write a summary and discussion of the publication. These written documents will be graded, and count as 25% for the final grade.
Lecture notesScripts of all lectures will be available.
Literature"Molecular Biology of the Cell" (5th edition) by Alberts, Johnson, Lewis, Raff, Roberts, and Walter.
Medical Physics
Track Core Courses
During the Master program, a minimum of 12 CP must be obtained from track core courses.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0385-00LBiomedical Imaging Information W4 credits3GS. Kozerke, U. Moser, M. Rudin
AbstractIntroduction and analysis of medical imaging technology including X-ray procedures, computed tomography, nuclear imaging techniques using single photon and positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound imaging techniques.
ObjectiveUnderstand the physical and technical principles underlying X-ray imaging, computed tomography, single photon and positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound and Doppler imaging techniques. Develop the mathematical framework to describe image encoding/decoding, point-spread function/modular transfer function, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast behavior for each of the methods.
ContentX-ray imaging
Computed tomography
Single photon emission tomography
Positron emission tomography
Magnetic resonance imaging
Ultrasound/Doppler imaging
Lecture notesLecture notes and handouts: Biomedical Imaging
LiteratureIntroduction to Medical Imaging: Physics, Engineering and Clinical Applications by Andrew Webb, Nadine Barrie Smith,
Cambridge University Press
402-0341-00LMedical Physics IW6 credits2V + 1UP. Manser
AbstractIntroduction to the fundamentals of medical radiation physics. Functional chain due to radiation exposure from the primary physical effect to the radiobiological and medically manifest secondary effects. Dosimetric concepts of radiation protection in medicine. Mode of action of radiation sources used in medicine and its illustration by means of Monte Carlo simulations.
ObjectiveUnderstanding the functional chain from primary physical effects of ionizing radiation to clinical radiation effects. Dealing with dose as a quantitative measure of medical exposure. Getting familiar with methods to generate ionizing radiation in medicine and learn how they are applied for medical purposes. Eventually, the lecture aims to show the students that medical physics is a fascinating and evolving discipline where physics can directly be used for the benefits of patients and the society.
ContentThe lecture is covering the basic principles of ionzing radiation and its physical and biological effects. The physical interactions of photons as well as of charged particles will be reviewed and their consequences for medical applications will be discussed. The concept of Monte Carlo simulation will be introduced in the excercises and will help the student to understand the characteristics of ionizing radiation in simple and complex situations. Fundamentals in dosimetry will be provided in order to understand the physical and biological effects of ionizing radiation. Deterministic as well as stochastic effects will be discussed and fundamental knowledge about radiation protection will be provided. In the second part of the lecture series, we will cover the generation of ionizing radiation. By this means, the x-ray tube, the clinical linear accelarator, and different radioactive sources in radiology, radiotherapy and nuclear medicine will be addressed. Applications in radiolgoy, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy will be described with a special focus on the physics underlying these applications.
Lecture notesA script will be provided.
402-0345-00LIntroduction to Medical Physics
Does not take place this semester.
W4 credits2VA. J. Lomax
AbstractMedical physics is a fascinating and worthwhile scientific discipline, providing many professional opportunities to apply physics to the care of patients, either in the clinic or in industry. It is also an area allowing for exciting, interesting and fulfilling areas of research.
ObjectiveIt is the aim of this course to give bachelor and master level students an insight into the wide spectrum of medical applications of physics, and to provide some insight into the work of the medical physicist in clinics, industry and research.
ContentThe lecture series will begin with a short historical overview of medical physics and an overview of the lecture series (lecture 1). This will be followed by two lectures on the physics of medical imaging. Medical imaging is one of the most important areas of preventative medicine and diagnostics, and in these two lectures, we will summarise the physics aspects of all the most important medical imaging modalities (X-ray, nuclear medicine, CT, MRI, Ultrasound imaging etc.). With lectures 4 and 5, we will move onto one of the other major areas of physics applied to medicine, radiotherapy. As the name implies, this is a physics 'heavy' discipline, being dependent as it is on both accelerator and particle physics. However, what is less well known is that this is also the second most successfu
l treatment of cancer after surgery and a great success story for the application of physics to medicine. In lectures 6 and 7 will then move on to a very different area, that of bio-photonics and bio-physics. Here we will look into the applications of lasers in medicine, from therapy to their use in particle acceleration for medical applications, as well as a variety of optical techniques for studying biological tissues, cells and structures.
In the second half of the lecture series (lectures 8-13) the style changes somewhat, and we will concentrate on professional aspects of medical physics and the role of the medical physicist in various professional scenarios. As such, lectures 8-11 will cover the role of the clinical medical physicist in diagnostic radiology, MRI, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy, whilst the last two lectures will concentrate on their role in industry and research. For many of this second set of lectures, external experts in the various areas will be invited in order to give the student the best possible insight into the life of a professional medical physicist.
227-0943-00LRadiobiologyW2 credits2VM. Pruschy
AbstractThe purpose of this course is to impart basic knowledge in radiobiology in order to handle ionizing rays and to provide a basis for predicting the radiation risk.
Objective
ContentEinführung in die Strahlenbiologie ionisierender Strahlen: Allgemeine Grundlagen und Begriffsbestimmungen; Mechanismen der biologischen Strahlenwirkung; Strahlenwirkung auf Zellen, Gewebe und Organe; Modifikation der biologischen Strahlenwirkung; Strahlenzytogenetik: Chromosomenveränderungen, DNA-Defekte, Reparaturprozesse; Molekulare Strahlenbiologie: Bedeutung inter- und intrazellulärer Signalübermittlungsprozesse, Apoptose, Zellzyklus-Checkpoints; Strahlenrisiko: Strahlensyndrome, Krebsinduktion, Mutationsauslösung, pränatale Strahlenwirkung; Strahlenbiologische Grundlagen des Strahlenschutzes; Nutzen-Risiko-Abwägungen bei der medizinischen Strahlenanwendung; Prädiktive strahlenbiologische Methoden zur Optimierung der therapeutischen Strahlenanwendung.
Lecture notesBeilagen mit zusammenfassenden Texten, Tabellen, Bild- und Grafikdarstellungen werden abgegeben
LiteratureLiteraturliste wird abgegeben.
Für NDS-Absolventen empfohlen: Hall EJ: Radiobiology for the Radiologist, 5th Edition, Lippincott Williams&Wilkins, ISBN 0-7817-2649-2, 2000
Prerequisites / NoticeThe former number of this course unit is 465-0951-00L.
Recommended Elective Courses
These courses are particularly recommended for the Medical Physics track. Please consult your track advisor if you wish to select other subjects.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
402-0674-00LPhysics in Medical Research: From Atoms to Cells Information W6 credits2V + 1UB. K. R. Müller
AbstractScanning probe and diffraction techniques allow studying activated atomic processes during early stages of epitaxial growth. For quantitative description, rate equation analysis, mean-field nucleation and scaling theories are applied on systems ranging from simple metallic to complex organic materials. The knowledge is expanded to optical and electronic properties as well as to proteins and cells.
ObjectiveThe lecture series is motivated by an overview covering the skin of the crystals, roughness analysis, contact angle measurements, protein absorption/activity and monocyte behaviour.

As the first step, real structures on clean surfaces including surface reconstructions and surface relaxations, defects in crystals are presented, before the preparation of clean metallic, semiconducting, oxidic and organic surfaces are introduced.

The atomic processes on surfaces are activated by the increase of the substrate temperature. They can be studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The combination with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) allows determining the sizes of the critical nuclei and the other activated processes in a hierarchical fashion. The evolution of the surface morphology is characterized by the density and size distribution of the nanostructures that could be quantified by means of the rate equation analysis, the mean-field nucleation theory, as well as the scaling theory. The surface morphology is further characterized by defects and nanostructure's shapes, which are based on the strain relieving mechanisms and kinetic growth processes.

High-resolution electron diffraction is complementary to scanning probe techniques and provides exact mean values. Some phenomena are quantitatively described by the kinematic theory and perfectly understood by means of the Ewald construction. Other phenomena need to be described by the more complex dynamical theory. Electron diffraction is not only associated with elastic scattering but also inelastic excitation mechanisms that reflect the electronic structure of the surfaces studied. Low-energy electrons lead to phonon and high-energy electrons to plasmon excitations. Both effects are perfectly described by dipole and impact scattering.

Thin-films of rather complex organic materials are often quantitatively characterized by photons with a broad range of wavelengths from ultra-violet to infra-red light. Asymmetries and preferential orientations of the (anisotropic) molecules are verified using the optical dichroism and second harmonic generation measurements. These characterization techniques are vital for optimizing the preparation of medical implants and the determination of tissue's anisotropies within the human body.

Cell-surface interactions are related to the cell adhesion and the contractile cellular forces. Physical means have been developed to quantify these interactions. Other physical techniques are introduced in cell biology, namely to count and sort cells, to study cell proliferation and metabolism and to determine the relation between cell morphology and function.

3D scaffolds are important for tissue augmentation and engineering. Design, preparation methods, and characterization of these highly porous 3D microstructures are also presented.

Visiting clinical research in a leading university hospital will show the usefulness of the lecture series.
Other Elective Courses
These courses may be suitable for the Medical Physics track. Please consult your track advisor.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0447-00LImage Analysis and Computer Vision Information W6 credits3V + 1UG. Székely, O. Göksel, L. Van Gool
AbstractLight and perception. Digital image formation. Image enhancement and feature extraction. Unitary transformations. Color and texture. Image segmentation and deformable shape matching. Motion extraction and tracking. 3D data extraction. Invariant features. Specific object recognition and object class recognition.
ObjectiveOverview of the most important concepts of image formation, perception and analysis, and Computer Vision. Gaining own experience through practical computer and programming exercises.
ContentThe first part of the course starts off from an overview of existing and emerging applications that need computer vision. It shows that the realm of image processing is no longer restricted to the factory floor, but is entering several fields of our daily life. First it is investigated how the parameters of the electromagnetic waves are related to our perception. Also the interaction of light with matter is considered. The most important hardware components of technical vision systems, such as cameras, optical devices and illumination sources are discussed. The course then turns to the steps that are necessary to arrive at the discrete images that serve as input to algorithms. The next part describes necessary preprocessing steps of image analysis, that enhance image quality and/or detect specific features. Linear and non-linear filters are introduced for that purpose. The course will continue by analyzing procedures allowing to extract additional types of basic information from multiple images, with motion and depth as two important examples. The estimation of image velocities (optical flow) will get due attention and methods for object tracking will be presented. Several techniques are discussed to extract three-dimensional information about objects and scenes. Finally, approaches for the recognition of specific objects as well as object classes will be discussed and analyzed.
Lecture notesCourse material Script, computer demonstrations, exercises and problem solutions
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
Basic concepts of mathematical analysis and linear algebra. The computer exercises are based on Linux and C.
The course language is English.
Biology Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0945-00LCell and Molecular Biology for EngineersW6 credits4GC. Frei
AbstractThe course gives an introduction into cellular and molecular biology, specifically for students with a background in engineering. The focus will be on the basic organization of eukaryotic cells, molecular mechanisms and cellular functions. Textbook knowledge will be combined with results from recent research and technological innovations in biology.
ObjectiveAfter completing this course, engineering students will be able to apply their previous training in the quantitative and physical sciences to modern biology. Students will also learn the principles how biological models are established, and how these models can be tested.
ContentLectures will include the following topics: DNA, chromosomes, RNA, protein, genetics, gene expression, membrane structure and function, vesicular traffic, cellular communication, energy conversion, cytoskeleton, cell cycle, cellular growth, apoptosis, autophagy, cancer, development and stem cells.

In addition, three journal clubs will be held, where one/two publictions will be discussed. For each journal club, students (alone or in groups of up to three students) have to write a summary and discussion of the publication. These written documents will be graded, and count as 25% for the final grade.
Lecture notesScripts of all lectures will be available.
Literature"Molecular Biology of the Cell" (5th edition) by Alberts, Johnson, Lewis, Raff, Roberts, and Walter.
Molecular Bioengineering
Track Core Courses
During the Master program, a minimum of 12 CP must be obtained from track core courses.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
376-1714-00LBiocompatible MaterialsW4 credits3GK. Maniura, P. M. Kollmannsberger, J. Möller, M. Zenobi-Wong
AbstractIntroduction to molecules used for biomaterials, molecular interactions between different materials and biological systems (molecules, cells, tissues). The concept of biocompatibility is discussed and important techniques from biomaterials research and development are introduced.
ObjectiveThe class consists of three parts:
1. Introdcution into molecular characteristics of molecules involved in the materials-to-biology interface. Molecular design of biomaterials.
2. The concept of biocompatibility.
3. Introduction into methodology used in biomaterials research and application.
ContentIntroduction into native and polymeric biomaterials used for medical applications. The concepts of biocompatibility, biodegradation and the consequences of degradation products are discussed on the molecular level. Different classes of materials with respect to potential applications in tissue engineering and drug delivery are introduced. Strong focus lies on the molecular interactions between materials having very different bulk and/or surface chemistry with living cells, tissues and organs. In particular the interface between the materials surfaces and the eukaryotic cell surface and possible reactions of the cells with an implant material are elucidated. Techniques to design, produce and characterize materials in vitro as well as in vivo analysis of implanted and explanted materials are discussed.
In addition, a link between academic research and industrial entrepreneurship is established by external guest speakers.
Lecture notesHandouts can be accessed online.
LiteratureLiteratur
Biomaterials Science: An Introduction to Materials in Medicine, Ratner B.D. et al, 3rd Edition, 2013
Comprehensive Biomaterials, Ducheyne P. et al., 1st Edition, 2011

(available online via ETH library)

Handouts provided during the classes and references therin.
402-0674-00LPhysics in Medical Research: From Atoms to Cells Information W6 credits2V + 1UB. K. R. Müller
AbstractScanning probe and diffraction techniques allow studying activated atomic processes during early stages of epitaxial growth. For quantitative description, rate equation analysis, mean-field nucleation and scaling theories are applied on systems ranging from simple metallic to complex organic materials. The knowledge is expanded to optical and electronic properties as well as to proteins and cells.
ObjectiveThe lecture series is motivated by an overview covering the skin of the crystals, roughness analysis, contact angle measurements, protein absorption/activity and monocyte behaviour.

As the first step, real structures on clean surfaces including surface reconstructions and surface relaxations, defects in crystals are presented, before the preparation of clean metallic, semiconducting, oxidic and organic surfaces are introduced.

The atomic processes on surfaces are activated by the increase of the substrate temperature. They can be studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The combination with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) allows determining the sizes of the critical nuclei and the other activated processes in a hierarchical fashion. The evolution of the surface morphology is characterized by the density and size distribution of the nanostructures that could be quantified by means of the rate equation analysis, the mean-field nucleation theory, as well as the scaling theory. The surface morphology is further characterized by defects and nanostructure's shapes, which are based on the strain relieving mechanisms and kinetic growth processes.

High-resolution electron diffraction is complementary to scanning probe techniques and provides exact mean values. Some phenomena are quantitatively described by the kinematic theory and perfectly understood by means of the Ewald construction. Other phenomena need to be described by the more complex dynamical theory. Electron diffraction is not only associated with elastic scattering but also inelastic excitation mechanisms that reflect the electronic structure of the surfaces studied. Low-energy electrons lead to phonon and high-energy electrons to plasmon excitations. Both effects are perfectly described by dipole and impact scattering.

Thin-films of rather complex organic materials are often quantitatively characterized by photons with a broad range of wavelengths from ultra-violet to infra-red light. Asymmetries and preferential orientations of the (anisotropic) molecules are verified using the optical dichroism and second harmonic generation measurements. These characterization techniques are vital for optimizing the preparation of medical implants and the determination of tissue's anisotropies within the human body.

Cell-surface interactions are related to the cell adhesion and the contractile cellular forces. Physical means have been developed to quantify these interactions. Other physical techniques are introduced in cell biology, namely to count and sort cells, to study cell proliferation and metabolism and to determine the relation between cell morphology and function.

3D scaffolds are important for tissue augmentation and engineering. Design, preparation methods, and characterization of these highly porous 3D microstructures are also presented.

Visiting clinical research in a leading university hospital will show the usefulness of the lecture series.
465-0953-00LBiostatisticsW2 credits2V + 1UB. Sick
AbstractThe course deals with simple quantitative and graphical as well as more complex methods of biostatistics. Contents: Descriptive statistics, probability theory and design of experiments, testing hypotheses, confidence intervals, correlation, simple and multiple linear regression, analysis of variance, logistic regression, survival analysis (Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox-regression).
Objective
551-0103-00LFundamentals of Biology II: Cell Biology Information W5 credits5VU. Kutay, Y. Barral, E. Hafen, G. Schertler, U. Suter, S. Werner
AbstractThe goal of this course is to provide students with a wide general understanding in cell biology. With this material as a foundation, students have enough of a cell biological basis to begin their specialization not only in cell biology but also in related fields such as biochemistry, microbiology, pharmacological sciences, molecular biology, and others.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is to provide students with a wide general understanding cell biology. With this material as a foundation, students have enough of a cell biological basis to begin their specialization not only in cell biology but also in related fields such as biochemistry, microbiology, pharmacological sciences, molecular biology, and others.
ContentThe focus is animal cells and the development of multicellular organisms with a clear emphasis on the molecular basis of cellular structures and phenomena. The topics include biological membranes, the cytoskeleton, protein sorting, energy metabolism, cell cycle and division, viruses, extracellular matrix, cell signaling, embryonic development and cancer research.
Lecture notesThe lectures are presented in the Powerpoint format. These are available on the WEB for ETH students over the nethz (https://sharepoint.biol.ethz.ch/sites/e-learn/551-0103-00L-H13/default.aspx). Some lectures are available on the ETH WEB site in a live format (Livestream) at the above WEB site.
LiteratureThe lectures follow Alberts et al. ‘Molecular Biology of the Cell’ Fifth edition, 2008 ISBN 978-0-8153-4105-5 (hard cover) and ISBN 978-0-8153-4106-2 (paperback).
Prerequisites / NoticeSome of the lectures are given in the English language.
551-1295-00LIntroduction to Bioinformatics: Concepts and Applications Information W6 credits4GW. Gruissem, K. Bärenfaller, A. Caflisch, G. Capitani, J. Fütterer, M. Robinson, A. Wagner
AbstractStorage, handling and analysis of large datasets have become essential in biological research. The course will introduce students to a number of applications of bioinformatics in biology. Freely accessible software tools and databases will be explained and explored in theory and praxis.
ObjectiveIntroduction to Bioinformatics I: Concepts and Applications (formerly Bioinformatics I) will provide students with the theoretical background of approaches to store and retrieve information from large databases. Concepts will be developed how DNA sequence information can be used to understand phylogentic relationships, how RNA sequence relates to structure, and how protein sequence information can be used for genome annotation and to predict protein folding and structure. Students will be introduced to quantitative methods for measuring gene expression and how this information can be used to model gene networks. Methods will be discussed to construct protein interaction maps and how this information can be used to simulate dynamic molecular networks.

In addition to the theoretical background, the students will develop hands-on experiences with the bioinformatics methods through guided exercises. The course provides students from different backgrounds with basic training in bioinformatics approaches that have impact on biological, chemical and physics experimentation. Bioinformatics approaches draw significant expertise from mathematics, statistics and computational science.

Although "Intoduction to Bioinformatics I" will focus on theory and praxis of bioinformatics approaches, the course provides an important foundation for the course "Introduction to Bioinformatics II: Fundamentals of computer science, modeling and algorithms" that will be offered in the following semester.
ContentBioinformatics I will cover the following topics:

From genes to databases and information
BLAST searches
Prediction of gene function and regulation
RNA structure prediction
Gene expression analysis using microarrays
Protein sequence and structure databases
WWW for bioinformatics
Protein sequence comparisons
Proteomics and de novo protein sequencing
Protein structure prediction
Cellular and protein interaction networks
Molecular dynamics simulation
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