Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2019

Health Sciences and Technology Master Information
Major in Medical Technology
Electives
Elective Courses II
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
376-1392-00LMechanobiology: Implications for Development, Regeneration and Tissue EngineeringW3 credits2GA. Ferrari, K. Würtz-Kozak, M. Zenobi-Wong
AbstractThis course will emphasize the importance of mechanobiology to cell determination and behavior. Its importance to regenerative medicine and tissue engineering will also be addressed. Finally, this course will discuss how age and disease adversely alter major mechanosensitive developmental programs.
ObjectiveThis course is designed to illuminate the importance of mechanobiological processes to life as well as to teach good experimental strategies to investigate mechanobiological phenomena.
ContentTypically, cell differentiation is studied under static conditions (cells grown on rigid plastic tissue culture dishes in two-dimensions), an experimental approach that, while simplifying the requirements considerably, is short-sighted in scope. It is becoming increasingly apparent that many tissues modulate their developmental programs to specifically match the mechanical stresses that they will encounter in later life. Examples of known mechanosensitive developmental programs include osteogenesis (bones), chondrogenesis (cartilage), and tendogenesis (tendons). Furthermore, general forms of cell behavior such as migration, extracellular matrix deposition, and complex tissue differentiation are also regulated by mechanical stimuli. Mechanically-regulated cellular processes are thus ubiquitous, ongoing and of great clinical importance.

The overall importance of mechanobiology to humankind is illustrated by the fact that nearly 80% of our entire body mass arises from tissues originating from mechanosensitive developmental programs, principally bones and muscles. Unfortunately, our ability to regenerate mechanosensitive tissue diminishes in later life. As it is estimated that the fraction of the western world population over 65 years of age will double in the next 25 years, an urgency in the global biomedical arena exists to better understand how to optimize complex tissue development under physiologically-relevant mechanical environments for purposes of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.
Lecture notesn/a
LiteratureTopical Scientific Manuscripts
376-1397-00LOrthopaedic Biomechanics Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 48.
W3 credits2GR. Müller, P. Atkins
AbstractThis course is aimed at studying the mechanical and structural engineering of the musculoskeletal system alongside the analysis and design of orthopaedic solutions to musculoskeletal failure.
ObjectiveTo apply engineering and design principles to orthopaedic biomechanics, to quantitatively assess the musculoskeletal system and model it, and to review rigid-body dynamics in an interesting context.
ContentEngineering principles are very important in the development and application of quantitative approaches in biology and medicine. This course includes a general introduction to structure and function of the musculoskeletal system: anatomy and physiology of musculoskeletal tissues and joints; biomechanical methods to assess and quantify tissues and large joint systems. These methods will also be applied to musculoskeletal failure, joint replacement and reconstruction; implants; biomaterials and tissue engineering.
Lecture notesStored on ILIAS.
LiteratureOrthopaedic Biomechanics:
Mechanics and Design in Musculoskeletal Systems

Authors: Donald L. Bartel, Dwight T. Davy, Tony M. Keaveny
Publisher: Prentice Hall; Copyright: 2007
ISBN-10: 0130089095; ISBN-13: 9780130089090
Prerequisites / NoticeLectures will be given in English.
376-1400-00LTransfer of Technologies into Neurorehabilitation Restricted registration - show details W3 credits2VC. Müller, R. Gassert, R. Riener, H. Van Hedel, N. Wenderoth
AbstractThe course focuses on clinical as well as industrial aspects of advanced technologies and their transfer into neurorehabilitation from both theoretical and practical perspectives. The students will learn the basics of neurorehabilitation and the linkage to technologies, gain insight into the development within the medtech field and learn applications of technologies in clinical settings.
ObjectiveThe students will:
- Learn basics and principles of clinical neuroscience and neurorehabilitation.
- Gain insight into the technical basics of advanced technologies and the transfer into product development processes.
- Gain insight into the application, the development and integration of advanced technologies in clinical settings. This includes the advantages and limitations according to different pathologies and therapy goals.
- Get the opportunity to test advanced technologies in practical settings.
- Learn how to transfer theoretical concepts to actual settings in different working fields.
ContentMain focus:
- Neurobiological principles applied to the field of neurorehabilitation.
- Clinical applications of advanced rehabilitation technologies.
- Visit medical technology companies, rehabilitation centers and labs to gain deeper insight into the development, application and evaluation of advanced technologie
Lecture notesTeaching materials will be provided for the individual events and lectures.
- Slides (pdf files)
- Information sheets and flyers of the visited companies, labs and clinics
376-1614-00LPrinciples in Tissue EngineeringW3 credits2VK. Maniura, J. Möller, M. Zenobi-Wong
AbstractFundamentals in blood coagulation; thrombosis, blood rheology, immune system, inflammation, foreign body reaction on the molecular level and the entire body are discussed. Applications of biomaterials for tissue engineering in different tissues are introduced. Fundamentals in medical implantology, in situ drug release, cell transplantation and stem cell biology are discussed.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of molecular aspects for the application of biodegradable and biocompatible Materials. Fundamentals of tissue reactions (eg. immune responses) against implants and possible clinical consequences will be discussed.
ContentThis class continues with applications of biomaterials and devices introduced in Biocompatible Materials I. Fundamentals in blood coagulation; thrombosis, blood rheology; immune system, inflammation, foreign body reaction on the level of the entire body and on the molecular level are introduced. Applications of biomaterials for tissue engineering in the vascular system, skeletal muscle, heart muscle, tendons and ligaments, bone, teeth, nerve and brain, and drug delivery systems are introduced. Fundamentals in medical implantology, in situ drug release, cell transplantation and stem cell biology are discussed.
Lecture notesHandouts provided during the classes and references therin.
LiteratureThe molecular Biology of the Cell, Alberts et al., 5th Edition, 2009.
Principles in Tissue Engineering, Langer et al., 2nd Edition, 2002
376-1620-00LSkeletal Repair Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 42.

Only for Health Sciences and Technology MSc and Biomedical Engineering MSc.
W3 credits3GS. Grad, D. Eglin, F. Moriarty, M. Stoddart
AbstractThe course gives an introduction into traumatic and degenerative pathologies of skeletal tissues. Emphasis is put on bone, cartilage and intervertebral disc. Established and new treatments are described, including cell, gene and molecular therapy, biomaterials, tissue engineering and infection prevention. In vitro/in vivo models are explained.
ObjectiveThe objectives of this course are to acquire a basic understanding of
(1) important pathologies of skeletal tissues and their consequences for the patient and the public health
(2) current surgical approaches for skeletal repair, their advantages and drawbacks
(3) recent advances in biological strategies for skeletal repair, such as (stem) cell therapy, gene therapy, biomaterials and tissue engineering
(4) pathology, prevention and treatment of implant associated infections
(5) in vitro and in vivo models for basic, translational and pre-clinical studies
ContentAccording to the expected background knowledge, the cellular and extracellular composition and the structure of the skeletal tissues, including bone, cartilage, intervertebral disc, ligament and tendon will briefly be recapitulated. The functions of the healthy tissues and the impact of acute injury (e.g. bone fracture) or progressive degenerative failure (e.g. osteoarthritis) will be demonstrated. Physiological self-repair mechanisms, their limitations, and current (surgical) treatment options will be outlined. Particular emphasis will be put on novel approaches for biological repair or regeneration of critical bone defects, damaged hyaline cartilage of major articulating joints, and degenerative intervertebral disc tissues. These new treatment options include autologous cell therapies, stem cell applications, bioactive factors, gene therapy, biomaterials or biopolymers; while tissue engineering / regenerative medicine is considered as a combination of some of these factors. In vitro bioreactor systems and in vivo animal models will be described for preclinical testing of newly developed materials and techniques. Bacterial infection as a major complication of invasive treatment will be explained, covering also established and new methods for its effective inhibition. Finally, the translation of new therapies for skeletal repair from the laboratory to the clinical application will be illustrated by recent developments.
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowledge in the cellular and molecular composition, structure and function of healthy skeletal tissues, especially bone, cartilage and intervertebral disc are required; furthermore, basic understanding of biomaterial properties, cell-surface interactions, and bacterial infection are necessary to follow this course.
376-1624-00LPractical Methods in Biofabrication Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 12.
W5 credits4PM. Zenobi-Wong, S. Schürle-Finke, K. Würtz-Kozak
AbstractBiofabrication involves the assembly of materials, cells, and biological building blocks into grafts for tissue engineering and in vitro models. The student learns techniques involving the fabrication and characterization of tissue engineered scaffolds and the design of 3D models based on medical imaging data. They apply this knowledge to design, manufacture and evaluate a biofabricated graft.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to give students hands-on experience with the tools required to fabricate tissue engineered grafts. During the first part of this course, students will gain practical knowledge in hydrogel synthesis and characterization, fuse deposition modelling and stereolithography, bioprinting and bioink design, electrospinning, and cell culture and viability testing. They will also learn the properties of common biocompatible materials used in fabrication and how to select materials based on the application requirements. The students learn principles for design of 3D models. Finally the students will apply their knowledge to a problem-based project.
Prerequisites / NoticeNot recommended if passed 376-1622-00 Practical Methods in Tissue Engineering
376-1660-00LScientific Writing, Reporting and Communication Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30.

Only for Health Sciences and Technology MSc
W3 credits2VB. Taylor
AbstractThis course aims to teach many of the unwritten rules on how to communicate effectively, from writing reports or manuscripts (or indeed their Master thesis!) through to improving skills in oral presentations, and presenting themselves at interview.
ObjectiveThis course will teach students to communicate effectively in official environments, including:
- writing manuscripts, theses, CVs, reports etc
- presenting posters
- oral presentations
- critical reviews of literature
376-1712-00LFinite Element Analysis in Biomedical Engineering Information W3 credits2VS. J. Ferguson, B. Helgason
AbstractThis course provides an introduction to finite element analysis, with a specific focus on problems and applications from biomedical engineering.
ObjectiveFinite element analysis is a powerful simulation method for the (approximate) solution of boundary value problems. While its traditional roots are in the realm of structural engineering, the methods have found wide use in the biomedical engineering domain for the simulation of the mechanical response of the human body and medical devices. This course provides an introduction to finite element analysis, with a specific focus on problems and applications from biomedical engineering. This domain offers many unique challenges, including multi-scale problems, multi-physics simulation, complex and non-linear material behaviour, rate-dependent response, dynamic processes and fluid-solid interactions. Theories taught are reinforced through practical applications in self-programmed and commercial simulation software, using e.g. MATLAB, ANSYS, FEBIO.
Content(Theory) The Finite Element and Finite Difference methods
Gallerkin, weighted residuals, discretization

(Theory) Mechanical analysis of structures
Trusses, beams, solids and shells, DOFs, hand calculations of simple FE problems, underlying PDEs

(Application) Mechanical analysis of structures
Truss systems, beam systems, 2D solids, meshing, organ level analysis of bones

(Theory and Application) Mechanical analysis of structures
Micro- and multi-scale analysis, voxel models, solver limitations, large scale solvers

(Theory) Non-linear mechanical analysis of structures
Large strain, Newton-Rhapson, plasticity

(Application) Non-linear mechanical analysis of structures
Plasticity (bone), hyperelasticity, viscoelasticity

(Theory and Application) Contact analysis
Friction, bonding, rough contact, implants, bone-cement composites, pushout tests

(Theory) Flow in Porous Media
Potential problems, Terzhagi's consolidation

(Application) Flow in Porous Media
Confined and unconfined compression of cartilage

(Theory) Heat Transfer and Mass Transport
Diffusion, conduction and convection, equivalency of equations

(Application) Heat Transfer and Mass Transport
Sequentially-coupled poroelastic and transport models for solute transport

(Theory) Computational Biofluid Dynamics
Newtonian vs. Non-Newtonian fluid, potential flow

(Application) Computational Biofluid Dynamics
Flow between micro-rough parallel plates
Lecture notesHandouts consisting of (i) lecturers' script, (ii) selected excerpts from relevant textbooks, (iii) selected excerpts from theory manuals of commercial simulation software, (iv) relevant scientific publications.
Prerequisites / NoticeFamiliarity with basic numerical methods.
Programming experience with MATLAB.
376-1721-00LBone Biology and Consequences for Human HealthW2 credits2VG. A. Kuhn, J. Goldhahn, E. Wehrle
AbstractBone is a complex tissue that continuously adapts to mechanical and metabolic demands. Failure of this remodeling results in reduced mechanic stability ot the skeleton. This course will provide the basic knowledge to understand the biology and pathophysiology of bone necessary for engineering of bone tissue and design of implants.
ObjectiveAfter completing this course, students will be able to understand:
a) the biological and mechanical aspects of normal bone remodeling
b) pathological changes and their consequences for the musculoskeletal system
c) the consequences for implant design, tissue engineering and treatment interventions.
ContentBone adapts continuously to mechanical and metabolic demands by complex remodeling processes. This course will deal with biological processes in bone tissue from cell to tissue level. This lecture will cover mechanisms of bone building (anabolic side), bone resorption (catabolic side), their coupling, and regulation mechanisms. It will also cover pathological changes and typical diseases like osteoporosis. Consequences for musculoskeletal health and their clinical relevance will be discussed. Requirements for tissue engineering as well as implant modification will be presented. Actual examples from research and development will be utilized for illustration.
376-1724-00LAppropriate Health System Design Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 42.
W3 credits2VW. Karlen
AbstractThis course elaborates upon relevant aspects in the conception, implementation and distribution of health devices and systems that effectively meet peoples and societies' needs in a local context. Four key elements of appropriateness (usage, cost, durability and performance) that are integral to the engineering design process are extensively discussed and applied.
ObjectiveThe main goals are to
> Evaluate the appropriateness of health systems to the cultural, financial, environmental and medical context in which they will be applied
and
> Design health systems from a user's perspective for a specific context

At the end of the course, students can
> name, understand and describe the 4 main principles that define appropriate technology
> apply these principles to critically analyze and assess health systems and technology
> project him/herself into a unfamiliar person and context and create hypotheses as to that person's needs, requirements, and priorities
> modify specifications of existing systems to improve appropriateness
> discuss the challenges and illustrate the the ethical and societal consequences of proposed design modifications
> communicate effectively the results of his/her system analysis and implementation strategies to non-specialists
ContentThe course will be interactive and involve roleplay. Please do not sign up for this course if you are not ready to leave your comfort zone in class. The lectures are divided in two parts:
The first part elaborates upon the important concepts of the design of health care devices and systems, and discusses implementation and dissemination strategies. We focus on communities such as low income households, the elderly, and patients with chronic illnesses that have special needs. Topics covered include point-of-care diagnostics, information and communication technologies, mobile health, user interactions, and also the social-cultural considerations.
The second part consists of elaboration of an appropriate device conducted by student groups. Each group will analyse an existing product or solution, critically assess its appropriateness according to the criteria learned in class, and provide explanations as to why the system succeeds or fails. The students will also present design improvements. Grading will be based on a written case report due in the middle of the semester and a final seminar presentation in form of a poster discussion and demo.
LiteratureWHO, "Medical Devices: Managing the Mismatch", 2010.
http://www.who.int/medical_devices/publications/med_dev_man-mismatch/en/

PATH, "The IC2030 report. Reimagining Global Health," 2015. http://ic2030.org/report/

R. Malkin and K. Von Oldenburg Beer, "Diffusion of novel healthcare technologies to resource poor settings," Annals of Biomedical Engineering, vol. 41, no. 9, pp. 1841:50, 2013.
Prerequisites / NoticeTarget Group:
Students of higher semesters and doctoral students of
- D-MAVT, D-ITET, D-INFK, D-HEST
- Biomedical Engineering, Robotics, Systems and Control
- Medical Faculty, University of Zurich
Students of other departments, faculties, courses are also welcome
376-1974-00LColloquium in Biomechanics Information W2 credits2KB. Helgason, S. J. Ferguson, R. Müller, J. G. Snedeker, B. Taylor, K. Würtz-Kozak, M. Zenobi-Wong
AbstractCurrent topics in biomechanics presented by speakers from academia and industry.
ObjectiveGetting insight into actual areas and problems of biomechanics.
376-1986-00LBayesian Data Analysis on Models of Behavior
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at UZH.
UZH Module Code: DOEC0829

Mind the enrolment deadlines at UZH:
https://www.uzh.ch/cmsssl/en/studies/application/mobilitaet.html
W3 credits2SR. Polania, University lecturers
AbstractMaking sense of the data acquired via experiments is fundamental in many fields of sciences. This course is designed for students/researchers who want to gain practical experience with data analysis based on Bayesian inference. Coursework involves practical demonstrations and discussion of solutions for data analysis problems. No advanced knowledge of statistics and probability is required.
ObjectiveThe overall goal of this course it that the students are able to develop both analytic and problem-solving skills that will serve to draw reasonable inferences from observations. The first objective is to make the participants familiar with the conceptual framework of Bayesian data analysis. The second goal is to introduce the ideas of modern Bayesian data analysis, including techniques such as Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques, alongside the introduction of programming tools that facilitate the creation of any Bayesian inference model. Throughout the course, this will involve practical demonstrations with example datasets, homework, and discussions that should convince the participants of this course that it is possible to make inference and understand the data acquired from the experiments that they usually obtain in their own research (starting from simple linear regressions all the way up to more complex models with hierarchical structures and dependencies). After working through this course, the participants should be able to build their own inference models in order to interpret meaningfully their own data.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe very basics (or at least intuition) of programming in either Matlab or R
402-0673-00LPhysics in Medical Research: From Humans to CellsW6 credits2V + 1UB. K. R. Müller
AbstractThe aim of this lecture series is to introduce the role of physics in state-of-the-art medical research and clinical practice. Topics to be covered range from applications of physics in medical implant technology and tissue engineering, through imaging technology, to its role in interventional and non-interventional therapies.
ObjectiveThe lecture series is focused on applying knowledge from physics in diagnosis, planning, and therapy close to clinical practice and fundamental medical research. Beside a general overview, the lectures give a deep insight into a very few selected techniques, which will help the students to apply the knowledge to a broad range of related techniques.

In particular, the lectures will elucidate the physics behind the X-ray imaging currently used in clinical environment and contemporary high-resolution developments. It is the goal to visualize and quantify (sub-)microstructures of human tissues and implants as well as their interface.

Ultrasound is not only used for diagnostic purposes but includes therapeutic approaches such as the control of the blood-brain barrier under MR-guidance.

Physicists in medicine are working on modeling and simulation. Based on the vascular structure in cancerous and healthy tissues, the characteristic approaches in computational physics to develop strategies against cancer are presented. In order to deliberately destroy cancerous tissue, heat can be supplied or extracted in different manner: cryotherapy (heat conductivity in anisotropic, viscoelastic environment), radiofrequency treatment (single and multi-probe), laser application, and proton therapy.

Medical implants play an important role to take over well-defined tasks within the human body. Although biocompatibility is here of crucial importance, the term is insufficiently understood. The aim of the lectures is the understanding of biocompatibility performing well-defined experiments in vitro and in vivo. Dealing with different classes of materials (metals, ceramics, polymers) the influence of surface modifications (morphology and surface coatings) are key issues for implant developments, which might be bio-inspired.

Mechanical stimuli can drastically influence soft and hard tissue behavior. The students should realize that a physiological window exists, where a positive tissue response is expected and how the related parameter including strain, frequency, and resting periods can be selected and optimized for selected tissues such as bone.

For the treatment of severe incontinence, we are developing artificial smart muscles. The students should have a critical look at promising solutions and the selection procedure as well as realize the time-consuming and complex way to clinical practice.

The course will be completed by relating the numerous examples and a common round of questions.
ContentThis lecture series will cover the following topics:
Introduction: Imaging the human body down to individual cells and beyond
Development of artificial muscles for incontinence treatment
X-ray-based computed tomography in clinics and related medical research
High-resolution micro computed tomography
Phase tomography using hard X-rays in biomedical research
Metal-based implants and scaffolds
Natural and synthetic ceramics for implants and regenerative medicine
Biomedical simulations
Polymers for medical implants
From open surgery to non-invasive interventions - Physical approaches in medical imaging
Dental research
Focused Ultrasound and its clinical use
Applying physics in medicine: Benefitting patients
Lecture noteshttp://www.bmc.unibas.ch/education/ETH_Zurich.phtml

login and password to be provided during the lecture
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents from other departments are very welcome to join and gain insight into a variety of sophisticated techniques for the benefit of patients.
No special knowledge is required. Nevertheless, gaps in basic physical knowledge will require additional efforts.
551-0320-00LCellular Biochemistry (Part II)W3 credits2VY. Barral, R. Kroschewski, A. E. Smith
AbstractThis course will focus on molecular mechanisms and concepts underlying cellular biochemistry, providing advanced insights into the structural and functional details of individual cell components, and the complex regulation of their interactions. Particular emphasis will be on the spatial and temporal integration of different molecules and signaling pathways into global cellular processes.
ObjectiveThe full-year course (551-0319-00 & 551-0320-00) focuses on the molecular mechanisms and concepts underlying the biochemistry of cellular physiology, investigating how these processes are integrated to carry out highly coordinated cellular functions. The molecular characterization of complex cellular functions requires a combination of approaches such as biochemistry, but also cell biology and genetics. This course is therefore the occasion to discuss these techniques and their integration in modern cellular biochemistry.
The students will be able to describe the structural and functional details of individual cell components, and the spatial and temporal regulation of their interactions. In particular, they will learn to explain how different molecules and signaling pathways can be integrated during complex and highly dynamic cellular processes such as intracellular transport, cytoskeletal rearrangements, cell motility, and cell division. In addition, they will be able to illustrate the relevance of particular signaling pathways for cellular pathologies such as cancer or during cellular infection.
ContentSpatial and temporal integration of different molecules and signaling pathways into global cellular processes, such as cell division, cell infection and cell motility. Emphasis is also put on the understanding of pathologies associated with defective cell physiology, such as cancer or during cellular infection.
LiteratureRecommended supplementary literature (review articles and selected primary literature) will be provided during the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeTo attend this course the students must have a solid basic knowledge in chemistry, biochemistry, cell biology and general biology. Biology students have in general already attended the first part of the "Cellular Biochemistry" concept course (551-0319-00). The course will be taught in English.
In addition, the course will be based on a blended-learning scenario, where frontal lectures will be complemented with carefully chosen web-based teaching elements that students access through the ETH Moodle platform.
551-0318-00LImmunology IIW3 credits2VA. Oxenius, M. Kopf, S. R. Leibundgut, E. Wetter Slack, further lecturers
AbstractIntroduction into the cellular and molecular basis of the immune system and immune responses against diverse pathogens, tumors, transplants, and self (autoimmunity)
ObjectiveThe lectures will provide a detailed understanding:
- how innate and adaptive immune responses interact at the cellular and molecular level.
- how the immune system recognizes and fights against pathogenic microorganisms including viruses, bacteria, and parasites.
- why lymphocytes tolerate self molecules.
- about function and dysfunction the intestinal immune system.
- immunopathology and inflammatory diseases.
ContentThe aim of lecture is to understand:
> How pathogens are recognized by the innate immune system
> Immune defense against various pathogens
> Immunology of the skin, lung and intestines
> Tumor immunology
> Migration and homing of immune cells
> tolerance and autoimmunity
> T cell memory
Lecture notesPresentations of the lecturers are available at the Moodle link
LiteratureRecommended: Kuby Immunology (Freeman)
Major in Molecular Health Sciences
Compulsory Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
376-0302-00LPracticing Translational Science Restricted registration - show details
Only for Health Sciences and Technology MSc.
O2 credits4AJ. Goldhahn, S. Ben-Menahem, C. Ewald, W. Karlen
AbstractTranslational Science is a cross disciplinary scientific research that is motivated by the need for practical applications that help patients. The students should apply knowledge they gained in the prior course during a team approach focused on one topic provided by the supervisor. Each student has to take a role in the team and label clear responsibility and contribution.
ObjectiveAfter completing this course, students will be able to apply:
a) Principles of translational science (including project planning, ethics application, basics of resource management and interdisciplinary communication)
b) The use of a translational approach in project planning and management
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite: lecture 376-0300-00 "Translational Science for Health and Medicine" passed.
Electives
Electives Courses I
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
551-0326-00LCell Biology Information W6 credits4VS. Werner, M. Bordoli, R. Henneberger, W. Kovacs, M. Schäfer, U. Suter, A. Wutz
AbstractThis Course introduces principle concepts, techniques, and experimental strategies used in modern Cell Biology. Major topics include: neuron-glia interactions in health and disease; mitochondrial dynamics; stem cell biology; growth factor action in development, tissue repair and disease; cell metabolism, in particular sensing and signaling mechanisms, cell organelles, and lipid metabolism.
Objective-To prepare the students for successful and efficient lab work by learning how to ask the right questions and to use the appropriate techniques in a research project.
-To convey knowledge about neuron-glia interactions in health and disease.
- To provide information on different types of stem cells and their function in health and disease
-To provide information on growth factor signaling in development, repair and disease and on the use of growth factors or their receptors as drug targets for major human diseases
-To convey knowledge on the mechanisms underlying repair of injured tissues
-To provide the students with an overview of mitochondrial dynamics.
-Providing an understanding of RNA processing reactions and their regulations.
-To provide a comprehensive understanding of metabolic sensing mechanisms occurring in different cell types and organelles in response to glucose, hormones, oxygen, nutrients as well as lipids, and to discuss downstream signaling pathways and cellular responses.
-To provide models explaining how disturbances in complex metabolic control networks and bioenergetics can lead to disease and to highlight latest experimental approaches to uncover the intricacies of metabolic control at the cellular and organismal level.
-Providing the background and context that foster cross-disciplinary scientific thinking.
376-0209-00LMolecular Disease MechanismsW6 credits4VC. Wolfrum, H. Gahlon, M. Kopf
AbstractIn this course the mechanisms of disease development will be studied. Main topics will be:

1. Influence of environmental factors with an emphasis on inflammation and the immune response.
2. Mechanisms underlying disease progression in metabolic disorders, integrating genetic and environmental factors.
3. Mechanisms underlying disease progression in cancer, integrating genetic and environment
ObjectiveTo understand the mechanisms governing disease development with a special emphasis on genetic and environmental associated components
Lecture notesAll information can be found at:

https://moodle-app2.let.ethz.ch/course/view.php?id=690

The enrollment key will be provided by email
551-0318-00LImmunology IIW3 credits2VA. Oxenius, M. Kopf, S. R. Leibundgut, E. Wetter Slack, further lecturers
AbstractIntroduction into the cellular and molecular basis of the immune system and immune responses against diverse pathogens, tumors, transplants, and self (autoimmunity)
ObjectiveThe lectures will provide a detailed understanding:
- how innate and adaptive immune responses interact at the cellular and molecular level.
- how the immune system recognizes and fights against pathogenic microorganisms including viruses, bacteria, and parasites.
- why lymphocytes tolerate self molecules.
- about function and dysfunction the intestinal immune system.
- immunopathology and inflammatory diseases.
ContentThe aim of lecture is to understand:
> How pathogens are recognized by the innate immune system
> Immune defense against various pathogens
> Immunology of the skin, lung and intestines
> Tumor immunology
> Migration and homing of immune cells
> tolerance and autoimmunity
> T cell memory
Lecture notesPresentations of the lecturers are available at the Moodle link
LiteratureRecommended: Kuby Immunology (Freeman)
Elective Courses II
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0396-00LEXCITE Interdisciplinary Summer School on Bio-Medical Imaging Information Restricted registration - show details
The school admits 60 MSc or PhD students with backgrounds in biology, chemistry, mathematics, physics, computer science or engineering based on a selection process.

Students have to apply for acceptance by April 22, 2019. To apply a curriculum vitae and an application letter need to be submitted. The notification of acceptance will be given by May 24, 2019. Further information can be found at: www.excite.ethz.ch.
W4 credits6GS. Kozerke, G. Csúcs, J. Klohs-Füchtemeier, S. F. Noerrelykke, M. P. Wolf
AbstractTwo-week summer school organized by EXCITE (Center for EXperimental & Clinical Imaging TEchnologies Zurich) on biological and medical imaging. The course covers X-ray imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear imaging, ultrasound imaging, infrared and optical microscopy, electron microscopy, image processing and analysis.
ObjectiveStudents understand basic concepts and implementations of biological and medical imaging. Based on relative advantages and limitations of each method they can identify preferred procedures and applications. Common foundations and conceptual differences of the methods can be explained.
ContentTwo-week summer school on biological and medical imaging. The course covers concepts and implementations of X-ray imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear imaging, ultrasound imaging, infrared and optical microscopy and electron microscopy. Multi-modal and multi-scale imaging and supporting technologies such as image analysis and modeling are discussed. Dedicated modules for physical and life scientists taking into account the various backgrounds are offered.
Lecture notesHand-outs, Web links
Prerequisites / NoticeThe school admits 60 MSc or PhD students with backgrounds in biology, chemistry, mathematics, physics, computer science or engineering based on a selection process. To apply a curriculum vitae, a statement of purpose and applicants references need to be submitted. Further information can be found at: http://www.excite.ethz.ch/education/summer-school.html
  • First page Previous page Page  4  of  7 Next page Last page     All