Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2019

Biology Master Information
Elective Major Subject Areas
Elective Major: Cell Biology
Elective Compulsory Master Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
551-0140-00LEpigeneticsW4 credits2VA. Wutz, U. Grossniklaus, R. Paro, R. Santoro
AbstractEpigenetics studies the inheritance of traits that cannot be attributed to changes in the DNA sequence. The lecture will present an overview of different epigenetic phenomena and provide detailed insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms. The role of epigenetic processes in the development of cancer and other disorders will be discussed.
ObjectiveThe aim of the course is to gain an understanding of epigenetic mechanisms and their impact on the development of organisms, regenerative processes or manifestation of disease.
ContentTopics
- historical overview, concepts and comparison Genetics vs. Epigenetics
- Biology of chromatin: structure and function, organization in the nucleus and the role of histone modifications in processes like transcription and replication
- DNA methylation as an epigenetic modification
- Inheritance of epigenetic modifications during cell division: cellular memory
- Stability and reversibility of epigenetic modifications: cellular plasticity and stem cells
- Genomic imprinting in plants and mammals
- X chromosome inactivation and dosis compensation
- position effects, paramutations and transvection
- RNA-induced gene silencing
- The role of epigenetic processes in cancer development or cell aging
551-0224-00LAdvanced Proteomics Restricted registration - show details
For master students from the 2nd semester on, also doctoral candidates and post docs.
W4 credits6GR. Aebersold, L. Gillet, M. Gstaiger, A. Leitner, P. Pedrioli
AbstractGoal of the course is to analyze current and newly emerging technologies and approaches in protein and proteome analysis with regard to their application in biology, biotechnology and medicine.
Format: Introduction by instructor followed by discussions stimulated by reading assignments and exercises.
ObjectiveTo discuss current and newly emerging technologies and approaches in protein and proteome analysis with regard to their applications in biology, biotechnology, medicine and systems biology.
ContentBlock course teaching current methods for the acquisition and processing of proteomic datasets.
Prerequisites / NoticeNumber of people: Not exceeding 30.
Students from ETHZ, Uni Zurich and University of Basel
Non-ETH students must register at ETH Zurich as special students http://www.rektorat.ethz.ch/students/admission/auditors/index_EN
551-1126-00LTechnologies in Molecular MicrobiologyW4 credits2VH.‑M. Fischer, B. Christen, M. Christen, further lecturers
AbstractThe lecture course provides an advanced understanding of modern techniques used in molecular microbiology. Current technologies and research directions in molecular microbiology including applied aspects will be illustrated with paper discussions. The format is a lecture course enriched by group activities.
ObjectiveThe lecture course aims at providing principles of modern techniques used in molecular microbiology. Emphasis is on genetic, biochemical, and cellular analysis including also bioinformatics aspects. Discussion of a set of commonly applied technologies will assist students in evaluating current research in molecular microbiology and choosing appropriate methods for their own demands.
ContentImportant genetic, biochemical, biophysical, bioinformatic and structural analysis methods will be presented that are used to gain a deeper understanding of the molecular principles and mechanisms underlying basic physiological processes in prokaryotes. Applied aspects of molecular microbiology and current research in this area will also be covered.

List of topics:
- Analysis of genes, genomes and transcriptomes
- Analysis of proteins, proteomes and microbial systems
- Synthetic biology
Lecture notesUpdated handouts will be provided during the class.
LiteratureCurrent literature references, relevant papers and handouts will be provided during the lectures.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe following lecturers will contribute to the course:

Prof. Beat Christen (ETH)
Dr. Matthias Christen (ETH)
Prof. Hans-Martin Fischer (ETH)
Dr. Jonas Grossmann (FGCZ)
Dr. Florian Freimoser (Agroscope)
Dr. Bernd Roschitzki (FGCZ)
Dr. Roman Spörri (ETH)
551-0338-00LCurrent Approaches in Single Cell Analysis (University of Zurich)
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at UZH.
UZH Module Code: BIO256

Mind the enrolment deadlines at UZH:
https://www.uzh.ch/cmsssl/en/studies/application/mobilitaet.html
W2 credits1VUniversity lecturers
AbstractIn this lecture, we will discuss the most important single cell
approaches, the questions they can address and current developments. We will cover single cell: genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics (CyTOF mass cytometry), metabolomics and highly multiplexed imaging. Finally, we will also discuss the latest approaches for the analysis of such generated highly multiplexed single cell data.
ObjectiveOn completion of this module the students should be able to:
- explain the basic principles of single cell analysis techniques
- identify and justify the limitations of the current single cell
technologies and suggest reasonable improvements
- know the basic challenges in data analysis imposed by the complex
multi parameter data.
Key skills:
On completion of this module the students should be able to:
- summarize and discuss the impact these technologies have on biology
and medicine
- design biological and biomedical experiments for which single cell
analysis is essential
ContentCurrently single cell analysis approaches revolutionize the way we study and understand biological systems. In all biological and biomedical settings, cell populations and tissues are highly heterogeneous; this heterogeneity plays a critical role in basic biological processes such as cell cycle, development and organismic function, but is also a major player in disease, e.g. for cancer development, diagnosis and treatment.
Currently, single cell analysis techniques are rapidly developing and
find broad application, as the single cell measurements not only enable
to study cell specific functions, but often reveal unexpected biological
mechanisms in so far (assumed) well understood biological processes.
In this lecture, we will discuss the most important single cell approaches, the questions they can address and current developments. We will cover single cell genomics, single cell transcriptomics, single cell proteomics (CyTOF mass cytometry), single cell metabolomics and highly multiplexed single cell imaging. Finally, we will also discuss the latest approaches for the analysis of such generated highly multiplexed single cell data.
551-1404-00LRNA and Proteins: Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Gene Expression (University of Zurich)
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at UZH.
UZH Module Code: BCH252

Mind the enrolment deadlines at UZH:
https://www.uzh.ch/cmsssl/en/studies/application/mobilitaet.html
W3 credits2VUniversity lecturers
AbstractThe course introduces the cellular processes and molecular mechanisms involved in regulating genome expression at the post-transcriptional level.
Topics will include :
-RNA processing, and transport;
-protein synthesis and translational control, trafficking and degradation;
-RNA-guided regulation (RNA interference, microRNAs);
-molecular surveillance and quality control mechanisms
Objective-Outline the cellular processes
used by eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells
to control gene expression at the post-
transcriptional level.
-Describe the molecular mechanisms
underlying post-transcriptional gene
regulation
-Identify experimental approaches
used to study post-transcriptional gene
regulation and describe their strengths
and weaknesses.
551-1412-00LMolecular and Structural Biology IV: Visualizing Macromolecules by X-Ray Crystallography and EMW4 credits2VN. Ban, D. Böhringer, T. Ishikawa, M. A. Leibundgut, K. Locher, M. Pilhofer, K. Wüthrich, further lecturers
AbstractThis course provides an in-depth discussion of two main methods to determine the 3D structures of macromolecules and complexes at high resolution: X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy. Both techniques result in electron density maps that are interpreted by atomic models.
ObjectiveStudents will obtain the theoretical background to understand structure determination techniques employed in X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy, including diffraction theory, crystal growth and analysis, reciprocal space calculations, interpretation of electron density, structure building and refinement as well as validation. The course will also provide an introduction into the use of cryo-electron tomography to visualize complex cellular substructures at sub-nanometer resolutions, effectively bridging the resolution gap between optical microscopy and single particle cryo-electron microscopy. Lectures will be complemented with practical sessions where students will have a chance to gain hands on experience with sample preparation, data processing and structure building and refinement.
ContentFebruary 22 Lecture 1 Prof. Dr. Kurt Wüthrich
History of Structural Molecular Biology

March 1 Lecture 2 Prof. Dr. Kaspar Locher
X-ray diffraction from macromolecular crystals

March 8 Lecture 3 Prof. Dr. Kaspar Locher
Data collection and statistics, phasing methods

March 15 Lecture 4 Prof. Dr. Nenad Ban
Crystal symmetry and space groups

March 22 Lecture 5 Ban Lab
Practical session with X-ray data processing

March 29 Lecture 6 Prof. Dr. Takashi Ishikawa
Principle of cryo-EM for biological macromolecules I, including hardware of TEM and detectors, image formation principle (phase contrast, spherical aberration, CTF), 3D reconstruction (central-section theorem, backprojection, missing information)

April 5 Lecture 7 Dr. Daniel Boehringer
Single particle analysis, including principle (projection matching, random conical tilt, angular reconstitution)

April 12 Lecture 8 Ban Lab
Practical session including specimen preparation (cryo, negative stain, visit to ScopeM

May 3 Lecture 9
Prof. Dr. M. Pilhofer
Tomography I, including basics and subtomogram averaging

May 10 Lecture 10 Ban Lab
Practical session with example initial EM data processing

May 17 Lecture 11 Prof. Dr. Martin Pilhofer
Practical session (including recent techniques, including cryo-FIB)

May 24 Lecture 12 Prof. Dr. Nenad Ban
EM and X-ray structure building, refinement, validation and interpretation

May 31 Lecture 13 Ban Lab
Practical session with model building and refinemen
551-1414-00LMolecular and Structural Biology V: Studying Macromolecules by NMR and EPRW4 credits2VF. Allain, A. D. Gossert, G. Jeschke, K. Wüthrich
AbstractThe course provides an overview of experimental methods for studying function and structure of macromolecules at atomic resolution in solution. The two main methods used are Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy.
ObjectiveInsight into the methodology, areas of application and limitations of these two methods for studying biological macromolecules. Practical exercises with spectra to have hands on understanding of the methodology.
ContentPart I: Historical overview of structural biology.
Part II: Basic concepts of NMR and initial examples of applications.
2D NMR and isotope labeling for studying protein function and molecular interactions at atomic level.
Studies of dynamic processes of proteins in solution.
Approaches to study large particles.
Methods for determination of protein structures in solution.
Part III: NMR methods for structurally characterizing RNA and protein-RNA complexes.
Part IV: EPR of biomolecules
Literature1) Wüthrich, K. NMR of Proteins and Nucleic Acids, Wiley-Interscience.
2) Dominguez et al, Prog Nucl Magn Reson Spectrosc. 2011 Feb;58(1-2):1-61.
3) Duss O et al, Methods Enzymol. 2015;558:279-331.
551-1700-00LIntroduction to Flow Cytometry Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 24.
W2 credits1VJ. Kisielow, L. Tortola, further lecturers
AbstractThe lecture provides an introduction to flow cytometry. We will cover the technology basics, experimental design, data acquisition and analysis of flow and mass cytometry. In addition, various research applications will be discussed. The format is a lecture course enriched by a visit to the ETH Flow Cytometry Core Facility and practical demonstration of the use of analysis and sorting instruments.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is to provide the basic knowledge of flow and mass cytometry required for planning and execution of cytometric experiments.
ContentThe lecture course aims at teaching principles of flow cytometry. The emphasis is on theoretical principles (signal detection, fluorochromes, signal spill-over and compensation) as well as practical aspects of experimental design and performance (sample preparation, controls, data acquisition and analysis).
List of topics:
- Principles of Flow Cytometry
- Signal processing
- Compensation and Controls
- Data analysis, gating and presentation
- Panel design
- Sorting
- Mass cytometry
- High-dimensional data analysis
- Practical demonstration (hardware and software)
Modern flow cytometric techniques for immunophenotyping, analysis of proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis and cell signalling will be introduced.
Lecture notesUpdated handouts will be provided during the class.
LiteratureCurrent literature references on immunophenotyping, analysis of proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis and cell signalling will be discussed during the lectures.
376-1306-00LClinical Neuroscience Information W3 credits3GG. Schratt, University lecturers
AbstractThe lecture series "Clinical Neuroscience" presents a comprehensive, condensed overview of the most important neurological diseases, their clinical presentation, diagnosis, therapy options and possible causes. Patient demonstrations (Übungen) follow every lecture that is dedicated to a particular disease.
ObjectiveBy the end of this module students should be able to:
- demonstrate their understanding and deep knowledge concerning the main neurological diseases
- identify and explain the different clinical presentation of these diseases, the methodology of diagnosis and the current therapies available
- summarize and critically review scientific literature efficiently and effectively
701-1708-00LInfectious Disease DynamicsW4 credits2VS. Bonhoeffer, R. D. Kouyos, R. R. Regös, T. Stadler
AbstractThis course introduces into current research on the population biology of infectious diseases. The course discusses the most important mathematical tools and their application to relevant diseases of human, natural or managed populations.
ObjectiveAttendees will learn about:
* the impact of important infectious pathogens and their evolution on human, natural and managed populations
* the population biological impact of interventions such as treatment or vaccination
* the impact of population structure on disease transmission

Attendees will learn how:
* the emergence spread of infectious diseases is described mathematically
* the impact of interventions can be predicted and optimized with mathematical models
* population biological models are parameterized from empirical data
* genetic information can be used to infer the population biology of the infectious disease

The course will focus on how the formal methods ("how") can be used to derive biological insights about the host-pathogen system ("about").
ContentAfter an introduction into the history of infectious diseases and epidemiology the course will discuss basic epidemiological models and the mathematical methods of their analysis. We will then discuss the population dynamical effects of intervention strategies such as vaccination and treatment. In the second part of the course we will introduce into more advanced topics such as the effect of spatial population structure, explicit contact structure, host heterogeneity, and stochasticity. In the final part of the course we will introduce basic concepts of phylogenetic analysis in the context of infectious diseases.
Lecture notesSlides and script of the lecture will be available online.
LiteratureThe course is not based on any of the textbooks below, but they are excellent choices as accompanying material:
* Keeling & Rohani, Modeling Infectious Diseases in Humans and Animals, Princeton Univ Press 2008
* Anderson & May, Infectious Diseases in Humans, Oxford Univ Press 1990
* Murray, Mathematical Biology, Springer 2002/3
* Nowak & May, Virus Dynamics, Oxford Univ Press 2000
* Holmes, The Evolution and Emergence of RNA Viruses, Oxford Univ Press 2009
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowledge of population dynamics and population genetics as well as linear algebra and analysis will be an advantage.
Elective Major: Molecular Health Sciences
Compulsory Concept Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
376-0209-00LMolecular Disease MechanismsO6 credits4VC. Wolfrum, H. Gahlon, M. Kopf
AbstractIn this course the mechanisms of disease development will be studied. Main topics will be:

1. Influence of environmental factors with an emphasis on inflammation and the immune response.
2. Mechanisms underlying disease progression in metabolic disorders, integrating genetic and environmental factors.
3. Mechanisms underlying disease progression in cancer, integrating genetic and environment
ObjectiveTo understand the mechanisms governing disease development with a special emphasis on genetic and environmental associated components
Lecture notesAll information can be found at:

https://moodle-app2.let.ethz.ch/course/view.php?id=690

The enrollment key will be provided by email
Elective Compulsory Concept Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
551-0326-00LCell Biology Information W6 credits4VS. Werner, M. Bordoli, R. Henneberger, W. Kovacs, M. Schäfer, U. Suter, A. Wutz
AbstractThis Course introduces principle concepts, techniques, and experimental strategies used in modern Cell Biology. Major topics include: neuron-glia interactions in health and disease; mitochondrial dynamics; stem cell biology; growth factor action in development, tissue repair and disease; cell metabolism, in particular sensing and signaling mechanisms, cell organelles, and lipid metabolism.
Objective-To prepare the students for successful and efficient lab work by learning how to ask the right questions and to use the appropriate techniques in a research project.
-To convey knowledge about neuron-glia interactions in health and disease.
- To provide information on different types of stem cells and their function in health and disease
-To provide information on growth factor signaling in development, repair and disease and on the use of growth factors or their receptors as drug targets for major human diseases
-To convey knowledge on the mechanisms underlying repair of injured tissues
-To provide the students with an overview of mitochondrial dynamics.
-Providing an understanding of RNA processing reactions and their regulations.
-To provide a comprehensive understanding of metabolic sensing mechanisms occurring in different cell types and organelles in response to glucose, hormones, oxygen, nutrients as well as lipids, and to discuss downstream signaling pathways and cellular responses.
-To provide models explaining how disturbances in complex metabolic control networks and bioenergetics can lead to disease and to highlight latest experimental approaches to uncover the intricacies of metabolic control at the cellular and organismal level.
-Providing the background and context that foster cross-disciplinary scientific thinking.
Elective Compulsory Master Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
551-1310-00LA Problem-Based Approach to Cellular Biochemistry Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 15.
W6 credits2GM. Peter, E. Dultz, M. Gstaiger, V. Korkhov, V. Panse, A. E. Smith
AbstractIndependent, guided acquisition of an overview over a defined area of research, identification of important open questions, development of an experimental strategy to address a defined question, and formulation of this strategy within the framework of a research grant.
ObjectiveThe students will learn to acquire independently an overview over a defined area of research, and to identify important open questions. In addition, they will learn to develop an experimental strategy to address a defined question, and to formulate this strategy within the framework of a research grant.
ContentThe students will work in groups of two to three, in close contact with a tutor (ETH Prof or senior scientist). A research overview with open questions and a research grant will be developed independently by the students, with guidance from the tutor through regular mandatory meetings. The students will write both the research overview with open questions and the grant in short reports, and present them to their colleagues.
LiteratureThe identification of appropriate literature is a component of the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course will be taught in english, and requires extensive independent work.
551-0512-00LCurrent Topics in Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
Number of participants limited to 8
W2 credits1SU. Suter
AbstractThe course is a literature seminar or "journal club". Each Friday a student, or a member of the Suter Lab in the Institute of Molecular Health Sciences, will present a paper from the recent literature.
ObjectiveThe course introduces you to recent developments in the fields of cellular and molecular neurobiology. It also supports you to develop your skills in critically reading the scientific literature. You should be able to grasp what the authors wanted to learn e.g. their goals, why the authors chose the experimental approach they used, the strengths and weaknesses of the experiments and the data presented, and how the work fits into the wider literature in the field. You will present one paper yourself, which provides you with practice in public speaking.
ContentYou will present one paper yourself. Give an introduction to the field of the paper, then show and comment on the main results (all the papers we present are available online, so you can show original figures with a beamer). Finish with a summary of the main points and a discussion of their significance.
You are expected to take part in the discussion and to ask questions. To prepare for this you should read all the papers beforehand (they will be announced a week in advance of the presentation).
Lecture notesPresentations will be made available after the seminars.
LiteratureWe cover a range of themes related to development and neurobiology. Before starting your preparations, you are required to check with Laura Montani (laura.montani@biol.ethz.ch), who helps you with finding an appropriate paper.
Prerequisites / NoticeYou must attend at least 80% of the journal clubs, and give a presentation of your own. At the end of the semester there will be a 30 minute oral exam on the material presented during the semester. The grade will be based on the exam (45%), your presentation (45%), and a contribution based on your active participation in discussion of other presentations (10%).
551-0140-00LEpigeneticsW4 credits2VA. Wutz, U. Grossniklaus, R. Paro, R. Santoro
AbstractEpigenetics studies the inheritance of traits that cannot be attributed to changes in the DNA sequence. The lecture will present an overview of different epigenetic phenomena and provide detailed insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms. The role of epigenetic processes in the development of cancer and other disorders will be discussed.
ObjectiveThe aim of the course is to gain an understanding of epigenetic mechanisms and their impact on the development of organisms, regenerative processes or manifestation of disease.
ContentTopics
- historical overview, concepts and comparison Genetics vs. Epigenetics
- Biology of chromatin: structure and function, organization in the nucleus and the role of histone modifications in processes like transcription and replication
- DNA methylation as an epigenetic modification
- Inheritance of epigenetic modifications during cell division: cellular memory
- Stability and reversibility of epigenetic modifications: cellular plasticity and stem cells
- Genomic imprinting in plants and mammals
- X chromosome inactivation and dosis compensation
- position effects, paramutations and transvection
- RNA-induced gene silencing
- The role of epigenetic processes in cancer development or cell aging
701-1350-00LCase Studies in Environment and HealthW4 credits2VK. McNeill, N. Borduas-Dedekind, T. Julian
AbstractThis course will focus on a few individual chemicals and pathogens from different standpoints: their basic chemistry or biology, their environmental behavior, (eco)toxicology, and human health impacts. The course will draw out the common points in each chemical or pathogen's history.
ObjectiveThis course aims to illustrate how the individual properties of chemicals and pathogens along with societal pressures lead to environmental and human health crises. The ultimate goal of the course is to identify common aspects that will improve prediction of environmental crises before they occur. Students are expected to participate actively in the course, which includes the critical reading of the pertinent literature and class presentations.
ContentEach semester will feature case studies of chemicals and pathogens that have had a profound effect on human health and the environment. The instructors will present eight of these and the students will present approx. six in groups of three or four. Students will be expected to contribute to the discussion and, on selected topics, to lead the discussion.
Lecture notesHandouts will be provided as needed.
LiteratureHandouts will be provided as needed.
551-1100-00LInfectious Agents: From Molecular Biology to Disease
Number of participants limited to 22.
Requires application until 2 weeks before the start of the semester; selected applicants will be notified one week before the first week of lectures.
(if you missed the deadline, please come to the first date to see, if there are any slots left)
W4 credits2SW.‑D. Hardt, L. Eberl, U. F. Greber, A. B. Hehl, M. Kopf, S. R. Leibundgut, C. Münz, A. Oxenius, P. Sander
AbstractLiterature seminar for students at the masters level and PhD students. Introduction to the current research topics in infectious diseases; Introduction to key pathogens which are studied as model organisms in this field; Overview over key research groups in the field of infectious diseases in Zürich.
ObjectiveWorking with the current research literature. Getting to know the key pathogens serving as model organisms and the research technologies currently used in infection biology.
Contentfor each model pathogen (or key technology):
1. introduction to the pathogen
2. Discussion of one current research paper.
The paper will be provided by the respective supervisor. He/she will give advice (if required) and guide the respective literature discussion.
Lecture notesTeachers will provide the research papers to be discussed.
Students will prepare handouts for the rest of the group for their assigned seminar.
LiteratureTeachers will provide the research papers to be discussed.
Prerequisites / NoticeRestricted to max 22 students. Please sign up until two weeks before the beginning of the semester via e-mail to micro_secr@micro.biol.ethz.ch and include the following information: 551-1100-00L; your name, your e-mail address, university/eth, students (specialization, semester), PhD students (research group, member of a PhD program? which program?). The 22 students admitted to this seminar will be selected and informed by e-mail in the week befor the beginning of the semester by W.-D. Hardt.
The first seminar date will serve to form groups of students and assign a paper to each group.
227-0396-00LEXCITE Interdisciplinary Summer School on Bio-Medical Imaging Information Restricted registration - show details
The school admits 60 MSc or PhD students with backgrounds in biology, chemistry, mathematics, physics, computer science or engineering based on a selection process.

Students have to apply for acceptance by April 22, 2019. To apply a curriculum vitae and an application letter need to be submitted. The notification of acceptance will be given by May 24, 2019. Further information can be found at: www.excite.ethz.ch.
W4 credits6GS. Kozerke, G. Csúcs, J. Klohs-Füchtemeier, S. F. Noerrelykke, M. P. Wolf
AbstractTwo-week summer school organized by EXCITE (Center for EXperimental & Clinical Imaging TEchnologies Zurich) on biological and medical imaging. The course covers X-ray imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear imaging, ultrasound imaging, infrared and optical microscopy, electron microscopy, image processing and analysis.
ObjectiveStudents understand basic concepts and implementations of biological and medical imaging. Based on relative advantages and limitations of each method they can identify preferred procedures and applications. Common foundations and conceptual differences of the methods can be explained.
ContentTwo-week summer school on biological and medical imaging. The course covers concepts and implementations of X-ray imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear imaging, ultrasound imaging, infrared and optical microscopy and electron microscopy. Multi-modal and multi-scale imaging and supporting technologies such as image analysis and modeling are discussed. Dedicated modules for physical and life scientists taking into account the various backgrounds are offered.
Lecture notesHand-outs, Web links
Prerequisites / NoticeThe school admits 60 MSc or PhD students with backgrounds in biology, chemistry, mathematics, physics, computer science or engineering based on a selection process. To apply a curriculum vitae, a statement of purpose and applicants references need to be submitted. Further information can be found at: http://www.excite.ethz.ch/education/summer-school.html
227-0946-00LMolecular Imaging - Basic Principles and Biomedical ApplicationsW2 credits2VM. Rudin
AbstractConcept: What is molecular imaging.
Discussion/comparison of the various imaging modalities used in molecular imaging.
Design of target specific probes: specificity, delivery, amplification strategies.
Biomedical Applications.
ObjectiveMolecular Imaging is a rapidly emerging discipline that translates concepts developed in molecular biology and cellular imaging to in vivo imaging in animals and ultimatly in humans. Molecular imaging techniques allow the study of molecular events in the full biological context of an intact organism and will therefore become an indispensable tool for biomedical research.
ContentConcept: What is molecular imaging.
Discussion/comparison of the various imaging modalities used in molecular imaging.
Design of target specific probes: specificity, delivery, amplification strategies.
Biomedical Applications.
551-1132-00LBasic Virology Information
Does not take place this semester.
W2 credits1V
AbstractIntroduction into the basics of virology, including characterization of viruses, virus-cell interactions, virus-host interactions, virus-host population interactions, basics of prevention and prophylaxis as well as diagnostics.
ObjectiveIntroduction into the basics of virology.
ContentBasics in virology. Characterization of viruses, virus-cell interactions, virus-host interactions, virus-host population interactions, basics of prevention and prophylaxis as well as diagnostics.
Lecture notesThe lecture uses the lecturer's 'Allgemeine Virologie' as a basis.
The lecturer's slides as well as selected primary literature will be provided 24-48 hrs prior to the lecture in pdf format.
LiteratureFlint et al., 2009. Principles of Virology, 3rd Edition.
ASM Press, Washington, DC, USA.
Vol I. ISBN 978-1-55581-479-3
Vol II. ISBN 978-1-55581-480-9
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowledge in molecular biology, cell biology, immunology.
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