Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2019

Health Sciences and Technology Master Information
Major in Neurosciences
Electives
Elective Courses II
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-1708-00LInfectious Disease DynamicsW4 credits2VS. Bonhoeffer, R. D. Kouyos, R. R. Regös, T. Stadler
AbstractThis course introduces into current research on the population biology of infectious diseases. The course discusses the most important mathematical tools and their application to relevant diseases of human, natural or managed populations.
ObjectiveAttendees will learn about:
* the impact of important infectious pathogens and their evolution on human, natural and managed populations
* the population biological impact of interventions such as treatment or vaccination
* the impact of population structure on disease transmission

Attendees will learn how:
* the emergence spread of infectious diseases is described mathematically
* the impact of interventions can be predicted and optimized with mathematical models
* population biological models are parameterized from empirical data
* genetic information can be used to infer the population biology of the infectious disease

The course will focus on how the formal methods ("how") can be used to derive biological insights about the host-pathogen system ("about").
ContentAfter an introduction into the history of infectious diseases and epidemiology the course will discuss basic epidemiological models and the mathematical methods of their analysis. We will then discuss the population dynamical effects of intervention strategies such as vaccination and treatment. In the second part of the course we will introduce into more advanced topics such as the effect of spatial population structure, explicit contact structure, host heterogeneity, and stochasticity. In the final part of the course we will introduce basic concepts of phylogenetic analysis in the context of infectious diseases.
Lecture notesSlides and script of the lecture will be available online.
LiteratureThe course is not based on any of the textbooks below, but they are excellent choices as accompanying material:
* Keeling & Rohani, Modeling Infectious Diseases in Humans and Animals, Princeton Univ Press 2008
* Anderson & May, Infectious Diseases in Humans, Oxford Univ Press 1990
* Murray, Mathematical Biology, Springer 2002/3
* Nowak & May, Virus Dynamics, Oxford Univ Press 2000
* Holmes, The Evolution and Emergence of RNA Viruses, Oxford Univ Press 2009
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowledge of population dynamics and population genetics as well as linear algebra and analysis will be an advantage.
Practical Training and Semester Project
Practical Training and Semesterproject only for majors below-mentioned:
-Human Movement Science and Sport
-Health Technologies
-Molecular Health Sciences
-Neurosciences
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
376-2110-00LInternship 12 Weeks (Research or Job Oriented) Restricted registration - show details W15 credits34PLecturers
AbstractPractical Training Internships are either research-oriented for exercising scientific (laboratory) methods or job-related for giving insight into the future world of work (industry, services, school).
ObjectiveStudents should exercise scientific working and/or get realistic insights into future jobs.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis version of internships lasts for at least 12 weeks full time equivalent.
376-2111-00LInternship 8 Weeks (Research or Job Oriented) Restricted registration - show details W10 credits23PLecturers
AbstractPractical Training Internships are either research-oriented for exercising scientific (laboratory) methods or job-related for giving insight into the future world of work (industry, services, school).
ObjectiveStudents should exercise scientific working and/or get realistic insights into future jobs.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis version of internships lasts for at least 8 weeks full time equivalent.
376-2112-00LInternship 4 Weeks (Research or Job Oriented) Restricted registration - show details W5 credits11PLecturers
AbstractPractical Training Internships are either research-oriented for exercising scientific (laboratory) methods or job-related for giving insight into the future world of work (industry, services, school).
ObjectiveStudents should exercise scientific working and/or get realistic insights into future jobs.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis version of internships lasts for at least 4 weeks full time equivalent.
GESS Science in Perspective
» see Science in Perspective: Language Courses ETH/UZH
» see Science in Perspective: Type A: Enhancement of Reflection Capability
» Recommended Science in Perspective (Type B) for D-HEST
Research Internship
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
376-2100-00LResearch Internship Restricted registration - show details O15 credits36AProfessors
Abstract12-week internship intended for exercising (independent) scientific working.
ObjectiveStudents shall exercise scientific working as preparation for their master thesis.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe Research Internship lasts for at least 12 weeks full time equivalent. It can be combined with the Master Thesis.
Master's Thesis
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
376-2000-00LMaster's Thesis Restricted registration - show details
Only students fulfilling the following criteria can start with their master thesis:
a. successful completion of the bachelor programme;
b. fulfillment of any additional requirements necessary to gain admission to the master programme.
O30 credits71DSupervisors
Abstract6-months research study with topics from the chosen major within the field of Health Sciences and Technology. In general, it includes the study of existing literature, the specification of the research question, the choice of the methodological approach, the collection, analysis and interpretation of data, and the written and oral reporting of the findings.
ObjectiveThe students shall demonstrate their ability to carry out a structured, scientific piece of work independently.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe Master Thesis can only be started after the Bachelor Degree was obtained and/or master admission requirements have been fulfilled.
Course Units for Additional Admission Requirements
The courses below are only for MSc students with additional admission requirements
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
406-0253-AALMathematics I & II Information
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-13 credits28RA. Cannas da Silva
AbstractMathematics I covers mathematical concepts and techniques necessary to model, solve and discuss scientific problems - notably through ordinary differential equations.
Main focus of Mathematics II: multivariable calculus and partial differential equations.
ObjectiveMathematics is of ever increasing importance to the Natural Sciences and Engineering. The key is the so-called mathematical modelling cycle, i.e. the translation of problems from outside of mathematics into mathematics, the study of the mathematical problems (often with the help of high level mathematical software packages) and the interpretation of the results in the original environment.

The goal of Mathematics I and II is to provide the mathematical foundations relevant for this paradigm. Differential equations are by far the most important tool for modelling and are therefore a main focus of both of these courses.
Content1. Linear Algebra and Complex Numbers:
systems of linear equations, Gauss-Jordan elimination, matrices, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, cartesian and polar forms for complex numbers, complex powers, complex roots, fundamental theorem of algebra.

2. Single-Variable Calculus:
review of differentiation, linearisation, Taylor polynomials, maxima and minima, fundamental theorem of calculus, antiderivative, integration methods, improper integrals.

3. Ordinary Differential Equations:
variation of parameters, separable equations, integration by substitution, systems of linear equations with constant coefficients, 1st and higher order equations, introduction to dynamical systems.

4. Multivariable Differential Calculus:
functions of several variables, partial differentiation, curves and surfaces in space, scalar and vector fields, gradient, curl and divergence.

5. Multivariable Integral Calculus:
multiple integrals, line and surface integrals, work and flow, Gauss and Stokes theorems, applications.

6. Partial Differential Equations:
separation of variables, Fourier series, heat equation, wave equation, Laplace equation, Fourier transform.
Literature- Bretscher, O.: Linear Algebra with Applications, Pearson Prentice Hall.
- Thomas, G. B.: Thomas' Calculus, Part 1, Pearson Addison-Wesley.
- Thomas, G. B.: Thomas' Calculus, Part 2, Pearson Addison-Wesley.
- Kreyszig, E.: Advanced Engineering Mathematics, John Wiley & Sons.
376-0203-AALMovement and Sport Biomechanics
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course.
E-4 credits3RN. Singh, B. Taylor
AbstractLearning to view the human body as a (bio-) mechanical system. Making the connections between everyday movements and sports activity with injury, discomfort, prevention and rehabilitation.
Objective"Students are able to describe the human body as a mechanical system.
They analyse and describe human movement according to the laws of mechanics."
ContentMovement- and sports biomechanics deals with the attributes of the human body and their link to mechanics. The course includes topics such as functional anatomy, biomechanics of daily activities (gait, running, etc.) and looks at movement in sport from a mechanical point of view. Furthermore, simple reflections on the loading analysis of joints in various situations are discussed. Additionally, questions covering the statics and dynamics of rigid bodies, and inverse dynamics, relevant to biomechanics are investigated.
406-0063-AALPhysics II
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-5 credits11RA. Refregier
AbstractIntroduction to the "way of thinking" and the methodology in Physics. The Chapters treated are Magnetism, Refraction and Diffraction of Waves, Elements of Quantum Mechanics with applications to Spectroscopy, Thermodynamics, Phase Transitions, Transport Phenomena.
ObjectiveIntroduction to the scientific methodology. The student should develop his/her capability to turn physical observations into mathematical models, and to solve the latter.
The student should acquire an overview over the basic concepts used in the theory of heat and electricity.
ContentBook:
Physics for Scientists and Engineers, Douglas C. Giancoli, Pearson Education (2009), ISBN: 978-0-13-157849-4

Chapters:
17 (without 17-5, 17-10), 18 (without 18-5, 18-6, 18-7), 19, 20 (without 20-7, 20-8, 20-9, 20-10, 20-11), 21 (without 21-12), 23, 25 (without 25-9, 25-10), 26 (without 26-4, 26-5, 26-7), 27, 28 (without 28-4, 28-5, 28-8. 28-9, 28-10), 29 (without 29-5, 29-8), 32 (without 32-8), 33 (without 33-4, 33-5, 33-9, 33-10), 34 (without 34-4, 34-6, 34-7), 35 (without 35-2, 35-3, 35-9, 35-11, 35-12, 35-13).
Literaturesee "Content"

Friedhelm Kuypers
Physik für Ingenieure und Naturwissenschaftler
Band 2 Elektrizität, Optik, Wellen
Verlag Wiley-VCH, 2003, Fr. 77.-
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