Shweta Shinde: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2023

Name Prof. Dr. Shweta Shinde
FieldComputer Science
Address
Dep. Informatik
ETH Zürich, CAB F 71.2
Universitätstrasse 6
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 633 09 88
E-mailshweta.shinde@inf.ethz.ch
URLhttps://shwetashinde.org/
DepartmentComputer Science
RelationshipAssistant Professor (Tenure Track)

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
252-0217-00LComputer Systems Information 8 credits4V + 2U + 1AT. Roscoe, S. Shinde, R. Wattenhofer
AbstractThis course is about real computer systems, and the principles on which they are designed and built. We cover both modern OSes and the large-scale distributed systems that power today's online services. We illustrate the ideas with real-world examples, but emphasize common theoretical results, practical tradeoffs, and design principles that apply across many different scales and technologies.
ObjectiveThe objective of the course is for students to understand the theoretical principles, practical considerations, performance tradeoffs, and engineering techniques on which the software underpinning almost all modern computer systems is based, ranging from single embedded systems-on-chip in mobile phones to large-scale geo-replicated groups of datacenters.

By the end of the course, students should be able to reason about highly complex, real, operational software systems, applying concepts such as hierarchy, modularity, consistency, durability, availability, fault-tolerance, and replication.
ContentThis course subsumes the topics of both "operating systems" and "distributed systems" into a single coherent picture (reflecting the reality that these disciplines are highly converged). The focus is system software: the foundations of modern computer systems from mobile phones to the large-scale geo-replicated data centers on which Internet companies like Amazon, Facebook, Google, and Microsoft are based.

We will cover a range of topics, such as: scheduling, network protocol stacks, multiplexing and demultiplexing, operating system structure, inter-process communication, memory managment, file systems, naming, dataflow, data storage, persistence, and durability, computer systems performance, remove procedure call, consensus and agreement, fault tolerance, physical and logical clocks, virtualization, and blockchains.

The format of the course is a set of about 25 topics, each covered in a lecture. A script will be published online ahead of each lecture, and the latter will consist of an interactive elaboration of the material in the script. There is no book for the course, but we will refer to books and research papers throughout to provide additional background and explanation.
Prerequisites / NoticeWe will assume knowlege of the "Systems Programming" and "Computer Networks" courses (or equivalent), and their prerequisites, and build upon them.
252-1414-00LSystem Security Information 7 credits2V + 2U + 2AS. Capkun, S. Shinde
AbstractThe first part of the course covers general security concepts and hardware-based support for security.
In the second part, the focus is on system design and methodologies for building secure systems.
ObjectiveIn this lecture, students learn about the security requirements and capabilities that are expected from modern hardware, operating systems, and other software environments. An overview of available technologies, algorithms and standards is given, with which these requirements can be met.
ContentThe first part of the lecture covers hardware-based security concepts. Topics include the concept of physical and software-based side channel attacks on hardware resources, architectural support for security (e.g., memory management and permissions, disk encryption), and trusted execution environments (Intel SGX, ARM TrustZone, AMD SEV, and RISC-​V Keystone).

In the second part, the focus is on system design and methodologies for building secure systems. Topics include: common software faults (e.g., buffer overflows, etc.), bug-​detection, writing secure software (design, architecture, QA, testing), compiler-​supported security (e.g., control-​flow integrity), and language-​supported security (e.g., memory safety).

Along the lectures, model cases will be elaborated and evaluated in the exercises.
252-4601-00LCurrent Topics in Information Security Information Restricted registration - show details
The deadline for deregistering expires at the end of the second week of the semester. Students who are still registered after that date, but do not attend the seminar, will officially fail the seminar.
2 credits2SS. Capkun, K. Paterson, A. Perrig, S. Shinde
AbstractThe seminar covers various topics in information security: security protocols (models, specification & verification), trust management, access control, non-interference, side-channel attacks, identity-based cryptography, host-based attack detection, anomaly detection in backbone networks, key-management for sensor networks.
ObjectiveThe main goals of the seminar are the independent study of scientific literature and assessment of its contributions as well as learning and practicing presentation techniques.
ContentThe seminar covers various topics in information security, including network security, cryptography and security protocols. The participants are expected to read a scientific paper and present it in a 35-40 min talk. At the beginning of the semester a short introduction to presentation techniques will be given.

Selected Topics

- security protocols: models, specification & verification
- trust management, access control and non-interference
- side-channel attacks
- identity-based cryptography
- host-based attack detection
- anomaly detection in backbone networks
- key-management for sensor networks
LiteratureThe reading list will be published on the course web site.
263-0009-00LInformation Security Lab Information Restricted registration - show details 8 credits2V + 1U + 3P + 1AS. Shinde, D. Basin, S. Capkun, K. Paterson, F. Tramèr
AbstractThis InterFocus Course will provide a broad, hands-on introduction to Information Security, introducing adversarial thinking and security by design as key approaches to building secure systems.
ObjectiveThis course will introduce key concepts from Information Security, both from attack and defence perspectives. Students will gain an appreciation of the complexity and challenge of building secure systems.
ContentThe course is organised in three-week segments. In each segment, a new concept from Information Security will be introduced. The overall scope will be broad, including cryptography, protocol design, system security, and privacy.
Lecture notesWill be made available during the semester.
LiteraturePaul C. van Oorschot, Computer Security and the Internet: Tools and Jewels.
Dan Boneh and Victor Shoup, A Graduate Course in Applied Cryptography.
Prerequisites / NoticeIdeally, students will have taken the D-INFK Bachelors course “Information Security" or an equivalent course at Bachelors level.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityfostered